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What Is A Diabetic Exchange List?

Diabetes And Diet Food Exchange Lists

Diabetes And Diet Food Exchange Lists

In this article, the dietician, Dr Ingrid van Heerden, discusses one of the most important concepts which is used to work out diabetic diets , namely the Food Exchange Lists. Food Exchange Lists are groups of foods which have been classified together because they have certain common characteristics. For example, the Milk Exchange List contains all foods that either contain milk or are derived from milk, such as yoghurt. In adddition all foods in the so-called full-cream milk category contain 12g of carbohydrate, 8g of protein and 8g of fat. If a low-fat milk exchange is used, the carbohydrate and protein contents stay the same, but the fat content drops from 8g to 5g per serving. Taken one step further, a fat-free milk exchange would contain no fat, but still provide the same amount of carbohydrate and protein. The Six Food Exchange Lists are as follows: Milk (which is divided into full-cream, low-fat, and fat-free subcategories) Meat (which is also divided into high-fat, standard meat, and lean meat subcategories) The idea is that each food in the specific exchange list can be swopped for one of the other items in the same list. For example, half a cup of low-fat milk and half a cup of low-fat yoghurt are interchangeable with each other. What do these Food Exchange Lists contribute to the diet? Each one of the food lists makes a specific contribution to the daily diet and it is important to remember that no ONE exchange category can supply all the nutrients needed for a well-balanced diet. Everyone, including diabetics, needs to eat foods from all six exchange lists every day to make sure that their diets are balanced and that they remain healthy. These are the foods included in the six Food Exchange Lists and what each category contributes to the diet: Milk List - mi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Exchange

Diabetic Exchange

Tweet A diabetic exchange diet is designed to allow you easy control over the amount of sugar and cholesterol you allow into your body. A successful diabetic exchange diet will help to control you weight and your sugar levels. It is necessary to carefully measure food in a diabetic exchange diet, and it is generally recommended to eat 3 meals and one snack per day. The diabetic exchange divides foods into 6 specific groups, and measures food per serving size. Try the Food Exchange Calculator A balanced diet will take the correct proportion from each food group, and your dietician will tell you the number of servings that should be eaten from each food group per day. Food in the same group may be exchanged to give variety. Be sure to carefully measure or weigh each food and drink item. Diabetic Exchange food groups This list is certainly not comprehensive, but it does contain a wide variety of foods that conform to the diabetic exchange diet. Some foods may not be included that are perfectly alright to eat, but patients on a diabetic exchange diet should avoid eating foods in the ‘PROHIBITED LIST.’ However, because a food does not appear in the prohibited list, it is not necessarily alright to eat. Bread and Starch 1/2 cup of cooked lima beans 1/2 cup of cooked pasta 1/2 a 6-inch piece of pita bread 1/2 cup of mashed potatoes or a small jacket potato 1/3 cup of cooked rice 1/2 cup of cooked green peas 1/2 a hamburger or hot dog bun 2 rice cakes One 6-inch round small tortilla 1/2 cup of cooked winter squash 1/2 3-inch bagel 1 slice of bread (not oversized) 1/2 cup of cooked cereal 1/2 cup of corn or 1 medium corn on the cob 6 saltine crackers / three 2-1/2-inch square crackers 1 small dinner roll 1/2 cup cooked dried beans (I.E; kidney, pinto, lentils, chick peas, wh Continue reading >>

