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What Foods Can Diabetics Not Eat?

What Foods Should I Avoid If I Have Diabetes?

What Foods Should I Avoid If I Have Diabetes?

The quick answer is that you don't have to completely avoid eating any food just because you have diabetes. However, some foods are healthier than others. What you'll likely need to focus on is how much carbohydrate you eat. Carbohydrate is found in starchy foods (bread, pasta, rice, and cereal), fruit and fruit juices, milk and yogurt, beans and peas and sweets. You don't need to stop eating these foods but you will need to control how much you do eat. Also, choose the healthier carbs -- these are the carbs that are whole grain, such as brown rice or whole wheat bread, and/or higher in fiber, like fresh fruit and beans. Go for nonfat or low-fat milk and yogurt. For heart health, choose leaner protein foods, like skinless poultry, seafood, lean red meat, eggs and tofu. And for fat choices, go with healthy fats like olive and canola oil, nuts, seeds and avocado. Limit saturated fat, found in butter, stick margarine, red meat and whole-milk dairy foods. Also, limit the sugary/sweet foods, mostly because they contain empty calories and may also be high in fat. These foods may also raise your blood glucose more quickly than whole grain or unrefined carbs. I hope your doctor didn’t give you a list of foods you can and can’t eat because of your diabetes, because it really is simpler than that. I want you to know that you can eat anything you want to. Of course there are some rules. Here is the secret: The fuel that runs the human body is sugar. The job of your digestive system is to turn everything that you put into your mouth into sugar to feed the trillions of cells that make up your body. The problem is that some foods become sugar in your body more quickly than other foods. Oh, and the second problem is that you have diabetes, which means your body doesn’t deal too Continue reading >>

25 Diabetic Foods For Stable Blood Glucose And Overall Health

25 Diabetic Foods For Stable Blood Glucose And Overall Health

Sticking to a diet of diabetic foods is one natural way to help manage your condition and feel as good as possible all day long. If you’re tired of the cycle of eating foods that spike your blood sugar levels, this list will help you avoid those foods and crowd them out with better, more healthy choices. 1. Spinach and Kale Spinach and kale are very similar to each other in terms of how they’re handled by the body and the amount of nutrition they provide. Diabetics can enjoy as much of either one as they care for, and there really isn’t a huge advantage of one over the other. You’ll be getting both Vitamin A and Vitamin C from each, as well as potassium, magnesium, and iron. Baby spinach and baby kale are very much alike in terms of usability, each having their own taste which is their major difference. You can use spinach and kale interchangeably in green smoothie recipes, but kale gets the edge in the snack department because it’s so easy to make kale chips that taste great and won’t leave you filled with regret when you’re done snacking. Eating Nutrient Dense Foods If you’re looking for some of the most nutrient dense foods on the planet you can’t go wrong with spinach and kale. Once for once they provide more vitamins and minerals than just about any other food, including other vegetables and fruit. 2. Beans Beans are a great addition to most any meal because they’ll help to stabilize your blood sugar, rather than have a detrimental effect or no effect at all. Foods like this are important because they can help balance out other foods that aren’t necessarily diabetic-friendly, and they can reduce the amount of insulin needed to bring your levels back to normal. Beans are easy enough to add to a meal, and many recipes call for beans as part of t Continue reading >>

Top 10 Dangerous Foods To Be Avoided By Diabetic Patients

Top 10 Dangerous Foods To Be Avoided By Diabetic Patients

Diabetes or diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease in which the patient suffers from the high level of glucose in the blood. High blood sugar level is caused either due to lack of insulin production by beta cells of the pancreas that is also known as type 1 diabetes or due to insulin resistance in which the body cells fail to utilize the insulin produced by the pancreas that is known as type 2 diabetes. There are numerous natural remedies for diabetes and 10 foods diabetics should avoid, which when combined with a healthy lifestyle can help in controlling and maintain blood sugar at healthy levels. Symptoms of Diabetes There are a wide range of symptoms for diabetes, but the most common ones are as follows: Extreme thirst Excessive hunger Frequent urination Weight loss Dry, itchy skin Slower healing of bruises and cuts Blurred vision Lack of energy Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet Foods that should be avoided by People Suffering from Diabetes The most important factor that affects both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is diet, and a well-planned diet can work effectively in maintaining blood glucose at healthy levels. Here we have a list of 10 foods diabetics should avoid. White Bread The most effective way to control diabetes is through a well-planned diabetic diet and people suffering from diabetes must always be careful about what they eat. One of the most dangerous foods for diabetics is refined starch. Refined starch is found in any food that is made from white flour such as white bread, white flour pasta, etc. These refined carbohydrates have a high glycemic index that causes a rapid rise in blood sugar levels, which is extremely harmful to diabetic patients. It is best to opt for whole grains and barn cereals like oatmeal that are rich in fiber. Thes Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

