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What Is A Diabetic Diet Meal Plan?

Meal Plan For A Diabetic Bodybuilder

Meal Plan For A Diabetic Bodybuilder

Diabetes, or as it's fully called Diabetes Mellitus, is in fact two completely different diseases type 1 and type 2. From a nutritional point of view each should be treated differently, and meal plans for each can be viewed though the relevant links here where you can also read more about the conditions. The plan below is aimed at a type 1 diabetic, i.e. who replies on injections of insulin to control their blood sugar levels, and who is looking to increase their muscle size and strength. The individual will more likely be on an insulin regimen which allows for some flexibility by having one injection of long acting insulin per day and an appropriate dose of super-fast acting insulin prior to a meal. Regular meals and snacks are encouraged, especially in respect of slow-released low glycaemic carbohydrate foods as the basis of each meal and snack. If you do not control your own insulin regimen, then speak to your doctor or diabetes specialist nurse. See our Glycaemic Index Tables for GI values of foods. Many diabetics feel they cannot make notable muscle and strength gains due to their condition, but there is no reason at all why a diabetic cannot make just as good gains as a non diabetic. There is nothing revolutionary and special about a diet for type 1 diabetics; it's simply based on the healthy eating guidelines which everyone should be following, so simply incorporate concepts applicable to muscle growth, and the results will be fruitful. So called 'diabetic products' such as special chocolates, cakes, biscuits, etc are not recommended. Eating a range of low fat, low sugar, high fibre 'ordinary' foods is far better. Many of these 'diabetic products' are no lower in fat or calories and are normally more expensive. Some contain the sweetener sorbitol which can cause Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Constant Carbohydrate Meal Plan

Diabetes: Constant Carbohydrate Meal Plan

With the constant carbohydrate meal plan, you count carb choices and eat the same number of carb choices at each meal or snack. You take insulin or other diabetes medicines at the same times and in the same amounts each day. The constant carbohydrate plan may be easier to follow than other plans because you do not need to track food groups or adjust your insulin with meals. What are carbohydrates? Carbohydrates, also called carbs, are a source of energy for your body. There are three basic types of carbs: starches, sugars, and dietary fiber. Starches are not digested and turned into energy as fast as sugars. Starch is found in plant-based foods such as pasta, bread, cereals, rice, potatoes, beans, and corn. Sugars such as glucose and fructose raise blood sugar very quickly. Sugar is found in foods such as fruit, milk, soft drinks, baked goods, and candy. Dietary fiber is the part of plants that cannot be digested. Fiber is found in whole-grain bread and pasta, beans, peas, leafy vegetables, raisins, prunes, apples, and berries. You can tell how much carbohydrate is in a food by reading the nutrition facts. You can find nutrition facts on the food label, in nutrition books or apps for your smartphone or computer, or on the internet. Fifteen grams of carbs equals 1 carb choice. A gram is a way to measure how much something weighs. Carbs raise your blood sugar level more than protein or fat. If you use insulin, you need to balance how much insulin you take with the amount of carbs you eat. This helps keep your blood sugar at a healthy level and helps prevent many health problems. How does the constant carbohydrate plan work? Your healthcare provider or dietitian will tell you how many carb choices you should eat, based on how many calories you need each day. Too many carbs Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Diet

The Diabetes Diet

What's the best diet for diabetes? Whether you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes, your nutritional needs are virtually the same as everyone else, so no special foods are necessary. But you do need to pay attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat. While following a Mediterranean or other heart-healthy diet can help with this, the most important thing you can do is to lose a little weight. Losing just 5% to 10% of your total weight can help you lower your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Losing weight and eating healthier can also have a profound effect on your mood, energy, and sense of wellbeing. Even if you’ve already developed diabetes, it’s not too late to make a positive change. By eating healthier, being more physically active, and losing weight, you can reduce your symptoms or even reverse diabetes. The bottom line is that you have more control over your health than you may think. The biggest risk for diabetes: belly fat Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. However, your risk is higher if you tend to carry your weight around your abdomen as opposed to your hips and thighs. A lot of belly fat surrounds the abdominal organs and liver and is closely linked to insulin resistance. You are at an increased risk of developing diabetes if you are: A woman with a waist circumference of 35 inches or more A man with a waist circumference of 40 inches or more Calories obtained from fructose (found in sugary beverages such as soda, energy and sports drinks, coffee drinks, and processed foods like doughnuts, muffins, cereal, candy and granola bars) are more likely to add weight around your abdomen. Cutting back on sugary foods can mean a slimmer waistline as well as a lowe Continue reading >>

