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What Food To Eat If You Have Hypoglycemia?

How To Treat Low Blood Sugar: 7 Tricks Every Diabetic Should Know

How To Treat Low Blood Sugar: 7 Tricks Every Diabetic Should Know

What causes hypoglycemia? iStock/Erna Vader Taking certain diabetes medications, skipping meals, not consuming enough carbs, and even too much exercise can throw your blood sugar off balance and cause low blood sugar. Insomnia and excessive alcohol consumption have also been linked to low glucose levels. When blood sugar dips to a level that's too low to sustain normal functioning—in most people, that's below 70 mg/dl—it results in a hypo attack with varying symptoms depending on its severity. People who have recurring bouts of low blood sugar may have no warning signs at all, explains Michael Bergman, MD, endocrinologist and clinical professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center. This is known as hypoglycemic unawareness; the longer you’ve had diabetes, the more common it is. On the milder end of the low blood sugar spectrum, you may feel hungry, nauseated, jittery, nervous, and have cold and clammy-feeling skin. Many people also describe the feeling that their heart is racing or pounding. Low blood sugar can happen at night, too, causing nightmares and night sweats. Moderate low blood sugar can cause behavioral changes, making you fearful, confused, or angry. It can also trigger blurry vision, slurred speech, and problems with balance and walking. A layperson may even mistake you for being drunk. If left untreated, severe low blood sugar can cause loss of consciousness, seizures, irreversible brain or heart damage, coma, or even death. Here are first aid tips to handle a diabetic emergency. iStock/Geber86 It goes like this: If your blood sugar reading is low (below 70 mg/dl), eat or drink something equal to 15 grams of fast-acting carbohydrate (4 ounces of juice). Even if you feel okay, don't wait for the symptoms of hypoglycemia to kick in. Rest for 15 mi Continue reading >>

Diet For Hypoglycemia Without Diabetes

Diet For Hypoglycemia Without Diabetes

The type of hypoglycemia that occurs in people without diabetes is referred to as reactive hypoglycemia. Reactive hypoglycemia would be the results of too much insulin secreted or not enough glucagon released after a meal, which lead to low blood sugar levels a few hours after eating. If you blood sugars are too low -- below 70 mg/dL -- you may feel dizzy, light-headed, tired, hungry and confused. A few changes to your diet can help you prevent reactive hypoglycemia. Video of the Day Instead of eating two to three large meals, split your food intake into five to six smaller meals. Eating too much at once can stimulate the overproduction of insulin and increase your risk of experiencing an hypoglycemic episode. Space your meals evenly throughout the day, every two to three hours, and don't forget to reduce the amounts of food you eat at each meal to avoid gaining weight. For example, if your lunch usually is a sandwich, an apple and a yogurt, divide your meal into two parts. Have the first part at one time and save the remaining for later. Choose Low-Glycemic Index Carbohydrates Carbohydrate-containing foods with a high-glycemic index make your blood sugar levels peak, overstimulate the secretion of insulin and can often result in reactive hypoglycemia within a few hours. Avoid processed and refined carbohydrates such as white flours, white bread, breakfast cereals, crackers, baked goods, sweets and desserts. Replace these foods with low-glycemic index carbohydrates that will help you stabilize your blood sugar levels. Low-glycemic index carbohydrate foods include old-fashioned oatmeal, steel-cut oat, stone-ground whole grain flour, sourdough bread, temperate climate fruit, barley, quinoa, basmati rice and whole-grain pasta. Never eat carbohydrates on alone. Protein help Continue reading >>

Get In The Zone: My Tips For Avoiding Hypoglycemia During Exercise

Get In The Zone: My Tips For Avoiding Hypoglycemia During Exercise

Twitter summary: Diagnosing & solving hypoglycemia (lows) & hyperglycemia (highs) during exercise w/ #diabetes. It’s all about personal experimentation. Exercise has been one of four complete gamechangers for managing my type 1 diabetes, but it can frequently be a source of confusion, frustration, exhaustion, and blood sugar unpredictability. I think this is partially why I get so many reader questions on this topic – managing blood sugars during exercise is challenging. Fortunately, it’s not impossible! This article shares what I’ve learned from athletes, healthcare providers, and 14 years of experimenting with blood sugars during exercise. I strongly believe that anyone with diabetes can master exercise, and it all starts with becoming a good driver – maintaining the right speed (100-180 mg/dl) while applying the proper amount of gas and brake (food and insulin) at the right times. The big challenge is that universal driving recommendations aren’t possible, since everyone’s car model (i.e., body), car engine (i.e., diabetes, physiology), and road conditions (type of exercise) are different. The key is not to give up, as it can take a while to climb the learning curve and figure out what works for you. This article offers a toolkit to help you on that path. Part I shares a diagnostic checklist, followed by some potential tactics to avoid lows and highs (Part II). Part III shares what I specifically do, in case it’s useful. I’m a pretty active person (much of my exercise is vigorous) and have figured out what works for me over time, so your adjustments could (and probably will) differ dramatically. You should absolutely talk to your healthcare provider before making any changes to your medications or routine. If you find this article useful, check out Continue reading >>