Diabetic Food List

Diabetic Food List

Source Being diabetic does not mean you have to eat boring or bland foods. There are many healthy and flavorful food choices that are less likely to cause blood sugar spikes. Printable Food List If you're diabetic, the following printable list can help you make smart eating decisions. It may be browsed online or downloaded to print and carry with you or display on your fridge. If you need downloading assistance, check out these helpful tips. Foods on the List Following a diabetic eating plan may seem daunting, but when you are armed with the right information, it gets easier with time. As your knowledge grows about how specific foods affect blood sugar in the body, food selection will be a breeze. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the following foods can be enjoyed on a diabetic menu: Whole grains: Avoid refined grains and white or enriched flours since, according to the ADA, they only include the starchy part of the grain. Think out of the box and give grains other than wheat a try, such as quinoa, farrow, millet or triticale. Beans and legumes: Beans provide fiber, protein, and a heavy dose of nutrition. They're also inexpensive and versatile. The ADA recommends incorporating several meals of beans into your diet each week. Vegetables: Diabetics can enjoy starchy and non-starchy vegetables, but starchy veggies such as potatoes, pumpkin, and corn should be consumed in moderation. Non-starchy choices such as mushrooms, cauliflower, cucumbers, and greens should fill half of your plate each meal. Fruits: Fruits offer nutrition and sweet taste without added refined sugars, but they still impact blood sugar. The ADA says on its website that most fruits have a low glycemic index and can be enjoyed. Within a glycemic scale diet, fruits that fall in the med Continue reading >>

12 Proven Foods Essential For Every Type 2 Diabetes Diet

12 Proven Foods Essential For Every Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Cut out bread. No sugar in your coffee. Only one potato at dinner. If you’ve got blood sugar problems then you’ve heard those instructions over and over. The focus is always on what you should remove from your diet, and it’s incredibly frustrating. What about what you can eat? What about the foods you should be adding to a diet for type 2 diabetes… the foods that can actually improve blood sugar control? Research shows there are many natural foods that can help. Either by reducing sugar absorption into the bloodstream, or by improving insulin resistance. It’s certainly worth your while to learn what those foods are, rather than just what to avoid. I’ve done some of the research here and strongly recommend you start with the following. 1. Almonds improve glucose metabolism Tree nuts – not peanuts, which grow in the ground – are linked with many metabolic health benefits. But almonds really standout when it comes to managing blood sugar. They are very low in carbohydrates, but that’s not why. The reason is Magnesium. Magnesium is an essential mineral involved in over 300 bodily processes, including blood pressure regulation and blood sugar control (1, 2). Alongside spinach, almonds and cashews are among the best sources of magnesium in the human diet. Several handfuls provides over 20% of the daily recommended intake (2). While the mechanism is unclear, having low magnesium levels is strongly associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It appears to impact on insulin secretion, which may be the reason that 25-38% of type 2 diabetics have low magnesium (4). Clinical trials have shown that restoring low magnesium significantly improves insulin response and reduces blood sugar levels (4, 5). Especially if you’re magnesium deficient and insulin resist Continue reading >>

What To Eat, Diabetics

What To Eat, Diabetics

Food Suggestions and Tips for People who have Idiopathic Gastroparesis or Delayed Emptying of the Stomach Information: adapted and reviewed by: Carol Rees Parrish, RD, MS Nutrition Support Specialist University of Virginia Health System Digestive Health Center of Excellence Gastroparesis and Dysmotilities Association (GPDA) www.digestivedistress.com __________________________________________________________ Introduction: What to eat when your stomach is not working right can be challenging for anyone, but is particularly so for individuals with Type I 1 diabetes mellitus, who are also faced with a slow-emptying stomach (gastroparesis). Wide swings in blood glucose levels can be an early sign of gastroparesis in someone with diabetes mellitus. Others may experience digestive symptoms that punctuate life's routines, rob one's appetite, or develop into patterns of nausea and vomiting. Dietary manipulation can greatly assist you in regaining blood glucose control. Proper use of your insulin or diabetic medication is also of utmost importance. Your diabetologist, or primary care physician, dietitian, diabetes nurse specialist, and diabetes educator are your best resources. For those who are experiencing moderate to more severe digestive symptoms, eating may become inconsistent from meal to meal, day to day, or week to week, depending upon the frequency and intensity of digestive distress. Getting a handle on good blood glucose control - while still attempting to eat enough calories in order to maintain your weight - may seem daunting. Our aim is to provide you with knowledge and suggestions to aid your efforts as you work towards optimal management with your medical team. In general: Little research is available in the area of diet and gastroparesis. What works for one perso Continue reading >>