Dtd Super Meal Planning Reverses Type 2 Diabetes

Dtd Super Meal Planning Reverses Type 2 Diabetes

Author Sidebar: When I was diabetic, meal planning was not easy for me. It was a lot easier to just stop by McDonald's, KFC or Pizza Hut than it was to go to a grocery store and then have to go home and cook something. :-) But, after my recovery from the coma, I learned the critical importance of proper meal planning. If I had not learned this, I believe that I would still be diabetic and on medications today or possibly even dead. Proper meal planning is truly one of the key enablers for diabetics to eat healthy and be successful with controlling and reversing their Type 2 diabetes. So, why don't many diabetics (and non-diabetics for that matter) do a better job at meal planning and following a healthy diet? There are 10 major reasons why most people (including diabetics) don't do a better job at planning their meals and following a healthy diet: 1. Time/Convenience: Most people feel that they don't have the time to go grocery-shopping and prepare healthy meals every day for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Also, it's a lot more convenient to just stop by McDonald's or KFC on the way home from work or just call and order a pizza. 2. Motivation: Most of us are not motivated to eat healthy --- until one day we find ourselves diagnosed with a disease such as diabetes, or, we become severely overweight or obese; or, we have a wake-up call due to a heart attack or a diabetic coma (like I did). 3. Nutrient Absorption: We all metabolize and absorb food and its nutrients differently. A a result, our bodies react differently and respond differently to blood glucose control. 4. Cost: Some people tend to believe that it cost more to eat healthy foods. Nothing could be further from the truth! Especially if you take into account the amount of money that is saved from prescription drug Continue reading >>

Making A Diabetic Meal Plan Work For You

Making A Diabetic Meal Plan Work For You

How a Diabetes Meal Plan Can Help You Knowing how to plan heart healthy meals is important for managing all types of diabetes diets. Food can raise blood sugar levels. The type and amount of foods that are eaten will affect how high and how fast blood sugar levels will rise. It is important to make healthy eating choices about when to eat, what to eat and how much to eat. When should a diabetic eat? Eat your meals and snacks at about the same time each day. By doing this, your blood sugar levels may stay under control. Space your meals 4-5 hours apart. Eat in-between snacks as needed. If you take insulin or diabetes pills, keep the right balance between food and these medicines. You should understand how long your pills or insulin take to work to lower blood glucose levels. Find out when they work the best you plan when to eat. Snacks between meals are very important if you go more than five hours from meal to meal. What should a diabetic eat? Eat about the same size meals and snacks every day. Most people eat a small breakfast, a medium sized lunch and a larger dinner. This forces the body to process most of the day's food at the end of the day. A better idea is to eat all meals that are about the same size. You will be eating balanced meals throughout the day. Make healthy food choices rich in vitamins, minerals, lean protein like white chicken and fiber such as brown rice. The fiber takes longer to break down. Blood sugars rise slower. This will keep blood sugar levels better controlled. It will help your body better process the sugar coming from your food. Do not skip meals. If you take insulin or diabetes pills, do not skip meals. This can cause your blood sugars to drop too low. Skipping one meal could cause you to overeat at the next meal. Even if you do not take Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

Diabetes Menu Plan

Diabetes Menu Plan

This menu plan includes seven days of meals and snacks, and a tip sheet to help build the plan to suit your tastes. Use this plan to help prevent or manage type 2 diabetes. For help with using the Diabetes Menu Plan speak to an EatRight Ontario Registered Dietitian at 1-877-510-510-2 or send an email. Download the Diabetes Menu Plan for women (PDF) Download the Diabetes Menu Plan for men (PDF) Please note: This meal plan is for general informational purposes only and is not meant to replace personalized advice given to you by your healthcare team. To find out about the amount of carbohydrate that’s right for you, ask your doctor for a referral to a Registered Dietitian. An EatRight Ontario Registered Dietitian can also help you find a Diabetes Education Program in your neighbourhood. In the meantime, this meal plan can help you get started on planning healthy meals to help prevent or manage diabetes. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet Regulations And Menu Plan