Food Exchange Lists For People With Diabetes

Food Exchange Lists For People With Diabetes

Food Exchange Lists for People With Diabetes Food Exchange Lists for People With Diabetes Figuring out what to eat when you have diabetes can be tricky. That's why there are different methods for getting the right balance of foods on your plate. One of these methods is the diabetic food exchange lists. Find out what they are and how they can help you control your blood sugar. Your biggest goal when eating with diabetes is to eat the right amount of carbohydrate, protein, and calories at each meal and snack. Doing so can help you keep your blood sugar in a good range. Your doctor, diabetes educator, or registered dietitian can help you figure out how many carbohydrates you should eat every day (and what times of day to eat them) for optimal blood sugar control. Diabetic food exchange lists can be a big help when planning your meals. Diabetic food exchanges are an easy way to create a meal plan that has a variety of choices while making sure that the consumption of carbohydrates is controlled. Similar foods are grouped into categories or "exchanges" that have the same amounts of carbohydrates, protein, calories and/or fat. Meal plans, which are usually devised by you and a nutritionist, specify the number of servings you can have from each exchange list . Foods on the same list can be exchanged for each other, to give variety and choice to an otherwise structured meal plan. So, for instance, say your snack can have two carbohydrate exchanges . That would mean you could choose to have two slices of bread, or a cup of milk and an apple. You can mix and match according to your preferences, but the exchange system gives you a way to quantify how much of what kind of food you can have. Especially when you're starting to use food exchanges, you'll find that usingmeasuring cups Continue reading >>

Diabetic Food Exchanges Made Easy

Diabetic Food Exchanges Made Easy

The food exchange system can make eating and meal planning with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes much easier. Understanding the basics of the food exchange system can also help you manage blood glucose levels. In the food exchange system, food is categorized into 3 main groups: Carbohydrates Protein (eg, meat) and protein substitutes (eg, eggs, cheese, soy) Fats The Carbohydrates Group The Carbohydrates group is further broken down into bread/starch, fruit, milk, other carbohydrates (sugar and sweets), and vegetables. When a meal plan says 2 1/2 carbohydrate exchanges (1 bread/starch, 1 fruit, 1/2 milk), it means that there are many servings for those kinds of carbohydrates. You can refer to food exchange lists for the exact measurement of carbohydrates in food—these lists are posted in almost every diabetic cookbook, or refer to the diabetic exchanges listed at the end of each recipe. For example, for those 2 1/2 carbohydrate exchanges, you might choose 1 slice of bread, 1 medium fresh peach, and 1/2 cup of skim milk. You could also choose 1/2 cup of cooked pasta, 1 cup of cubed melon, and 1/2 cup of nonfat yogurt. In general, 1 carbohydrate exchange (bread/starch, fruit, and milk) provides 12 to 15 grams of carbohydrates. Since a serving of vegetables only has 5 grams of carbohydrates, it takes 3 vegetables to equal 1 carbohydrate exchange. The Protein Group The Protein group is broken down into very low-fat protein, low-fat protein, medium-fat protein, and high-fat protein. A protein exchange provides 7 grams of protein and varying amounts of fat. Again, look to a food exchange list or the exchanges listed at the end of each recipe for the amount of protein exchange for each serving. The Fats Group The Fats group is divided into monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, Continue reading >>

1,400-calorie Diet Exchange Servings

1,400-calorie Diet Exchange Servings

Weigh or measure portions to avoid consuming too much. 4 Types of Foods to Avoid for B Positive Blood Type The exchange diet is a system put together by the American Dietetic Association and groups foods based on how they affect your blood sugar. Foods are grouped into starches, meats, non-starchy vegetables, fruits, milk, fats and a few smaller categories, including fast foods. Exchanged foods within the same group have similar effects on blood sugar levels, which is especially important if you have diabetes. Based on a 1,400-calorie diet, limit the servings you consume from each group to avoid going over your allotted exchanges. You can have seven starch exchanges for a 1,400-calorie diet. Starch exchanges have 15 grams of carbohydrates, less than 3 grams of protein, less than 1 gram of fat and about 80 calories. One exchange of starch is a slice of wheat bread, 1/2 cup of oatmeal, 1/3 cup of pasta or rice or 3 cups of popcorn. Starchy vegetables, beans and legumes also fit into this exchange group. Single exchanges of these foods includes 1/2 cup of corn, a 3-ounce baked potato, 1/2 cup of mashed sweet potato, as well as 1/2 cup of baked beans or lentils. Plan your meals each day and aim to include a serving from each group at every meal or snack. For example, to use your seven starch exchanges, have two exchanges at breakfast, two at lunch, one as a mid-afternoon snack and two exchanges at dinner. Meat, seafood, eggs and cheese are all included in the meat group. You can have five meat exchanges on a 1,400-calorie diet, but you need to stick to lean meats and seafood to avoid consuming too much fat and too many calories. One exchange of lean meats has no carbohydrates, 7 grams of protein, less than 3 grams of fat and 45 calories. Lean-meat options include skinless Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Exchanges