Foods Diabetics Should Never Eat

Foods Diabetics Should Never Eat

Foods Diabetics Should Never Eat: “Diabetes is all about carbs,” Deborah Malkoff-Cohen, registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, says. No medical prescription can fix a bad diet. The condition requires daily maintenance – monitoring blood sugar levels, eating healthy and exercising are crucial. Managing your weight is a lot more serious than simply looking and feeling good. Watching your diet can be a matter of life and death. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a master’s degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. Bananas are a healthy way to get nutrients such as vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. However, bananas sometimes tend to get a bad rap, even from doctors. In an internet search, you might frequently run into “informational advertisements” with bananas as part of the list of the five foods you should never eat. Never eat? That seems a little extreme, especially if you know your nutrition facts about this fruit. Get to know your banana Bananas are fat free, sodium free, and cholesterol free. But it is important to understand that bananas are NOT carbohydrate free! And figuring the carbohydrate content of a banana can be tricky because the content varies with size. Use this chart when calculating the carb content of the bananas you eat (measure once and eyeball thereafter): 6 inches or smaller: 18.5 grams 6 to 7 inches: 23 grams 7 to 8 inches: 27 grams 8 to 9 inches: 31 grams 9 inches or larger: 35 grams From small to large bananas in that scale, you will get anywhere from two to four grams of fiber per serving, depending on the size. Obviously the larger the banana, the higher the fiber, potassium, and vitamin C content, but that also comes with higher carbohydrate content. Of the 30 grams of carbohydrate in a “medium” banana, 19 grams are sugar and the other 11 grams are starch, including three grams of fiber. A fully ripe banana has a glycemic index of 51—this would be considered a low-glycemic index food, as the cutoff is 55. In addition, the ripeness of a banana changes its glycemic index. An under-ripe banana with visible green sections on the peel Continue reading >>

Eat Well!

Eat Well!

When you have diabetes, deciding what, when, and how much to eat may seem challenging. So, what can you eat, and how can you fit the foods you love into your meal plan? Eating healthy food at home and choosing healthy food when eating out are important in managing your diabetes. The first step is to work with your doctor or dietitian to make a meal plan just for you. As soon as you find out you have diabetes, ask for a meeting with your doctor or dietitian to discuss how to make and follow a meal plan. During this meeting, you will learn how to choose healthier foods—a variety of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy foods, lean meats, and other proteins. You will also learn to watch your portion sizes and what to drink while staying within your calorie, fat, and carbohydrate (carbs) limits. You can still enjoy food while eating healthy. But how do you do that? Here are a few tips to help you when eating at home and away from home. Eating Healthy Portions An easy way to know portion sizes is to use the “plate method.” Looking at your basic 9-inch dinner plate[PDF – 14 MB], draw an imaginary line down the middle of the plate, and divide one side in half. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables, like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and carrots. In one of the smaller sections, put a grain or starchy food such as bread, noodles, rice, corn or potatoes. In the other smaller section, put your protein, like fish, chicken, lean beef, tofu, or cooked dried beans. Learn more at Create Your Plate, an interactive resource from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that shows how a healthy plate should look. This tool allows you to select different foods and see the portion sizes you should use in planning your meal Continue reading >>

Foods And Fruits That Diabetics Should Not Eat

Foods And Fruits That Diabetics Should Not Eat

A healthy diabetic diet can include any food in moderation, as long as it allows you to keep your blood sugar levels within target. However, "moderation" may be difficult to apply to some foods because of their very high carbohydrate content. Some foods also seem to trigger cravings or promote overeating. If you have diabetes, it may be best to avoid eating these foods, to prevent problems with your blood sugar that could compromise your health. Video of the Day Many fruits at the supermarket today are made to be larger in size, which means they contain a lot more carbohydrates per serving. Diabetics should keep their carbohydrate intake moderate, because carbs influence your blood sugar more than other nutrients. Avoid large apples, which contain over 30 g of carbohydrates; choose a very small apple to cut your carb intake in half. The same goes for oranges and pears. If you enjoy mango, papaya or melon, keep your serving to no more than 1/2 cup. Juice may provide some of the nutrients found in fruits, but a very important factor is missing: fiber. Without the fiber, fruit juices are a lot less satisfying compared to whole fruits, and can result in a quicker rise in your blood sugar levels. In addition, most diabetics do not keep their serving to 4 oz., and consume up to 12 oz. or 16 oz. at a time, resulting in consumption of up to 40 g to 55 g of carbohydrates. Dried fruits are a very concentrated source of carbohydrates. Unless you can stick to a serving of no more than 1 tbsp. to 2 tbsp., you should not eat them. Because dried fruits are dehydrated, they take less space in your stomach, and it is easy to overeat. For example, if you eat about 1/2 cup of raisins, dried cranberries, dried figs, dried banana or dried apple, it adds up to close to 50 g to 60 g of carboh Continue reading >>

