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What Foods Help Lower Blood Sugar?

The Top 20 Foods For Beating Diabetes

The Top 20 Foods For Beating Diabetes

Every time you roll your shopping cart into the supermarket, you’re making a decision that goes far beyond whether you’re going to have pork or pierogies for dinner. You’re actually choosing between being a victim and a victor. What you put in your cart goes a long way toward determining whether you’ll be compromised by diabetes or start controlling and eventually even beating it. That’s why we’ve assembled the following list of the 20 best foods for fighting diabetes. Every time you go to the store from now on, take this list with you and check off each item. In fact, if your favourite store has a delivery service, sign up for it so your supplies are automatically replenished every few weeks. Research proves that making a few key changes to your diet such as eating more produce, fewer refined carbohydrates, plenty of lean protein, and more ‘good’ fat’helps improve blood-sugar control and cuts the risk of diabetes-related complications. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that one or two or even five foods on this list will transform you. You need most of them, yes, even the flaxseed, because together they represent a new approach to eating, a lifestyle rather than just a diet. 1. Apples Because they offer so many health advantages, put these at the core of your diet. Apples are naturally low in calories, yet their high fibre content (4 grams) fills you up, battles bad cholesterol, and blunts blood-sugar swings. Red Delicious and Granny Smith are also among the top 10 fruits with the most disease-fighting antioxidants. Eat them whole and unpeeled for the greatest benefit, or make a quick ‘baked’ apple. After washing and chopping one apple, put it in a bowl with a dusting of cinnamon and microwave until soft (about 4 minutes). Enjoy with yogourt an Continue reading >>

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

We wrote an article a while ago why sugar is bad for our health (here). But HFR is now taking it a step further and bringing you a list of foods that lower blood sugar and regulate your insulin levels! Sugar is bad for you not only because it is high in calories, but also because it spikes your blood sugar and your triglycerides, which is a risk factor for heart disease. Lima Beans: Are high in soluble fiber which slows digestion and prevents blood sugar from rising too quickly after you eat. Just don’t eat them raw because they are toxic uncooked. Oatmeal: is another super source of soluble fiber, which keeps blood sugar on an even keel and may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. Bitter Melon: This vegetable looks like a cucumber with warts, and it’s an Indian folk remedy for diabetes. As the name implies, bitter melon has a taste that’s a long way from sweet but it can be cooked or added to other dishes. In one study, supplements of bitter melon juice improved the glucose tolerance of 73% of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Peanuts: eat a handful of peanuts or a Peanut butter because the fat, fiber and protein in these nuts can stave off blood sugar spikes. A study found that women who ate peanut butter (or an ounce of nuts) five or more times a week lowered their risk of type 2 diabetes by nearly 30%. Just be mindful of portion control because peanuts are high in calories. Cabbage: is low in calories and high in fiber, with a glycemic index rating of near zero, meaning that it converts to sugar very slowly in the body. Vinegar: vinegar has long been used to cure a wide range of ailments. The acetic acid in vinegar (the compound that’s responsible for its tart taste and smell) helps stabilize blood sugar levels after eating. So pick salad dressings that have a v Continue reading >>

12 Powerfoods To Beat Diabetes

12 Powerfoods To Beat Diabetes

Can controlling your blood sugar and preventing diabetes complications be as simple as eating the right foods? Yes. Certain foods are packed with nutrients that stabilize blood sugar levels, protect your heart, and even save your vision from the damaging effects of diabetes. These 12 foods can give you an extra edge against diabetes and its complications. 1. Apples In a Finnish study, men who ate the most apples and other foods high in quercetin had 20 percent less diabetes and heart disease deaths. Other good sources of quercetin are onions, tomatoes, leafy green vegetables, and berries. 2. Cinnamon A study at the Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland, found that if you use ½ teaspoon of cinnamon daily, it can make cells more sensitive to insulin. Therefore, the study says, the cells convert blood sugar to energy. After 40 days of taking various amount of cinnamon extract, diabetics experienced not only lower blood sugar spikes after eating, but major improvements in signs of heart health. And you can sprinkle cinnamon on just about anything. 3. Citrus Fruit Studies show that people with diabetes tend to have lower levels of vitamin C in their bodies, so antioxidant-packed citrus fruit is a great snack choice. It may seem quicker to get your C from a pill, but since fruit is low in fat, high in fiber, and delivers lots of other healthy nutrients, it's a better choice. 4. Cold-Water Fish Heart disease strikes people with diabetes twice as often as it does people without the illness, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diets high in omega-3 fatty acids—the "good fat" in cold-water fish such as wild Alaskan salmon, sardines, and Atlantic mackerel—can help lower artery-clogging LDL cholesterol and triglycerides while raising levels of HDL Continue reading >>

