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What Foods Increase Your Insulin Levels?

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Unlock Glucagon: Your Body’s Fat-burning Hormone

Unlock Glucagon: Your Body’s Fat-burning Hormone

This may come as a surprise, but burning body fat and sculpting a lean, healthy physique is not about eating less food. It’s about eating the right kinds of foods. If you’ve been reading Healing Gourmet for a while,you know that high-glycemic foods promote weight gain by stimulating the “fat-storage hormone,” insulin. But keeping your blood sugar stable with foods that have a low glycemic impact is only half the fat loss equation. The other half involves the “fat-burning hormone,” glucagon. By understanding the interplay between these two important hormones and how they are affected by the foods you eat, you can truly win the battle of the bulge. Insulin and Glucagon: Your Hormonal See-Saw The hormones insulin and glucagon are both produced in the pancreas, but that’s where their similarities end. In fact, these hormones are antagonistic or inversely paired. Just like a see-saw, when one goes up, the other goes down and when one goes down, the other goes up. These two hormones also serve opposite functions. Insulin is a fat-storage and blocking hormone. The job of insulin is to lower your blood sugar by shuttling glucose into the muscles and liver as a source of energy. When glucose is present in your bloodstream, insulin blocks access to your body’s fat reserves. After all, why burn fat, when you have sugar around? Insulin also causes the body store excess glucose as fat. Glucagon is a fat-burning and unlocking hormone. Glucagon can actually raise your blood sugar by converting glycerol in your fat cells into glucose for fuel. Glucagon also signals the fat cells to release free fatty acids (a process called lipolysis). Glucagon signals the body to release stored fat to be used as fuel. Numerous research studies illustrate the effects of these two opposi Continue reading >>

Block Sugar From Your Body In 7 Easy Ways

Block Sugar From Your Body In 7 Easy Ways

One major reason this doesn't happen has to do with our diets. When you consume starch and refined sugar, these foods enter the bloodstream quickly, causing a sugar spike. Your body then produces the hormone insulin to drive that sugar from your bloodstream into cells. But over time, excessive levels of insulin can make your muscle cells lose sensitivity to the hormone, leading to type-2 diabetes and heart disease. Your fat cells are another story: They always remain sensitive. Insulin spikes lock fat into them, so you can't use it for energy. How do you break this cycle and get your body to work optimally again? Happily, you don't need to go on an extreme diet. The first step is just to reduce the blood sugar spikes that produce sharp increases of insulin. The substance in our diet that's most responsible for these surges is starch, namely, anything made from potatoes, rice, flour, corn, or other grains. (Think pasta, lasagna, white bread, doughnuts, cookies, and cakes.) You could cut out these foods entirely. But wouldn't it be great if there were a way to solve the problem without completely eliminating these carbs? It turns out there is. You can blunt the blood sugar-raising effects by taking advantage of natural substances in foods that slow carbohydrate digestion and entry into the bloodstream. No matter what kind of sugar blocker you use, your waistline (and health) will win in the end. Sugar Blocker 1: Have a fatty snack 10 to 30 minutes before your meals Reason: You remain fuller longer. At the outlet of your stomach is a muscular ring, the pyloric valve. It regulates the speed at which food leaves your stomach and enters your small intestine. This valve is all that stands between the ziti in your stomach and a surge of glucose in your bloodstream. But you can Continue reading >>

