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What Is The Best Food To Control Diabetes?

Eating Well With Diabetes: South Indian And Sri Lankan Diets

Eating Well With Diabetes: South Indian And Sri Lankan Diets

Many staple foods in the South Indian diet are good for your health. From fresh guava to lentils to vegetarian cuisine, there are lots of nutrient-rich choices. However, deep fried items, high-fat foods and refined flour are also common and should be limited. If you have diabetes, you can work with your healthcare team to develop a plan that is right for you. It will likely include exercise, a meal plan, blood sugar monitoring and perhaps medication. This article will focus on the dietary changes that you can make. Diabetes information in other languages! Call EatRight Ontario at 1-877-510-510-2 to get practical tips and information on managing diabetes in: Gujrati, Pakistani, Punjabi and Urdu. This information will tell you which of your favourite traditional foods fit into a healthy diet and which should be limited to help you manage diabetes. What is type 2 diabetes? Diabetes is a disease where the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. When the body is working well, insulin helps carry sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells where it is used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body's cells do not receive enough glucose, so it stays in your blood. High blood glucose (or high blood sugar) can lead to heart, kidney, vision and blood vessel problems. Who has a higher risk of diabetes? Some ethnic groups in Canada have a higher risk of getting diabetes, including people of South Asian descent. There are certain genes that affect insulin function. Having these genes increases your risk of diabetes. These genes are commonly found in high risk populations such as people with South Asian heritage. What to eat…and when If you have diabetes, it is important to eat every 4 to 6 hours Continue reading >>

Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Hyperglycemia is the medical term for abnormally high blood glucose. If left untreated, hyperglycemia can cause serious health complications and affect your eyes, kidneys, nerves, and heart. Your blood glucose levels depend on your diet. If you make certain dietary changes, you can control diabetes. As one of the most common questions of people diagnosed with diabetes is what foods they can eat, we suggest you a few foods which help diabetes. Yogurt Yogurt is a rich source of protein, calcium, and vitamin D. This food supports your bones and teeth structure. According to a study, people who consume foods which are rich in calcium keep their weight in check. Also, they are less prone to insulin resistance. Consume non-fat yogurt. Sweet potatoes Sweet potatoes are rich in antioxidants, vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. Diabetics can substitute regular potatoes with sweet potatoes and lower the glycemic index. Grill them or bake them with the skin on. Also, you can add them to soups, salads, or casserole. Beans Beans are an excellent source of dietary fiber, protein, magnesium, and potassium. This food keeps your blood sugar consistent. Eat them as a main dish, or add it to a soup or a salad. Dark green leafy vegetables Berries Berries have potent antioxidant activity. Also, this fruit is a rich source of vitamins and fiber which keep your blood glucose levels in check. Another important thing for berries is that they reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Choose your most favorite one: strawberries, blueberries, blackberries and so on. Fish Fish is a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids. Diabetics should include it twice a week in their diet. Salmon, sardines, herring, mackerel, and tuna are the best choice. Consume it baked or grilled. Consult your doctor if Continue reading >>

10 Indian Foods For Type 2 Diabetes Prevention And Control

10 Indian Foods For Type 2 Diabetes Prevention And Control

Type 2 Diabetes or Diabetes mellitus is one such lifestyle condition which can be easily managed with a good diabetic diet and weight loss. In this blog, we present to you the top 10 best foods for diabetics that one must include in the diet. Now avail a Diabetes Weight Management Consultation with Superfoods from an expert Truweight Nutritionist, for FREE! Click and get started. A Diabetes Diet plays a crucial role in dealing with the disease. Hence it is very important to know which foods can help. A typical diet plan for type 2 diabetes should contain healthy fruits and veggies. However, there are certain superfoods like Quinoa, Oats, Bitter Gourd, legumes which are not that popular but can greatly help managing diabetes. 10 Superfoods for Type 2 Diabetes patients Fenugreek Seeds Psyllium Seeds Millets Bitter gourd Oats Seeds Brown rice Quinoa Cinnamon Legumes We have compiled the list of 10 superfoods for Type 2 Diabetes management in the video below. 1. Fenugreek Seeds Fenugreek seeds or methi seeds are one of the top superfoods for diabetes mellitus prevention and control. Studies have found that fenugreek helps lower the blood sugar by affecting the rate of digestion of starch and other carbs. In addition, several clinical trials seem to have shown methi seeds to reduce the metabolic conditions seen commonly in diabetes mellitus. A study even found that 100 grams of fenugreek seeds seemed to lower the fasting blood sugar levels. 2. Psyllium Seeds Psyllium husk is one the major foods for diabetes that you can incorporate in the diet. In the digestive system, viscous fibres present in psyllium husk absorb water and swells to form a thick, jelly-like mass. According to a study conducted by Cleveland Clinic, the resulting viscous substance slows down the rate at whic Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet Or Insulin? How To Best Control Blood Sugar

