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What Foods Are Good For Diabetics?

6 Steps To A Real Food Diabetes Diet {guest Post}

6 Steps To A Real Food Diabetes Diet {guest Post}

Can a real food diabetes diet improve the health of diabetics? There are now 25.8 million people in the United States alone who have diabetes according to the American Diabetes Association. This number does not include the countless people who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes, gestational diabetes, or the many who live with the symptoms but have not yet been diagnosed. Diabetes is becoming a household norm in our country and as the numbers continue to rise, the results will continue to be devastating…unless we become educated about what really causes many cases of this disease and how it can be managed effectively or even reversed. This is a guest post from Brandy of Living Water Health and Wellness. My family and I know personally how diabetes can affect the person diagnosed as well as those around them. And I also know that if empowered with the RIGHT information regarding whole foods for diabetes, exercise, and lifestyle, it is completely and totally possible to live an abundantly healthy life! Note from Katie: My Mother-in-law’s Battle with Diabetes and Heart Disease My mother-in-law had a sudden double bypass, and helping her nail down a diet in the aftermath of heart surgery was a tremendous challenge. She was only 57 at the time, which helped the recovery, but she also has diabetes, which complicated everything dramatically. “What to eat” would be a hard enough question if we just tried to follow the diet recommendations given at the hospital, because the “Heart Healthy Diet” and the “Diabetes Healthy Diet” have some contradictions. Me being the food lady, however, further complicated the matter. I knew some of the recommendations were a load of crap bad research and misguided good intentions, but I needed some hard facts to back me up and a Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

How to keep your blood sugar in check when dining out. By the dLife Editors Going out to eat is fraught with challenges for people who need to watch their blood sugar. There’s the giant portion size issue, the unknown ingredients, and the “special-occasion effect.” That’s the way we tell ourselves it’s ok to make unhealthy choices on special occasions. Our idea of what constitutes a special occasion is pretty subjective. Here are some tips on making d-friendly choices in restaurants, by type of cuisine. What to Order at Italian Restaurants Italian restaurants can be full of high-carbohydrate foods like bread, pasta, pizza, risotto, and gnocci. Many of these combine refined carbs with processed meats like sausage and pepperoni, and batters or breading (think eggplant Parmesan or fried mozzarella). Things you can do: Ask your server to skip the bread basket for your table. If you’re going to splurge and have pasta, ask for it as a side dish and don’t eat more than the size of your fist. That’s one cup of pasta, or about 45 grams of carbohydrate. Order unbreaded chicken or veal baked with sauces like piccata, marsala, puttanesca, francese, or cacciatore. Other good choices include: Caesar salad with grilled or baked fish, escarole and beans, and minestrone soup. What to Order at Mexican Restaurants Mexican food can be full of carbohydrates with large portions of rice, beans, and tortillas. Things you can do: At the very least, limit portion sizes. Ask to have half your plate wrapped to go before you even start eating. Skip the rice; ask for black beans or salad in its place. If you love chips and salsa, take a handful and then ask for the basket to be removed from the table. Order soft chicken or fish tacos and eat the fillings with a fork, skipping the tor Continue reading >>

Best Diabetic Cat Food

Best Diabetic Cat Food

The exact cause of diabetes in cats isn’t known but it seems to affect overweight and obese cats more than other cats. This is probably because being overweight makes the body less sensitive to insulin’s effects. Diabetes is also more likely to occur in older cats – which are also more likely to be overweight. Read Story If your cat is diagnosed with diabetes it is usually a frightening time for an owner. Symptoms typically include lethargy, increased urination, increased thirst, and loss of appetite. Your cat’s urine may be sticky to the touch because it literally contains sugar excreted from his body. Left untreated, diabetes can become life-threatening. However, many cats have diabetes and live long, happy lives with proper management. Following your vet’s diagnosis, you will probably have to give your cat regular doses of the hormone insulin to help control his condition. Feeding your cat a diet suited to his condition can also help manage his diabetes. Quick Look : Top 4 Best Diabetic Cat Foods Food Price Nutrition Rating You probably already know that cats require meat in their diets. They need more meat and protein than dogs and they are not as good at breaking down carbs and starches as dogs. This is even more true when it comes to diabetic cats. Their bodies have greater difficulty moving sugar/glucose from the bloodstream to distribute it to the cells in the body. This is why sugar builds up in the cat’s bloodstream and can become harmful. As you might guess, it makes sense to feed a diabetic cat a diet that has less starch in it so it won’t break down into more sugar/glucose. According to the latest research, diabetic cats can benefit from diets that are high in protein and fat and low in carbohydrates. Kitten foods (especially canned kitten foo Continue reading >>