The 55 Best Ways To Boost Your Metabolism

The 55 Best Ways To Boost Your Metabolism

Metabolism. It’s the set of life-sustaining chemical transformations within the cells of living organisms. It’s such a big concept that it’s understandable to feel as if it’s beyond your control. Not true! There are a bunch of quick and easy diet and lifestyle changes you can make to boost your metabolism, make your body run more efficiently, and reach your weight-loss and fitness goals faster. In addition to this list, check out the The Super Metabolism Diet to lose up to a pound a day! The tested two-week eating plan will torch fat and ignite your body’s fuel furnace, from Today Show Health and Wellness correspondent David Zinczenko, the bestselling author of Zero Belly Diet. Click here to buy now! If you want to weigh less, you’ve got to eat less, right? Well, if you take in too few calories, it can cause your body to lose muscle mass, which will decrease the rate of your metabolism. Plus, when you skimp on calories, your body slows the rate at which is burns calories to conserve the fuel it’s got. “Under-fueling is just as risky as over-fueling,” explains Carolyn Brown, MS RD at Foodtrainers in Manhattan. Lisa Moskovitz, RD, CDN agrees: “In an attempt for quick, noticeable weight loss, many people wrongfully believe that eating as few calories as possible is the best solution. Not only can this lead to numerous nutritional deficiencies as the body is getting less food overall, it can actually have the opposite effect on weight loss.” Instead of cutting calories like crazy, use the simple diet and exercise hacks below that can help you slim down quickly and safely without screwing up your metabolism. If you always opt for coffee over tea, you could be missing out on a major metabolism boost. In a recent 12-week study, participants who drank 4-5 Continue reading >>

10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar

10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar

Certain foods can send your blood sugar level on a roller coaster, with insulin rushing to keep up. The good news is, while there are some surprises, most of these foods fall under the same category: processed food, such as white flour and sugar. "Refined flours and sugar cause huge spikes in insulin and get absorbed quickly, which causes problems," says Mark Hyman,… Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Diet Guide For Beginners + Advanced Weight Loss Tips

Insulin Resistance Diet Guide For Beginners + Advanced Weight Loss Tips

Is insulin resistance, diabetes or pre diabetes making it difficult or impossible for you to lose weight? If you fall into this category you probably understand that for the most part insulin resistance is a DIETARY disease. Meaning you most likely have this condition because of the food you've eaten (or are currently eating). Understanding this concept is very important because if you understand that insulin resistance can be caused (and worsened) by diet it is also true that diet can actually help to lower insulin levels and reverse insulin resistance. But hold on. I have some good news for you and some bad news... First the bad news: Most Doctors and patients approach insulin resistance all wrong which leads to higher insulin levels and more weight gain over time. But, here's the good news: I'm going to walk you through how to approach insulin resistance through diet, medications and supplements. Because the best way to treat and reverse insulin resistance is with a comprehensive approach: Let's talk about what foods to eat, what foods to avoid, how much food you should be eating, what type of macromolecules you should consume on a daily basis and much more...​ Understanding Insulin Resistance Before we talk about diet and interventions for insulin resistance you really need to have a basic understand of what insulin resistance is and WHY you would even want to treat it. This is the beginners guide to understanding insulin resistance, diabetes and pre diabetes: Insulin is a hormone that is secreted from your pancreas in response to two macromolecules: glucose (sugar) and protein. It's primary job is to move that sugar inside your cells so your body can burn them for energy. It can put this glucose (energy) into all cells including your fat cells. Why? Because your Continue reading >>

11 Ways To Start Reversing Type 2 Diabetes Today

11 Ways To Start Reversing Type 2 Diabetes Today

Whether you have a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or or you’ve been told you’re at risk, read on for 11 ways to start reversing the effects immediately. Type 2 diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions. There are 3.9 million people living with diabetes – 90 per cent those of being affected by type 2 diabetes. Here’s another shocking statistic: 1 in 3 UK adults has prediabetes, the condition that precedes diabetes. As you’ll soon see on BBC One’s Doctor in the House, it is entirely possible to both prevent as well as reverse type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, a lot of the advice that is given for the condition is, in my opinion, unhelpful and misguided. Most people think of it as a blood sugar problem but this is the ultimate effect rather than the cause. WHAT IS TYPE 2 DIABETES? Type 2 diabetes is a condition that is characterised by chronically elevated blood sugar levels. However, the main cause as well as the driver for this condition is something called Insulin Resistance. When you eat certain foods, particularly refined carbohydrates, that food is converted to sugar inside your body. Your body’s way of dealing with this sugar is to produce a hormone called insulin. Insulin moves the sugar inside your cells so that it can be used for energy. Sounds great, right? Well, yes and no. When working efficiently, this is a fantastic system that helps your body to function well. But when you have type 2 diabetes, prediabetes or significant abdominal obesity, that system does not work so well. Eating too many refined carbohydrates elevates your insulin levels for long periods of time and your cells start to become resistant to the effects of insulin. Think of this a bit like alcohol. When you start to drink, a single glass of wine can make you feel drunk. Once your b Continue reading >>

Does Eating Sugar Really Cause Acne?

