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Whey Protein For Diabetics To Gain Weight

How To Put On Weight When You Have Diabetes

How To Put On Weight When You Have Diabetes

Not everybody with diabetes needs to lose weight. Some people have the opposite problem; the pounds just won’t stay on. Although certainly a great source of calories, filling up on hot fudge sundaes isn’t the best way to fill out your frame if you have diabetes. Before we talk about some healthful strategies for weight gain, it is important to make sure your efforts to add a few pounds are not sabotaged by out of control blood glucose numbers. If your glucose level is very high, all the extra calories in the world won’t have the desired effect. When the body perceives it is starving –that is essentially what occurs when it can’t use all the glucose building up in the blood stream– glucose (energy or calories) spills into the urine. So instead of keeping those precious calories to add muscle and some fat you will end up losing weight. If you are losing weight and your glucose levels are in good control then a visit to your health care provider is in order to look for other causes of weight loss. The old adage says; to gain a pound a week, add 500 calories a day to your current calorie level. Now new research tells us that this isn’t entirely accurate, but it is still a good place to start. You can find out about how many calories you are eating now by using any one of a hundreds of nutrition management websites on the internet: Caloriecount.com, Myfitnesspal.com and Fitday.com are three options. One of the first things to look at when you are trying to gain weight is low calorie foods to eliminate. Plain beverages such as black coffee or tea, broth soups, low calorie salads all fill you up without providing much in the way of calories. All of your food chooses should be as calorie dense as possible. If you like salads for example, keep the lettuce to a mini Continue reading >>

11 Smoothie Recipes For Weight Gain The Healthy Way

11 Smoothie Recipes For Weight Gain The Healthy Way

Add 1 cup of whole milk - you can also use full fat yogurt or soy milk. You might be looking to gain weight for a variety of reasons: You want to build up more muscle, get stronger or become more athletic Chronic illness can lead to weight loss, as can health conditions that might result in you losing weight or having a significantly decreased appetite. This can include hyperthyroidism , diabetes, digestive issues such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and depression At its simplest, it could be that youve lost more weight than you anticipated when you stopped eating unhealthily and now you need to put a bit back on, as happened to me To gain weight, you need to consume more calories than you burn off. It sounds so simple, right? Putting on weight isnt about eating as much as you can and of whatever you like though. A lot of people do go down this road but there is a right and wrong way to gain weight. Opting for fatty and sugary foods and junk food is a very unhealthy way to do it. Your healthy options for gaining extra poundsinclude: Drinking shakes such as these - many prefer to go that route since the shakes are easy to make and usually taste real good. Incorporating high calorie foods into your diet that are healthy too. Ideally, these will be calorie dense but also contain lots of vital nutrients. Protein and healthy fats should be your priority and you can boost your calorie intake through foods that are rich in these. Making smoothies that incorporate high calorie ingredients - this is one of the easiest and healthiest options. Whatever option you choose, you want to gain weight gradually at a pound or two per week rather than all at once. If your reasons for wanting to put on weight are on medical grounds its best to consult a medical professional before you Continue reading >>

