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What Is Metformin Er 500mg Used For?

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

I'm seeing quite a few posts on BBSes from people who are having problems with metformin because of side effects that could be eliminated if they were taking the extended release form of this drug. For some reason, many family doctors don't seem to be aware that there is a ER version of this drug that has such benefits. This is probably because metformin is a cheap generic and isn't promoted by herds of beautiful ex-cheerleaders turned drug company salespushers who "educate" doctors about far more expensive--and less effective--newer drugs. Here are the facts: Metformin (also sold under the brand name Glucophage) comes in a regular version which is taken at meal time, three times a day, and an extended release form (marketed as ER or XR) which is taken once a day. Almost always, when people report diarrhea or intense heartburn with metformin, they are taking regular version. I experienced the heartburn on the regular drug. It was very disturbing because the pain was localized over my heart and felt just like the description of a heart attack you read in articles. My doctor assured me it was coming from the metformin, but that didn't make it any easier to live with because I kept wondering how, if I were having a real heart attack, I'd know it wasn't a pain from the drug? The ER version releases the drug more slowly and this usually eliminates the gastrointestinal problems. The trade off with taking the ER form is that the amount of blood sugar lowering you see might be a bit less than with the regular form as the drug acts in a slower smoother fashion rather than hitting all at once. But if you can't take the regular at all drug because of the side effects, the slight weakening in effect is a reasonable trade off. Plus, you only have to remember to take one dose rather Continue reading >>

Metformin Hydrochloride: Oral Tablet, Extended Release (500mg)

Metformin Hydrochloride: Oral Tablet, Extended Release (500mg)

What is this Medicine? METFORMIN (met FOR min) is used to treat type 2 diabetes. It helps to control blood sugar. Treatment is combined with diet and exercise. This medicine can be used alone or with other medicines for diabetes. Generic 94.28%Brand 5.72% *Brand contains same active ingredient but may not represent FDA-approved generic equivalent 750mg1000mg500mg Ingredients Close All Sections Reported Side Effects for Metformin Hydrochloride 500mg Extended-Release Tablet Close Elements of your daily lifestyle may have an effect on the medications you are taking. Drug interactions can result in unwanted side effects, reduce the effectiveness of your medicine or possibly increase the action of a particular medicine. Close All Interactions Close If you use tobacco or are trying to quit tobacco use, you may need to monitor your blood sugar more frequently. Nicotine, a component of tobacco, can increase the blood sugar. Also, if you are trying to quit smoking, as your body adjusts to not smoking, your blood sugar levels may change; the actions of Antidiabetic Agents (medicines used to treat diabetes) may be increased and this could lead to low blood sugar. Know the symptoms of low or high blood sugar and report them if they occur. Monitor your blood sugar regularly. Close Class B - Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. OR Animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus in any trimester. Class B - Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. OR Animal studies have shown an adver Continue reading >>

Metformin Er 500mg

Metformin Er 500mg

About this medication Metformin ER is the name of the medication. It comes in the form of a tablet, and should be taken by mouth. It belongs to a class of medications called Biguanide. Why is this medication prescribed This medication is used to treat type-2 diabetes and pre-diabetes conditions. Normally, when you eat food, the body breaks down all of the sugars and starches into a sugar called glucose. This is the basic fuel for the cells in the body. The body needs Insulin to be able to use this sugar for energy. Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the cells. In type 2 diabetes, either the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin. This causes glucose to build up in the blood instead of going into cells. It can lead to serious diabetes complications. How does it work Metformin belongs to a group of medications called Biguanides. They work by decreasing the amount of sugar produced by the liver and increasing the amount of sugar absorbed by muscle cells. As a result you get more sugar in the cells and less is in the blood. How to use it This medication comes as a tablet. You should put it in your mouth and swallow it with a glass of water. Do not chew, break or crush it. Swallow it whole. What to do if you are pregnant Tell your physician if you become pregnant. There are not enough studies about this medication in pregnant women. Use the medication during pregnancy only if clearly needed. Continue reading >>