Does Eating Sugar Really Cause Acne?

Can eating excess sugar cause acne? originally appeared on Quora: the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Sugar by itself does not cause acne per se. There are many reasons that acne can form and hormonal fluctuations in the body (hormonal acne) can be a significant factor for your breakouts. Acne has many possible culprits; therefore, it is imperative to see a qualified dermatologist to assess your acne as well as skin type and put you on a specific skin care regimen tailored just for you. However, I do believe that acne is best treated with a comprehensive approach. Along with in-office medical treatments, at home skin care medications and creams, a healthy diet and lifestyle also help to promote healthy skin. Here are some useful insights as to why sugar may be bad for your skin and further exacerbate your acne breakouts. Let's examine how sugar affects your skin. Sugar’s oxidative properties can provoke acne and breakouts. Sugar and foods high on the glycemic index (meaning foods that, once ingested, convert quickly into glucose and cause your body's insulin levels to elevate), lead to a burst of inflammation that goes throughout your entire body. Foods high in sugar and saturated fats - like white bread, candy, fried foods, ice cream, sodas, and anything else with a main ingredient of sugar - cause spikes in your body's insulin levels that further exacerbate inflammation. Steep insulin spikes increase the production of skin oils and contribute to the clogging of follicles, which can worsen skin complexion. Your body breaks down "simple carbohydrates”, like refined sugars and white flour, rapidly converting them into glucose, which then floods the blood stream. When this occurs, your body reacts by pr Continue reading >>

Six Insulin-sensitizing Foods For Weight Loss

Six Insulin-sensitizing Foods For Weight Loss

Insulin is the primary hormone that tells your body to store energy as fat or use it as fuel — so you want to ensure that your diet is designed to keep insulin levels (and in turn, your weight) in check. Food can be as powerful as a drug — it can make you weak and sick or it can make strong and healthy. I picked some of my favourite superfoods, spices and seeds that will not only protect against cancer, heart disease and diabetes, but also help your waistline by boosting your insulin-sensitivity. 1. Stay healthy with horseradish It may clear your sinuses and more. Horseradish contains a high percentage of glucosinolates (significantly more than broccoli), which act as a natural antibiotic and can also improve your resistance to cancer and environmental toxins. Horseradish is also said to aid digestion, reduce urinary tract infections and fight against certain pathogens in food, such as listeria, E. coli and staphylococcus aureus. Bottom line: If you prefer prepared horseradish to a homemade recipe, than look for one with no added sugars. 2. Ample dose of avocado Fats, when eaten in the proper balance with protein and carbohydrates, can help to slow the release of sugars into the bloodstream, which leads to less insulin release. The end result? You stay fuller longer, and your waist gets slimmer, faster. In one study 347 adults (half were females) who consumed an average of half an avocado a day had higher intakes of important nutrients — including dietary fibre, vitamin E, magnesium and potassium — than people who didn’t eat avocados. They also reaped the benefits of being lighter (7.5 pounds on average) with a smaller waist circumference (4cm on average). Bottom line: Keep in mind that fat does have twice the amount of calories as carbs or protein, so limit y Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

When people eat a food containing carbohydrates, the digestive system breaks down the digestible ones into sugar, which enters the blood. As blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that prompts cells to absorb blood sugar for energy or storage. As cells absorb blood sugar, levels in the bloodstream begin to fall. When this happens, the pancreas start making glucagon, a hormone that signals the liver to start releasing stored sugar. This interplay of insulin and glucagon ensure that cells throughout the body, and especially in the brain, have a steady supply of blood sugar. Carbohydrate metabolism is important in the development of type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it makes. Type 2 diabetes usually develops gradually over a number of years, beginning when muscle and other cells stop responding to insulin. This condition, known as insulin resistance, causes blood sugar and insulin levels to stay high long after eating. Over time, the heavy demands made on the insulin-making cells wears them out, and insulin production eventually stops. Glycemic index In the past, carbohydrates were commonly classified as being either “simple” or “complex,” and described as follows: Simple carbohydrates: These carbohydrates are composed of sugars (such as fructose and glucose) which have simple chemical structures composed of only one sugar (monosaccharides) or two sugars (disaccharides). Simple carbohydrates are easily and quickly utilized for energy by the body because of their simple chemical structure, often leading to a faster rise in blood sugar and insulin secretion from the pancreas – which can have negative health effects. Complex carbohydrates: These carbohydrates have mo Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