5 Foods That Can Help In Diabetic Weight Gain

5 Foods That Can Help In Diabetic Weight Gain

Most of us associate weight gain to diabetes but weight loss? Yes! Though, it may come as a surprise to many, but weight loss – drastic weight loss – is one of the earliest signs of a person suffering from diabetes, mostly type 2. Diabetes leads to low levels of insulin, below the minimum required levels in the human body. This propels the body cells to start breaking down fat and muscle in the body for energy, since lack of insulin means that the cells are not able to store glucose. The body feels it is starving and starts to consume all available fat and also muscle which leads to weight loss. The weight loss can be anywhere between 3-4.5 kilograms in a month and is not healthy at all. This also leads to frequent trips to the bathroom as the body is pumping and recycling the blood faster. How Can A Diabetic Gain Weight? While many who are diagnosed with diabetes need to watch their diet and daily food intake to maintain their optimum body weight, others can go on to take insulin injections to keep weight loss under check. However, there are many diabetic weight gain supplements that are now accessible to diabetic people to help them maintain their body weight. It is important that you don’t act in half knowledge and binge on sweets like doughnuts, candies and confectionery items. They will cause an increase in blood sugar levels and cause complications in the body. What else can a diabetic person do to stay at a healthy weight? Well they can: 1. Eat Several Small Meals: Since the body is unable to store what a diabetic person eats, it is important to fuel the body regularly by eating several small meals in a day. It is also important to make healthier food choices. Avoid extra oily and sugary foods and chose foods that have a high glycemic index. 2. Whey Protein Continue reading >>

Tips To Choosing A Sugar Free Protein Powder That’s Diabetes Friendly

Tips To Choosing A Sugar Free Protein Powder That’s Diabetes Friendly

If you're wondering if protein powder fits into a diabetic diet, the answer is yes. Protein powder makes a great addition to baked goods such as cakes. It also makes a great addition to shakes, can be taken as a meal replacement, and even consumed as a liquid snack. But like most foods, all protein powders aren't created equal. Some are poor quality and won't provide health benefits, while others with high quality ingredients can help with weight loss and making foods taste great. And when you're looking for sugar free options, which are a must with diabetes, there are a few extra things to be aware of. Ingredients It goes without saying that whenever you buy a food that is packaged – always read the label! If a product has an ingredient list as long as your arm or contains many ingredients you can't pronounce or recognize, then it's not a good quality product. Make sure the protein powder you purchase doesn't contain any more that 7-10 ingredients, even less is better. Sugar/ sweeteners Be sure to check what type of sugar or sweeteners the product uses. Steer clear of products that contain sugar and fructose. And be aware that many protein powders contain artificial sweeteners such as aspartame and these are not good for diabetics to eat, or anyone for that matter. We recommend monk fruit or stevia based protein powders, or second to that, erythritol or xylitol. Proprietary blends When a supplement company claims their product is a “proprietary blend” that offers benefits above and beyond other products, don't believe it. Often they won't list the ingredients of their “proprietary blend” on the label, which means you really have no idea what's in the product. Also, when they make claims that certain ingredients are included in their “proprietary blend,” o Continue reading >>

Protein Supplements: Whey

Protein Supplements: Whey

The goal of last week’s protein post was to “refresh” your memory about protein: what it does, where it’s found, and how much you need. That being said, the subject of protein is hot enough to fuel debates regarding who needs more and what’s the best way to get it. As I mentioned last week, there are some people who do need more protein, namely endurance athletes, people who are ill or malnourished, and older adults. Most of us, though, don’t need a whole lot more protein than what’s recommended to stay healthy. And we already know that since we don’t need all that much, we tend to get more than enough from our daily food intake. However, if, for whatever reason, you don’t think you’re getting enough protein and/or you don’t happen to care for the usual protein food sources (meat, poultry, fish, eggs), then it’s possible that you could benefit from a supplement. And here’s the tricky part, because trying to choose a protein supplement is about as daunting as deciding what flavor ice cream to order is for a child. There are so many choices and so many forms of supplements. This week, we’ll look at one of the most popular supplements: whey. Whey Protein What it is: “Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet, eating her curds and whey…” Do you remember that nursery rhyme? The whey that Miss Muffet was enjoying at the time is the same whey that’s commonly found in today’s protein drinks and powders. Whey is one of the two main proteins found in milk and it makes up about 20% of milk protein (casein makes up the other 80%). Drilling down a little more, there are three types of whey protein: whey isolate, whey concentrate, and hydrolysate whey protein. Each type of whey protein contains different amounts of fat, cholesterol, lactose, and bioacti Continue reading >>

Yes, I Want To Gain Weight!

Yes, I Want To Gain Weight!