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

Cut your risk of developing prediabetes by adding these delicious foods to your diet. Lima Beans Also known as butter beans because of their creamy texture, lima beans are high in soluble fiber. “Soluble fiber slows digestion and prevents blood sugar from rising too quickly after you eat,” says Angela Ginn-Meadow, R.D., a diabetes educator and spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. Best bet: Never eat raw lima beans—they contain a cyanide-like toxin that can make you sick. Other beans with lots of soluble fiber: Kidney, navy, black, pinto Try this: Choose fresh lima beans over frozen when you can, suggests Carol Hildebrand, coauthor of 500 Three-Ingredient Recipes. “Shell the beans, simmer them for about 25 minutes and drain. Then saute with chopped ham, diced red onion and a dash of red pepper or vinegar.” Oatmeal This chewy breakfast staple is another super source of soluble fiber, which keeps blood sugar on an even keel and may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes.Best bet: Make your oatmeal the old-fashioned way, using rolled or steel-cut oats. Instant oatmeal tends to be lower in fiber and flavored versions are high in sugar, says Ginn-Meadow. Other sources of soluble fiber: Ground psyllium seeds, Brussels sprouts, pears, oranges, grapefruit Try this: Add sauteed apples to your oatmeal, suggest Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, authors of The Flavor Bible. “Heat a little apple juice in a pan, add thinly sliced or diced peeled apples and cook on medium-high heat until soft.” Sprinkle with cinnamon and stir them into your oatmeal. Peanuts and Peanut Butter Whether you eat a handful of peanuts or a PBJ, the fat, fiber and protein in these nuts can stave off blood sugar spikes. And that’s not all—a study found that women who ate peanut butt Continue reading >>

10 Powerful Foods To Help Lower Blood Sugar Quickly

10 Powerful Foods To Help Lower Blood Sugar Quickly

Blood sugar is a sneaky health issue, but there are many powerful foods that can help you lower blood sugar levels efficiently and quickly. First, in order to understand why high (and low) blood sugar occurs, it’s important to have a basic understanding of what triggers blood sugar highs and lows, and it all starts with insulin. Insulin is the hormone that goes into our blood stream and delivers nutrients to the cells so that our blood sugar stays stable. While insulin is often thought of as a negative hormone, it’s actually valuable and vital to our health. When our body doesn’t produce insulin or use insulin efficiently, we can develop insulin resistance which can lead to Type 2 diabetes. One of the best things we can all do in order to help insulin do its job is to eat regularly and eat a balanced diet that’s filled with healthy foods. Start With These Tips to Lower Blood Sugar Levels To help you get started on filling your plate with more blood sugar friendly foods that will help lower your blood sugar, start by removing refined sugar, refined grains, and most processed foods from your diet. Processed foods (and especially fast food) all contain chemicals and refined ingredients that our bodies don’t recognize as real nutrients, so our cells never really get what they need and we feel hungry all the time as a result. This also leads to blood sugar swings and spikes that cause insulin to work less efficiently. What helps insulin work best so that blood sugar stays in a stable place are foods that pack dense amounts of nutrition and contain amino acids (that form protein in the body), fiber (which is the best source of carbohydrates), and healthy fats from real food. Let’s check out some foods that can help lower blood sugar levels by offering us these nut Continue reading >>

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

Skipping meals could potentially push your blood glucose higher. When you don't eat for several hours because of sleep or other reasons, your body fuels itself on glucose released from the liver. For many people with type 2 diabetes (PWDs type 2), the liver doesn't properly sense that the blood has ample glucose already, so it continues to pour out more. Eating something with a little carbohydrate signals the liver to stop sending glucose into the bloodstream and can tamp down high numbers. Skipping meals can also lead to overeating, which can cause an increase in weight. And if you take certain diabetes medications that stimulate the body's own insulin such as common sulfonylureas, or you take insulin with injections or a pump, you risk having your blood glucose drop too low when you skip or delay meals. Going Low-Carb Low-carb diets "are not balanced and deprive the body of needed fiber, vitamins, and minerals," says Constance Brown-Riggs, M.S.Ed, R.D., CDE, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes (Career Press, 2010). Recently, Brown-Riggs counseled a PWD type 2 who ate very little carbohydrate. The result: poor energy and severe headaches. Brown-Riggs helped the person balance out his meal plan by suggesting fruits, grains, and other carb-containing foods. "His headaches subsided, his energy level was restored, and he was happy to learn that he could eat healthy sources of carbohydrate and manage his blood glucose levels successfully," Brown-Riggs says. The keys to success are to manage portions of all foods, spread your food out over your day, and work with your health care team to devise an individualized meal, activity, and medication plan. Eating Pasta Al Dente It is best to eat your spaghetti al dente, says David J. A. Jenkins, M. Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar Naturally

