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What Is The Best Food To Control Diabetes?

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

While a low carb diet appears to be useful on the whole, there are also many foods shown to help. Either by lowering blood sugars and/or improving insulin sensitivity. This articles looks at 10 of the best foods and supplements for lowering blood sugars, based on current research. Just know they should never be used in place of your diabetes medication, but rather alongside. 1. Resistant Starch Lowers Sugars After Meals Starches are long chains of glucose (sugar) found in oats, grains, bananas, potatoes and various other foods. Some varieties pass through digestion unchanged and are not absorbed as sugar into the blood. These are known as resistant starch. Many studies show resistant starch can greatly improve insulin sensitivity. That is, how well the body can move sugar out of the blood and into cells for energy. This is why it’s so useful for lowering blood sugar levels after meals (1, 2). The effect is so great that having resistant starch at lunch will reduce blood sugar spikes at dinner, known as the “second meal effect” (3). Problem is many foods high in resistant starch, such as potatoes, are also high in digestible carbs that can spike blood sugar. Therefore resistant starch in supplement form – without the extra carbs – is recommended. Summary: Supplemental resistant starch is a fantastic option for those struggling to control sugars or have hit a plateau. 2. Ceylon Cinnamon Several cinnamon compounds appear to prevent the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream, minimising blood sugar spikes. It may also dramatically improve insulin sensitivity (4, 5). In a recent clinical trial, 25 poorly-controlled type 2 diabetics received either 1 gram per day of cinnamon or placebo (dummy supplement) for 12 weeks. Fasting blood sugar levels in the cinnamon gro Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Dogs can have diabetes just like humans - both Type 1 and Type 2. Diabetic dogs are increasingly common, but the disease is entirely manageable unless left untreated. MY DOG HAS DIABETES: OVERVIEW 1. If your dog shows symptoms of diabetes (described below), seek veterinary care at once. 2. Work with your vet to determine the right type of insulin and the right dose for your individual dog. 3. Take your dog for frequent veterinary checkups. 4. Learn how to give insulin injections and reward your dog for accepting them. 5. Consistently feed your diabetic dog the same type of food at the same time of day. 6. Report any unusual symptoms or reactions to your vet. For years public health officials have reported a diabetes epidemic among America’s children and adults. At the same time, the rate of canine diabetes in America has more than tripled since 1970, so that today it affects about 1 in every 160 dogs. But while many human cases are caused and can be treated by diet, for dogs, diabetes is a lifelong condition that requires careful blood sugar monitoring and daily insulin injections. The medical term for the illness is diabetes mellitus (mellitus is a Latin term that means “honey sweet,” reflecting the elevated sugar levels the condition produces in urine and blood). Diabetes occurs when the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin to metabolize food for energy, or when the body’s cells fail to utilize insulin properly. The pancreas’s inability to produce insulin is known in humans as type 1 (formerly called juvenile or insulin-dependent) diabetes. This is analogous to the type that affects virtually all dogs. Dogs can also develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Type 2 (formerly adult onset) diabetes, which is the result of insulin resistance often l Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Sulfonylureas, for example, glimepiride (Amaryl) and glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Meglitinides, for example, nateglinide (Starlix) and repaglinide (Prandin) Thiazolidinediones, for example, pioglitazone (Actos) DPP-4 inhibitors, for example, sitagliptin (Januvia) and linagliptin (Tradjenta) What types of foods are recommended for a type 2 diabetes meal plan? A diabetes meal plan can follow a number of different patterns and have a variable ratio of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The carbohydrates consumed should be low glycemic load and come primarily from vegetables. The fat and proteins consumed should primarily come from plant sources. What type of carbohydrates are recommended for a type 2 diabetic diet plan? Carbohydrates (carbs) are the primary food that raises blood sugar. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure the impact of a carbohydrate on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. The main factors that determine a food's (or meal's) glycemic load are the amount of fiber, fat, and protein it contains. The difference between glycemic index and glycemic load is that glycemic index is a standardized measurement and glycemic load accounts for a real-life portion size. For example, the glycemic index of a bowl of peas is 68 (per 100 grams) but its glycemic load is just 16 (lower the better). If you just referred to the glycemic index, you'd think peas were a bad choice, but in reality, you wouldn't eat 100 grams of peas. With a normal portion size, peas have a healthy glycemic load as well as being an excellent source of pro Continue reading >>

What Type Of Pregnancy Diet Should I Follow If I Have Gestational Diabetes?

