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What Foods Can I Eat To Lower My Blood Sugar?

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

If you get a high reading when checking your blood sugar, is there a way to get the number down quickly? Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Can Help Prevent Diabetes

10 Foods That Can Help Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is an epidemic in the United States, with about 29 million people who have it, another 8 million who are undiagnosed and 86 million who are considered pre-diabetic, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes, the most common form, is a disease in which the body’s cells don’t use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to get glucose into the cells, but over time, the pancreas can’t make enough to keep blood glucose levels normal and the result is type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes increases a person’s risk for several health conditions including high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. It’s also responsible for as many as 12 percent of deaths in the U.S., three times higher than previous estimates, a January 2017 study in the journal PLOS ONE found. Although genetics can increase your chances of developing type 2 diabetes, both diet and exercise also play a big role. In fact, people with pre-diabetes who lost just 5 to 7 percent of their body weight reduced their risk by 54 percent, a study out of John Hopkins in July 2013 found. Here, experts weigh in with 10 foods that balance your blood sugar and can prevent diabetes: 1. Apples You might think fruit is off the menu because of its sugar content, but fruit is filled with vitamins and nutrients that can help ward off diabetes. Apples are one of the best fruits you can eat because they’re rich in quercetin, a plant pigment. Quercetin helps the body secrete insulin more efficiently and wards off insulin resistance, which occurs when the body has to make more and more insulin to help glucose enter the cells. Insulin resistance is the hallmark characteristic of type 2 diabetes. “It’s filled with antioxidants, and also there’s fiber in the fruit that nat Continue reading >>

How To Decrease Your Blood Sugar In Pregnancy

How To Decrease Your Blood Sugar In Pregnancy

If your doctor has told you you have elevated blood sugar levels, you probably already know the potential risks. Uncontrolled blood sugar during pregnancy increases your risk of developing gestational diabetes, a potentially serious condition that can complicate delivery, according to the National Institutes of Health, and even increase your child's risk of developing type-2 diabetes later in life. Fortunately, for most women, reducing blood sugar is as simple as changing your diet, according to Aviva Romm, a physician, midwife and author of "The Natural Pregnancy Book." It's not about deprivation or eating bland, tasteless foods. Instead, you can lower blood sugar levels while enjoying delicious, natural foods. Low Glycemic Index Foods Foods can be rated based on how quickly they are converted to glucose. Some foods, such as white bread, pasta, white rice, donuts and most processed foods, quickly become glucose and raise blood sugar, while causing inflammation. Whole, natural foods are usually "low-glycemic index" foods, meaning they reduce inflammation and lower blood sugar levels. The key to maintaining healthy blood sugar levels during pregnancy, says Dr. Sean Daneshmand, M.D., a San Diego obstetrician and the founder of Miracle Babies, is "eating low glycemic index (GI) type foods as much as possible." He adds, "Low GI types of foods include beans; sunflower and pumpkin seeds; whole intact grains, including oats, wheat and barley; and most vegetables and fruits." He recommends avoiding high GI foods, such as white bread, white rice, most breakfast cereals and potatoes. Improve Digestion Los Angeles-based clinical nutritionist Stella Metsovas, B.S., CCN, says people tend to overlook the importance of digestion in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. She says, "Op Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

While a low carb diet appears to be useful on the whole, there are also many foods shown to help. Either by lowering blood sugars and/or improving insulin sensitivity. This articles looks at 10 of the best foods and supplements for lowering blood sugars, based on current research. Just know they should never be used in place of your diabetes medication, but rather alongside. 1. Resistant Starch Lowers Sugars After Meals Starches are long chains of glucose (sugar) found in oats, grains, bananas, potatoes and various other foods. Some varieties pass through digestion unchanged and are not absorbed as sugar into the blood. These are known as resistant starch. Many studies show resistant starch can greatly improve insulin sensitivity. That is, how well the body can move sugar out of the blood and into cells for energy. This is why it’s so useful for lowering blood sugar levels after meals (1, 2). The effect is so great that having resistant starch at lunch will reduce blood sugar spikes at dinner, known as the “second meal effect” (3). Problem is many foods high in resistant starch, such as potatoes, are also high in digestible carbs that can spike blood sugar. Therefore resistant starch in supplement form – without the extra carbs – is recommended. Summary: Supplemental resistant starch is a fantastic option for those struggling to control sugars or have hit a plateau. 2. Ceylon Cinnamon Several cinnamon compounds appear to prevent the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream, minimising blood sugar spikes. It may also dramatically improve insulin sensitivity (4, 5). In a recent clinical trial, 25 poorly-controlled type 2 diabetics received either 1 gram per day of cinnamon or placebo (dummy supplement) for 12 weeks. Fasting blood sugar levels in the cinnamon gro Continue reading >>