What To Eat, Diabetics

What To Eat, Diabetics

Food Suggestions and Tips for People who have Idiopathic Gastroparesis or Delayed Emptying of the Stomach Information: adapted and reviewed by: Carol Rees Parrish, RD, MS Nutrition Support Specialist University of Virginia Health System Digestive Health Center of Excellence Gastroparesis and Dysmotilities Association (GPDA) www.digestivedistress.com __________________________________________________________ Introduction: What to eat when your stomach is not working right can be challenging for anyone, but is particularly so for individuals with Type I 1 diabetes mellitus, who are also faced with a slow-emptying stomach (gastroparesis). Wide swings in blood glucose levels can be an early sign of gastroparesis in someone with diabetes mellitus. Others may experience digestive symptoms that punctuate life's routines, rob one's appetite, or develop into patterns of nausea and vomiting. Dietary manipulation can greatly assist you in regaining blood glucose control. Proper use of your insulin or diabetic medication is also of utmost importance. Your diabetologist, or primary care physician, dietitian, diabetes nurse specialist, and diabetes educator are your best resources. For those who are experiencing moderate to more severe digestive symptoms, eating may become inconsistent from meal to meal, day to day, or week to week, depending upon the frequency and intensity of digestive distress. Getting a handle on good blood glucose control - while still attempting to eat enough calories in order to maintain your weight - may seem daunting. Our aim is to provide you with knowledge and suggestions to aid your efforts as you work towards optimal management with your medical team. In general: Little research is available in the area of diet and gastroparesis. What works for one perso Continue reading >>

How To Eat When You Have Gout And Diabetes

How To Eat When You Have Gout And Diabetes

1 Avoid purine-rich foods. Since uric acid is produced from the metabolism of purine in the body, it is best to avoid foods that contain purine. Urate crystals accumulate in the joints if uric acid is elevated and this can aggravate joint pain in gout. Also, uric acid elevation can increase insulin resistance which is a condition wherein the body do not respond to the function of insulin[1]. This can further elevate the blood sugar levels of a person, leading to diabetic symptoms. Purine-rich foods are mackerel, anchovies, organ meats, dried beans, peas, canned goods, instant noodles, wine and beer. 2 Avoid foods rich in fructose. Foods rich in fructose consume a lot of adenosine triphosphate (or ATP) when metabolized. This ATP is an energy-supplying molecule that the cells in the body use. Over-consumption of ATP leads to its depletion and results in the generation of substances such as lactic acid and uric acid, thereby increasing the levels of uric acid in the blood. Also, fructose is considered a sugar. Consuming foods rich in fructose can elevate the blood sugar of a person and lead to occurrence of symptoms. Foods to avoid are apples, bananas, pears, agave, melons, asparagus, beans, broccoli, cabbage, onion, tomato, peanuts, raisins, figs, carbonated drinks, fruit drinks, ketchup, canned goods, chocolate, pastries and breakfast cereals. 3 Avoid alcohol. Alcohol interferes with the removal of uric acid from the body. When alcohol is converted to lactic acid, it reduces the amount of uric acid that is eliminated from the body through the kidneys. This is because the lactic acid competes with the uric acid in terms of being removed by the kidneys through urine. Increased levels of ethanol (alcohol) in the body increase the body's production of uric acid by increasing Continue reading >>

Feeding The Diabetic Cat

Feeding The Diabetic Cat

Diet plays a critical role in the management of feline diabetes. In fact, with the right diet and medication, it is highly likely that cats newly diagnosed with diabetes will achieve diabetic remission — meaning they will become non-diabetic and no longer require insulin therapy. This is most common within the first four to six months after diagnosis and institution of appropriate diet and insulin therapy. What Is the Best Food for a Diabetic Cat? Cats are true obligate carnivores and as such have a very high protein requirement and an almost nonexistent carbohydrate requirement. Cats are designed to consume foods that are high in protein, moderate in fat and very low in carbohydrates. The following composition is ideal: 50 percent (or greater) of calories from animal-based protein 20-45 percent of calories from fat 1-2 percent of calories from carbohydrates Rich in water (approximately 70 percent by weight) When referring to commercial cat food, this ideal composition will only be found in canned cat food formulas. Most dry foods are not low enough in carbohydrates. Additionally, dry foods usually contain plant-based protein and are too low in overall protein to satisfy a cat’s high protein requirement. Therefore, dry foods are not generally recommended for diabetic cats. It is well established that the ideal feline diet — especially to achieve diabetic remission — is a canned high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. What Is a Low-Carb Diet? A low-carbohydrate diet is one that provides less than 10 percent of the total calories as carbohydrates. Some cats will have adequate control of their diabetes on higher-carbohydrate diets, while others may require further restriction to 5 percent of the calories as carbohydrates. In general, the lower the carbs the better for Continue reading >>

