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What Is Best Food For Diabetes?

10 Foods That Can Help Prevent Diabetes

10 Foods That Can Help Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is an epidemic in the United States, with about 29 million people who have it, another 8 million who are undiagnosed and 86 million who are considered pre-diabetic, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes, the most common form, is a disease in which the body’s cells don’t use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to get glucose into the cells, but over time, the pancreas can’t make enough to keep blood glucose levels normal and the result is type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes increases a person’s risk for several health conditions including high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. It’s also responsible for as many as 12 percent of deaths in the U.S., three times higher than previous estimates, a January 2017 study in the journal PLOS ONE found. Although genetics can increase your chances of developing type 2 diabetes, both diet and exercise also play a big role. In fact, people with pre-diabetes who lost just 5 to 7 percent of their body weight reduced their risk by 54 percent, a study out of John Hopkins in July 2013 found. Here, experts weigh in with 10 foods that balance your blood sugar and can prevent diabetes: 1. Apples You might think fruit is off the menu because of its sugar content, but fruit is filled with vitamins and nutrients that can help ward off diabetes. Apples are one of the best fruits you can eat because they’re rich in quercetin, a plant pigment. Quercetin helps the body secrete insulin more efficiently and wards off insulin resistance, which occurs when the body has to make more and more insulin to help glucose enter the cells. Insulin resistance is the hallmark characteristic of type 2 diabetes. “It’s filled with antioxidants, and also there’s fiber in the fruit that nat Continue reading >>

15 Power Foods For Diabetics

15 Power Foods For Diabetics

Some of the best foods for diabetics include dark chocolate, avocados, fish, quinoa, spinach, tomatoes, red onions, broccoli, egg whites, beans, blueberries, oatmeal, and many more. What is Diabetes? The fact that you are reading this article likely means that you are familiar with diabetes, perhaps you even suffer from the condition yourself, but a bit of background information is always valuable. If you know someone who has diabetes or are have a lifestyle that puts you at high risk for diabetes, then this is also information that could be very beneficial for you. Diabetes, quite simply, is a classification of metabolic diseases that result in a person having high blood sugar. More than 380 million people around the world suffer from this disease, and numbers are increasing every year. The technical name of diabetes is Diabetes mellitus, but more importantly is knowing the difference between different types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes: Type 1 diabetes means that a person is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that enables cells in our fat tissue and skeletal muscles to absorb glucose (sugar) from the blood. Having too much blood sugar causes a wide range of health concerns, including increased hunger and thirst (which leads to overeating and obesity), increased urination, and even more serious health issues, such as kidney failure, heart problems, damage to your vision, and even death. Type 1 diabetes is caused by the autoimmune destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas that create insulin; this type represents approximately 10% of diabetes cases in the world. Type 2 diabetes: Type 2 diabetes represents the other 90% of global diabetes cases and is often referred to as “adult-onset diabetes”. Type 2 diabetes is a result of lifestyle, not a metabolic autoimmu Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For A Diabetic Dog

Diet Tips For A Diabetic Dog

Once a dog is diagnosed with diabetes they usually remain diabetic. While there are feeding and dietary strategies that can help keep their glucose levels low and well-controlled, they will usually require insulin injections lifelong. An excellent diet choice for a diabetic dog is a meat-based high protein food that is moderately fat and carbohydrate restricted. Carbohydrates, if included, should be low glycemic (for example, barley or sorghum). Ideally, at least 30 to 40% of the calories in your diabetic dog's food would come from protein and less than 30% of calories would come from fat and carbohydrates each. Further dietary fat restriction may be necessary if your diabetic dog has pancreatitis or blood fat elevations. Options to consider include Nature's Variety Instinct, Wysong, and Halo. Several studies indicate that high or moderately high–fiber diets may help some diabetics by minimizing their post–eating blood sugar fluctuations. While this is true for SOME dogs, a clear clinical benefit has not been shown for the majority of diabetic dogs. Sometimes high fiber diets will cause inappropriate weight loss (in a thin diabetic) and should be avoided. High fiber diets may also be associated with undesirable intestinal side effects such as decreased appetite (due to poor palatability), flatulence and diarrhea or constipation. If your dog is very overweight or obese and in need of weight loss, you might consider a diet with higher fiber to aid in weight loss. Instead of changing to a high fiber diet formulation (which often contains inferior ingredients), you can also consider adding supplemental fiber to your dog's regular diabetic food in order to increase the overall fiber content while still maintaining a high quality food. To best control your diabetic dog's Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Diabetes