Anytime an article on weight management with diabetes comes across my Facebook or email feed, its always about how to lose weight. And thats just terrific but for me, I have the exact opposite problem. When I was hit with 1.5 a few years back, I was 190lbs - working out and running 5 miles 3x a week. I was 48 at the time. The diabetes came on really fast and really strong and within 2 months had burned off 35 lbs, leaving me feeling like a mere shell of myself. Being 5ft 7 and155 lbs I felt like a stick person. I struggled for over 6 months getting my sugars back to normal and it was only when my endo started me on insulin did I gain any weight back. Three years later I am up to a somewhat respectable 162 lbs with glucose numbers averaging around 120 bg. I still run but only once a week - more often I walk instead. I also eat like a teenager as there seem to be no satisfying my persistent raging hunger. I am eating more than I ever have and being a man of 51, Im thinking I should be a cow by now. My daily goal is to get at least 100 gms of protein and no more than 60 gm of carbs which I must maintain or I start to lose weight. Along with the standard 3 eggs in the morn/1/4 lb lunch meat in the afternoon followed by a fish, chicken or lean red meat dinner in the evening, Ive plowed through dozens of gallons of Golds Whey protein powders. So much so that I should be like the muscle giant on the label by now. (oh the marketing.) I am now trying plain greek yogurts which come in at a hefty 21 gms protein per cup. I can burn through one container in two days which gets pretty expensive so not sure how long I can afford that. Anyway, wondering if any 1.5ers out there has the same issues and if so, how do you deal with it? Any thoughts would be appreciated. D.D. Family "Impai Continue reading >>

The Skinny On Shakes For People With Diabetes

The Skinny On Shakes For People With Diabetes

1 / 6 Learn All About the Best Weight Loss Shakes for Diabetes Diabetes is an increasingly common condition that causes blood sugar levels to rise higher than normal. There are several types of diabetes, but type 2 diabetes is the most common form. Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight or obese and must be medically managed to prevent serious diabetes complications. Along with making lifestyle changes and taking medication, people with diabetes must keep a watchful eye on their blood glucose levels and the foods they eat throughout each day. Whether you’re watching your weight or looking for a quick diabetes-friendly meal on the go, a meal replacement shake may be a good — or not so good — option for those with diabetes. Of course, a healthy diet of whole foods is always best, but shakes can provide a nice “safety net” for when a healthy meal is not an option. While meal replacement shakes may fill you up, even the best weight loss shakes don’t provide complete dietary nutrition. If you rely on weight loss or meal replacement shakes regularly, you will still need a healthy balance of real food each day, including: Fat-free or low-fat dairy Fresh fruits and vegetables, especially nonstarchy vegetables Lean protein Legumes, like beans and peas Nuts Seafood Soy Whole grains Also, not all meal replacement shakes are created equal; even the best weight loss shakes designed for people with diabetes may fall short when it comes to complete nutrition. For example, the Glucerna Rich Chocolate Shake is gluten-free and great for people who are lactose intolerant. But the Glucerna Shake is only enough to replace a moderate snack or part of a meal — not an entire meal. You will need to read the label and find out what’s missing when it comes to fat, pro Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding With Diabetes.

Bodybuilding With Diabetes.

Weight training can be therapeutic and is recommended for the prevention and treatment of many diseases and illnesses. For example, it is recommended that people with diabetes exercise regularly. This is true for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. When individuals hear the term "bodybuilding," they automatically think of competitive bodybuilding. In all reality, this is just one very small sector of a large subset of the population who weight trains (e.g., body builds) for general aesthetics and health. Weight training itself can also be therapeutic and is recommended for the prevention and treatment of many diseases and illnesses. For example, it is recommended that people with diabetes exercise regularly. This is true for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A Brief Background About Diabetes The rate of diabetes is soaring at an unthinkable level in North America. This increase is related to the obesity epidemic in this country; diabetes is one of the many diseases associated with obesity. There Are Two Main Types Of Diabetes: Type I Type II In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas (organ responsible for insulin production) completely stops producing insulin. Insulin is the hormone necessary to use glucose (sugar) found in foods for energy. Therefore, individuals with type 1 diabetes must take insulin shots. This usually develops in children between the ages of 8 to 12, but can develop at any age. I'm aware of one woman who developed type I diabetes in her mid 50's. Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented; it is an autoimmune disease that ultimately results in the cells of the pancreas which produce insulin to stop functioning. On the contrary, type 2 diabetes is a disease in which the body is unable to produce and/or unable to properly use insulin. This accounts for about 90% of the t Continue reading >>