Fiftysomething Diet: 5 Foods That Will Bring Your Blood Pressure Down

Fiftysomething Diet: 5 Foods That Will Bring Your Blood Pressure Down

Consuming natural foods, along with cutting out salt, will have you eating well and avoiding heart disease High blood pressure, also known as "the silent killer," is an epidemic in our nation. It typically has no warning signs or symptoms, and many people don't realize they have it, which is why we must all get it checked regularly. Over time, unaddressed elevated blood pressure can have disastrous consequences including stroke, heart attack, blindness and kidney failure. Every 39 seconds, someone in this country dies of cardiovascular disease. And despite the fact that the largest risk factor in these deaths — high blood pressure — is both preventable and reversible, as many as 67 million American adults live with high blood pressure, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Alarmingly, 47 percent of those with a diagnosis have not gotten their blood pressure under control, according to government research. And many of those afflicted don't adhere to recommended medication regimens because of the drugs' side effects. Medications are highly effective in bringing down blood pressure, when taken properly. But what you eat (and drink) also has a dramatic impact. The government-endorsed Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet has been proven as effective as prescription medication in reducing blood pressure. (MORE: Fiftysomething Diet: Foods to Help You Age Better) Many imagine that a blood-pressure-lowering diet involves bland, unseasoned foods and deprivation. That couldn't be further from the truth. Although reducing your sodium intake is an important step in lowering blood pressure, what you add to your diet is as important as what you take out. Here are 5 surprising and delicious foods from my Blood Pressure DOWN action plan: Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Diet

The Diabetes Diet

What's the best diet for diabetes? Whether you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes, your nutritional needs are virtually the same as everyone else, so no special foods are necessary. But you do need to pay attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat. While following a Mediterranean or other heart-healthy diet can help with this, the most important thing you can do is to lose a little weight. Losing just 5% to 10% of your total weight can help you lower your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Losing weight and eating healthier can also have a profound effect on your mood, energy, and sense of wellbeing. Even if you’ve already developed diabetes, it’s not too late to make a positive change. By eating healthier, being more physically active, and losing weight, you can reduce your symptoms or even reverse diabetes. The bottom line is that you have more control over your health than you may think. The biggest risk for diabetes: belly fat Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. However, your risk is higher if you tend to carry your weight around your abdomen as opposed to your hips and thighs. A lot of belly fat surrounds the abdominal organs and liver and is closely linked to insulin resistance. You are at an increased risk of developing diabetes if you are: A woman with a waist circumference of 35 inches or more A man with a waist circumference of 40 inches or more Calories obtained from fructose (found in sugary beverages such as soda, energy and sports drinks, coffee drinks, and processed foods like doughnuts, muffins, cereal, candy and granola bars) are more likely to add weight around your abdomen. Cutting back on sugary foods can mean a slimmer waistline as well as a lowe Continue reading >>