What Type Of Pregnancy Diet Should I Follow If I Have Gestational Diabetes?

Good nutrition is especially important during pregnancy if you've developed gestational diabetes. Diabetes develops when your body can't efficiently produce or use insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas that allows cells to turn sugar in your blood (glucose) into usable fuel. When large amounts of glucose accumulate in your blood, it means that your cells aren't getting the fuel they need. High blood sugar can be harmful for you and your developing baby, so it's important to try to control it. One way to keep your blood sugar levels under control is to follow a specific meal plan. I strongly recommend seeing a registered dietitian who can create a diet particularly suited to you, based on your weight, height, physical activity, and the needs of your growing baby, as well as your level of glucose intolerance. She'll also take into account your personal food preferences. (Note: If dietary changes aren't sufficient to keep your blood sugar in a healthy range, you'll need to take insulin as well. If your practitioner prescribes insulin injections, you'll need to meet again with your dietitian to reassess your diet.) A dietitian starts by determining how many calories you need each day. Then she teaches you how to determine portion sizes and how to balance your meals with just the right amounts of protein, carbohydrates, and fat. She also assesses your current eating habits to make sure you're getting enough vitamins and minerals. Here are some general dietary guidelines: Eat a variety of foods, distributing calories and carbohydrates evenly throughout the day. Make sure both your meals and your snacks are balanced. The American Diabetes Association recommends that you eat three small-to-moderate-size meals and two to four snacks every day, including an after-dinner snack. Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Treatment For Diabetes And Also Control, Best Food To Control Diabetes?

What Is The Best Treatment For Diabetes And Also Control, Best Food To Control Diabetes?