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar Naturally

Processed foods like cookies, cakes, and candy (and even starchy plant foods like rice, beans, and potatoes) can cause rapid increases in blood sugar levels. After one meal containing these foods, blood sugar can get so high that insulin can’t keep up. Side effects like fatigue, blurred vision, headaches, trouble concentrating, and frequent urination can result. If you consume high-carbohydrate foods every day, you increase your risk of type 2 diabetes — the medical diagnosis for having chronically high blood sugar levels that are caused by diet and lifestyle. (This is different from type 1 diabetes — a condition where the body produces little to no insulin.) Over 422 million people have diabetes worldwide, and their high blood sugar levels are destroying their bodies. To know if your blood sugar levels are chronically high, many doctors will check your A1C levels. A1C stands for glycated hemoglobin, which is formed when blood sugar attaches to hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells). A1C tests measure the percentage of your hemoglobin that has blood sugar attached to it. If blood sugar levels have been high for the past 3 months, then more hemoglobin will be glycated. Thus, A1C testing provides an accurate measurement of how high your blood sugar has been over the past two to three months. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates pre-diabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal. Earlier in this article, we explored how you can raise your blood sugar. Just eat cookies, cakes, rice, potatoes, and other high-carbohydrate foods, and you will be on the fast track toward diabetes. Following this logic, won’t eating fewer carbohydrates lower your blood sug Continue reading >>

Surprising Foods That Help Lower Blood Sugar If You Have Diabetes

Surprising Foods That Help Lower Blood Sugar If You Have Diabetes

For the 26 million people in the U.S. with diabetes and the estimated 79 million American adults with pre-diabetes, there has never been a better time to start managing and improving your diabetes. Researchers know more today than they did just five years ago about diet, insulin, medications and complications. Each person with type 2 diabetes needs to work out his/her particular eating, exercise or medical plan so it translates into normal blood sugars in his/her particular body. In general food and meal choices that work best for these people are lower sugar, lower sodium, higher fiber, lean meats and plant protein, fruits and vegetables and sources of monounsaturated and omega-3 fatty acids. Beyond that there are some specific and even surprising foods that may help lower blood sugars in people with diabetes. Information and recipes for the following can be found in the new edition of my best-selling book, Tell Me What to Eat If I Have Diabetes. . Foods with little to no carbohydrate The following foods, when eaten alone, even in large amounts, are not likely to cause a significant rise in blood sugar because they contain few carbohydrates: Meat Poultry Fish Avocados Dark green veggies and salad vegetables Eggs Cheese Mushrooms Some Nuts (a 2-ounce serving of these nuts contain 5 grams or less net carbs: almonds, brazil nuts, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts, peanuts, pecans, walnuts). Foods with synergy In my book, FOOD SYNERGY, I looked at research that suggested synergy within and between certain foods or food components—where components seemed to work together for maximum health benefit. Foods with synergy that seemed to keep insulin levels steady include: Whole grains Soluble fiber in oats Soy protein Ground flaxseed Foods and food partnerships with synergy that might Continue reading >>