Food And Diabetes

Food And Diabetes

Dietary Advice for people with Type 2 Diabetes When you have Type 2 diabetes your nutritional needs are the same as everyone else—no special foods or complicated diets are needed. The key to eating well with diabetes is eating regularly, watching your serving size and following a healthy eating plan that is low in refined sugars and fat. This means choosing lower fat options when eating meat, poultry, dairy products and spreads, enjoying a good variety of fresh fruit and vegetables, getting the majority of your energy from unrefined and whole grain starches (e.g. potatoes and wholegrain bread and cereals) and keeping high sugar, high fat foods as treats only. You need more than 40 different nutrients for good health and no single food supplies them all. Eating a wide variety of foods is the key to ensuring that you get all the nutrients you need. Our “Healthy eating for people with type diabetes booklet” is an easy-to-read guide which has been prepared specifically for people with type 2 diabetes and for those waiting to see a dietitian, however the booklet provides useful guidance for everyone interested in developing healthy eating habits. Useful resources: Healthy eating for people with type 2 diabetes booklet Getting active for better health Continue reading >>

What Fruits Are Good For Diabetes?

What Fruits Are Good For Diabetes?

The U.S. National Library of Medicine says diabetes occurs because of elevated blood glucose levels. The pancreas no longer uses or produces enough insulin for the body to function properly. Without enough insulin, high levels of glucose remain in the bloodstream. Diet plays a major role in controlling blood glucose levels, so people should maintain a nutritionally dense diet. Many diabetics think that they can’t eat fruits when diagnosed with diabetics; however, many fruits are good for diabetes because they have low sugar content. Apples Natural News cites a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey that took place from 1999 to 2004. The research found that apples are good fruits for diabetes because they prevent conditions that cause metabolic syndrome, including diabetes. Many participants in the study saw a decrease in symptoms 24 hours after eating apples. Apples reduced inflammation related to diabetes and heart disease. According to Nutrition Data, apples are 38 on the glycemic index--the index used to determine how foods affect blood sugar levels. Grapefruit Grapefruits, 25 on the glycemic index, are good fruits for diabetes because they naturally lower blood sugar levels. The Diabetes Action Research and Education Foundation states that none of the ingredients in grapefruit seem to hinder insulin production. Fresh grapefruit works better than juice because of its slow conversion rate in the body. Oranges Oranges are low-glycemic-index fruits, at 48, and are also good for diabetics. The World’s Healthiest Foods, produced by the George Mateljan Foundation, states that fiber and Vitamin C found in oranges controls blood sugar levels. Oranges, a low-fat snack, can be part of a healthy diet that controls or reduces weight, one of the risk factors for dia Continue reading >>

10 Nutrition Tips For Managing Cancer And Diabetes

10 Nutrition Tips For Managing Cancer And Diabetes

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, and of the more than 13 million Americans who have or have had cancer, eight to 18 percent also have diabetes. It’s an eye-opening statistic and a reminder about why it’s important to be proactive about our overall health and well-being during and after cancer treatment. “Because of the huge link between insulin resistance and cancer, it is critically important for people who have diabetes to manage their blood glucose during cancer treatment,” adds Brooke McIntyre, a clinical oncology dietitian and diabetes program coordinator at CTCA in Tulsa. McIntyre recommends the following tips to help manage cancer and diabetes: Never eat a “naked” carbohydrate. Funny statement, but people remember it! Rather than eating only an apple, eat a handful of nuts or one to two tablespoons of nut butter too. This helps decrease the rise in blood sugar and makes you feel more satisfied. Eat fewer carbohydrates. Decreasing carbohydrate intake not only lowers blood sugar, but can also help lower blood pressure. Eat more veggies, fruits and whole grains. Eating cancer-fighting foods high in fiber can help regulate blood sugar. Foods to add to your diet include: Asian pears, raspberries, blackberries, bananas, blueberries, beans, broccoli, spinach, lentils, peas, corn, flax seeds and whole-grain breads or crackers. Exercise regularly. The American Institute for Cancer Research and the American Diabetes Association recommend 30 minutes of physical activity five days a week to lower risk of cancer recurrence. Add healthy fats to your diet. Say “no” to doughnuts and fried chicken and “hello” to healthy fats such as avocado, salmon and walnuts. Good fats contain antioxidants, help you maintain a steady blood sugar level and feel Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

