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What Should A Diabetic Eat For Breakfast Lunch And Dinner

Meal Timing

Meal Timing

“Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper,” is a saying attributed to 20th-century American nutrition activist Adelle Davis. Many people, of course, do not follow this advice to eat a large breakfast, a medium-large lunch, and a small dinner. It is commonplace in the United States for dinner to be the largest meal of the day, and some people see no problem in this. Others, however — including many researchers and people with diabetes — question whether timing meals this way produces the best health effects. This has led to some debate over whether a large dinner, or a late dinner, could be harmful to your health. A recent article at Fox News Latino, written by a registered dietitian, claims that eating dinner later in the evening has not been shown to cause weight gain or to produce ill health effects. The author notes that in many Latin countries, as well as in Europe, it is routine to eat dinner at 9 PM. The problem with late dinners in the United States, he claims, is that they are often the main source of food for the day due to hectic schedules and failure to prioritize meals. Thus, people are often starved at dinnertime and overeat. As a guideline to prevent this, he suggests that people should consume 70% of their day’s calories before dinner, but they may eat the remaining 30% as late as they want, except within 90 minutes before bed. A study published last year, however, somewhat contradicts the claim that meal timing makes no difference. Presented at Obesity 2010: The Obesity Society 28th Annual Scientific Meeting, the study found that eating a later dinner produced several metabolic effects. The participants were 10 healthy Japanese men with an average age of 40 and an average body-mass index (BMI) of 23. They were ea Continue reading >>

Making A Diabetic Meal Plan Work For You

Making A Diabetic Meal Plan Work For You

How a Diabetes Meal Plan Can Help You Knowing how to plan heart healthy meals is important for managing all types of diabetes diets. Food can raise blood sugar levels. The type and amount of foods that are eaten will affect how high and how fast blood sugar levels will rise. It is important to make healthy eating choices about when to eat, what to eat and how much to eat. When should a diabetic eat? Eat your meals and snacks at about the same time each day. By doing this, your blood sugar levels may stay under control. Space your meals 4-5 hours apart. Eat in-between snacks as needed. If you take insulin or diabetes pills, keep the right balance between food and these medicines. You should understand how long your pills or insulin take to work to lower blood glucose levels. Find out when they work the best you plan when to eat. Snacks between meals are very important if you go more than five hours from meal to meal. What should a diabetic eat? Eat about the same size meals and snacks every day. Most people eat a small breakfast, a medium sized lunch and a larger dinner. This forces the body to process most of the day's food at the end of the day. A better idea is to eat all meals that are about the same size. You will be eating balanced meals throughout the day. Make healthy food choices rich in vitamins, minerals, lean protein like white chicken and fiber such as brown rice. The fiber takes longer to break down. Blood sugars rise slower. This will keep blood sugar levels better controlled. It will help your body better process the sugar coming from your food. Do not skip meals. If you take insulin or diabetes pills, do not skip meals. This can cause your blood sugars to drop too low. Skipping one meal could cause you to overeat at the next meal. Even if you do not take Continue reading >>

12 Breakfast Rules For Diabetes

12 Breakfast Rules For Diabetes

First, eat it iStock/EasyBuy4u Even if your blood sugar is high in the morning, don't skip breakfast. Research shows that forgoing a morning meal increases the risk for obesity and insulin resistance. And studies confirm that breakfast eaters are better able to resist fatty and high-calorie foods later in the day. Aim to eat your breakfast at the same time every day, since keeping your blood sugar levels even throughout the day means eating consistently from day to day. Try to incorporate these healthy carbs for diabetes into your breakfast. iStock/ShotShare You can't (and shouldn't) avoid restaurants altogether, but there's one meal you should almost always eat at home: breakfast. Look at the alternatives: Diner-style breakfasts can include 1,000 calories or more with astronomical amounts of carbohydrates and fats. A healthy-sounding whole-wheat bagel with light cream cheese from a bagel shop may contain up to 67 grams of carbs, 450 calories, and 9 grams of fat. A sausage muffin may pack 29 grams of carbs, 370 calories, and 22 grams of fat. Compare those to a bowl of oatmeal (half a cup) with a half cup of fat-free milk, which contains a mere 12 grams of carbs, 195 calories, and 3 grams of fat. iStock/MarkGillow We assume you're already starting out with a cereal that contains at least 5 grams of fiber per serving. (Studies have found that people who regularly eat whole-grain cereal gain less weight than people who don't.) Make it even more diabetes-friendly by adding half a cup (one serving) of fresh fruit, such as strawberries or blueberries. Here's why fruit is healthy for diabetes (not forbidden!). Sprinkle 1 or 2 tablespoons of ground flaxseed on hot and cold cereal and yogurt iStock/Sasha Radosavljevic Rich in protein and fiber, these tiny seeds are a godsend to Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Menu Plan