Metformin Extended-release Tablets

Metformin Extended-release Tablets

Generic Name: Metformin Extended-Release Tablets (met FOR min) Brand Name: Fortamet, Glucophage XR Warning Rarely, metformin may cause an acid health problem in the blood (lactic acidosis). The risk of lactic acidosis is higher in people with kidney problems and in people who take certain other drugs like topiramate. The risk is also higher in people with liver problems or heart failure, in older people (65 or older), or with alcohol use. If lactic acidosis happens, it can lead to other health problems and can be deadly. Lab tests to check the kidneys may be done while taking this medicine (metformin extended-release tablets). Talk with the doctor. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of too much lactic acid in the blood (lactic acidosis) like fast breathing, fast or slow heartbeat, a heartbeat that does not feel normal, very bad upset stomach or throwing up, feeling very sleepy, shortness of breath, feeling very tired or weak, very bad dizziness, feeling cold, or muscle pain or cramps. Do not take this medicine if you have a very bad infection, low oxygen, or a lot of fluid loss (dehydration). Talk with your doctor before you drink alcohol. If you are having an exam or test with contrast or have had one within the past 48 hours, talk with your doctor. Tell all of your health care providers that you take this medicine (metformin extended-release tablets). This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists. Uses of Metformin Extended-Release Tablets: It is used to lower blood sugar in patients with high blood sugar (diabetes). What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Metformin Extended-Release Tablets? If you have an allergy to metformin or any other part of this medicine. If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, o Continue reading >>

Information On Metformin Hcl Er 500 Mg For Weight Loss

Information On Metformin Hcl Er 500 Mg For Weight Loss

If you have high blood glucose levels, you may take metformin hydrochloride, an oral anti-hyperglycemic medication that lowers blood sugar. Metformin may also help you lose weight in some cases by decreasing your appetite. Clinical studies have not proven that metformin helps you lose weight if you don't have Type 2 diabetes or other metabolic disorders that cause insulin resistance. It may help prevent weight gain or cause modest weight loss if you're taking antipsychotic drugs that cause weight gain. Metformin comes in several doses, including a 500-milligram extended release form, which you may find easier to take. Video of the Day Metformin might help you lose weight if you have metabolic syndrome or polycystic ovary disease, both associated with insulin resistance. The pancreas releases insulin in response to glucose in your bloodstream. Insulin helps cells remove glucose from the bloodstream. When you eat large amounts of high-carb foods, the pancreas may overproduce insulin to keep up. Eventually, your cells stop responding to the insulin and your blood glucose levels rise. Because your cells feel starved for energy, you feel hungry all the time and may crave carbohydrates. Metformin helps cells respond better to insulin, so you don't feel as hungry. Insulin can also cause your liver to convert extra calories to fat. Metformin decreases the amount of glucose your liver produces, and also decreases the amount of glucose absorbed in your intestines. Decreased amounts of glucose in your bloodstream results in less glucose absorbed by your cells. When you absorb less glucose, you lose weight. An Indian study published in the March 2011 "British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology" reported that metformin increased weight loss in people taking olanzapine, an antipsychoti Continue reading >>