Weight Gainer For Diabetics

Weight Gainer For Diabetics

Hi. I've been a diabetic for 5 yrs now. I lost a lot of weight from it. I'm looking to start a body building program and need to gain weight. I've been searching for a weight gainer that is low carb but high calorie. I want to use the shakes with meals and as a snack. Can someone suggest a weight gainer like that? The ones I've seen have an enormous amount of carbs and I don't want to keep my sugars in control or else all my effort will be for nothing. By the way, I've got an unusual form of diabetes called Cystic Fibrosis Diabetes. My diet is high calorie high fat. I'm not really limited to carbs but I want to know the gainers with the least amount of carbs as possible. My diet is being monitored by a nutritionist and she gave me recipes for shakes and stuff but I'm looking for something already in a powder that I can add to my shakes or just take alone. I need to gain about 25-30 lbs. As I was 160lbs but now 125 lbs. Thanks. Hi. I've been a diabetic for 5 yrs now. I lost a lot of weight from it. I'm looking to start a body building program and need to gain weight. I've been searching for a weight gainer that is low carb but high calorie. I want to use the shakes with meals and as a snack. Can someone suggest a weight gainer like that? The ones I've seen have an enormous amount of carbs and I don't want to keep my sugars in control or else all my effort will be for nothing. By the way, I've got an unusual form of diabetes called Cystic Fibrosis Diabetes. My diet is high calorie high fat. I'm not really limited to carbs but I want to know the gainers with the least amount of carbs as possible. My diet is being monitored by a nutritionist and she gave me recipes for shakes and stuff but I'm looking for something already in a powder that I can add to my shakes or just ta Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight With Protein Shakes As A Diabetic

How To Gain Weight With Protein Shakes As A Diabetic

How to Gain Weight With Protein Shakes as a Diabetic Beth Rifkin has been writing health- and fitness-related articles since 2005. Her bylines include "Tennis Life," "Ms. Fitness," "Triathlon Magazine," "Inside Tennis" and others. She holds a Bachelor of Business Administration from Temple University. Protein powder falling out of a scoop with a jug of powder next to it.Photo Credit: PeoGeo/iStock/Getty Images It may be a challenge for a type 1 diabetic with a fast metabolism to gain weight since they tend to avoid foods that are notorious for packing on the pounds. Though there is no one way for a type 1 diabetic to eat, the increased potential for dangerous side effects, like heart disease, usually encourages them to stick to a healthy meal plan. However, protein shakes made with nutritious yet high-calorie ingredients can help you to put on weight without sabotaging your health. Choose the type of protein shake that you want to make. For example, the combination of plain yogurt, fresh squeezed fruit juice, strawberries, blackberries and a little peanut butter make a healthy drink that includes plenty of protein, vitamins and minerals. Remember to count the carbs that you put into the protein shake. Type 1 diabetics match their carbohydrates with their insulin so it is important to keep track. Measure your food properly. For example, rather than throw a handful of raspberries into the shake, measure out or 1 cup precisely. Keep it healthy by avoiding heart-damaging saturated fats and added, processed sugars. Type 1 diabetics have a greater risk of heart disease and high blood pressure. Use low or non-fat dairy products, fresh fruits and fresh squeezed fruit juices. Use a high-quality source of protein, such as whey powder, which is derived from dairy products. Diabet Continue reading >>