Diabetes Diet Or Insulin? How To Best Control Blood Sugar

Finding out you have type 2 diabetes can be overwhelming to say the least. Your diet suddenly becomes even more important, as you closely track and learn to what to eat to control your blood sugar. Darlene Turner, ARNP, CDE, UnityPoint Health, offers diabetes diet tips and also discusses when it might be necessary to use insulin. Diabetes Diet or Medication? Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes more resistant to the insulin naturally produced and released by the pancreas. The pancreas becomes overworked when large amounts of carbohydrates are consumed, and the body can’t keep up with the amount of insulin needed. Turner says type 2 diabetes management depends on whether the diagnosis is made early or late in the disease process. “Sometimes, we find type 2 diabetes early, and we can treat it with diet changes and possibly oral medication,” Turner says. “However, sometimes we diagnose it when the person has already had it a long time, and the pancreas is hardly making any insulin. In that case, we need to have insulin from the beginning in order to gain control of their blood sugars.” Turner says that many people with type 2 diabetes who manage the condition for years will still need insulin at some point, due to the natural progression of the disease. Diabetes Diet Tips to Start Today There are three parts to type 2 diabetes management: dietary changes, an activity plan and medication. Turner recommends learning all you can about diabetes to get it controlled quickly, before more insulin resistance is created from high blood sugar levels. “Our bodies respond better to lifestyle changes early in the disease process, rather than allowing uncontrolled diabetes to go on for a few years before getting serious about taking care of the condition. Lifestyle c Continue reading >>

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

Despite conventional wisdom, a diabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you have to commit to a bland and boring diet. There are loads of delicious foods that are safe and healthy to eat—you may just not know what they are yet. But that’s okay, because we’re here to help! Read on to discover the best and worst drinks, grains, proteins, and produce picks for your diet, according to top nutritionists. Once you’ve read through the list and added some things to your shopping list, click over to these 15 Cooking and Eating Tips If You Have Diabetes to find out how to transform the Eat This picks into delicious, satisfying meals. According to the American Diabetes Association, it’s important to choose the most nutritious whole grains possible. Although grains help to maintain steady blood-sugar levels and provide heart-healthy fiber, white flour-based products can’t claim the same. Because the bran, germ, and endosperm have been compromised, these foods elevate blood-sugar levels and should only be consumed on occasion. “Oats contain a type of fiber called beta-glucan, which seems to have an anti-diabetic effect,” explains Jackie Newgent, RDN, CDN, author of The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook., adding,* “I advise people with diabetes to steer clear of added sugars by enjoying savory rather than sweet oatmeal.” For some tips on whipping up a delectable bowl of oats, dig into these 20 Savory Oatmeal Recipes for a Flat Belly. Though you likely assumed sugary donuts and muffins weren’t the best way to kick off your day, we bet you didn’t realize just how awful certain pastries can be. “Cinnamon rolls, for example, can contain more saturated fat and added sugars than people with diabetes should have in an entire day,” cautions Newgent. Yikes! Always turn down t Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Cure Diabetes