Your Diabetes Menu Plan

How do you get all the nutrition you need in a day while still being mindful of calories and carbs? The secret is to plan ahead. Meal planning depends on lots of things, like your taste preferences, medications, and activity level, says Jill Weisenberger, RDN, CDE, author of Diabetes Weight Loss -- Week by Week. But good general advice to follow is to keep your carbs consistent -- eat the same amount at breakfast, lunch, and dinner to keep blood sugar from spiking or dipping too low. Weisenberger recommends 45 grams as a target for the three main meals of the day. "If you go lower than 30 grams at a meal, it's going to be really hard to get all the nutrients you need, such as fiber and phytochemicals," the health-boosting nutrients in fruits and vegetables. This sample meal plan provides 1,400 calories. Supplement with healthy snacks to reach your personal calorie goals. If you're rushed in the mornings, make breakfast a snap with mix-and-match prepared items such as hardboiled eggs, nuts or seeds, a part-skim cheese stick, peanut butter, or yogurt for protein; toast, crispbread, or unsweetened instant oatmeal for whole grains; plus any kind of fruit -- dried fruit, a banana, an apple. Menu Avocado Toast and Egg Café au lait made with a half cup 1% milk Medium orange Avocado Toast and Egg This has to be one of the most satisfying, easy breakfasts around, thanks to a helping of fiber from the avocado and whole-grain bread. For an extra flavor kick, sprinkle with Cajun seasoning or smoked paprika. Makes 1 serving. Ingredients: 1 slice 100% whole grain bread 1/5 avocado 1 egg salt and pepper Directions: 1. Toast bread. Scoop out avocado and mash onto toast. Top with a poached or soft-boiled egg and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Per serving: 235 calories, 10 g protein, 19 Continue reading >>

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

If breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day, lunch can often be the most hurried. A recent survey found that 62 percent of Americans rush through lunch at their desks, and even when we manage to leave the office, fast-food restaurants and food courts often prevail over more healthy options. But they don't have to be your only option — and, in fact, they shouldn't be your first choice if you have type 2 diabetes. In general, try to pack your own lunch whenever possible — the health benefits, not to mention the cost-savings, can be enormous. Short on prep time? Put these quick and nutritious lunch ideas on your menu to fill you up and keep your blood sugar in check. 1. Salads Salad should be in regular rotation for lunch. You can create a different salad every day of the week by varying your toppings. Try grilled chicken, shrimp, or fish, but avoid heaping on a lot of fattening ingredients, such as bacon bits and heavy cheeses. Salads with lots of raw vegetables are best, including carrots, cucumbers, radishes, celery, and spinach. Sprinkle nuts or seeds on top, add a few dried cranberries, and garnish with some avocado chunks to give it zip. Choose a salad dressing made with vinegar and olive oil to avoid added sugars found in fat-free and low-fat versions, and limit the serving to one tablespoon for a side salad and two tablespoons for an entrée-sized salad. 2. Sandwiches As with salads, there are many ways to spice up a sandwich. Start with whole-grain bread or a whole-wheat tortilla. Pick a lean meat, such as turkey, ham, or grilled chicken; layer on your choice of veggies; add mustard, low-fat mayonnaise, or hummus to the mix — and you have a filling and tasty lunch. Stay away from greasy chips, French fries, and other fattening sides. Instead choose fr Continue reading >>

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Healthy eating is the cornerstone of managing diabetes, yet it can be a challenge figuring out what to eat to balance your blood sugar. Here we've created a delicious 3-day meal plan that makes it easier to follow a diabetes diet. In this plan you'll find a mix of nutritious foods including fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, healthy fats and dairy. This plan limits the amount of foods with refined carbohydrates (think white bread, white rice and sugar), added sugars and saturated fats, which can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Incorporating a variety of foods, as we do in this meal plan, is a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Not sure if this is the right plan for you? Calculate your calorie level and find the diet meal plan that will work best for you. Day 1 Meal Prep Tip: Cook or set aside an extra 1/2 cup of black beans tonight at dinner to have for lunch on Day 2. Be sure to rinse canned beans to get rid of excess salt. Breakfast (298 calories, 32 grams carbohydrates) • 1 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt • 1/2 cup blueberries • 1 1/2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts • 2 tsp. honey Top yogurt with blueberries, walnuts and honey. Note: We use a small amount of added sweetener, in this case h Continue reading >>