Metformin Overview

Metformin Overview

Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides, which work by helping your body respond better to the insulin it makes naturally, decreasing the amount of sugar your liver makes, and decreasing the amount of sugar your intestines absorb. This medication comes in tablet, extended-release tablet, and liquid forms. It is taken up to 3 times daily, depending on which form you are taking. Swallow extended-release tablets whole. Common side effects of metformin include diarrhea, nausea, and upset stomach. Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Metformin may be found in some form under the following brand names: Serious side effects have been reported including: Lactic Acidosis. In rare cases, metformin can cause a serious side effect called lactic acidosis. This is caused by a buildup of lactic acid in your blood. This build-up can cause serious damage. Lactic acidosis caused by metformin is rare and has occurred mostly in people whose kidneys were not working normally. Lactic acidosis has been reported in about one in 33,000 patients taking metformin over the course of a year. Although rare, if lactic acidosis does occur, it can be fatal in up to half the people who develop it. It is also important for your liver to be working normally when you take metformin. Your liver helps remove lactic acid from your blood. Make sure you tell your doctor before you use metformin if you have kidney or liver problems. You should also stop using metformin and call your doctor right away if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treate Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin, marketed under the trade name Glucophage among others, is the first-line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes,[4][5] particularly in people who are overweight.[6] It is also used in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.[4] Limited evidence suggests metformin may prevent the cardiovascular disease and cancer complications of diabetes.[7][8] It is not associated with weight gain.[8] It is taken by mouth.[4] Metformin is generally well tolerated.[9] Common side effects include diarrhea, nausea and abdominal pain.[4] It has a low risk of causing low blood sugar.[4] High blood lactic acid level is a concern if the medication is prescribed inappropriately and in overly large doses.[10] It should not be used in those with significant liver disease or kidney problems.[4] While no clear harm comes from use during pregnancy, insulin is generally preferred for gestational diabetes.[4][11] Metformin is in the biguanide class.[4] It works by decreasing glucose production by the liver and increasing the insulin sensitivity of body tissues.[4] Metformin was discovered in 1922.[12] French physician Jean Sterne began study in humans in the 1950s.[12] It was introduced as a medication in France in 1957 and the United States in 1995.[4][13] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[14] Metformin is believed to be the most widely used medication for diabetes which is taken by mouth.[12] It is available as a generic medication.[4] The wholesale price in the developed world is between 0.21 and 5.55 USD per month as of 2014.[15] In the United States, it costs 5 to 25 USD per month.[4] Medical uses[edit] Metformin is primarily used for type 2 diabetes, but is increasingly be Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl Er 500mg

Metformin Hcl Er 500mg

METFORMIN HCL ER- metformin hydrochloride extended releasetablet Metformin hydrochloride extended - release tablets are oral antihyperglycemic drugs used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N,N-dimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other classes of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The structural formula is as shown: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline compound with a molecular formula of C4H11N5HCl and a molecular weight of 165.63. Metformin hydrochloride is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. Metformin hydrochloride extended - release tablets, USP contain 500 mg or 750 mg of metformin hydrochloride USP as the active ingredient. Metformin hydrochloride extended - release tablets 500 mg contain the inactive ingredients xanthan gum, hypromellose, sodium carbonate, povidone, talc, colloidal silicon dioxide and magnesium stearate. Metformin hydrochloride extended - release tablets 750 mg contain the inactive ingredients xanthan gum, hypromellose, sodium carbonate, povidone, talc, colloidal silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate and ferric oxide (red). Metformin hydrochloride extended - release tablets meet USP dissolution test 10. System Components and Performance-Metformin hydrochloride extended - release tablets comprises a hydrophilic polymer matrix system. Metformin hydrochloride is combined with a drug release controlling polymers to form a monophasic matrix system. After administration, fluid from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract enters the tablet, causing the polymers to hydrate and swell. Drug is released sl Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Editor’s Note: This is the second post in our miniseries about diabetes drugs. Tune in on August 21 for the next installment. Metformin (brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza) is a member of a class of medicines known as biguanides. This type of medicine was first introduced into clinical practice in the 1950’s with a drug called phenformin. Unfortunately, phenformin was found to be associated with lactic acidosis, a serious and often fatal condition, and was removed from the U.S. market in 1977. This situation most likely slowed the approval of metformin, which was not used in the U.S. until 1995. (By comparison, metformin has been used in Europe since the 1960’s.) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required large safety studies of metformin, the results of which demonstrated that the development of lactic acidosis as a result of metformin therapy is very rare. (A finding that has been confirmed in many other clinical trials to date.) Of note, the FDA officer involved in removing phenformin from the market recently wrote an article highlighting the safety of metformin. Metformin works primarily by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. It does this by activating a protein known as AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK. This protein acts much like an “energy sensor,” setting off cellular activities that result in glucose storage, enhanced entry of glucose into cells, and decreased creation of fatty acids and cholesterol. A secondary effect of the enhanced entry of glucose into cells is improved glucose uptake and increased storage of glycogen (a form of glucose) by the muscles. Additionally, the decrease in fatty acid levels brought about by metformin may indirectly improve insulin resistance and beta cell func Continue reading >>

Mailmyprescriptions.com Wholesale: Metformin Hcl Er 500 Mg Tablet (generic Glucophage Xr)