What medical conditions are associated with insulin resistance? While the metabolic syndrome links insulin resistance with abdominal obesity, elevated cholesterol, and high blood pressure; several other medical other conditions are specifically associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance may contribute to the following conditions: Type 2 Diabetes: Overt diabetes may be the first sign insulin resistance is present. Insulin resistance can be noted long before type 2 diabetes develops. Individuals reluctant or unable to see a health-care professional often seek medical attention when they have already developed type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Fatty liver: Fatty liver is strongly associated with insulin resistance. Accumulation of fat in the liver is a manifestation of the disordered control of lipids that occurs with insulin resistance. Fatty liver associated with insulin resistance may be mild or severe. Newer evidence suggests fatty liver may even lead to cirrhosis of the liver and, possibly, liver cancer. Arteriosclerosis: Arteriosclerosis (also known as atherosclerosis) is a process of progressive thickening and hardening of the walls of medium-sized and large arteries. Arteriosclerosis is responsible for: Other risk factors for arteriosclerosis include: High levels of "bad" (LDL) cholesterol Diabetes mellitus from any cause Family history of arteriosclerosis Skin Lesions: Skin lesions include increased skin tags and a condition called acanthosis nigerians (AN). Acanthosis nigricans is a darkening and thickening of the skin, especially in folds such as the neck, under the arms, and in the groin. This condition is directly related to the insulin resistance, though the exact mechanism is not clear. Acanthosis nigricans is a cosmetic condition strongly Continue reading >>

Top 3 Diabetes Myths, Busted: Fruit, Starchy Vegetables, And Blood Glucose

Top 3 Diabetes Myths, Busted: Fruit, Starchy Vegetables, And Blood Glucose

Almost 10 percent of Americans have diabetes and that number is growing. Unfortunately, the myths surrounding diabetes are as widespread as the disorder itself. Here we debunk the most common diabetes myths. For the past 50 years, people diagnosed with all forms of diabetes have been advised to eat low-carb diets high in fat and protein, and to avoid eating high-carbohydrate foods like fruits, potatoes, squash, corn, beans, lentils, and whole grains. Despite this popular opinion, more than 85 years of scientific research clearly demonstrates that a low-fat, plant-based whole foods diet is the single most effective dietary approach for managing type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This means that a low-fat diet—not a low-carb diet—has been shown across the board to minimize oral medication and insulin use, stabilize blood glucose, and dramatically reduce long-term disease risk in people with diabetes. Myth #1: You Develop Type 2 Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar Eating sweets is not a direct cause of type 2 diabetes. People develop type 2 diabetes over time by slowly developing a resistance to insulin, the hormone that escorts glucose out of your blood and into tissues like your muscle and liver. I like to think of type 2 diabetes as a very advanced form of insulin resistance in which glucose remains trapped in your blood because your body cannot use insulin properly. In this way, elevated blood glucose is a symptom of diabetes, and NOT the root cause. The real cause of insulin resistance is dietary fat. We discussed it at length in this article. People with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are told to eat foods that are low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein simply because they don’t create an immediate need for insulin. But in the hours and days after a meal hi Continue reading >>

