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What Happens If You Eat Carbs On Metformin

Foods To Eat While Taking Metformin

Foods To Eat While Taking Metformin

Metformin is a prescription medication used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Metformin can be taken alone or in conjunction with other medications, such as insulin. It is important to eat a healthy diet. A dietician can make recommendations for your particular case, but most people with diabetes eat a healthy variety of foods in moderation and follow regular mealtimes. Video of the Day Carbohydrates are broken into two main categories—sugars (simple carbohydrates) and starches (complex carbohydrates). Carbohydrates break down into blood sugar during digestion. Focus on eating complex carbohydrates such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and low-fat dairy products. Many people with diabetes use the Glycemic Index (GI) to choose foods. The higher GI foods tend to cause a greater increase in blood sugar. Low GI foods tend to be higher in fat. Non-starchy vegetables like spinach, carrots, broccoli and great beans are choices. Eat brown rice and whole wheat pasta. Include high-fiber foods. Aim for 25 to 30 grams of fiber daily. Dietary fiber consists of the parts of plant foods that the body cannot digest. Fiber decreases the risk of heart disease and helps control blood sugar levels. Great sources of fiber include vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole-wheat flour, wheat bran and nuts. Include dry beans such as kidney and pinto beans. Heart healthy dieting is extremely important for a person with diabetes due to the increased risk of heart disease and stroke caused by the accelerated development of clogged or hardened arteries. Limit your intake of saturated fats to less than 7 percent of your daily calories. Eat as little trans fat as possible. Choose monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats instead. Sources of monounsaturated fats include olive and canola oil. Continue reading >>

New Findings About What Metformin Really Does

New Findings About What Metformin Really Does

As many of my readers know, there is no requirement that the companies that sell pharmaceutical drugs provide an accurate explanation of what it is that their drugs do or of how they do it. All that they have to prove is that the drug has an impact on some measurable phenomenon. The company may claim that a drug functions using a mechanism that is later proven to be untrue. This has been the case with the SSRI drugs which it turned out actually work by remodelling the nerves in the hippocampus, NOT by changing levels of serotonin. Metformin, which has been used for decades, is another drug whose effect is well understood--it lowers blood sugar and reduces the amount of insulin needed to lower blood sugar. This has been interpreted to mean that it lowers insulin resistance. But new findings are calling this into question, as we discover that metformin may actually be stimulating insulin release or blocking the liver's release of glucose rather than impacting insulin resistant cell receptors. The first finding is one I stumbled over recently, one which seems to have gone unnoticed by the medical press. It is that metformin appears to boost GLP-1 levels. GLP-1 is an incretin hormone secreted in the gut which stimulates the beta cell to secrete insulin in the presence of high blood sugars. GLP-1 may also lower glucagon production at the same time. While Byetta and Januvia are higly promoted as being incretin drugs, some little known research suggests that metformin may also raise the level of GLP-1 in the body. Enhanced secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 by biguanide compounds. Yasuda N et al. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2002 Nov 15;298(5):779-84. This was old news, but it may partially explain some of the stomach symptoms people experience with metformin. GLP-1 stops or Continue reading >>

I Take Metformin 500 Three Times A Day, Yet My Blood Sugar Is High?

I Take Metformin 500 Three Times A Day, Yet My Blood Sugar Is High?

Q: I take metformin 500 three times a day, and I eat less carbs and I exercise, yet my blood sugar levels remain high—up to 171 this morning. I'm sorry to hear that your blood glucose levels remain elevated despite taking metformin, watching your carbs, and exercising. Are you getting enough high-quality sleep on a regular basis? Inadequate sleep can cause high blood sugar readings in the morning even in people who eat right, exercise, and take medication as directed. Your elevated fasting blood blood sugar may also be due to the Dawn Phenomenon, in which increased production of growth hormone and other hormones overnight cause your liver to release stored sugar. Sometimes having a small protein snack—like a handful of nuts or a hard-boiled egg—before bed can help lower morning blood sugar. In fact, some people find that adding some carbs, like a half cup of berries, to the protein snack actually helps bring down their morning blood sugar even more. However, this is very individual, so it's a good idea to experiment with different snacks and amounts of food to see how your own blood sugar responds. Finally, consistency with diet, exercise, and medication is important, and it may take some time for blood sugar to normalize. If the measures above and keeping carb intake down, speak with your endocrinologist or other diabetes specialist. Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California. Disclaimer The content of this website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material on the site (collectively, “Content”) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for, and dLife does not provide, professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatm Continue reading >>