12 Powerfoods To Beat Diabetes

12 Powerfoods To Beat Diabetes

Can controlling your blood sugar and preventing diabetes complications be as simple as eating the right foods? Yes. Certain foods are packed with nutrients that stabilize blood sugar levels, protect your heart, and even save your vision from the damaging effects of diabetes. These 12 foods can give you an extra edge against diabetes and its complications. 1. Apples In a Finnish study, men who ate the most apples and other foods high in quercetin had 20 percent less diabetes and heart disease deaths. Other good sources of quercetin are onions, tomatoes, leafy green vegetables, and berries. 2. Cinnamon A study at the Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland, found that if you use ½ teaspoon of cinnamon daily, it can make cells more sensitive to insulin. Therefore, the study says, the cells convert blood sugar to energy. After 40 days of taking various amount of cinnamon extract, diabetics experienced not only lower blood sugar spikes after eating, but major improvements in signs of heart health. And you can sprinkle cinnamon on just about anything. 3. Citrus Fruit Studies show that people with diabetes tend to have lower levels of vitamin C in their bodies, so antioxidant-packed citrus fruit is a great snack choice. It may seem quicker to get your C from a pill, but since fruit is low in fat, high in fiber, and delivers lots of other healthy nutrients, it's a better choice. 4. Cold-Water Fish Heart disease strikes people with diabetes twice as often as it does people without the illness, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diets high in omega-3 fatty acids—the "good fat" in cold-water fish such as wild Alaskan salmon, sardines, and Atlantic mackerel—can help lower artery-clogging LDL cholesterol and triglycerides while raising levels of HDL Continue reading >>

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

I have gestational diabetes. Why do I have to watch what I eat? Eating well is an important way to stay healthy for all women in pregnancy. But if you have gestational diabetes (GD), choosing the right food is especially important. When you eat, your digestive system breaks most of your food down into a type of sugar called glucose. Glucose is one of your body’s main sources of energy. Glucose enters your bloodstream and then, with the help of insulin (a hormone made by your pancreas), your cells use the glucose as fuel. However, if your body doesn't produce enough insulin – or your cells have a problem responding to the insulin – too much glucose stays in your blood, instead of moving into the cells and getting converted to energy. Pregnancy hormones reduce the effect of insulin, so your body has to make more of it. If your body can't keep up with the demands for insulin, your blood sugar levels can get too high. That's when GD happens. It's important to control it, as it can lead to problems for your baby. You may be able to control GD by changing what you eat and combining a healthy diet with regular exercise. Learn all about gestational diabetes, including risk factors, symptoms to watch out for, and how it's managed. How will I have to change my diet? If you’ve been diagnosed with GD, your doctor should refer you to a dietitian who can work out a special diet for you. Every pregnancy is different, so what works for one woman may not work for you. You’ll probably need to experiment with different foods and combinations of foods before you work out what’s best for your body. Your dietitian will be able to help you with this. Women with GD say the foods they can tolerate often change as their pregnancy progresses, which can be frustrating. Others say their Continue reading >>

Proven Tips & Strategies To Bring High Blood Sugar Down (quickly)

Proven Tips & Strategies To Bring High Blood Sugar Down (quickly)

Untreated, high blood sugar can cause many problems and future complications. Recognizing signs of high blood sugar levels and knowing how to lower them can help you prevent these complications and increase the quality and length of your life. Topics covered (click to jump to specific section) High blood sugar level symptoms and signs Symptoms of high blood sugar include: Increased thirst Tired all the time Irritability Increased hunger Urinating a lot Dry mouth Blurred vision Severe high blood sugar can lead to nausea and fruity smelling breath The signs and symptoms for high blood sugar are the same for both type 1 and type 2. Signs usually show up quicker in those who have type 1 because of the nature of their diabetes. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that causes the body to stop making insulin altogether. Type 2 is caused by lifestyle factors when the body eventually stops responding to insulin, which causes the sugar to increase slowly. People with type 2 can live longer without any symptoms creeping because their body is still making enough insulin to help control it a little bit. What causes the blood sugar levels go to high? Our bodies need sugar to make energy for the cells. Without it, we cannot do basic functions. When we eat foods with glucose, insulin pairs with it to allow it to enter into the cell wall. If the insulin is not there, then the glucose molecule can’t get through the wall and cannot be used. The extra glucose hangs out in the bloodstream which is literally high blood sugar. The lack of insulin can be caused by two different things. First, you can have decreased insulin resistance which means that your insulin doesn’t react the way that it is supposed to. It doesn’t partner with glucose to be used as fuel. Secondly, you can have no insuli Continue reading >>