The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics

The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics

Whether you are looking to kick start your current weight loss plan or gain muscle in the gym, protein powders can very helpful. However, if you are diabetic you need to take extra care when choosing a protein powder. Ensuring that the supplement you choose fits with your current lifestyle and dietary needs is very important. Read on to find out exactly what the best protein powder for diabetics is. Who Are Protein Powders Designed For? There are a number of protein powders available, all of which are usually marketed for specific uses. For example, you can find protein for weight loss, powders for bulking up and gaining muscle and meal replacements. Traditionally though, most people tend to use protein powder as a post workout shake in order to aid their fitness goals. The Benefits Of Protein Powder Protein Powder Aids Weight Loss While Preserving Muscle If you are starting a serious weight loss program, especially if you’re attempting to improve or reverse the effects of type 2 diabetes, following a very low calorie diet (VLCD) is a good plan. Programs such as the blood sugar diet can be a great way to lose weight fast. One thing to be careful of is that restricting calories to this level can cause your body to break down muscle as you workout while it attempts to hold onto your fat stores. Drinking a protein shake post workout can help preserve muscle and burn more calories. Protein Powder Controls Hunger If you are trying your best to complete a weight loss program, constantly feeling hungry can be a huge obstacle. However, research has shown that drinking shakes with 50 grams of whey protein can reduce the hormones which tell the brain you’re hungry for up to four hours (source). Protein Powder Can Help You Beat Stress If you are feeling stressed, run down and Continue reading >>

I Am Underweight, How Do I Gain Weight When I Have Diabetes?

I Am Underweight, How Do I Gain Weight When I Have Diabetes?

You may have lost weight because your blood sugar has been running high. This can cause much of the carbohydrate food that you eat to pass into your urine and not be absorbed into your body. Alternately, you may have been slim to begin with, and then as you got older your pancreas may not be making as much insulin, so you got diabetes. Regardless of the cause, once you have diabetes and are underweight, eating can be a challenge. Restricting carbohydrate foods that increase your blood sugar, also restricts calories, so you need to rely more on proteins and fats to get your needed calories. I have a 6-page section in The Complete Diabetes Guide devoted to this topic. The first thing to do is to see your doctor, to find out if you need more diabetes medications, or a change in medications. The right diabetes medication can help you gain weight by improving absorption of sugar. Next step, look at what you are eating. It is best to spread your intake out into three small meals and three small snacks. This spreads out your carbohydrates and also means you will not feel so full at each meal. Here are a few simple ideas to boost calories: spread peanut butter on an apple or banana, to add protein slice up avocado and have it in sandwiches or salads add ¼ cup of skim milk powder to each cup of milk to double the protein add extra oil such as olive, canola, corn or soya oil, margarine, mayonnaise and salad dressings to recipes and foods such as mashed potatoes, rice or pasta, oatmeal, scrambled eggs or casseroles add chopped nuts or roasted sunflower seeds on top of yogurt or cereal add sliced or shredded cheese to soups and casseroles. In addition to boosting calories, it is important to rebuild lost muscles. To build muscle strength, a walk is good, and so is doing some weigh Continue reading >>