21 Foods That Increase Metabolism (you’ll Love #7)

21 Foods That Increase Metabolism (you’ll Love #7)

Diet, schmiet. Ditch your strict eating regimen and give your metabolism a boost by eating. Yes, eating. Just by consuming certain metabolism-boosting foods and drinks, you can give your body a kick-start in calorie burning, and speed up that seemingly slow metabolism of yours. First, it’s important to know what your metabolism actually is and how it works. You might be under the impression that you already know, but Brad Davidson, author of “The Stark Naked 21-Day Metabolic Reset,” fitness expert and nutritionist, bets you don’t. “Most people, when asked what the metabolism is, believe it’s simply about the energy your body burns,” he says, explaining that many believe that metabolism boils down to being naturally fast or slow burning. “Metabolism is so much more than that though,” says Davidson. He says that his favorite definition of metabolism comes from The Schwarzbein Principle by Dr. Dianna Schwarzbein, who writes, “Metabolism is the combined effects of all the varied biochemical processes that continually occur in your body on a cellular level. These processes enable every individual component of your body to function, making it possible for you to think, digest food, move and perform all the functions of a living, breathing being.” In other words, metabolism isn’t just a concern for people who feel like they need to shed a few pounds – and that’s something all our experts agree on. “Anyone can benefit from a boosted metabolism because your metabolism is literally the powerhouse to your body providing energy to keep you going,” says Beth Warren, MS, RDN, CDN, Funder & CEO of Beth Warren Nutrition and author of “Living Real Life with Real Food” (Skyhorse 2014). “A well-boosted metabolism helps ensure your body is functioning Continue reading >>

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Skipping breakfast iStock/Thinkstock Overweight women who didn’t eat breakfast had higher insulin and blood sugar levels after they ate lunch a few hours later than they did on another day when they ate breakfast, a 2013 study found. Another study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that men who regularly skipped breakfast had a 21 percent higher chance of developing diabetes than those who didn’t. A morning meal—especially one that is rich in protein and healthy fat—seems to stabilize blood sugar levels throughout the day. Your breakfast is not one of the many foods that raise blood sugar. Here are some other things that happen to your body when you skip breakfast. Artificial sweeteners iStock/Thinkstock They have to be better for your blood sugar than, well, sugar, right? An interesting new Israeli study suggests that artificial sweeteners can still take a negative toll and are one of the foods that raise blood sugar. When researchers gave mice artificial sweeteners, they had higher blood sugar levels than mice who drank plain water—or even water with sugar! The researchers were able to bring the animals’ blood sugar levels down by treating them with antibiotics, which indicates that these fake sweeteners may alter gut bacteria, which in turn seems to affect how the body processes glucose. In a follow-up study of 400 people, the research team found that long-term users of artificial sweeteners were more likely to have higher fasting blood sugar levels, reported HealthDay. While study authors are by no means saying that sugary beverages are healthier, these findings do suggest that people who drink artificially sweetened beverages should do so in moderation as part of a healthy diet. Here's what else happens when you cut artificial sweetener Continue reading >>

5 Foods To Balance Blood Sugar

5 Foods To Balance Blood Sugar

Good health is all about balance, especially when it comes to blood sugar. Eating the proper ratio of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates at every meal keeps blood sugar stable, helps maintain physical and emotion balance, stops food cravings, and sustains energy levels. Balance your blood sugar by eating from the following list regularly, and don’t forget to keep your body hydrated with PLENTY of water each day. You can’t eat enough of these! Look for nutrient-dense options such as kale, spinach, and broccoli, which are loaded with fiber and calcium. Eat them at every meal! Wild caught fish, free-range beef, and eggs are excellent sources of blood stabilizing protein. Eat 4 to 6 ounces at least twice a day for blood sugar balance Grab a handful of almonds or walnuts for a healthy snack that keeps you satisfied and stable. Nuts are a great source of fiber, healthy fat, and protein. Lentils, garbanzo beans, and hummus are high in fiber, low in fat, and a good source of protein, keeping blood sugar nice and steady. Be sure to soak beans overnight, which will ease digestion. To balance blood sugar, avoid foods that spike insulin levels, increase inflammation in the body, and lead to weight gain. For optimal health, steer clear of these next two foods... No longer limited to candy, refined sugar is added to everyday items such as salad dressing, yogurt, fruit juice, and prepackaged foods. Read food labels carefully and focus on fresh, whole foods to avoid unnecessary spikes in blood sugar. Continue reading >>

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