Will Metformin Allow Me To Eat More Carbs

Will Metformin Allow Me To Eat More Carbs

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Will Metformin allow me to eat more carbs I am prediabetic and control my BG values by eating only 20 grams of carbohydrates per day. I was wondering ,if I took Metform ,would I be able to eat more carbs and still maintain good BG values. I'm not sure your GP would prescribe it for you as a prediabetic. Mine says he can no longer give it to me because my HbA1c is down to 42 (from 49) At a guess I would say you could possibly eat a very little more but metformin doesn't reduce BG's by very much at all (sorry no figures to hand) No. The 20g of carbs is your personal preference up to now and I expect you would be able to eat more carbs (dependant on which ones of course) without difficulty. You will, however, have a few days of erratic/spikey BG levels after the uplift before it settles. I found about 100-150g a reasonable amount for me and gave me a lot of flexibility if you are on 20g of carb and your BG is too high, I think you will find you are diabetic. time for a visit to the Dr I am prediabetic and control my BG values by eating only 20 grams of carbohydrates per day. I was wondering ,if I took Metform ,would I be able to eat more carbs and still maintain good BG values. I don't believe Metformin is licensed, in UK, for prediabetes. It is used for non-diabetic ladies with PCOS, but by the very fact you're a gentleman, it probably means you wouldn't qualify on those grounds. I understand Consultants can prescribe it, if they can justify it, but unless you're already being looked after by a specialist, there would be a few hoops to jump through. 20g carbohydrate a day does seem quite spartan. I am prediabetic and control my BG values by eating only Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin?

What Is Metformin?

MORE Metformin is a prescription drug used primarily in the treatment of Type II diabetes. It can be used on its own or combined with other medications. In the United States, it is sold under the brand names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumetza and Riomet. "Metformin is very often prescribed as the first step in a diabetic's regime," said Ken Sternfeld, a New York-based pharmacist. How it works "When you're diabetic you lose the ability to use the insulin you need to offset the food," Sternfeld explained. "If you eat a carb or sugar that can't be metabolized or offset by the insulin you produce, your sugar levels will be higher. Metformin and drugs in that category will help your body better metabolize that food so that insulin levels will be able to stay more in line." Metformin aims to decrease glucose production in the liver, consequently lowering the levels of glucose in the bloodstream. It also changes the way that your blood cells react to insulin. "It makes them more sensitive to insulin," said Dr. Stephen Neabore, a primary care doctor at the Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C. "It makes the same amount of insulin work better. It transports the insulin to the cells in a more effective way." Metformin may have a preventive health role, as well. New research presented at the American Diabetes Association 2017 Scientific Sessions showed that long-term use of metformin is particularly useful in preventing the onset of type II diabetes in women who have suffered from gestational diabetes. Because metformin changes the way the body uses insulin, it is not used to treat Type I diabetes, a condition in which the body does not produce insulin at all. Metformin & PCOS Metformin is sometimes prescribed to treat polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), according to Neabore. "I Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Metformin is often one of the first medications prescribed to people with diabetes, according to the Canadian Diabetes Association (see reference 2 under Highlights of Revisions). It helps lower your blood sugar levels by decreasing the amount of glucose, or sugar, produced by your liver. It also helps your insulin, the hormone that gets the sugar out of your blood and into your cell, work better. (see reference 1 pg 1 under Clinical Pharmacology under Mechanism of Action para 1). While you do not need to avoid any foods when taking metformin, you may need to limit or avoid alcohol (see reference 1 pg 8 under alcohol intake.). Metformin and Alcohol If your doctor has prescribed metformin to help you get better control over your blood sugar, you should not drink an excessive amount of alcohol, including beer, wine or hard liquor (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). Too much alcohol causes metformin to breakdown too much lactate, which is a by-product of glucose and amino acids, and may lead to lactic acidosis (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). If you drink alcohol, it's OK to have moderate amounts while on metformin, which means up to 1 drink a day for women and 2 drinks a day for men (see reference 3 pg x). But everyone is different, so be sure to talk to your doctor first to a safe amount of alcohol for you. Lactic acidosis is actually not very common when taking metformin, but it can be dangerous, and even deadly, according to the Food and Drug Administration (see reference 1 pg 15). Symptoms that warrant an immediate call to your doctor include difficulty breathing, stomach pain, diarrhea, muscle cramps, unusual sleepiness or weakness or an all-around achiness. Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