10 Foods That Cure Diabetes

Foods can control diabetes to the point where some diabetics can maintain normal blood sugar levels without medication. Although there may be a debate as to whether diet cures the condition, people diagnosed with diabetes can manage their blood glucose levels through certain foods and healthy lifestyle changes. Research has shown that some people with type 2 diabetes are able to keep their blood sugar levels out of the diabetes range through exercise and a diet that limits their calorie intake to 1,200 to 1,800 a day, according to WebMD. Even when diabetics still require medication, a proper meal plan can improve their condition significantly for a healthier life. Here are 10 foods with the nutrients to beat diabetes. SPECIAL: GMO Food: It's Worse Than We Thought . . . 1. Black, navy, pinto or kidney beans provide valuable protein without the saturated food from many protein foods. Beans are also high in fiber, magnesium and potassium. 2. Dark, green leafy vegetables are low in carbohydrates and calories, so people can eat a lot of them without fat and fullness. The American Diabetes Association recommends spinach, collards, and kale. 3. Fish with omega-3 fatty acids provide protein and fight the risk of heart disease. The ADA recommends six to nine ounces of fish a week. Diabetics should avoid breaded or fried fish and focus on grilled, broiled or baked fish. Omega-3 rich fish include salmon, tuna, sardines, herring, and mackerel. 4. Fat-free milk and yogurt avoid the fat while providing calcium as well as fortified vitamin D in many dairy products. 5. Whole grains give people a full feeling without the fat and offer nutrients. Whole grains include whole grain bread, whole grain pasta and brown rice. Refined gains lose nutrients during processing. 6. Fruits with low-gl Continue reading >>

10 Diet And Exercise Tricks To Control Diabetes

10 Diet And Exercise Tricks To Control Diabetes

Small goals make a big difference When it comes to type 2 diabetes, you need diet and exercise goals that encourage you to succeed—not ones that set you up to fail, says Ann Goebel-Fabbri, PhD, a psychologist and investigator at the Joslin Diabetes Center, in Boston. "I think goals have to be small and well spelled out for people. Everyone has the experience of going to a health practitioner and being told something vague: 'You know, you really ought to lose weight.' What does that mean? Goals need to be broken down into small nuts and bolts," she says. First step: See where you stand now Margaret Savoca, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, suggests that you stop and look at your eating and exercise habits, and figure out what will be the easiest changes to make, rather than making huge changes that are tough to sustain. "Diabetes is a marathon, not a sprint," says Elizabeth Hardy, 47, a Dallas resident who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2005. For Hardy it was easiest to make changes in her life one step at a time. Here are 10 ways to start. Bring your own lunch Avoid eating lunch at restaurants or fast-food joints. Restaurant meals "can go out of control easily," Savoca says. They tend to have large portions, lots of calories, and high amounts of fat. Research has found an association between eating out more and having a higher body weight. When you make your own lunch, you control the ingredients and your portion sizes. If making your own lunch every day is too much, you might want to try twice a week to start. Use a pedometer These handy devices—available for less than $20 at sporting goods stores—clip on to your waistband and record the number of steps you take. Use one to estimat Continue reading >>

Antioxidants & Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Antioxidants & Diabetes: What You Need To Know

A question we get asked all the time, are antioxidants good for diabetics? Can it help in diabetes management? Is it possible that antioxidants may help reduce the risk of diabetes? Let’s answer this frequently asked question. What are Antioxidants? Antioxidants are substances that inhibit oxidation. Oxidation is a chemical process that results in the transfer of electrons—it always occurs along with a reduction—one substance is oxidized while another is reduced. These are termed “redox reactions”. Rust, corrosion and the internal combustion engine are examples of redox reactions that we are all familiar with. In the body, these types of reactions are occurring all the time producing end products that are known as free radicals. Free radicals are highly reactive substances and can bind to DNA and proteins, damaging them permanently and causing cell, tissue and organ damage. The body has natural antioxidants (eg. Vitamin C, Vitamin E and glutathione) that normally sop up all these free radicals, reducing and often eliminating the damage caused. In many different chronic diseases, including diabetes, the levels of free radicals overcome the body’s ability to soak or sop them up. The high level of antioxidants leads to a condition in the cells, tissues and organs known as oxidative stress. We see oxidative stress show up as chronic inflammation and damage to nerves, blood vessels, tissues and organs. In diabetes, the blood sugar glucose is heavily oxidized as are proteins and lipids (fats) leading to what is known as Advanced Glycation End products or AGEs. In fact, A1c, often followed to monitor how well someone is controlling their blood sugar levels is an AGE.[1] How can Antioxidants Benefit Diabetics? Many studies have shown that oxidative stress is strongl Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Following a type 2 diabetes diet doesn’t mean you have to give up all the things you love — you can still enjoy a wide range of foods and, in some cases, even help reverse type 2 diabetes. Indeed, creating a diet for diabetes is a balancing act: It includes a variety of healthy carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The trick is ultimately choosing the right combination of foods that will help keep your blood sugar level in your target range and avoid big swings that can cause diabetes symptoms — from the frequent urination and thirst of high blood sugar to the fatigue, dizziness, headaches, and mood changes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The Basics of the Type 2 Diabetes Diet: What Should You Eat? To follow a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, you must first understand how different foods affect your blood sugar. Carbohydrates, which are found to the largest degree in grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables, are broken down into glucose in the blood faster than other types of food, which raises blood sugar, potentially leading to hyperglycemia. Protein and fats do not directly impact blood sugar, but both should be consumed in moderation to keep calories down and weight in a healthy range. To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says. How Many Carbs Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), you can calculate Continue reading >>