Shopping List For Diabetics

Shopping List For Diabetics

Control Type 2 Diabetes, Shed Fat Our Shopping List for Diabetics is based on the Pritikin Eating Plan, regarded worldwide as among the healthiest diets on earth. The Pritikin Program has been documented in more than 100 studies in peer-reviewed medical journals to prevent and control many of our nation’s leading killers – heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and obesity as well as type 2 diabetes. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, pay special attention. Research on newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics coming to the Pritikin Longevity Center illustrate how profoundly beneficial early intervention can be. Scientists from UCLA followed 243 people in the early stages of diabetes (not yet on medications). Within three weeks of coming to Pritikin, their fasting blood sugar (glucose) plummeted on average from 160 to 124. Research has also found that the Pritikin Program reduces fasting insulin by 25 to 40%. Shopping List for Diabetics – More Features Here’s another big plus to our Shopping List for Diabetics. In addition to icons that are diabetes-focused like “sugar free,” this list uses icons like “low cholesterol” and “low sodium” because many people with diabetes are working to control not just diabetes but related conditions like high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. This list can help you identify those foods most advantageous in helping you reach your personal health goals. Diabetic Food Taboos? Not Anymore! Have you been told you have to give up juicy watermelon or sweet grapes? What if we told you those foods really aren’t taboo? Watch the Video Our Healthy Shopping List for Diabetics also lists the top 10 things to put back on the shelf if you’re trying to: Lose Weight Lower Blood Pres Continue reading >>

Top 5 Diabetes Super Foods

Top 5 Diabetes Super Foods

Article Even though we live in a pill-popping, drug-oriented culture, more and more people are starting to realize that food is really our best medicine. In 90% of all chronic and degenerative diseases, poor diet is either the direct cause or a significant factor. This is especially true for Type 2 diabetes. There is no stage of Type 2 that can’t be helped by making some smart dietary changes. And the earlier they are made, the more dramatic the health improvements will be. The “prescription” is simple A few simple changes in a patient’s eating habits can actually reverse Type 2 so that all metabolic functions, including the body’s insulin production, return to normal. Here’s the shorthand version… Quit consuming the foods and beverages that spike your blood sugar and trigger the insulin response (sweets, sodas, juices, plus refined carbs such as bread, baked goods, pasta, chips, and grain-based commercial foods, like breakfast cereals). Over-consuming these can cause Type 2, and even small amounts will make it worse. Start eating more of the foods that heal the damage that insulin-resistance and diabetes have done to your body. Do this by turning your diet into an anti-inflamatory diet as inflammation is one of the root causes of diabetes (beware: inflammation destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas). In this diet try to include plenty of what I call “the diabetes-healing superfoods.” Here are the top 5 according to extensive scientific research… 1. Extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) If you have diabetes or prediabetes, controlling blood sugar has a huge impact on how you feel — and this marvelous monounsaturated oil can really help. A 2006 study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine put people on either a low-fat diet, a Medit Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet & Prevention

Diabetes Diet & Prevention

Diabetes is on the rise, yet most cases are preventable with healthy lifestyle changes. Some can even be reversed. You can improve your health in a big way by making small changes to the way you eat, while still enjoying your favorite foods and taking pleasure from your meals. Understanding Diabetes Diabetes (medically known as diabetes mellitus) is a common, chronic disorder marked by elevated levels of blood glucose, or sugar. It occurs when your cells don’t respond appropriately to insulin (a hormone secreted by the pancreas), and when your pancreas can’t produce more insulin in response. Diabetes usually can’t be cured. Left untreated — or poorly managed — it can lead to serious long-term complications, including kidney failure, amputation, and blindness. Moreover, having diabetes increases your risk for cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. For more information, see Harvard’s health supplement here. Eating to Prevent, Control and Reverse Diabetes Eating right is vital if you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes. While exercise is also important, what you eat has the biggest impact when it comes to weight loss. But what does eating right for diabetes mean? Your may be surprised to hear that your nutritional needs are virtually the same everyone else: no special foods or complicated diets are necessary. A diabetes diet is simply a healthy eating plan that is high in nutrients, low in fat, and moderate in calories. It is a healthy diet for anyone! The only difference is that you need to pay more attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat Tip 1: Choose high-fiber, slow-release carbs Carbohydrates have a big impact on your blood sugar levels—more so than fats and proteins—but you don’t hav Continue reading >>

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