14 Amazing Herbs That Lower Blood Sugar

14 Amazing Herbs That Lower Blood Sugar

We live in a world where prescription medicine is getting more and more expensive as well as controversial. Alternative medicine is gaining momentum and with good reason! The same is true for treatments for diabetes type 2. You have therapies that can reverse diabetes through lifestyle and diet changes, natural supplements that can help stabilize blood sugar levels, and also herbs that lower blood sugar. Not only are these alternative therapies safer, but they are also easier on your pocket, on your body and mind. Maintaining normal blood sugar levels is necessary for the body’s overall health. Erratic blood sugar levels can affect the body’s ability to function normally and even lead to complications if left unchecked. Some herbs and spices found in nature do a tremendous job of naturally lowering blood sugar levels, making them a boon for diabetics and pre-diabetics. What’s more, being nature’s multi-taskers, herbs and spices also produce overall health benefits beyond just helping balance blood sugar. We want to clarify one thing right away – not everything on our list can be classified as ‘herbs’. However, they are all from natural sources. Herbs come from the leafy and green part of the plant. Spices are parts of the plant other than the leafy bit, such as the root, stem, bulb, bark or seeds. RELATED: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) With that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the best herbs that lower blood sugar, along with a few spices thrown in, to give you a more comprehensive list. Please note that while we normally do not use animal studies to support any dietary supplement, several herbs like garlic and ginger are considered ‘food’ and so, are used traditionally by cultures across the world in their daily diet Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your A1c Levels: A Healthful Guide

How To Lower Your A1c Levels: A Healthful Guide

An A1C blood test measures average blood sugar levels over the past 2 to 3 months. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend the use of A1C tests to help diagnose cases of prediabetes, type 1, and type 2 diabetes. A1C tests are also used to monitor diabetes treatment plans. What is an A1C test? An A1C test measures how well the body is maintaining blood glucose levels. To do this, an A1C test averages the percentage of sugar-bound hemoglobin in a blood sample. When glucose enters the blood, it binds to a red blood cell protein called hemoglobin. The higher blood glucose levels are, the more hemoglobin is bound. Red blood cells live for around 4 months, so A1C results reflect long-term blood glucose levels. A1C tests are done using blood obtained by a finger prick or blood draw. Physicians will usually repeat A1C tests before diagnosing diabetes. Initial A1C tests help physicians work out an individual's baseline A1C level for later comparison. How often A1C tests are required after diagnosis varies depending on the type of diabetes and management factors. Lowering A1C levels Many studies have shown that lowering A1C levels can help reduce the risk or intensity of diabetes complications. With type 1 diabetes, more controlled blood glucose levels are associated with reduced rates of disease progression. With type 2 diabetes, more controlled A1C levels have also been shown to reduce symptoms affecting the small arteries and nerves in the body. This influences eyesight and pain while decreasing complications. Long-term studies have also shown that early and intensive blood glucose control can reduce cardiovascular complications in people with type 1 or 2 diabetes. Even small changes in A1C levels can have big effects. The ADA recommend that maintaining fair control Continue reading >>

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

Diabetes tips can run the gamut, but our top tip (and most doctors' top tip) is to create a diet filled with foods that lower your blood sugar—and help control it, too. Sure, it sounds tricky, but it really needn't be. That’s because there’s an easy-to-follow nutritional formula that can help do the trick—and keep your blood pressure, cholesterol, and body weight in check. So, what is that formula? There are three parts: • Divide • Add • Subtract By dividing up the portions on your plate in a better way, adding certain healthy foods, and subtracting blood-sugar-unfriendly choices, you'll be well on your way to enjoying gaining better control of your blood sugar. Divide Up Your Plate Many people give over half of their dinner plate to a meat-based main course. But you'll want to readjust that thinking. Half of your plate should be produce; the other half can be divided between protein (like lean chicken) and high-fiber starches (like whole-wheat pasta or potatoes with the skins on). Add This Good Stuff To really control your blood sugar, you need to focus on foods that your body digests slowly, so that blood sugar is then released into your bloodstream slowly and steadily. But go the extra mile, and make sure the foods you choose are nutritious, too. Here are some good examples of foods that can lower your blood sugar: Beans—Not only are beans (like kidney and pinto) a low-fat, nutritious source of protein, but they're also high in fiber. And that's just what you want, because high-fiber foods slow down digestion. (Find out why legumes are especially great for blood sugar.) Whole grains—Like beans, whole grains are nutrient-rich, high in fiber, and low on the glycemic index. Translation: They digest more slowly than refined and processed grains, keeping Continue reading >>