The 4 Foods That Will Steady Your Blood Sugar

The 4 Foods That Will Steady Your Blood Sugar

Wondering what blood sugar has to do with you, if you don’t have diabetes? Keeping your blood sugar levels as steady as possiblenow may help you avoid getting diabetes later. “As you get older, your risk for type 2 diabetes goes up,” says Alissa Rumsey, Registered Dietitian and Spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Since you can’t modify your age, it is important to take other steps to lower your risk, including maintaining a healthy weight, getting enough exercise, and balancing your diet to prevent spikes in blood sugar.” Controlling your blood sugar will also just make you feel better. “It’s best to control blood sugar—it keeps your energy stable,” says Leann Olansky, M.D., an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic. “If your blood sugar doesn’t vary that much before and after a meal, that’s a healthier way to be.” Unrelated to diabetes, symptoms of occasional high blood sugar aren’t life-threatening, but rather unpleasant and only potentially dangerous if you suffer from other health problems. “When your blood sugar is too high, it can make you feel sluggish,” says Dr. Olansky. “When it’s higher still, it can lead to dehydration and make your blood pressure unstable, and cause you to urinate more often, especially at night.” But when your blood sugar remains chronically high, insulin, a hormone that’s supposed to help your body store sugar as energy, stops working as it should. “Prolonged high blood sugar levels can lead to insulin resistance, meaning your body isn’t able to use insulin properly,” says Rumsey. “Over time this insulin resistance can develop into diabetes, when insulin isn’t able to keep your blood sugar within normal levels.” Current research reveals an association between spik Continue reading >>

8 Foods That Help Lower High Blood Pressure

8 Foods That Help Lower High Blood Pressure

These tasty spuds are rich in magnesium and potassium, two nutrients that are an important part of the DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or high blood pressure). A potassium-rich diet helps the body become more efficient at flushing out excess sodium, which can raise blood pressure; and magnesium helps promote healthy blood flow, according to nutritionist Joy Bauer. Skim Milk A cold glass of milk offers a solid serving of both calcium and vitamin D, nutrients that work as a team to help lower blood pressure by 3 to 10 percent, according to Bauer’s website. Those numbers may not sound impressive, but they could translate to a 15 percent reduction in heart disease risk, she added. Other research suggests that people with low levels of calcium are at greater risk of high blood pressure. Livingly Eggs If you think eggs are not heart healthy, you should know that past studies have shown that yolks don’t raise heart disease risk; now recent research has found that egg whites can help dial down blood pressure, according to a study presented earlier this year at a meeting of the American Chemical Society. As MensHealth.com reported, when rats with high blood pressure were fed a protein found in egg whites, they experienced a drop in blood pressure that was comparable to a low dose of Captopril, a blood-pressure-lowering medication. Although more research is needed, eggs are a solid source of protein, vitamin D, and other healthy nutrients. Broccoli iStockphoto/Thinkstock This cruciferous veggie is a good source of the blood pressure-regulating minerals magnesium, calcium, and potassium. Previous research in animals has found that a diet high in broccoli sprouts may help reduce blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and stroke. Broccoli sprouts are high in Continue reading >>

Which Foods Help Diabetes?

Which Foods Help Diabetes?

Tweet One of the first questions for people newly diagnosed with diabetes is 'what can I eat'. Information can be very confusing with many news and healthy living magazines suggesting foods that can help diabetes. To help make some kind of sense, we present our guide on which foods can help diabetes. Picking a sensible diabetic diet The following guidelines provide a good basis for a diabetic diet. Foods with a low GI (glycaemic index) Include lean meats, fish or other sources of protein Include plenty of fibre Try to take in a relatively low amounts of saturated fat and salt Fruit and vegetables Vegetables are a very good choice. They contain a good quantity of vitamins and minerals and are a great source of fibre. Some vegetables have more effect on blood sugar than others so you may need to pick vegetables with a lower GI. Fruits are also a good source of fibre and vitamins but people with diabetes will often find that some fruits are better than others for their blood sugar levels. Protein Protein can be very useful as it is more slowly broken down by the body than carbohydrates. As a result, it has less of an effect on blood sugar and can help you to feel fuller for longer. Good protein sources include oily fish and lean meats, such as grilled skinless chicken. Whole grains Whole grain foods are those containing oats, barley, wheat where the full grain is used. Foods made from grains have quite a high concentration of carbohydrate so people with diabetes will benefit by testing their blood sugar before and after eating grain based foods to see whether their blood sugar is being raised too high. Much modern food is made from over processed grains, such as plain flour, many breads, white rice and pastries. However, whole grains varieties do exist. Breads with a highe Continue reading >>