Weight-gain Supplements For Diabetics

Weight-gain Supplements For Diabetics

Even though many people with diabetes struggle to lose weight, some may have the desire to gain. Supplements may help you get the calories you need to gain the weight. But as with all your other food choices, it's important to consider the total carbs in the supplement and how it might fit into your diet plan so that your blood sugars stay within the normal range. You won't be able to put the weight on if your blood sugars are out of control. Consult your doctor or dietitian to help you work the right supplement into your diet plan. Video of the Day Nutrition Shakes for Diabetes To gain 1 pound a week, you need to eat an extra 500 calories a day. These calories should come from a mix of carbs, protein and fat, according to the Joslin Diabetes Center. Nutrition shakes specifically designed for people with diabetes make a good choice because they contain a healthy mix of carbs, protein and fat. Most of these shakes have about 200 calories per 8-ounce serving, with about 50 percent of calories from carbs, 20 percent from protein and 30 percent from fat. These shakes also have 3 grams of fiber per serving, which may help keep blood sugar in control. Nutrition Bars for Diabetes You can also use nutrition bars specifically designed for people with diabetes to help add extra calories to your diet to gain weight. Nutrition information for these bars may vary, but they contain about 150 calories, with 50 percent of calories from carbs, 25 percent from protein and 25 percent from fat. The nutrition bars for people with diabetes are not as high in calories as the shakes, so you may need to eat more bars to meet your calorie needs for weight gain. A weight-gain supplement purchased at a health food store may also provide the calories you seek. Read food labels to find one that prov Continue reading >>

Best Weight Gain Supplements For Diabetics?

Best Weight Gain Supplements For Diabetics?

ybanks522310520 over a year ago Hello, Guest! Kudos to you that you want to define your body and become stronger. It sounds like you want to find a supplement that will not adversely affect your blood sugars. You gain achieve this goal if you eat the right foods. If you are adamant you want to use weight gain supplements, you should use supplements that are not high in carbohydrates. It is important to eat above your maintenance level to gain weight and muscle mass. This will entail finding supplements that contain mostly protein, such as whey protein, soy, or egg. Foods such as lean meat and be used to add more protein to your diet. You may alter your carb intake by increasing it to prevent hypoglycemia. With being on insulin therapy, you will need to take care of watching for high blood sugars. If you have been exercising on free weights and biking 10 miles a day, you already know how much carbohydrate you need to avoid hypoglycemic episodes. You have to make sure you eat an excess of calories to gain the muscle you wish to add. Good luck with your weight gain goal. Are there any diabetic patients that have information about gaining muscle and working out? How did you successfully gain weight and bulk up? What type of diet do you follow and what do you think worked the best to attain your goal? Did you have any problems with hypoglycemia while exercising and training on weights? Guest over a year ago Hi, i am a type 1 diabetic for 18years now since i was 5, 4 shots a day, novarapid and humalog. i have been body building since 16, the right diet gives your optimal performance and results. i upped my dosages because of my food intake, i only eat tuna, pastas, lean beef and chicken, egg whites, etc, very high protein food. i do have a protein supplement called LifeGain, Continue reading >>

Protein Powder For Diabetes

Protein Powder For Diabetes

“Is taking whey protein powder good or bad for people with type 2 diabetes?” This was a correspondent’s recent question. I told him that this is such a good question that I would answer him here. Many people supplement their protein intake with a daily scoop or two of protein powder. Years ago I did that myself. We have a wide variety of types and brands of protein powder to chose from. Besides whey protein, we can get casein, soy, and egg white protein powder from many vendors. Some years ago I decided that using the most complete protein was the best idea. I discovered that egg protein powder was the most complete. That means it has the best balance of the nine essential amino acids that comprise protein. One way to check this is to consult NutritionData.com. This comprehensive nutrition website rates foods in many respects, including “protein quality.” An amino acid score of 100 or more indicates a complete or high-quality protein, based on the recommendations of the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine. NutritionData’s report for whole dried eggs awards it an amino acid score of 131, the highest such score I can find for any food. Its amino acid report for dried egg whites is also high, 125. Whey is also a high quality protein, scoring 102 for sweet dried whey and 109 for acid dried whey. But a separate NutritionData score for a food’s inflammation factor indicates that whey and whole dried egg is inflammatory, while dried egg whites are anti-inflammatory. So, for several years I would make an egg white protein powder drink every day. Until I realized that I was already getting too much protein in my diet. Like other men, I need just 56 grams of complete protein per day, according to the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Med Continue reading >>

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