A Simple List Of Foods Prediabetics Should Avoid

A Simple List Of Foods Prediabetics Should Avoid

If your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, your body is telling you to adjust your diet. When you’re prediabetic, you can bring those numbers down through a diet of fresh, whole foods. Steer clear of processed foods, which often contain high levels of ingredients that aren’t your friends, and rethink your protein choices. Sweetened beverages may be the biggest culprits in increasing your diabetes risk, according to multiple studies cited by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. When you’re prediabetic, avoid sugary drinks such as: For the best beverage choices, choose water or club soda flavored with slices of citrus fruit or cucumber, plain coffee, unsweetened tea and unflavored sports drinks. The American Heart Association advises against alcoholic drinks, but if you occasionally indulge, opt for a mixer like club soda or tonic. Foods with Added Sugar Manufacturers add sugar to most processed foods to improve flavor and shelf life. The Nutrition Facts label tells you the grams of sugar in a serving. If sugar tops the ingredients list – or words like “syrup” or anything ending in “-ose” – chances are the product contains too much of the added sweet stuff. Some examples of commercially manufactured products that prediabetics should use sparingly or avoid completely include: baked goods, like cookies, cakes and pies cereal granola bars frozen desserts tomato sauce and ketchup salad dressings, barbecue sauce and marinades fruit-flavored yogurt jams and jellies Refined Grains White rice, white pasta and white flour products like bread are examples of refined grains that can spike your glucose levels. Switch out these foods for whole grains like brown rice, oats and oat bran, whole wheat, quinoa, millet and corn. Trans Fats While olive o Continue reading >>

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Know What to Avoid Diabetes requires daily maintenance, including monitoring your blood sugar, eating a healthy diet, exercising, and of course staying on top of any complications with your heart, eyes, and other organs. Controlling your weight is another key aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. If you’re overweight, losing some weight — even just 10 to 15 pounds — can help improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, reduce triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, and lower your blood pressure. A healthy diet for diabetes will help you manage your weight and lead you toward foods that have a positive effect on your glucose levels, while guiding you away from those foods that are likely to cause dangerous spikes in your blood sugar. Learn which nine foods you should steer clear of if you have type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

There Are Two Different Types Of Diabetes

There Are Two Different Types Of Diabetes

Diabetes develops when your body does not produce enough of the hormone insulin. Normally, when we eat foods rich in carbohydrates (starches), they are broken down into simple sugar and taken into our cells for energy. Insulin takes the sugar into our cells, so when our body does not produce enough insulin, the sugar from foods remains in our blood-stream and causes high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia). Type 1 Diabetics need to take insulin, follow a healthy diet and exercise to manage their Diabetes. Type 2 Diabetics can control their Diabetes with exercise and a healthy diet, and often need to take medication. You may not know you have diabetes as some symptoms may not be obvious or severe. General warning signs are: Constant thirst Constant tiredness or fatigue Frequent urination Unexplained weight loss Unexplained itchiness of the skin Blurring of eyesight Dizziness Slow healing of cuts and bruises Tingling or numbness of hands and feet What do I do if I have these symptoms? Many pharmacies do blood sugar testing. If your blood sugar is high, they will refer you to a doctor. By eating a healthy diet you can help to control your Diabetes. Do not cut out any foods completely. Rather include balanced amounts of all types of foods. Basic dietary guidelines: Do not miss meals. Have 3 small meals during the day, with small snacks in between. Enjoy a variety of foods daily. Make starchy foods part of most meals. . Include starches that have a low glycaemic index (meaning that they do not raise the blood sugar too quickly) such as rye bread, wholewheat seed loaf, bran cereal, sweet or baby potatoes, durum wheat pasta. Use fat sparingly; choose vegetable oils rather than hard fats - use lower fat spreads; do not deep-fry foods; use a limited amount of vegetable oil for cooking; Continue reading >>

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