Gestational Diabetes Diet Regulations And Menu Plan

If you have gestational diabetes, your practitioner has probably already told you that you'll have to pay extra attention to your diet. Not sure how to best go about that? It'll help to talk to a certified diabetes educator (CDE) who has experience in gestational diabetes and who will be able to show you how to select the right foods and design the best eating plan for your needs. Some key points to remember each day: Choose complex carbohydrates (such as whole grains and beans) over simple ones (like white rice and white bread) Opt for lean proteins over fatty ones Eat lots of fruits and veggies Stick to fat-free or low-fat dairy foods whenever possible Eat snacks throughout the day (to maintain your blood sugar level) Steer clear of processed sugars The following is an example menu of what you might eat in one day to meet your nutritional needs if you have gestational diabetes. The total number of calories comes out to 2089, and it features a moderate amount of diabetes-friendly carbohydrate foods, such as whole grains, legumes, and fruits and has many snacks sprinkled throughout the day. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet

Diabetic Diet

A diabetic diet is a dietary pattern that is used by people with diabetes mellitus or high blood glucose to manage diabetes. There is no single dietary pattern that is best for all people with all types of diabetes. For overweight and obese people with Type 2 diabetes, any weight-loss diet that the person will adhere to and achieve weight loss on is effective.[1][2] Since carbohydrate is the macronutrient that raises blood glucose levels most significantly, the greatest debate is regarding how low in carbohydrates the diet should be. This is because although lowering carbohydrate intake will lead to reduced blood glucose levels, this conflicts with the traditional establishment view that carbohydrates should be the main source of calories. Recommendations of the fraction of total calories to be obtained from carbohydrate are generally in the range of 20% to 45%,[3][4][5] but recommendations can vary as widely as from 16% to 75%.[6] The most agreed-upon recommendation is for the diet to be low in sugar and refined carbohydrates, while relatively high in dietary fiber, especially soluble fiber. People with diabetes are also encouraged to eat small frequent meals a day. Likewise, people with diabetes may be encouraged to reduce their intake of carbohydrates that have a high glycemic index (GI), although this is also controversial.[7] (In cases of hypoglycemia, they are advised to have food or drink that can raise blood glucose quickly, such as a sugary sports drink, followed by a long-acting carbohydrate (such as rye bread) to prevent risk of further hypoglycemia.) Others question the usefulness of the glycemic index and recommend high-GI foods like potatoes and rice. It has been claimed that oleic acid has a slight advantage over linoleic acid in reducing plasma glucose.[ Continue reading >>

What Type Of Pregnancy Diet Should I Follow If I Have Gestational Diabetes?

What Type Of Pregnancy Diet Should I Follow If I Have Gestational Diabetes?

Good nutrition is especially important during pregnancy if you've developed gestational diabetes. Diabetes develops when your body can't efficiently produce or use insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas that allows cells to turn sugar in your blood (glucose) into usable fuel. When large amounts of glucose accumulate in your blood, it means that your cells aren't getting the fuel they need. High blood sugar can be harmful for you and your developing baby, so it's important to try to control it. One way to keep your blood sugar levels under control is to follow a specific meal plan. I strongly recommend seeing a registered dietitian who can create a diet particularly suited to you, based on your weight, height, physical activity, and the needs of your growing baby, as well as your level of glucose intolerance. She'll also take into account your personal food preferences. (Note: If dietary changes aren't sufficient to keep your blood sugar in a healthy range, you'll need to take insulin as well. If your practitioner prescribes insulin injections, you'll need to meet again with your dietitian to reassess your diet.) A dietitian starts by determining how many calories you need each day. Then she teaches you how to determine portion sizes and how to balance your meals with just the right amounts of protein, carbohydrates, and fat. She also assesses your current eating habits to make sure you're getting enough vitamins and minerals. Here are some general dietary guidelines: Eat a variety of foods, distributing calories and carbohydrates evenly throughout the day. Make sure both your meals and your snacks are balanced. The American Diabetes Association recommends that you eat three small-to-moderate-size meals and two to four snacks every day, including an after-dinner snack. Continue reading >>