9 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

9 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

High blood sugar and insulin resistance are linked with inflammation, heart disease, kidney disease, and diabetes. Protect yourself with these nine blood-sugar-balancing foods: 1. Cinnamon Contains compounds that reduce blood sugar and improve insulin sensitivity, and cinnamon may also lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels—risk factors in diabetes. Don’t overdo it: Studies have found results with only ¼–1/2 teaspoon per day, and cinnamon contains coumarin, which may cause problems at higher doses. Try this: Stir cinnamon and currants into oatmeal; add a cinnamon stick to your morning coffee; toss steamed sweet potatoes with cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and coconut oil. Did You Know? Studies show that eating as little as 1/4 tsp. of cinnamon per day can improve insulin sensitivity and may also lower cholesterol. 2. Vinegar Contains acetic acid, which improves insulin sensitivity and can lower blood sugar by as much as 20 percent when consumed before or with meals containing carbs. Try this: Simmer balsamic vinegar until reduced to a thick, syrupy glaze, and drizzle on strawberries; combine apple cider vinegar with honey, lemon juice, and cayenne pepper for a breakfast tonic; whisk together red wine vinegar, shallots, mustard, thyme, and olive oil for an easy vinaigrette. 3. Broccoli sprouts Are high in a compound called sulforaphane that can improve insulin resistance and protect against diabetes. Broccoli sprouts also help lower LDL cholesterol, triglyceride levels, and inflammation in people with diabetes. You can find broccoli sprouts in most natural food stores, or look for broccoli sprout powder. Try this: Combine broccoli sprouts, grated carrot, and thinly sliced red onion in a pita; toss broccoli sprouts with shredded spinach, grated beets, and avocado, an Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

While a low carb diet appears to be useful on the whole, there are also many foods shown to help. Either by lowering blood sugars and/or improving insulin sensitivity. This articles looks at 10 of the best foods and supplements for lowering blood sugars, based on current research. Just know they should never be used in place of your diabetes medication, but rather alongside. 1. Resistant Starch Lowers Sugars After Meals Starches are long chains of glucose (sugar) found in oats, grains, bananas, potatoes and various other foods. Some varieties pass through digestion unchanged and are not absorbed as sugar into the blood. These are known as resistant starch. Many studies show resistant starch can greatly improve insulin sensitivity. That is, how well the body can move sugar out of the blood and into cells for energy. This is why it’s so useful for lowering blood sugar levels after meals (1, 2). The effect is so great that having resistant starch at lunch will reduce blood sugar spikes at dinner, known as the “second meal effect” (3). Problem is many foods high in resistant starch, such as potatoes, are also high in digestible carbs that can spike blood sugar. Therefore resistant starch in supplement form – without the extra carbs – is recommended. Summary: Supplemental resistant starch is a fantastic option for those struggling to control sugars or have hit a plateau. 2. Ceylon Cinnamon Several cinnamon compounds appear to prevent the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream, minimising blood sugar spikes. It may also dramatically improve insulin sensitivity (4, 5). In a recent clinical trial, 25 poorly-controlled type 2 diabetics received either 1 gram per day of cinnamon or placebo (dummy supplement) for 12 weeks. Fasting blood sugar levels in the cinnamon gro Continue reading >>

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

If you get a high reading when checking your blood sugar, is there a way to get the number down quickly? Continue reading >>

8 Tips To Avoid Blood Sugar Dips And Spikes

8 Tips To Avoid Blood Sugar Dips And Spikes

If you have type 2 diabetes and your blood sugar levels are racing up and down like a roller coaster, it's time to get off the ride. Big swings in your blood sugar can make you feel lousy. But even if you aren't aware of them, they can still increase your risk for a number of serious health problems. By making simple but specific adjustments to your lifestyle and diet, you can gain better blood-sugar control. Your body uses the sugar, also known as glucose, in the foods you eat for energy. Think of it as a fuel that keeps your body moving throughout the day. Blood Sugar Highs and Lows Type 2 diabetes decreases the body’s production of insulin, which is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in the blood and can damage nerves and blood vessels. This increase of blood sugar also increases your risk for heart disease and stroke. Over time, high blood sugar, also known as hyperglycemia, can lead to more health problems, including kidney failure and blindness. "Keeping blood sugar stable can help prevent the long-term consequences of fluctuations," says Melissa Li-Ng, MD, an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. Dr. Li-Ng explains that high blood sugar can cause a number of symptoms that include: Fatigue Increased thirst Blurry vision Frequent urination It's also important to know that you can have high blood sugar and still feel fine, but your body can still suffer damage, Li-Ng says. Symptoms of high blood sugar typically develop at levels above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). "You can have high blood sugar that's between 150 and 199 and feel perfectly fine," Li-Ng says. Over time, your body can also get used to chronically high blood sugar levels, so you don’t feel the symptoms, she says. On the flip side, if you Continue reading >>

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