Starting Low Carb With Diabetes Medications

Starting Low Carb With Diabetes Medications

So you have diabetes and you want to try a low-carb diet? Congratulations! It may be the single best thing you could ever do for your health. It can start to reverse your type 2 diabetes, and dramatically increase your blood sugar control with type 1 diabetes. However, you need to know what you are doing. Once you start eating low carb you may instantly have to lower any insulin doses, a lot. Avoiding the carbohydrates that raise your blood sugar decreases your need for medication to lower it. Taking the same dose of insulin as you did prior to adopting a low-carb diet might result in hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). You need to test your blood sugar frequently when starting this diet and adapt (lower) your medication. This should ideally be done with the assistance of a knowledgeable physician. No drugs If you have diabetes and you’re treated either by diet alone or just with Metformin there is no risk of low blood sugar on low carb. You can get started right away. Insulin As a general guide you may need to lower your doses by 30-50% or more when starting a strict low-carb diet. Unfortunately there’s no way to know the doses required in advance. You’ll have to test your blood sugar frequently and adapt (lower) insulin doses. This should ideally be done with the assistance of a knowledgeable physician. Note that as a general rule it’s easier to err on the low side, and take more insulin later if needed. That’s fine. If instead you overdose and get low sugar you’ll have to quickly eat or drink more carbohydrates, and that obviously reduces the effect of the low-carb diet. Insulin in type 1 diabetes The advice on insulin above generally applies to type 1 diabetes too. A low-carb, high-fat diet can be fantastic for empowering people with type 1 diabetes to get s Continue reading >>

T2 Diabetic Carbs Per Day Recommendations

T2 Diabetic Carbs Per Day Recommendations

Did you know that one of the most commonly asked questions is how many carbs per day is best for a diabetic to eat? And like many other people you may also be totally confused by that question? It's not surprising because the amount of carbs recommended does vary depending on where you read it or who tells you. Why is this? Well, believe it or not, there is no specific recommendation for carbs – that's why there are so many different numbers. So what we are going to share today is: A range of information Some view points for you to think about And also the experience of other people with diabetes Here at Diabetes Meal Plans we use a natural whole foods, lower carb approach and aim for around 80 g carbs per day. This is quite low compared to some of the recommendations, but research shows that lower carb diets work better than low fat diets. Studies show that lowering carbs helps lower insulin, improve insulin sensitivity, reduces blood glucose levels, reduces total and LDL cholesterol (the bad stuff, raises HDL cholesterol (the good stuff), and lowers A1C levels. A lower carb diet always outperforms a low fat, calorie restricted diet. This is something that science has proved time and time again. Yet, for some reason, this is not the type of information that is being made available publicly – it's just one of the major annoying things about the diabetes industry. So what the information I'm going to share about carbohydrates below is somewhat controversial – but the science is there, and so is the positive experience of many other diabetics. The stuff is not so controversial that I'm the only one sharing it. Many leading doctors and health practitioners believe in a lower carbohydrate approach for diabetes – such as Dr Sarah Hallberg, Dr Mark Hyman, Dr Gary Fett Continue reading >>