Best Foods For Diabetes

Learn more about great foods to eat for diabetes including cinnamon, nuts, oatmeal and more. With diabetes, it can be easy to fixate on all the foods you feel like you're missing out on. But there are lots of diabetic diet-friendly foods you can enjoy, and it's important to focus on the foods you can and should be eating more of. These diabetic diet-friendly foods are nutrient-packed powerhouses that can help you control your blood sugar and stay healthy. Pictured Recipe: Moroccan Kidney Bean & Chickpea Salad Pictured Recipe: Turkish Spice Mix Cinnamon This fragrant spice has been shown to lower cholesterol and keep blood sugar more stable. Just 1/4 teaspoon of cinnamon per day improved fasting blood sugar and cholesterol levels in one study published in the journal Diabetes Care, and other studies have shown similar effects. Get your cinnamon fix by sprinkling it into smoothies, yogurt, oatmeal or even your coffee. Another plus for cinnamon? It adds flavor to your food without adding sugar or salt. Pictured Recipe: Roasted Brussel Sprouts Nuts Walnuts in particular have been shown to help fight heart disease and can improve blood sugar levels, all thanks to walnuts' high levels of polyunsaturated fats. These healthy fats have been shown to help prevent and slow the progression of conditions like diabetes and heart disease. Almonds, pistachios and pecans also contain these beneficial fats. Nuts are low in carbohydrates and high in protein and fat, which makes them good for stabilizing blood sugar. Just be sure to watch your serving size. A 1/4-cup portion of shelled walnuts clocks in at 164 calories. Pictured Recipe: Quinoa & Chia Oatmeal Mix Oatmeal Whole grains, such as oats, are better for your blood sugar (the fiber helps minimize spiking) and may actually help impr Continue reading >>

Feeding The Diabetic Cat

Feeding The Diabetic Cat

Diet plays a critical role in the management of feline diabetes. In fact, with the right diet and medication, it is highly likely that cats newly diagnosed with diabetes will achieve diabetic remission — meaning they will become non-diabetic and no longer require insulin therapy. This is most common within the first four to six months after diagnosis and institution of appropriate diet and insulin therapy. What Is the Best Food for a Diabetic Cat? Cats are true obligate carnivores and as such have a very high protein requirement and an almost nonexistent carbohydrate requirement. Cats are designed to consume foods that are high in protein, moderate in fat and very low in carbohydrates. The following composition is ideal: 50 percent (or greater) of calories from animal-based protein 20-45 percent of calories from fat 1-2 percent of calories from carbohydrates Rich in water (approximately 70 percent by weight) When referring to commercial cat food, this ideal composition will only be found in canned cat food formulas. Most dry foods are not low enough in carbohydrates. Additionally, dry foods usually contain plant-based protein and are too low in overall protein to satisfy a cat’s high protein requirement. Therefore, dry foods are not generally recommended for diabetic cats. It is well established that the ideal feline diet — especially to achieve diabetic remission — is a canned high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. What Is a Low-Carb Diet? A low-carbohydrate diet is one that provides less than 10 percent of the total calories as carbohydrates. Some cats will have adequate control of their diabetes on higher-carbohydrate diets, while others may require further restriction to 5 percent of the calories as carbohydrates. In general, the lower the carbs the better for Continue reading >>

What Should I Eat?

What Should I Eat?

People with diabetes should follow the Australian Dietary Guidelines. Eating the recommended amount of food from the five food groups will provide you with the nutrients you need to be healthy and prevent chronic diseases such as obesity and heart disease. Australian Dietary Guidelines: To help manage your diabetes: Eat regular meals and spread them evenly throughout the day Eat a diet lower in fat, particularly saturated fat If you take insulin or diabetes tablets, you may need to have between meal snacks It is important to recognise that everyone’s needs are different. All people with diabetes should see an Accredited Practising Dietitian in conjunction with their diabetes team for individualised advice. Read our position statement 'One Diet Does Not Fit All'. Matching the amount of food you eat with the amount of energy you burn through activity and exercise is important. Putting too much fuel in your body can lead to weight gain. Being overweight or obese can make it difficult to manage your diabetes and can increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and cancer. Limit foods high in energy such as take away foods, sweet biscuits, cakes, sugar sweetened drinks and fruit juice, lollies, chocolate and savoury snacks. Some people have a healthy diet but eat too much. Reducing your portion size is one way to decrease the amount of energy you eat. Being active has many benefits. Along with healthy eating, regular physical activity can help you to manage your blood glucose levels, reduce your blood fats (cholesterol and triglycerides) and maintain a healthy weight. Learn more about exercise and maintaining a healthy weight. Fats have the highest energy (kilojoule or calorie) content of all foods. Eating too much fat can make you put on weight, which may make it more diffi Continue reading >>