List Of Diabetic Diets For Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner

List Of Diabetic Diets For Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner

People with diabetes have difficulty properly metabolizing carbohydrate. Monitoring how much carbohydrate you eat is critical for blood sugar control. Different meal planning tools include carbohydrate counting, the plate method and the glycemic index. If you use insulin, calculating how much carbohydrate you eat helps you administer the right dose. Choosing appropriate portion sizes also helps control blood sugar. Check with your doctor or nutritionist to determine the best diet for your health needs. Video of the Day Carbohydrate breaks down into glucose, which raises blood sugar. Carbohydrate counting is a common diabetic diet method and monitors portions of foods with carbohydrate including grains, potatoes, peas, corn, rice, bread, crackers, pasta, fruit, milk, beans, soy, candy, cookies and soda. The American Diabetes Association recommends 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrate at each meal, or three to four servings. Another approach to a diabetic diet is the plate method. For this diet, divide your plate in half. In one half, fill your plate with nonstarchy vegetables. In the other half, divide it in half again and use one side for protein and the other for carbohydrate. Include a side of fruit and dairy. When filling the plate, select foods with low or medium glycemic indexes. The glycemic index focuses on how quickly a carbohydrate-containing food raises blood sugar. Your liver helps regulate your blood sugar. During fasting, it will produce glucose, which can cause your blood sugar to rise. If you're diabetic, breakfast is an extremely important meal to help break your overnight fast and prevent the liver from producing glucose. Using carbohydrate counting, one breakfast menu includes a piece of whole-grain toast (15 grams of carbohydrate) with 1 tablespoon of peanu Continue reading >>

Easy Diabetic Recipes

Easy Diabetic Recipes

5 delicious diabetic recipes for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and even dessert! Need some new ideas for what to eat? We've put together 5 delicious—and diabetes-friendly—recipes. Breakfast, lunch, dinner—even an afternoon snack and a yummy dessert. This Patient Guide will help you eat well all day long with our easy diabetic recipes. Every recipe includes nutritional info to help you make good meal planning and insulin decisions. We've broken out the carbohydrates, calories, and fat content. Plus, we've given you the diabetic exchanges for every recipe—more help in making smart food decisions every time you eat. For more practical information on healthy living with diabetes, try these articles: Bon appétit! Continue reading >>

What Should A Diabetic Eat For Breakfast Lunch And Dinner?

What Should A Diabetic Eat For Breakfast Lunch And Dinner?

The number of diabetic patients is now increasing every year. This is hereditary and also due the changing lifestyle of the people. Diabetes is a medical condition in which there is a high level of sugar in the blood. It can happen because the pancreas fails to produce insulin or due to the cells of the body not reacting to the insulin that is produced. Once considered as a fatal disease, it is now possible to keep it under control and maintain normal levels of sugar in the blood by taking insulin and following a strict diet that is specially made for diabetic patients. The diet for diabetic patients must be very effective in controlling blood sugar and at the same time keep the patient healthy and well. Best Diabetic Diet Meal Plan Guide: The Basics of Diabetic Plan you should know: The main aim of the diabetic diet is to include food items and beverages that can maintain the level of sugar in the blood. In diabetics the insulin produced by the pancreas cannot regulate the bold sugar level. So they must always consume food that contains sugar in very low quantities. This way they can control the sugar levels and remain healthy. Some foods we consume are high in sugar and calories while others are low in calories and sugar. So a diabetic must have a proper knowledge about both types of foods. This way they can avoid foods that are rich in sugar content and take only those foods that are low in calorie and sugar content. In the diet chart below we discuss some of the healthy foods that are good for the diabetics. You can remove some food items from them or add some you prefer according to your choice. But is t is recommended that diabetics take food that is low in sugar. Diabetic Diet Plan Menu for a Day: Breakfast: Breakfast is an important meal of the day for all peopl Continue reading >>