Fig Leaves- Figs leaves are very commonly used in treating diabetes. They are believed to have anti-diabetic properties that help them to reduce the sugar levels in the blood. Fig leaves can be directly chewed on an empty stomach, or the leaves can be boiled in water and the water can be drunk like tea. Done on a regular basis, the need for insulin gets reduced. Fenugreek- Fenugreek seeds are rich in sugar-lowering properties. Even the leaves of this plant can be made as curry and consumed regularly. Fenugreek helps to reduce the insulin dependency when taken in regular intervals. A teaspoon-full of seeds should be soaked in a glass of water over night and the water along with the seeds should be drunk on empty stomach. No foods or medications should be taken for the next 30 minutes after consuming the water. This treatment is recommended for 2 – 3 times per week. Cinnamon- Cinnamon is the common spice used in every Indian cooking. The taste and the aroma enhancer also has beneficial anti-diabetic properties where it is believed to have the same properties like insulin in lowering the blood glucose level. It is recommended to take half spoon of cinnamon powder everyday to get the desired effect. It can also be chewed in its natural form instead of being made into a powder. Grape Seed Extract- Grape seeds are a rich source of vitamin E, flavonoids, linoleic acid and oligomeric proanthocyanidins. Recent studies have proved their efficacy in treating diabetes. The grape seeds are ground and placed in capsules; the person can take up to 300mg per day to reduce the blood sugar levels. Olive Oil- Olive oil is believed to have beneficiary effects such as reducing the cholesterol and triglycerides level in the blood. It also helps to reduce blood sugar level. Cooking all food Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Not only are 86 million Americans prediabetic, but 90% of them don't even know they have it, the Centers for Disease Control reports. What's more, doctors diagnose as many as 1.5 million new cases of diabetes each year, according to the American Diabetes Association. Whether you're at risk, prediabetic or following a diabetic diet as suggested by your doctor, a few simple strategies can help control blood sugar and potentially reverse the disease entirely. Plus, implementing just a few of these dietary changes can have other beneficial effects like weight loss, all without sacrificing flavor or feeling deprived. First, let's start with the basics. What is diabetes? There are two main forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that's usually diagnosed during childhood. Environmental and genetic factors can lead to the destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. That's the hormone responsible for delivering glucose (sugar) to your cells for metabolism and storage. In contrast, type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed in adulthood and caused by a variety of lifestyle factors like obesity, physical inactivity and high cholesterol. Typically, type 2 diabetics still have functioning beta cells, meaning that they're still producing insulin. However, the peripheral tissues become less sensitive to the hormone, and the liver produces more glucose, causing high blood sugar. When left unmanaged, type 2 diabetics may stop producing insulin altogether. While you may have some symptoms of high blood sugar (nausea, lethargy, frequent thirst and/or urination), a clinical diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes requires a repeat test of your blood sugar levels. How does a diabetic diet help? Unlike many other health conditions, the incredible th Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates Blood glucose is affected most by carbohydrates. And insulin dosing is typically based on food intake, especially carbohydrates. Knowing what foods contain carbohydrates and the amount of carbohydrates in a meal is helpful for blood glucose control. You should aim to include carbohydrates in each meal. Carbohydrate sources like vegetables, fruits and whole grains (high fiber) are preferred over carbohydrate sources with added fats, sugars and salt. Proteins are a necessary part of a balanced diet and can keep you from feeling hungry. They also do not raise your blood glucose like carbohydrates. However, to prevent weight gain, use portion control with proteins. In people with Type 2 diabetes, protein makes insulin work faster, so it may not be a good idea to treat low blood sugar with protein shakes or mixes. Fats Fats are a necessary part of a balanced diet, especially healthy fats like olive oil and fatty fish. The five food groups Some people believe that a diabetes diagnosis means “goodbye” to good food. Not so. Having diabetes does not mean that you can no longer enjoy good food, or that you have to give up your favorite foods. Living with diabetes means eating regular, healthy meals from the following five food groups: Grains and starches Vegetables Fruits Milk & alternatives Meat & alternatives Making healthy food choices Your dietitian or diabetes educator can help you to develop an eating plan that is right for you and fits into your lifestyle. Here are some guidelines for healthy eating: Healthy eating for diabetes is healthy eating for the whole family. Enjoy having regular meals, starting with breakfast first, then lunch and dinner. Space meals no more than 6 hours apart. Eat a variety of foods in each meal, including healthy fats, lean mea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