5 Foods That Lower Your Blood Sugar Quickly

5 Foods That Lower Your Blood Sugar Quickly

Eating a whole foods, plant-based diet is one of the simplest ways to manage your blood sugar and elevate your health to a whole new level. Your blood sugar controls several different hormonal responses in the body, all of which contribute to your energy, your mood, and even your hunger levels. Healthy blood sugars are also vital to prevent or manage Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hypoglycemia. Eating a diet that supports your blood sugar can also help prevent obesity. Plant-based foods are jam-packed with fiber, which is the main reason they’re so supportive of blood sugar levels. Fiber slows down the release of sugar within the bloodstream, which helps steady insulin levels. This prevents those blood sugar “ups and downs” that foods high in refined sugars, animal foods, and highly- processed foods can cause. To take care of your blood sugar, all you have to do is prioritize higher fiber sources of whole foods versus foods lower in fiber, such as foods with refined or added sugars, animal products (which dramatically raise insulin), and most processed foods. To keep things easy and simple, focus on eating foods that do support your blood sugar instead of focusing on those that don’t. As you’ll see, there are some pretty delicious plant-based foods and meals you can make with them that support your blood sugar. These foods will keep you energized, satisfied, provide your body with vitamins, minerals, fiber, healthy fats, and even some protein too! 1. Magnesium-Rich Leafy Greens All leafy greens such as: kale, spinach, romaine, arugula, collards, turnip greens, all lettuces, Swiss chard, dandelion greens, and any other green you can think of, are absolutely wonderful for your blood sugar. However, a few are especially rich in magnesium, which is acts like a Continue reading >>

What Foods Lower Blood Sugar Fast?

What Foods Lower Blood Sugar Fast?

Diabetes causes elevated blood sugar, or glucose, and is very sensitive to diet. Although no food has been proved to lower blood sugar fast, certain foods can lower blood sugar over time. Foods high in fiber, such as beans and nonstarchy vegetables, may improve glucose control for those with diabetes. Eating a diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids from fish and olive oil may also help balance blood sugar. The Mediterranean diet includes these nutritious foods. While there is no specific diet or eating plan recommended for diabetes, incorporating these foods into your diet may improve your blood glucose control. Video of the Day Multiple studies have examined the effect of fiber on blood sugar control. An October 2000 study in “Diabetes Care” reported that increasing the amount of high-fiber foods in the diet of those with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) resulted in improved glucose control over 6 months. People with T1DM don't make enough of the hormone insulin, which allows the body to use glucose in the blood for energy. Participants in this study were given increased fiber in the form of vegetables, such as artichokes, green peas and broccoli; fruits, such as raspberries, pears and apples; and legumes, such as split peas, lentils and black beans. The effect of fiber on blood sugar may extend to type 2 diabetes (T2DM), in which the body doesn't use insulin properly. However, according to the January 2014 "Diabetes Care," studies have shown that the amount of fiber needed to lower blood sugar levels may be more than 50 grams a day -- too much to expect the average person to consume. For now, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that people with diabetes eat the same amount of fiber as is recommended for the general public. The Mediterranean diet includes le Continue reading >>

How To Lower Blood Sugar With Diet

How To Lower Blood Sugar With Diet

Reader Approved High blood sugar can cause a number of health problems. Most notably, it can trigger the onset of diabetes, especially in people with a family history of the disease. Diabetics must monitor their diet to prevent their blood sugar from running dangerously high or too low. Pre-diabetics, or those with a genetic disposition to the disease, can keep blood sugar levels low by being careful with their diet, possibly reducing the risk of needing medication. Once you are diagnosed as Diabetic, it is dangerous to assume that diet and exercise alone can help you manage your blood sugar. If you are disciplined, then a doctor could agree that minimal medication is all that you need. It is not advised that a diagnosed diabetic to take charge of managing his or her blood sugar with diet and exercise alone. Continue reading >>

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