Metformin Sickness/low Carb Dieting

Metformin Sickness/low Carb Dieting

kristen49286 Posts: 386Member Member Posts: 386Member Member I'm on metformin also and fortunately I've had no side effects from taking it, but I'm looking forward to the day when I can cut down (like you) and eventually stop taking it completely! If you think your dose needs to be cut again, I would recommend talking to your doctor first. omma_to_3 Posts: 3,265Member Member Posts: 3,265Member Member I've been on Met for maybe 12 years. I just have now gotten to the point that it doesn't make me sick. I have never found low-carb to help with that at all. However, lower fat and healthier eating (ie high fiber) seem to help quite a bit. So, I would concentrate on adding fiber to your diet and eating a healthier balanced diet, not just low carb, and see if that helps. anfmusicgrl Posts: 62Member Posts: 62Member I have been taking it for over a year, I still have days where it makes me sick all day long, and sometimes I have weeks where I tolerate it well. Only your Dr. will know if you should change your dosage, BUT I do know that they probably won't recommend taking it "here and there". It's a medication that is meant to be taken with consistency. Not just on high-carb days. mander1621 Posts: 53Member Posts: 53Member I'm on 1000mg of Met a day....I re-started it a week ago (I used to take it for a few years but went a year without it). I've found that it doesn't matter what I eat, I still feel sick. I always take it with food but, it doesn't really help. Plus, I find that I have a weird metal taste in my mouth for a couple hours after. Not fun! joeylu Posts: 208Member Member Posts: 208Member Member i stopped taking it because i hate the way it makes me feel. I had my blood drawn last week and my sugars where fine without it bcampbell54 Posts: 936Member Member Posts: 936M Continue reading >>

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

September 30, 2015 by Dr. Brooke in Be Better , Eat Better , pcos 3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin Metformin is recommended by doctors for women with PCOS that want to loose weight or otherwise manage their PCOS and insulin resistance. But there are 3 very important things that you need to know about it including the fact that it's not the only option! Let me first say, I dont hate Metformin for women with PCOS . For some women it really does help spur ovulation, control blood sugar and help with some weight management but.its not without its share of issues. And its definitely not the magic bullet for weight loss although its usually presented that way. How Metformin (or its generic form: Glucophage) Works Metformin is typically given with meals throughout the day, or more commonly now the extended release version is given once with dinner or at bedtime. While only having to pop a pill one time per day is always appealing, this once a day dosing (especially at bedtime) is where I see the most problems with my patients. It lowers both fasting and post meal glucose levels by decreasing the glucose absorption in your intestines after a meal; as well as decreasing the amount of glucose your liver makes for later use. It also does help improve insulin sensitivity by increasing glucose movement into a cell. All sounds good so far right? Not so fast, here are the most common issues I see in women using Metformin: Metformin is notorious for causing sometimes severe digestive issues including stomach pain or upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and even a sense of body weakness or metallic taste in the mouth in some. And it is touted as not causing low blood sugar as many older blood sugar lowering drugs did, however I see it every day in my practice that Metformin can m Continue reading >>

Can I Have Grapefruit While Taking Metformin?

Can I Have Grapefruit While Taking Metformin?

Many medications, such as statins and some antihistamines, have a negative interaction with grapefruit. Metformin is used in treatment of type 2 diabetes. Does having grapefruit while taking metformin lead to adverse side effects? There’s limited research, but here’s what you need to know. Metformin is a drug that’s prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can’t use insulin normally. This means they can’t control the amount of sugar in their blood. Metformin helps people with type 2 diabetes control the level of sugar in their blood in several ways, including: decreasing the amount of sugar your body absorbs from food decreasing the amount of sugar produced by your liver increasing your body’s response to the insulin that it makes naturally Metformin can rarely cause a very serious and life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. People with liver, kidney, or heart problems should avoid taking metformin. There are more than 85 drugs that are known to interact with grapefruit. Of these drugs, 43 of them can lead to serious adverse effects. All forms of grapefruit — including freshly squeezed juice, frozen concentrate, and the whole fruit — can lead to drug interaction. Some of the chemicals found in grapefruit can bind to and inactivate an enzyme in your body that’s found in your intestines and liver. This enzyme helps break down the medication you take. Normally when you take a drug orally, it’s broken down slightly by enzymes before it reaches your bloodstream. This means that you receive a little less of the drug in your bloodstream than the amount you initially consumed. But when the enzyme is inhibited — as it is when it interacts with the chemicals in grapefruit — there’s a dramatically larger amount of the dr Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Restricted Diet In Conjunction With Metformin And Liraglutide Is An Effective Treatment In Patients With Deteriorated Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Proof-of-concept Study

Carbohydrate Restricted Diet In Conjunction With Metformin And Liraglutide Is An Effective Treatment In Patients With Deteriorated Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Proof-of-concept Study