Living With

Living With

If you have type 2 diabetes, it's important to look after your own health and wellbeing, with support from those involved in your care. Caring for your health will make treating your diabetes easier and minimise your risk of developing complications of diabetes. Self care for type 2 diabetes includes: maintaining good physical and mental health preventing illness or accidents effectively dealing with minor ailments and long-term conditions. Your diabetes care team As type 2 diabetes is a long-term condition, you'll be in regular contact with your diabetes care team. Your GP or diabetes care team will also need to check your eyes, feet and nerves regularly because they can also be affected by diabetes. You should also be tested regularly – at least once a year – to check how well your diabetes is being controlled over the long term. A blood sample will be taken from your arm, and the HbA1c test will be carried out. It measures how much glucose is in the red blood cells, and gives your blood glucose levels for the previous two to three months. Lifestyle changes Healthy eating Eating a healthy, balanced diet is very important if you have diabetes. However, you don't need to avoid certain food groups altogether. You can have a varied diet and enjoy a wide range of foods as long as you eat regularly and make healthy choices. You can make adaptations when cooking meals, such as reducing the amount of fat, salt and sugar you eat, and increasing the amount of fibre. You don't need to completely exclude sugary and high-fat foods from your diet, but they should be limited. The important thing in managing diabetes through your diet is to eat regularly and include starchy carbohydrates, such as pasta, as well as plenty of fruit and vegetables. If your diet is well balanced, you Continue reading >>

How To Eat To Manage Diabetes - Top 10 Tips

How To Eat To Manage Diabetes - Top 10 Tips

Moderation is key when it comes to managing diabetes. Douglas Twenefour, clinical advisor at Diabetes UK, explains what to eat when and shares his top 10 tips for managing your diabetes... There is not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ eating pattern for people with diabetes, but Douglas Twenefour suggests tips that can be incorporated into individual healthy eating goals for people who have the condition... 1. Eat regular meals Spacing meals evenly throughout the day will help control your appetite and blood glucose levels – especially if you are on twice-daily insulin. 2. Opt for slowly absorbed carbohydrates All carbohydrates (carbs) affect blood glucose levels, so be conscious of how much you eat and opt for carbs that are more gradually absorbed. Try wholewheat pasta, basmati rice; granary, pumpernickel or rye bread; new potatoes in their skins, sweet potatoes and yams; oat-based cereals, such as porridge or natural (unsweetened) muesli. For more information, take a look at our Spotlight on... low-GI foods. 3. Cut the fat Eat less fat – particularly saturated fat. Try unsaturated fats and oils, especially monounsaturated fats like extra virgin olive oil and rapeseed oil, as these types of fat are better for your heart. Use lower fat dairy products including skimmed or semi-skimmed milk. Grill, steam or bake foods rather than frying. Remember that all fats contribute similar amounts of calories, so limit your overall intake if you are aiming to lose weight. 4. Five a day Aim for at least five portions of fruit and vegetables every day to give your body the vitamins, minerals and fibre it needs. A portion is: 1 medium-sized piece of fruit, like a banana or apple, 1 handful of grapes, 1 tablespoon (30g) dried fruit, 1 small glass (150ml) of unsweetened 100% fruit juice or Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Diet