The Best Foods You Can Eat To Prevent Diabetes

The Best Foods You Can Eat To Prevent Diabetes

Coming down with a diabetes diagnosis is more than just frustrating. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it’s the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. But what exactly is it? Diabetes Research explains diabetes is a metabolic disease that causes the body to produce too little insulin. Insulin allows the glucose, or sugar, from the foods that you eat to enter your cells to use as energy, but diabetics don’t have enough insulin to make this happen. This means the sugars stay in your blood, and your body doesn’t have the energy necessary to complete daily functions. To lower your risk of diabetes, try adding the following six foods to your meals. 1. Whole grains There’s evidence to suggest that whole grains can protect you from diabetes, whereas refined carbohydrates, like those you would find in white bread, can increase your risk, explains Harvard’s School of Public Health. The fiber and bran found in whole grains make it harder for your digestive system to break down the grains into glucose. Because this process is more difficult, your blood sugar and insulin are increased very slowly, putting less stress on the body. Choosing whole grains that have a low glycemic load can decrease your risk of diabetes dramatically. 2. Carrots The color of carrots is a key indicator that they’re rich in carotenoids, which are antioxidants that may help prevent diabetes, says Prevention. Research from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health found, out of 4,500 people tested over a 15-year span, those who had the highest levels of carotenoids in their blood cut their diabetes risk in half. 3. Green leafy vegetables Some of the most nutritious vegetables are ones that are dark, green, and leafy, so if you haven’t begun adding spinac Continue reading >>

Homemade Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Homemade Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Ruby became sick in August of 2008. He was urinating a lot, had increased water consumption, and looked thinner than normal. He ended up in a veterinary hospital where he was diagnosed with diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, and pancreatitis. Ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening complication for those suffering from diabetes. It occurs due to a lack of insulin which the body responds to by burning fat for fuel and producing ketones. High levels of ketones can poison the body. Simply put, Ruby was quite ill. In an attempt to comfort Ruby, I would crawl into his hospital kennel, hold him, and sing to him. ‘You Are My Sunshine’ was on regular rotation. Perhaps I did less singing and more pleading and praying. Either way, after a week in the hospital I was able to take my sunshine home. It was a challenge to convince Ruby that getting two insulin shots a day was actually a good thing. I had success after following some great advice: use his food as a reward for receiving the shot. I started by putting his full food bowl on the counter while prepping his shot. Like any food-motivated dog, movement of his food bowl commands his attention. But then the approaching needle would make him run away. After he ran away, I would put his food bowl in the cupboard. That movement of his bowl would bring him back again. Round and round we went until he realized the simple equation of food bowl on counter + shot in dog = food bowl on floor + full dog belly. See, Ruby, insulin shots are a great thing! Now he rushes each injection along so he can eat. The hospital sent us home with a few samples of diabetic dog food. I sought advice from Ruby’s vet on both packaged and homemade diabetic dog food. Dr. Old Vet was quite ambivalent and offered little to no opinion or advice. His disinter Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

Best Diabetic Cat Food

Best Diabetic Cat Food

The exact cause of diabetes in cats isn’t known but it seems to affect overweight and obese cats more than other cats. This is probably because being overweight makes the body less sensitive to insulin’s effects. Diabetes is also more likely to occur in older cats – which are also more likely to be overweight. Read Story If your cat is diagnosed with diabetes it is usually a frightening time for an owner. Symptoms typically include lethargy, increased urination, increased thirst, and loss of appetite. Your cat’s urine may be sticky to the touch because it literally contains sugar excreted from his body. Left untreated, diabetes can become life-threatening. However, many cats have diabetes and live long, happy lives with proper management. Following your vet’s diagnosis, you will probably have to give your cat regular doses of the hormone insulin to help control his condition. Feeding your cat a diet suited to his condition can also help manage his diabetes. Quick Look : Top 4 Best Diabetic Cat Foods Food Price Nutrition Rating You probably already know that cats require meat in their diets. They need more meat and protein than dogs and they are not as good at breaking down carbs and starches as dogs. This is even more true when it comes to diabetic cats. Their bodies have greater difficulty moving sugar/glucose from the bloodstream to distribute it to the cells in the body. This is why sugar builds up in the cat’s bloodstream and can become harmful. As you might guess, it makes sense to feed a diabetic cat a diet that has less starch in it so it won’t break down into more sugar/glucose. According to the latest research, diabetic cats can benefit from diets that are high in protein and fat and low in carbohydrates. Kitten foods (especially canned kitten foo Continue reading >>