Your 5-week Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

Your 5-week Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

The Outsmart Diabetes Diet is based on new research that found four specific nutrients—fiber, vitamin D, omega-3s, and calcium—work together to help balance blood sugar and encourage weight loss. Build your daily diabetic diet meal plan by choosing one breakfast, one lunch and one dinner, plus two snacks—any combination gets you approximately 1,400 calories a day and a healthy dose of the "Fat-Fighting 4." Remember to eat about every 3 hours and practice portion control. Prevention Premium: What Every Woman Knows About Erectile Dysfunction Follow this mix and match diabetic diet meal plan—adapted from The Outsmart Diabetes Diet—for the next five weeks to help fight fat, maintain healthy blood sugar levels, boost energy, and reduce your diabetes risk. BREAKFAST Fruity bagel breakfast: Spread 1 Tbsp light cream cheese and 1 tsp 100% fruit spread on ½ of a whole grain bagel. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk. Crunchy yogurt: Combine 6 oz fat-free light yogurt, ¼ c granola cereal, 1 Tbsp ground flax seed, and 1 Tbsp chopped nuts. Add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Eggs and English muffin: Scramble 1 egg in a pan coated with 1 tsp canola or olive oil; top with ¼ c chopped tomato, onion, and chile salsa. Serve with toasted 100% whole grain English muffin, spread with 2 Tbsp low-fat (1%) cottage cheese, and 1 c fat-free milk. Instead of scrambled eggs, try poaching an egg: Good Morning Blend: Stir together 6 ounces fat-free yogurt, 2 Tbsp dried mixed fruit, 2 Tbsp ground flax seed and 2 Tbsp chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans. Nutty Oatmeal: Top ½ c cooked oatmeal with ¼ c walnuts or other nuts; add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched soy or rice beverage. Bagel and cream cheese: Sprea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Friendly Foods For Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner Or Snacks

Diabetes Friendly Foods For Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner Or Snacks

Your diet has to play a major role in controlling the level of blood glucose in your body. If you are diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus, then you should be very careful about what you eat. In fact, by eating right, you can also avoid the risks related to other life threatening ailments like heart disease or stroke. Eating right can be a challenging task at the beginning, but once you get used to healthy food and right diet, you cannot stay out of this regimen. The more you get into the habit of eating healthy, the more you feel the benefits. So, it is very important to decide on your diet for staying fit and healthy forever. For this, you should include plenty of fibers, vitamins and minerals in your daily diet. Always remember to avoid foods which are rich in trans or saturated fat, cholesterol, sugar or sodium. Here are some suggestions on your daily diet, which you can try on. Once you get the idea, you can also experiment with fresh and nutritious ingredients to prepare delectable dishes by keeping the food value intact. Breakfast Muffins – Bake healthy muffins using bran flakes cereal, fat-free milk, olive oil, unsweetened apple juice or sauce, egg substitute and light brown sugar. You can also substitute the all-purpose flour, if you want to. Prepare the batter by blending all the ingredients along with baking soda and baking powder and place inside the oven by pouring into a muffin tray. Flavorful Omelet – Mix your choice of fresh, green vegetables including fresh spinach, fresh basil etc with egg substitute. Use fat free milk and fat free cheese to mix with the omelet batter. Add few drops of oil on a skillet to fry the omelet. Garnish with chopped fresh tomatoes and more crumbled fat free cheese to prepare your special breakfast. Fruit Salad – Use your fav Continue reading >>

Food & Nutrition

Food & Nutrition

You can make a huge difference to your health by making a few simple changes to your everyday eating. In short: Base your meals around the healthy plate ( downloadable from here) Drink plenty of water and avoid drinking fruit juice and other sweet drinks. Eat breakfast, lunch and dinner every day. Eat some carbohydrate food at each meal, but try to keep your portion size of the carbohydrate food at a quarter of your plate. Choose food low in sugar, saturated fat and calories or kilojoules and avoid processed food where possible. Healthy food choices are the foundation of diabetes management, and losing some weight (if needed) can help improve diabetes management. Three meals a day at regular times are helpful. If the time between lunch and dinner is longer than 4-5 hours then a healthy afternoon tea snack may be important – such as a handful of nuts or a piece of fruit. Carbohydrate foods (starches and sugars) have the most direct effect on blood glucose levels. High sugar foods are discouraged but small amounts of sugar in foods are acceptable. Starchy foods (breakfast cereals, bread, rice, pasta, starchy vegetables like potato etc.) break down to glucose when digested. Have some but not too much of these foods at each meal. Choose wholegrain and less processed varieties of these foods where possible. The type of fat in your meal is also important. Saturated fat is discouraged as it is linked with heart disease. Healthier fats are found in olive and canola oils, margarines made from these, avocado and nuts. Generous amounts of vegetables and some fruit are all part of a diabetes friendly meal pattern. High intakes of salt are linked with high blood pressure. Good control of blood pressure is important for people with diabetes so take care with salt. Use some when you Continue reading >>