Hypoglycemia And Diet

What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, is a relatively rare condition. The symptoms include shakiness, weakness, faintness, headaches, mental dullness, and confusion. Such symptoms can be caused by any number of other problems, including stress. The only way to diagnose hypoglycemia is through a glucose tolerance test—the same type of test used to diagnose diabetes. Effects of Hypoglycemia Glucose is a type of sugar found in the blood. Eating a meal causes blood glucose levels to rise. Normally, as levels of glucose in the blood increase, the pancreas produces insulin. The insulin causes body cells to absorb the glucose and a gradual drop in the blood sugar level results. In a person with hypoglycemia, the body produces too much insulin in the presence of glucose. This causes a sudden drop in the blood sugar level. The High-Protein Myth Doctors used to recommend eating sugar-restricted, high-protein meals four or more times a day to help control hypoglycemia. But such treatment may actually impair glucose tolerance in patients.1 The main sources of protein for many individuals—animal products—are also high in saturated fat which can contribute to the development of diabetes,2,3 as well as numerous other health problems, from heart disease to breast cancer. Hypoglycemia and Diet The best way to control hypoglycemia is through a diet similar to that used to control diabetes mellitus: a reduction in simple sugars, a large intake of complex carbohydrates, and frequent feedings. Candy, sodas, and even fruit juices (which manufacturers often sweeten with lots of sugar) are all high in sugar and should be avoided. Foods that are high in soluble dietary fiber slow carbohydrate absorption and help to prevent swings in blood sugar levels. For som Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes involves making changes to your lifestyle, through diet, weight control and physical activity. Medication for diabetes, whether in tablet or injection form, is definitely not the only way to control your blood sugar (glucose) levels. How does type 2 diabetes affect your weight? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. The food you eat on a daily basis plays an important role in managing your diabetes, as well as ensuring you keep well and have enough energy for your daily activities. The same healthy eating principles apply whether you have diabetes or not. In fact, getting the whole family to eat this sort of balanced diet if you have diabetes can benefit their health as well as yours. Including foods from each of the main food groups described below will provide your body with the essential nutrients. See also separate leaflet called Healthy Eating. Fruit Continue reading >>

Eat Well!

Eat Well!

When you have diabetes, deciding what, when, and how much to eat may seem challenging. So, what can you eat, and how can you fit the foods you love into your meal plan? Eating healthy food at home and choosing healthy food when eating out are important in managing your diabetes. The first step is to work with your doctor or dietitian to make a meal plan just for you. As soon as you find out you have diabetes, ask for a meeting with your doctor or dietitian to discuss how to make and follow a meal plan. During this meeting, you will learn how to choose healthier foods—a variety of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy foods, lean meats, and other proteins. You will also learn to watch your portion sizes and what to drink while staying within your calorie, fat, and carbohydrate (carbs) limits. You can still enjoy food while eating healthy. But how do you do that? Here are a few tips to help you when eating at home and away from home. Eating Healthy Portions An easy way to know portion sizes is to use the “plate method.” Looking at your basic 9-inch dinner plate[PDF – 14 MB], draw an imaginary line down the middle of the plate, and divide one side in half. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables, like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and carrots. In one of the smaller sections, put a grain or starchy food such as bread, noodles, rice, corn or potatoes. In the other smaller section, put your protein, like fish, chicken, lean beef, tofu, or cooked dried beans. Learn more at Create Your Plate, an interactive resource from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that shows how a healthy plate should look. This tool allows you to select different foods and see the portion sizes you should use in planning your meal Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Nutrition

Diabetes And Nutrition

People who have diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. Managing diabetes means managing your blood sugar level. What you eat is closely connected to the amount of sugar in your blood. The right food choices will help you control your blood sugar level. Path to improved health Eating well is one of the primary things you can do to help control diabetes. Do I have to follow a special diet? There isn’t one specific “diabetes diet.” Your doctor can work with you to design a meal plan. A meal plan is a guide that tells you what kinds of food to eat at meals and for snacks. The plan also tells you how much food to have. For most people who have diabetes (and those without, too), a healthy diet consists of: 40% to 60% of calories from carbohydrates. 20% calories from protein. 30% or fewer calories from fat. Your diet should also be low in cholesterol, low in salt, and low in added sugar. Can I eat any sugar? Yes. In recent years, doctors have learned that eating some sugar doesn’t usually cause problems for most people who have diabetes — as long as it is part of a balanced diet. Just be careful about how much sugar you eat and try not to add sugar to foods. What kinds of foods can I eat? In general, at each meal you may have: 2 to 5 choices (or up to 60 grams) of carbohydrates. 1 choice of protein. A certain amount of fat. Talk to your doctor or dietitian for specific advice. Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are found in fruits, vegetables, beans, dairy foods, and starchy foods such as breads. Try to have fresh fruits rather than canned fruits, fruit juices, or dried fruit. You may eat fresh vegetables and frozen or canned vegetables. Condiments such as nonfat mayonnaise, ketchup, and mustard are also carbohydrates. Protein. Protein is found in meat, poultry, fish Continue reading >>

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