8 Foods To Eat To Beat Diabetes (and 5 To Avoid!)

8 Foods To Eat To Beat Diabetes (and 5 To Avoid!)

Not all carbs are bad. Foods made with whole grains, such as whole-wheat bread and brown rice, are sources of filling fiber (aiding weight loss, which can reduce your diabetes risk) and nutrients such as potassium, which helps the pancreas release insulin, the hormone that helps your cells use glucose for energy. Continue reading >>

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Figuring out the best foods to eat when you have diabetes can be tough. The main goal is to keep blood sugar levels well-controlled. However, it's also important to eat foods that help prevent diabetes complications like heart disease. Here are the 16 best foods for diabetics, both type 1 and type 2. Fatty fish is one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Salmon, sardines, herring, anchovies and mackerel are great sources of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, which have major benefits for heart health. Getting enough of these fats on a regular basis is especially important for diabetics, who have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke (1). DHA and EPA protect the cells that line your blood vessels, reduce markers of inflammation and improve the way your arteries function after eating (2, 3, 4, 5). A number of observational studies suggest that people who eat fatty fish regularly have a lower risk of heart failure and are less likely to die from heart disease (6, 7). In studies, older men and women who consumed fatty fish 5–7 days per week for 8 weeks had significant reductions in triglycerides and inflammatory markers (8, 9). Fish is also a great source of high-quality protein, which helps you feel full and increases your metabolic rate (10). Fatty fish contain omega-3 fats that reduce inflammation and other risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Leafy green vegetables are extremely nutritious and low in calories. They're also very low in digestible carbs, which raise your blood sugar levels. Spinach, kale and other leafy greens are good sources of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C. In one study, increasing vitamin C intake reduced inflammatory markers and fasting blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Beans If you’re looking for foods that raise blood-sugar levels slowly and gently like rolling waves, choose high-quality carbohydrates instead of low-quality carbs like refined grains and sugary foods. Whenever possible, you’ll want to couple these carbs with protein and/or healthy fat. Beans (including black, white, navy, lima, pinto, garbanzo, soy, and kidney) are a winning combination of high-quality carbohydrates, lean protein, and soluble fiber that helps stabilize your body’s blood-sugar levels and keeps hunger in check. Beans are also inexpensive, versatile, and virtually fat-free. Continue reading >>

Here Are The Best And Worst Foods For A Diabetic | Miami Herald

Here Are The Best And Worst Foods For A Diabetic | Miami Herald

We all tend to overeat sugary and fattening foods during the holiday season. But for many, particularly those with dietary challenges like diabetes, it’s an everyday struggle. The prevalence of diabetes in the U.S. climbed to a new high of 11.6 percent of Americans in 2016, up from 10.6 percent in 2008, according to a new report by Gallup and Sharecare, titled “The Face of Diabetes in the United States.” About 1.5 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year, estimates the American Diabetes Association. Roughly 95 percent have Type 2, the result of the nation’s obesity epidemic, a by-product of too little exercise and too much bad food. Never miss a local story. Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access. SUBSCRIBE NOW In Type 2, the pancreas produces insulin, but the body doesn’t use it properly, which can wreck havoc with blood-sugar levels. “Researchers have found over 60 different causes for Type 2 diabetes,” said Natalia Torres-Negron, a registered dietitian in Cleveland Clinic’s endocrinology department and patient educator at the Weston hospital. But lifestyle does “play a huge role” in preventing or improving the disease, she added. Diet, weight and sedentary behavior are “part of the whole package,” added Randy Kaplan, clinical dietitian at Memorial Hospital Pembroke. “It’s important to look at the big picture.” One strategy is to ask patients about their current typical diet and “together we choose one thing to change,” Torres-Negron said. “One patient had juice or soda with every single meal. He switched to water and didn’t make any other change in his diet. He was able to lose 10 pounds in a month just by doing that.” “Patients often think that certain foods are their enemy,” Continue reading >>

10 Best Foods For Diabetes And Blood Sugar

10 Best Foods For Diabetes And Blood Sugar

Some foods have a bigger impact on your blood sugar than others. Knowing which ones are the best for keeping blood sugar levels steady is especially important when you have diabetes, but it's a good idea for everyone. Your dietary goal is to choose foods that help keep your blood sugar level on an even keel. That typically means whole, minimally processed foods. Here are… Continue reading >>

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