Carbohydrate Exchanges

For foods without labels, use Carbohydrate Exchange Lists. Foods with a similar amount of carbohydrate per serving size are grouped together, and one carbohydrate exchange equals 15 grams of carbohydrate. What about foods without labels? Not all foods carry Nutrition Facts labels, so another way to count carbohydrates is to use Carbohydrate Exchange Lists. In the exchange system, foods with a similar amount of carbohydrate per serving size are grouped together. The foods within each list can be “exchanged” for one another during meal planning, and you end up with about the same amount of carbohydrate. One carbohydrate exchange equals 15 grams of carbohydrate. ONE CARBOHYDRATE EXCHANGE EQUALS 15 GRAMS OF CARBOHYDRATE. The Exchange Lists for Meal Planning is a helpful meal-building tool. You have the flexibility to mix and match your carbohydrate food choices, while staying within your carbohydrate budget for each meal. For example, if your goal is 45 grams of carbohydrate per meal, you may eat 3 exchanges of carbohydrate at each meal. Let’s put this into play: Let’s say you wanted to have some rice at lunch. One exchange of rice is 1/3 cup of cooked rice. If your goal is 45 grams of carbohydrate at a meal, then you can eat 1 cup of rice (or 3 exchanges of carbohydrate). So that’s 3 exchanges x 15 grams carbohydrate per exchange = 45 grams of carbohydrate. In the mood for a different meal? Using the same goal of 45 gram carbohydrate per meal, you could also choose: Each food item listed above equals 1 carbohydrate exchange – so that’s a total of 3 exchanges, or 45 grams of carbohydrate. Remember that the exchange system merely lists SERVINGS of carbohydrate that equal 15 grams of carbohydrate. Don’t confuse SERVING SIZE with PORTION SIZE. The portion size Continue reading >>

Diabetes Meal Planning: Exchanges

Diabetes Meal Planning: Exchanges

If you have diabetes, chances are, at some point, your doctor or maybe a dietitian has talked to you about your “diet.” Maybe you were given a “diabetic diet” to follow at some point. Or maybe you were given a list of foods to eat and foods to avoid. Perhaps you’re counting carbs or fat grams. Meal planning is a key part of diabetes self-management. Medical nutrition therapy Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) is the term used to describe the “diagnostic, therapy, and counseling services” provided by a registered dietitian (RD) for disease management — in this case, for diabetes. The goals of MNT are to: • Promote and support healthful eating patterns to improve overall health • Reach individualized blood sugar, blood pressure, and lipid goals • Achieve and maintain a healthy body weight • Delay or prevent complications of diabetes Meal-planning approaches are not “diabetic diets.” Rather, they’re meant to be viewed as healthful ways of eating that can lead to improved diabetes and weight control. An RD can help you determine what approach is best for you, especially if you’re unsure. This week, we’ll look at one of the approaches that’s been around for a long time: the diabetes exchange system. Diabetes exchanges The diabetes or food exchanges have been around since about 1950. Prior to this time, there was no organized way of helping people with diabetes manage their food choices. The American Diabetes Association, the American Dietetic Association, and the U.S. Public Health Service teamed up to provide a solution, creating what is known as the exchange system. The goal was to provide an educational tool for people with diabetes that would provide consistency with meal planning while promoting a wide variety of foods for overall health Continue reading >>