What To Eat When You Have Both Ibs And Diabetes

What To Eat When You Have Both Ibs And Diabetes

Some people have the misfortune of having to deal with IBS and diabetes at the same time. Little information is available as to how many people struggle with the two health problems together. What seems to be the case, however, is that IBS and diabetes are two distinct disorders, with no physiological overlap. Therefore, it appears to be just plain bad luck to be stuck with the two. IBS and diabetes do share one thing in common—a complicated relationship with food. This can make the job of figuring out what to eat quite challenging. If you have both IBS and diabetes, it might be a good idea to work with a nutritionist who is knowledgeable about both disorders in order to come up with a balanced food plan that is optimal for stabilizing blood sugar, while avoiding foods that may trigger IBS symptoms. The following discussion covers some of the factors that you may want to consider as you seek a dietary plan that works for you. What to Eat for Diabetes If you have been diagnosed with either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, you have hopefully discussed diet with your doctor and perhaps have worked with a nutritionist. Type 1 diabetes requires that you take special care with meal planning, while type 2 diabetes requires more of a focus on weight loss and control. Information on optimal diets for type 1 and 2 diets can be found here: What to Eat for IBS Unlike diabetes, the relationship between food and IBS symptoms is a somewhat controversial subject. For years, the medical establishment downplayed the role of food as a trigger or explanation for IBS distress. This approach was in direct contrast to the perception of many people with IBS that food is the absolute culprit in causing acute IBS symptoms. This disparity in perceptions is mellowing somewhat as researchers a Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Do you have type 2 diabetes, or are you at risk for diabetes? Do you worry about your blood sugar? Then you’ve come to the right place. The disease diabetes (any type) means that you have too much sugar in your blood. This page will show you how to best check this. You can normalize your blood sugar naturally as needed – without pills, calorie counting or hunger. Many people have already done so. As a bonus, a normalized blood sugar usually makes you healthier and leaner. Table of contents: A disastrous epidemic Two types of diabetes Normalize your blood sugar Become your own evidence A disastrous epidemic What’s wrong? Why do more and more people become diabetic? In the past, before our modern Western diet, diabetes was extremely rare. The disease is now becoming more and more common. Around the world, more and more people are becoming diabetic: The number of people with diabetes is increasing incredibly rapidly and is heading towards 500 million. This is a world epidemic. Will someone in your family be affected next? Your mother, father, cousin, your child? Or you? Is perhaps your blood already too sweet? Those affected by the most common form of diabetes (type 2) normally never regain their health. Instead, we take for granted that they’ll become a little sicker for every year that goes by. With time they need more and more drugs. Yet, sooner or later complications emerge. Blindness. Dialysis due to faulty kidneys. Dementia. Amputations. Death. Diabetes epidemic causes inconceivable suffering. Fortunately, there’s something that can be done. We just need to see through the mistake that has led to the explosion of disease – and correct it. This can normalize your blood sugar. Many have already succeeded in doing this. If you already know that you are diabe Continue reading >>

Antioxidants & Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Antioxidants & Diabetes: What You Need To Know

A question we get asked all the time, are antioxidants good for diabetics? Can it help in diabetes management? Is it possible that antioxidants may help reduce the risk of diabetes? Let’s answer this frequently asked question. What are Antioxidants? Antioxidants are substances that inhibit oxidation. Oxidation is a chemical process that results in the transfer of electrons—it always occurs along with a reduction—one substance is oxidized while another is reduced. These are termed “redox reactions”. Rust, corrosion and the internal combustion engine are examples of redox reactions that we are all familiar with. In the body, these types of reactions are occurring all the time producing end products that are known as free radicals. Free radicals are highly reactive substances and can bind to DNA and proteins, damaging them permanently and causing cell, tissue and organ damage. The body has natural antioxidants (eg. Vitamin C, Vitamin E and glutathione) that normally sop up all these free radicals, reducing and often eliminating the damage caused. In many different chronic diseases, including diabetes, the levels of free radicals overcome the body’s ability to soak or sop them up. The high level of antioxidants leads to a condition in the cells, tissues and organs known as oxidative stress. We see oxidative stress show up as chronic inflammation and damage to nerves, blood vessels, tissues and organs. In diabetes, the blood sugar glucose is heavily oxidized as are proteins and lipids (fats) leading to what is known as Advanced Glycation End products or AGEs. In fact, A1c, often followed to monitor how well someone is controlling their blood sugar levels is an AGE.[1] How can Antioxidants Benefit Diabetics? Many studies have shown that oxidative stress is strongl Continue reading >>