Go to: Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic progressive disease. During the course of the disease intensive treatment is often necessary resulting in multiple interventions including administration of insulin. Although dietary intervention is highly recommended, the clinical results of the widely prescribed diets with low fat content and high carbohydrates are disappointing. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested the effect of dietary carbohydrate-restriction in conjunction with metformin and liraglutide on metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Forty patients with type 2 diabetes already being treated with two oral anti-diabetic drugs or insulin treatment and who showed deterioration of their glucose metabolism (i.e. HbA1c >7.5), were treated. A carbohydrate-restricted diet and a combination of metformin and liraglutide were instituted, after stopping either insulin or oral anti-diabetic drugs (excluding metformin). After enrollment, the study patients were scheduled for follow-up visits at one, two, three and six months. Primary outcome was glycemic control, measured by HbA1c at six months. Secondary outcomes were body weight, lipid-profile and treatment satisfaction. Thirty-five (88%) participants completed the study. Nearly all participating patients experienced a drop in HbA1c and body weight during the first three months, an effect which was maintained until the end of the study at six months. Seventy-one percent of the patients reached HbA1c values below 7.0%. The range of body weight at enrollment was extreme, reaching 165 kg as the highest initial value. The average weight loss after 6 months was 10%. Most patients were satisfied with this treatment. During the intervention no significant change of lipids was observed. Most patients wh Continue reading >>

What Does Metformin Do For Eating To Many Carbs Or Sugar

What Does Metformin Do For Eating To Many Carbs Or Sugar

what does metformin do for eating to many carbs or sugar If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. what does metformin do for eating to many carbs or sugar Does anyone know what exactly metformin does for you if you eat to much sugars or carbs. iam horrible with my diet and was wondering if metformin would even out all the sugars and carbs I eat. Thanks... Well, from my personal standpoint, Met has greatly reduced my cravings for sugar. I guess since it's balancing out my body's insulin levels, my body's not having those terrible urges for sugar. I used to just eat sugary things all the time, and if I didn't have anything sweet, then I would HAVE to have a Coke. Now, with my sweet cravings normal, the physical side effect I have if I over indulge in sweets, carbs, or greasy food is diarhea. Yep, it's gross. I think of it as my body's way of saying, "You idiot! Krispy Kreme is not your friend!" On the upside, with the lowered sweet intake and the -ahem- immediate flushing of "naughty" food, I've lost 10lbs in 4 months. I was only about 15lbs overweight to start, so I'm on a good path. I believe that I shall look upon the goodness of the LORD in the land of the living! be strong, and let your heart take courage; I totally noticed a difference in my body's needs for sugar. Used to be I was terrified of my parents brining cookies and cakes into the house because I just knew I wouldn't be able to control myself and eat them all and then my sister would get mad at me and I would feel bad... Now a box of cookies that would last the weekends (if that) last th Continue reading >>

Metformin And Carbs?

Metformin And Carbs?

Friend TYPE 2 DX'ED DEC.21 2009, GD WHILE PREG 8 YS AGO Did i read somewhere that metformin has a carb blocker in it, or was i dreaming? D.D. Family Getting much harder to control I dont think it actually has a carb blocker in it, I know it is suppose to help so your body doesnt dump more glucose. yeah and lori if you are taking metiformin and you eat something with lots of carbs in it your body will let you know!!!! trust me on this lol... first time i ate a burger after i started the met i was in the bathroom for hrs.... I don't think it is a carb blocker, I've overeaten carbs while on metformin and all I get is high bgs. I don't think it affects food at all. Some people get terrible stomach cramps when eating and tend to lose their appetite. Metformin works in the liver to prevent the glucose spikes in the middle of the night or when you are not eating. Before I started metformin I would spike 3-4 hours after meals when I wasn't eating. Metformin has limited those spikes. Most people will tell you that metformin works best on a very low carb diet with exercise and lots of dietary fiber in your diet. There are other diabetic drugs like sulphyonureas that work specifically on insulin production when eating carbs. The injectible drug Byetta also works when you eat carbs to limit the impact. As far as I know metformin doesn't block the carbs but it may help you with insulin resistance in the long run so you handle them better. Continue reading >>

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