Diabetic Exchange Diet

Diabetic Exchange Diet

What is it? A diabetic exchange diet is a list of serving sizes of foods that you can choose to eat every day. These foods are divided into 6 groups. You need to eat the right number of servings from each food group every day to control your diabetes (di-uh-b-tees). Carbohydrates from food become blood sugar (glucose) in the body. In diabetes, the body does not make enough insulin, or the insulin it makes does not work properly. This causes the blood sugar to be too high. You can help control your blood sugar by limiting the carbohydrate and total calories in your diet. You may prevent kidney, eye, nerve, or heart problems by keeping your blood sugar within normal range. Care: Meal Plans Your dietitian will give you a meal plan. This plan tells you the number of servings to eat from each food group. And when to eat them during the day. You will need to measure your food while on this diet. Most people on a diabetic exchange diet need to eat 3 meals and 1 to 3 snacks every day. You can exchange or trade one food for another from the same food group. For example, 1 slice of bread can be exchanged for 3/4 cup dry cereal. Or you can exchange 1/2 cup fruit juice for 1/2 of a 9 inch banana. Carbohydrate Intake Your dietitian (di-uh-tih-shun) will explain how many servings or grams of carbohydrates you can eat during the day. Check with your dietitian before changing your food plan or switching 1 kind of carbohydrate for another. Read the labels of packaged foods to find out how many grams of carbohydrate a serving has in it. Check with your dietitian or caregiver before eating foods with the following: added sugar corn syrup honey molasses maple syrup jams and jellies Talk with your dietitian before eating any foods on the "Carefully Use the Following Foods" section. These fo Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Exchange List (exchange Diet)

The Diabetic Exchange List (exchange Diet)

The Diabetic Exchange Lists represent food choices a diabetic can make that are similar enough in nature to be exchanged for other foods on the list. This is a meal planning system for diabetics that was created by a committee of the American Dietetic Association and the American Diabetes Association for diabetics who want to use diet as a means of controlling their blood sugar levels. The exchange list was created mainly for those individuals who suffer from type 1 or type 2 diabetes; however, it can be used by anyone who needs a particular diet and even those who want to eat healthy foods as part of their daily diet plan. The foods on the exchange list are all basically healthy for you and can be used by anyone. The exchange list divides foods into six different food groups that are different when it comes to their fat, protein, carbohydrate, and calorie counts. Each item on the exchange list consists of foods that are similar to one another. Each item on a food exchange list contains foods that are basically the same when it comes to their fat, protein, carbohydrate, and calorie counts when compared to other foods on the list. When using the exchange list as part of your meal plan, you will likely see that the choices vary in the amount of food you can eat. This is because the exchange list is based on the weight of the food and some foods weigh more than others but have the same amount of nutrients when compared to other foods on the list. The Food Types on the Exchange List The different types of food on the exchange list includes the following: Starches and breads Meat (which is divided into very lean, lean, medium-fat, and high-fat categories) Vegetables Fruits Milk (which is divided into skim, low fat, and whole milk products) Fat Foods that can be exchanged wit Continue reading >>

The Exchange System | Diabetes Health

The Exchange System | Diabetes Health

We dont use them anymore, said my certified diabetes educator when I asked for a copy of the exchange lists used for meal planning. Many doctors, however, still use the exchange system. This meal planning system has survived for some 50 yearsdespite being somewhat eclipsed in recent years by the more precise practice of carb counting. Especially for those recently diagnosed with diabetes who are just beginning to make dietary changes, the exchange system helps to keep things simple. In addition, its versatile, and it teaches sound nutrition. The exchange system groups similar kinds of foods into various exchange listsfor instance, theres a fruit list, a vegetable list, a starch list, and others. Portion sizes are specified for each food. You should be able to exchange any food on a list for another food on the same list, because they are designed to have the same amount of calories, carbs, fat, and so on. The starch list, for example, includes bread, tortillas, pasta, rice and starchy vegetables like potatoes. Each serving provides approximately the same nutrients, and they are all interchangeable in your meal plan. Your meal plan tells you how many servings from specific lists you can have at each meal. Meeting with a registered dietitian is the best way to help you individualize the plan and to determine the calorie count and distribution of meals that are right for you. If youve been frightened by expectations of a diet that tells you what you cant eat, youll be delighted to discover that new, popular options are available on todays exchange lists. This versatility, while not all-inclusive, provides plenty of choices and will help you adhere to the plan. Those who dont know the difference between a carb and a calorie soon learn. The exchange system shows that carboh Continue reading >>