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

This 1,200-calorie meal plan makes it easy to follow a diabetes diet with healthy and delicious foods that help to balance blood sugar. The simple meals and snacks in this 7-day plan feature complex carbohydrates (think whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables), lean protein and healthy fats. We limited refined carbohydrates (like white bread, white pasta and white rice) as well as added sugars, which can spike your blood sugar quickly. We've also cut back on saturated fats and sodium, as they can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be difficult—choose a variety of nutritious foods, as we do in this meal plan, and add in daily exercise for a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Day 1 Breakfast (294 calories, 41 g carbohydrates) • 1/2 cup oats cooked in 1/2 cup each 2% milk and water • 1 medium plum, chopped • 4 walnut halves, chopped Top oats with plum and walnuts. A.M. Snack (96 calories, 18 g carbohydrates) • 3/4 cup blueberries • 1/4 nonfat plain Greek yogurt Top blueberries with yogurt. Lunch (319 calories, 37 g carbohydrates) Turkey & Apple Cheddar Melt • 2 slices whole-wheat bread • 2 tsp. whole-grain mustard, divided • 1/2 medium apple, sliced • 2 oz. low-sodium deli turkey • 2 Tbsp. shredded Cheddar cheese, divided • 1 cup mixed greens Top one slice of bread with 1 tsp. mustard, apple, turkey and 1 Tbsp. cheese. Top the other Continue reading >>

Seven-day Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan

Seven-day Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan

Eating a diabetes-friendly diet can help keep your blood sugar levels under control. But it can be difficult to stick to a regular meal plan — unless you have a plan in place. Check out these 21 delicious, diabetes-friendly recipes to use for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Remember to stay within your carbohydrate allowance by noting the carb content and serving size of the recipes. Also, be sure to balance your meals with lean protein and healthy plant fats. Breakfast: Cream Cheese-Stuffed French Toast This may sound too decadent for breakfast, but paired with scrambled egg whites, it can fit into a diabetes-friendly meal plan. Whole grain toast will help ensure you get your daily fiber too. Lunch: Salmon Salad with White Beans Salmon is one of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, and is also a delicious topper to workday salad. Dinner: Cuban-Marinated Sirloin Kabobs with Grilled Asparagus Spice things up with this flavorful skewer. Dried herbs and spices are a great way to pack a punch of flavor without adding unnecessary calories and fat. Breakfast: Apple Pie Oatmeal with Greek Yogurt Who wouldn’t like a slice of pie for breakfast? This oatmeal will leave your kitchen smelling like the flavors of fall, and your stomach happy and satisfied. Add some extra plain Greek yogurt on top for more protein. Lunch: Turkey-Cranberry Wraps Turkey and cranberry sauce isn’t just for Thanksgiving! This is an easy grab-and-go lunch that even your kids will enjoy. Note: This recipe may not be appropriate for all people with type 2 diabetes, because it contains 60 grams of carbs per serving. You can adjust the amount of cranberry sauce to lower the carb count. Dinner: Cilantro-Lime Tilapia with Spinach and Tomatoes Take a trip to the tropics with this fast fish dish. Breakfast Continue reading >>

Dinner Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Dinner Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Every 23 seconds, someone in the United States is diagnosed with diabetes. But although diabetes is widespread, public awareness and understanding of the disease can be limited. The Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC) report that 29 million Americans currently have diabetes, but a quarter of them do not know it. Another 86 million adults have prediabetes, with 90 percent of them being unaware. Diabetes is a serious disease that can, if uncontrolled, lead to loss of eyesight, cardiovascular problems, kidney damage, and even amputation of lower limbs. The good news is, it can be managed and these serious health problems can be avoided. Diet techniques for diabetes The even better news is that diabetes can be managed through a combination of exercise, health care, and diet. Despite popular belief, a diet can be varied, tasty, and fulfilling. The "diabetic plate" Maintaining a consistent, well-balanced diet can help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels under control. Portion control is also important, which is where the "diabetic plate" comes in. Endorsed by several organizations, including the American Diabetes Association, the "diabetic plate" can be very helpful when planning dinners. Follow these simple steps: Draw an imaginary line down the center of your plate. Divide one half into two further sections, so that your plate is now divided into three. Fill the biggest section with non-starchy vegetables, such as spinach, green beans, salsa, mushrooms, broccoli, or others. Use proteins to fill one of the smaller sections. Good options are skinless chicken, salmon, shrimp, tempeh or tofu, eggs, and much more. Legumes can fit in either the protein or the starch section because they provide both protein and carbohydrate. Grains, legumes and starch Continue reading >>

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