Meal Plan For Diabetes: 2000 Calories

Meal Plan For Diabetes: 2000 Calories

A healthy diet is important throughout your life, and even more so, if you have been diagnosed with diabetes. Balancing your diet throughout the day, and moderating the amount of carbohydrates you eat at each meal and snack will help to control your blood glucose levels, and prevent any complications from diabetes. Following a meal plan can help ensure that you get the nutrients you need, while controlling overall calories and carbohydrates. Meal planning tips It is important to eat a consistent amount of healthy carbohydrates at each meal and snack. Your carbohydrates should come from foods such as fruit, vegetables, whole grains, beans, and starchy vegetables. Milk and yogurt also include carbohydrate along with protein and calcium. Try to include at least 2-3 servings of these throughout the day. Choose lean proteins such as skinless chicken or turkey, lean beef, fish, eggs, and plant sources of protein such as tofu or other soy products at each meal. Limit unhealthy saturated fats which are found in butter, cream, and high-fat meats such as bacon or sausage. Too much saturated fat can raise your blood cholesterol and put you at greater risk for heart disease. Include healthy fats from foods such as olive oil, nuts, seeds, avocado, and nut butters, which can help to reduce your cholesterol. These foods are high in calories, so use them in moderation. It is best to avoid sweets, desserts, sweetened beverages, and fruit juices. These carbohydrate foods will raise your blood sugar very quickly. If you do want dessert of a sweet treat occasionally, try to stick to a small portion, and balance it out with a low carbohydrate meal. Check your blood glucose first thing in the morning when you wake up, and then 1 to 2 hours after each meal, to see if you need to adjust the am Continue reading >>

Seven-day Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan

Seven-day Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan

Eating a diabetes-friendly diet can help keep your blood sugar levels under control. But it can be difficult to stick to a regular meal plan — unless you have a plan in place. Check out these 21 delicious, diabetes-friendly recipes to use for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Remember to stay within your carbohydrate allowance by noting the carb content and serving size of the recipes. Also, be sure to balance your meals with lean protein and healthy plant fats. Breakfast: Cream Cheese-Stuffed French Toast This may sound too decadent for breakfast, but paired with scrambled egg whites, it can fit into a diabetes-friendly meal plan. Whole grain toast will help ensure you get your daily fiber too. Lunch: Salmon Salad with White Beans Salmon is one of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, and is also a delicious topper to workday salad. Dinner: Cuban-Marinated Sirloin Kabobs with Grilled Asparagus Spice things up with this flavorful skewer. Dried herbs and spices are a great way to pack a punch of flavor without adding unnecessary calories and fat. Breakfast: Apple Pie Oatmeal with Greek Yogurt Who wouldn’t like a slice of pie for breakfast? This oatmeal will leave your kitchen smelling like the flavors of fall, and your stomach happy and satisfied. Add some extra plain Greek yogurt on top for more protein. Lunch: Turkey-Cranberry Wraps Turkey and cranberry sauce isn’t just for Thanksgiving! This is an easy grab-and-go lunch that even your kids will enjoy. Note: This recipe may not be appropriate for all people with type 2 diabetes, because it contains 60 grams of carbs per serving. You can adjust the amount of cranberry sauce to lower the carb count. Dinner: Cilantro-Lime Tilapia with Spinach and Tomatoes Take a trip to the tropics with this fast fish dish. Breakfast Continue reading >>