Summit Medical Group Web Site

Summit Medical Group Web Site

The exchange meal plan divides foods into starch, fruit, milk, vegetable, meat, and fat groups. The plan gives you serving sizes for foods in each group that have about the same amount of carbohydrate, protein, fat, and calories. This lets you exchange, or swap, choices from a food list. The number of servings from each food group that you should eat is based on how many calories you need each day. A dietitian will help you plan how much food you should eat at each meal and teach you how to choose foods from the lists. The exchange meal plan is very flexible, and is helpful if you are overweight and need to keep track of calories. The following list is a sample of foods found on the exchange lists. Starch List: One starch exchange contains about 15 grams of carbohydrate, 3 grams of protein, 0 to 1 grams of fat, and 80 calories. A starch exchange is sometimes called a carb exchange and includes food such as bread, potatoes, rice, and corn. Fruit List: 1 fruit exchange contains about 15 grams of carbohydrate and 60 calories. Milk List: 1 milk exchange contains about 8 grams of protein and 12 grams of carbohydrate. Vegetable List: One vegetable exchange has 5 grams of carbohydrate, 2 grams of protein, no fat, and 25 calories. One-half cup of cooked or a cup of raw vegetables is a good measure for 1 exchange of most vegetables. Raw lettuce may be taken in larger quantities, but salad dressing usually equals 1 fat exchange. Meats are divided into very lean meats, lean meats, medium-fat meats, and high-fat meats. People with diabetes should try to eat more lean and medium fat meats and stay away from the high fat choices. The leaner the meat, the fewer the calories and fat. All meat exchanges have 7 grams of protein for 1 meat exchange. Fat List: Your body needs the right ki Continue reading >>

Why Follow A Diabetic Exchange Diet?

Why Follow A Diabetic Exchange Diet?

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, your dietitian may recommend a diabetic exchange plan. Learn how to use a diabetic exchange menu for your diabetic meal planning. A diabetic exchange diet is meant to ensure that you get just the right balance of carbohydrates, fats and proteins throughout the day to keep your blood sugar under control. Your dietitian will determine your specific nutritional and caloric requirements and create a unique diabetic exchange plan for you. Diabetic Meal Planning with the Exchange Diet In a diabetic exchange plan, all foods belong to one of six food groups: Fats: Most fat exchanges equal about a teaspoon. Fruits: Each fruit exchange contains about 15 grams of carbohydrates and about 60 calories. Meats: This group contains meats, cheeses, eggs, fish and soy, and is further broken down into lean (low-fat), medium-fat and high-fat foods. One meat exchange usually equals an ounce of cooked meat. Milk: A cup or eight ounces of milk is considered one milk exchange. Starches: One starch exchange has about 15 grams of carbohydrates, three grams of protein, a trace of fat and 80 calories. A half-cup of cooked cereal, grain or pasta is considered one starch exchange. Vegetables: One half cup of cooked or one cup of raw vegetables is considered one vegetable exchange, containing about five grams of carbohydrates and between two and three grams of fiber. How Does a Diabetic Exchange Diet Work? All exchange diets follow a diabetic exchange menu based on these six categories. Foods are grouped, and serving sizes determined according to calories, carbohydrate content, fat content and protein content. Diabetic Exchange Menu Rules When following a diabetic exchange plan, diabetics are allowed a certain number of exchange choices from each list, for eac Continue reading >>

Using The Exchange System

Using The Exchange System

A tool to help you plan your daily meals and control glucose. A tool to help you plan your daily meals and control glucose. Diabetes is a disorder of how your body processes food: after you eat something, the level of glucose in your blood rises, but your body is unable to produce enough (or any) of the hormone insulin, necessary to help clear glucose from the blood. So, every choice you make about what to eat or drink is important. Eating to manage diabetes, then, means eating with your eyes openknowing whats going into your body and when. That means planning for, and keeping track of, your meals. Ideally, youll work with a dietitian or diabetes educator to determine an eating plan that works with your schedule and your needs, one that takes into account how and what you like to eat. One system you might opt to use is the Exchange Systema classic method that has helped people with diabetes select foods for over 50 years. The Exchange System groups together foods that have roughly the same amounts of calories, carbohydrate, fat and protein into Exchange groups, so that one may be exchanged for another. There are six main categories of foods: Starch/Bread, Meat and Meat Substitutes, Vegetables, Fruit, Milk and Fat. Each exchange corresponds to a fixed serving size: one exchange in the Starch/Bread group, for instance, could be a 6-inch corn tortilla or 1/2 cup of green peas or 1/3 cup of pasta; an exchange in the Lean Meats group could be an ounce of tuna or lean pork. If youre following the Exchange System, youll work with a dietitian to plan out your daily meal pattern: which exchanges to include in each meal from each food group and how many. For example, at breakfast you might aim for one Starch exchange, one Fruit, one Fat and one Milk. Within that general pattern, Continue reading >>