Living With

Living With

If you have type 2 diabetes, it's important to look after your own health and wellbeing, with support from those involved in your care. Caring for your health will make treating your diabetes easier and minimise your risk of developing complications of diabetes. Self care for type 2 diabetes includes: maintaining good physical and mental health preventing illness or accidents effectively dealing with minor ailments and long-term conditions. Your diabetes care team As type 2 diabetes is a long-term condition, you'll be in regular contact with your diabetes care team. Your GP or diabetes care team will also need to check your eyes, feet and nerves regularly because they can also be affected by diabetes. You should also be tested regularly – at least once a year – to check how well your diabetes is being controlled over the long term. A blood sample will be taken from your arm, and the HbA1c test will be carried out. It measures how much glucose is in the red blood cells, and gives your blood glucose levels for the previous two to three months. Lifestyle changes Healthy eating Eating a healthy, balanced diet is very important if you have diabetes. However, you don't need to avoid certain food groups altogether. You can have a varied diet and enjoy a wide range of foods as long as you eat regularly and make healthy choices. You can make adaptations when cooking meals, such as reducing the amount of fat, salt and sugar you eat, and increasing the amount of fibre. You don't need to completely exclude sugary and high-fat foods from your diet, but they should be limited. The important thing in managing diabetes through your diet is to eat regularly and include starchy carbohydrates, such as pasta, as well as plenty of fruit and vegetables. If your diet is well balanced, you Continue reading >>

5 Best Foods For Diabetes

5 Best Foods For Diabetes

Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S., and doubles the risk of heart attack and stroke.1 However, type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle disease - our food choices can either prevent or promote insulin resistance and resultant diabetes. Many conventional diabetes diets rely on meat or grains as the major calorie source. However, these strategies have serious drawbacks. High-nutrient, low glycemic load (GL) foods are the optimal foods for diabetics, and these foods also help to prevent diabetes in the first place: Green vegetables: Nutrient-dense green vegetables – leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables, and other green vegetables – are the most important foods to focus on for diabetes prevention and reversal. Higher green vegetable consumption is associated with lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and among diabetics, higher green vegetable intake is associated with lower HbA1c levels.2,3A recent meta-analysis found that greater leafy green intake was associated with a 14 percent decrease in risk of type 2 diabetes.4 One study reported that each daily serving of leafy greens produces a 9 percent decrease in risk.5 Non-starchy vegetables: Non-green, non-starchy vegetables like mushrooms, onions, garlic, eggplant, peppers, etc. are essential components of a diabetes prevention (or diabetes reversal) diet. These foods have almost nonexistent effects on blood glucose and are packed with fiber and phytochemicals. Beans: Beans, lentils, and other legumes are the ideal carbohydrate source. Beans are low in GL due to their moderate protein and abundant fiber and resistant starch, carbohydrates that are not broken down in the small intestine. This reduces the amount of calories that can be absorbed from beans; plus, resistant starch is fermented by bacteria in t Continue reading >>

Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Hyperglycemia is the medical term for abnormally high blood glucose. If left untreated, hyperglycemia can cause serious health complications and affect your eyes, kidneys, nerves, and heart. Your blood glucose levels depend on your diet. If you make certain dietary changes, you can control diabetes. As one of the most common questions of people diagnosed with diabetes is what foods they can eat, we suggest you a few foods which help diabetes. Yogurt Yogurt is a rich source of protein, calcium, and vitamin D. This food supports your bones and teeth structure. According to a study, people who consume foods which are rich in calcium keep their weight in check. Also, they are less prone to insulin resistance. Consume non-fat yogurt. Sweet potatoes Sweet potatoes are rich in antioxidants, vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. Diabetics can substitute regular potatoes with sweet potatoes and lower the glycemic index. Grill them or bake them with the skin on. Also, you can add them to soups, salads, or casserole. Beans Beans are an excellent source of dietary fiber, protein, magnesium, and potassium. This food keeps your blood sugar consistent. Eat them as a main dish, or add it to a soup or a salad. Dark green leafy vegetables Berries Berries have potent antioxidant activity. Also, this fruit is a rich source of vitamins and fiber which keep your blood glucose levels in check. Another important thing for berries is that they reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Choose your most favorite one: strawberries, blueberries, blackberries and so on. Fish Fish is a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids. Diabetics should include it twice a week in their diet. Salmon, sardines, herring, mackerel, and tuna are the best choice. Consume it baked or grilled. Consult your doctor if Continue reading >>

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