Mailmyprescriptions.com Wholesale: Metformin Hcl Er 500 Mg Tablet (generic Glucophage Xr)

METFORMIN HCL ER 500 MG TABLET (Generic Glucophage XR) metformin hcl er 500 mg tablet (generic glucophage xr) metformin hcl er 500 mg tablet (generic glucophage xr) Metformin is used as monotherapy as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin may also be used in combination with a sulfonylurea or a thiazolidinedione antidiabetic agent as an adjunct to diet and exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who do not achieve adequate glycemic control with metformin, sulfonylurea, or thiazolidinedione monotherapy. Metformin may be used with repaglinide in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who have inadequate glycemic control with metformin or repaglinide monotherapy. Metformin is commercially available in fixed combination with repaglinide for use in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who are already receiving repaglinide and metformin concurrently as separate components or in those who have inadequate glycemic control with repaglinide or metformin monotherapy. Metformin also may be used concomitantly with nateglinide for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in treatment-naive patients (those not previously treated with antidiabetic agents) as well as in those who have previously received antidiabetic therapy. Metformin is commercially available in fixed combination with glyburide or glipizide for use as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus; such fixed-combination preparations may be used as initial therapy in patients whose hyperglycemia cannot be controlled by diet and exercise alone, or as second-line therapy in patients who do not achieve adequate control of hyperglycemia with metformin or sulfonylurea monotherapy. A thiaz Continue reading >>

Medicine Information - Kaiser Permanente

Medicine Information - Kaiser Permanente

Brand name(s): Fortamet, Glucophage XR, Glumetza Rarely, too much metformin can build up in the body and cause a serious (sometimes fatal) condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is more likely if you are an older adult, if you have kidney or liver disease, dehydration, heart failure, heavy alcohol use, if you have surgery, if you have X-ray or scanning procedures that use iodinated contrast, or if you are using certain drugs. For some conditions, your doctor may tell you to stop taking this medication for a short time. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.Stop taking this medication and get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as unusual tiredness, dizziness, severe drowsiness, chills, blue/cold skin, muscle pain, fast/difficult breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, or stomach pain with nausea/vomiting/diarrhea. Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.Metformin may be used with lifest Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Metformin Er (glucophage Xr) Side Effects

Metformin Er (glucophage Xr) Side Effects

What should I watch for? Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. A test called the HbA1C (A1C) will be monitored. This is a simple blood test. It measures your blood sugar control over the last 2 to 3 months. You will receive this test every 3 to 6 months. Learn how to check your blood sugar. Learn the symptoms of low and high blood sugar and how to manage them. Always carry a quick-source of sugar with you in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Examples include hard sugar candy or glucose tablets. Make sure others know that you can choke if you eat or drink when you develop serious symptoms of low blood sugar, such as seizures or unconsciousness. They must get medical help at once. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you have high blood sugar. You might need to change the dose of your medicine. If you are sick or exercising more than usual, you might need to change the dose of your medicine. Do not skip meals. Ask your doctor or health care professional if you should avoid alcohol. Many nonprescription cough and cold products contain sugar or alcohol. These can affect blood sugar. This medicine may cause ovulation in premenopausal women who do not have regular monthly periods. This may increase your chances of becoming pregnant. You should not take this medicine if you become pregnant or think you may be pregnant. Talk with your doctor or health care professional about your birth control options while taking this medicine. Contact your doctor or health care professional right away if think you are pregnant. The tablet shell for some brands of this medicine does not dissolve. This is normal. The tablet shell may appear whole in the stool. This is not a cause for concern. If you are going to need surgery, a MR Continue reading >>

Watertown Internists

Watertown Internists

What is the most important information I should know about metformin? You should not use this medicine if you have severe kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin. This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Metformin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes. Metformin is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other medications, but metformin is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking metformin? You should not use metformin if you are allergic to it, or if you have: if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin. To make sure metformin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: a history of heart disease or recent heart attack; if you have recently taken chlorpropamide; or if you are over 80 years old and have not recently had your kidney function checked. Some people taking metformin develop a serious condition called lactic acidosis. This may be more likely if you have li Continue reading >>

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