14-day Low-carb Diet Meal Plan

14-day Low-carb Diet Meal Plan

What should I eat? That’s probably the most common question from people who want to try a low-carb diet. Our goal is to make low carb simple, so we have just the answer for you. Either use our free two-week low-carb challenge for a step-by-step guide, including shopping lists etc., or just check out our 14-day low-carb diet plan below. Cook 1, 2 or 3 times per day Below you’ll find 42 recipes – breakfast, lunch and dinner every day for two weeks. Perfect, if you like variety. But if you instead want less cooking there are two things you can do: Simplify lunch: Cook two servings for dinner, and refrigerate the second serving for lunch the next day. Voilà: no need to cook for lunch! Simplify breakfast: Choose one breakfast you like, and eat it every day. Like scrambled eggs. Or, if you’re not hungry, you could skip breakfast completely, perhaps only having a coffee. This not only saves you time and money, it also increases the effect of the diet on weight loss and blood sugars. More on intermittent fasting Whatever option is right for you, find the recipes below. But first a few words about getting ready. Get ready A low-carb diet is safe for most people, but in the following three situations you may need extra support: If you’re not in any of these situations you should be good to go. Just remember one final thing if you’re just starting out on low carb: you need to drink enough fluids and get some extra salt during the first week, to avoid the low-carb flu 1 and feel your best. A cup of bouillon 1-2 times per day, for example, really helps. That’s it, let’s move on to the 14-day low-carb plan. Week 1 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Week 2 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Note Feel free to adjust this diet Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet Menus

Diabetic Diet Menus

Source Initially, a diabetic diet can be overwhelming. What to eat, how much to eat, and when to eat are commonly asked questions when embarking on a diabetic diet. In addition, learning about carbohydrates and their effect on glucose and insulin levels, and counting carbohydrate grams can be challenging at the onset. However, with sensible meal planning and the sample diabetic diet menus below, following a diet to control blood glucose levels can be easy and enjoyed. Importance of Meal Planning For most people, thinking about planning a week's worth of meals, or even three meals for the day, is unimaginable. However, whether you are trying to lose weight, aiming to maintain weight, or controlling a health condition, such as diabetes, meal planning is the answer. With thought, preparation, and modifications to suit your lifestyle, daily or weekly menus function as your game plan to balanced, healthful food selection. Benefits of meal planning include: Controlled blood sugar/insulin Reduction and/or elimination of medications Weight management Controlled cholesterol and triglyceride levels Controlled blood pressure Less likely to skip meals Proper portions Less frustration about what to eat Diabetic Menus Adhering to practical food choices can make a profound difference to your blood glucose and insulin levels. That reason alone is enough to imagine doing the once unimaginable task of planning suitable and tasty meals. Meals do not have to be bland or severely restrictive. The most important feature of a daily menu is its mix of complex carbohydrates, such as grains, fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats. The following diabetic diet menus will launch you on your way to a lifetime of healthy eating. Each menu supports adequate complex carbohydrate intake t Continue reading >>

Sample Diabetes Menu 1

Sample Diabetes Menu 1

If you are new to a low carb approach for managing diabetes relax, there is a better way! You will need to read this page, “Low Carb Paleo” for more in depth information on a proper low carb diabetes diet. Pictorial View of a sample diabetes menu with links to food posts. Listing of Zero Carb Snacks I share my diabetes meal plan with people and tell them, ‘there is a better way’ to successfully manage diabetes!! Due to the vast amount of incorrect and harmful information on the internet, much of it provided by the Medical Industry, even after going over the the low carb paleo diabetes meal plan I am often met with blank stares. I will then show them my diabetes food chart, to show them a visual of what they should eat, foods just like the one above. This helps but still others just can’t put it all together. People will ask, “What can diabetics eat”. It’s time to discover a true and proper diabetic diet, a ‘real’ diabetic friendly diet. Sample Diabetes Menu To help reinforce diabetes friendly food choices I created this page showing a weekly sample diabetes menu. It includes links to low carb diabetes recipe posts to aid in food preparation. The only thing missing is me preparing it! :) Below is a pictorial carousel of various diabetes meals I’ve prepared, some of these have been included in the Diabetic Diet Menu below. On the internet you will find MANY sites with a so called “diabetes meal plan”. The problem with 99 % of them, they are high carb and grain based. In actuality, they are designed to keep you on ever increasing amounts of drugs and insulin. MOST are not truly ‘diabetic friendly’, they are friendly to Big Food, Big Pharma and the medical industry. The meals in the diabetes diet menu below are based on my diabetes meal plan an Continue reading >>

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