Food Exchange (us)

Food Exchange (us)

Tweet In 1950, the US Food Exchange list was developed by the American Dietetic Association, the American Diabetes Association and the US Public Health Service to target meal planning problems. The aim of this concept was to provide people with diabetes with the tools to incorporate consistency in their meal planning and include a wider variety of foods. Carbohydrate exchanges are 15g per portion, which is different to the United Kingdom carbohydrate portions of one per 10g. You should not change to another method of counting food values if you use the US Food Exchange as this may require changing your medication if you have diabetes. What is food exchange? The word exchange refers to the food items on each list which may be substituted with any other food item on the same list. One exchange is approximately equal to another in carbohydrate, calories, protein and fat within each food list. The last published version of the Exchange Lists for Meal Planning was published by the American Diabetes Association and the American Dietetic Association in January 2013. These food exchange lists can be used to assess serving sizes for each food group. Diabetic exchange A diabetic exchange diet is designed to allow you easy control over the amount of sugar and cholesterol you allow into your body. A successful diabetic exchange diet will help to control your weight, BMI (Body Mass Index) and your sugar levels. It is necessary to carefully measure food in a diabetic exchange diet, and it is generally recommended to eat three meals and one snack per day. The diabetic exchange divides foods into six specific groups, and measures food per serving size. Try the Food Exchange Calculator A balanced diet will take the correct proportion from each food group, and your dietician will tell yo Continue reading >>

Food Exchange Lists

Food Exchange Lists

You can use the American Dietetic Association food exchange lists to check out serving sizes for each group of foods and to see what other food choices are available for each group of foods. Vegetables contain 25 calories and 5 grams of carbohydrate. One serving equals: ½ C Cooked vegetables (carrots, broccoli, zucchini, cabbage, etc.) 1 C Raw vegetables or salad greens If you’re hungry, eat more fresh or steamed vegetables. Fat-Free and Very Low-Fat Milk contain 90 calories per serving. One serving equals: Very Lean Protein choices have 35 calories and 1 gram of fat per serving. One serving equals: Measurement Ingredient 1 oz Turkey breast or chicken breast, skin removed 1 oz Fish fillet (flounder, sole, scrod, cod, etc.) 1 oz Canned tuna in water 1 oz Shellfish (clams, lobster, scallop, shrimp) ¾ C Cottage cheese, nonfat or low-fat 2 Egg whites ¼ C Egg substitute 1 oz Fat-free cheese ½ C Beans, cooked (black beans, kidney, chick peas or lentils): count as 1 starch/bread and 1 very lean protein Fruits contain 15 grams of carbohydrate and 60 calories. One serving equals: Measurement Ingredient 1 small Apple, banana, orange, nectarine 1 med. Fresh peach 1 Kiwi ½ Grapefruit ½ Mango 1 C Fresh berries (strawberries, raspberries, or blueberries) 1 C Fresh melon cubes 1⁄8th Honeydew melon 4 oz Unsweetened juice 4 tsp Jelly or jam Lean Protein choices have 55 calories and 2–3 grams of fat per serving. One serving equals: Measurement Ingredient 1 oz Chicken—dark meat, skin removed 1 oz Turkey—dark meat, skin removed 1 oz Salmon, swordfish, herring 1 oz Lean beef (flank steak, London broil, tenderloin, roast beef)* 1 oz Veal, roast or lean chop* 1 oz Lamb, roast or lean chop* 1 oz Pork, tenderloin or fresh ham* 1 oz Low-fat cheese (with 3 g or less of fat per oun Continue reading >>

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