What To Eat For Hypoglycemia: Pms & Pmdd Balance Diet

What To Eat For Hypoglycemia: Pms & Pmdd Balance Diet

If you found this article after exploring elsewhere on our site, you may already have seen references to balancing blood sugar with diet in articles specifically about migraines, irritability, and controlling PMS food cravings. There's a very good reason for this—the PMS Balance Diet with an emphasis on balancing your blood sugar can balance your mood and energy level, decrease your stress level, and help control the cause of many migraines and headaches. We use several terms in this article that all basically mean the same thing: unstable blood sugar, hypoglycemia, and reactive hypoglycemia are often referred to elsewhere as "low blood sugar." Blood sugar problems are one of the most common causes of many PMS symptoms, including physical, emotional, and thinking symptoms. Hypoglycemia is also a very common problem in people without PMS, causing fatigue, depression, and many other symptoms. Important note: We are not referring to diabetes. In diabetes, blood sugar is too high, and only falls too low as a result of medication. People with reactive hypoglycemia experience both steep peaks and deep valleys of blood sugar, but without the diabetic disease condition. Who Needs Blood Sugar Balance Who needs a special diet for blood sugar balance? Not everyone, but you can determine whether you have the tendency for blood sugar troughs and spikes by answering these five questions. Do you feel tired, irritable, or shaky if you don't eat on time? Does your energy often plummet or do you feel sleepy after meals, especially lunch? Do you crave sweets like cookies, candy, and ice cream? Do you crave starchy foods like rice, pasta, and bread? Are you fair-haired or red-haired with light skin and freckles? Do you have seasonal allergies? The more you answered yes, and the more stro Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Symptoms To Look Out For & Ways To Naturally Treat Them

Hypoglycemia Symptoms To Look Out For & Ways To Naturally Treat Them

Uncontrolled glucose levels are one of the most common health problems in the world. Hypoglycemia symptoms frequently affect people with prediabetes or diabetes but are also linked with other health problems, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol and even arthritis. And although it’s rarely mentioned, hypoglycemia has been called “an under-appreciated problem” that’s the most common and serious side effect of glucose-lowering diabetes drugs. (1) Those who are at risk for both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are not only people who are ill, overweight or inactive — anyone who consumes a poor diet and has trouble with normal glucose metabolism can develop symptoms. The standard American diet, which tends to be very high in things like refined grains and sugar but low in nutrients like healthy fats and fiber, contributes to hypoglycemia and related diseases. What are some clues you might be experiencing hypoglycemia symptoms, and what kind of things can you do to help manage them? Symptoms of hypoglycemia are often confused with other health conditions and can include sudden hunger, irritability, headaches, brain fog and shakiness. By managing your intake of empty calories, improving your diet, and paying attention to how meal timing and exercise affects you, you can help control low blood sugar symptoms and prevent them from returning. What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition caused by low blood sugar levels, also sometimes referred to as low glucose. Glucose is mostly found in carbohydrate foods and those containing sugar and is considered to be one of the most important sources of energy for the body. (2) Here’s an overview of how glucose works once it enters the body and the process of how our hormones regulate blood sugar levels: When we Continue reading >>

Sample Menu For Reactive Hypoglycemia

Sample Menu For Reactive Hypoglycemia

Sample menu The following sample menu provides ideas on how to plan meals and snacks to help prevent reactive hypoglycemia. The amount of food that you need each day depends on your age, gender, and activity level. Choose a variety of foods and eat a small snack or meal about every three hours. Sample Menu 1 Breakfast Cinnamon oatmeal cooked unsweetened oatmeal chopped pecans cinnamon ground flax seed Blueberries or diced apples Low fat milk (skim, 1%, 2%) or fortified soy beverage Water or coffee or tea Mid-morning snack Hard-boiled egg with cucumber, celery and carrots sticks Lunch Chicken tortilla wrap whole wheat tortilla wrap diced chicken sunflower seeds shredded lettuce mayonnaise Carrot and green pepper sticks Plum Low-fat milk or fortified soy beverage Mid-afternoon snack Hummus (chickpea and sesame seed spread) Brown rice crackers Cherry tomatoes Dinner Fish baked with lemon and green onions Quinoa Steamed broccoli sprinkled with sesame seeds Coleslaw salad with oil and vinegar dressing Water or coffee or tea Evening snack Low fat cheese (less than 20% M.F.) on dark rye crisp bread Pear Sample Menu 2 Breakfast Poached egg Whole grain pumpernickel bread Low fat milk or fortified soy beverage Peach Mid-morning snack Low-fat plain yogurt with almonds and a sliced banana Lunch Salmon stir fry diced salmon pieces brown rice red pepper broccoli kale Low-fat milk or fortified soy beverage Water or coffee or tea Mid-afternoon snack Unsalted seeds or nuts (handful) and dried fruit Dinner Vegetarian chili served over whole wheat bulgur Spinach salad spinach raspberries walnuts salad dressing. Low-fat milk or fortified soy beverage Water or coffee or tea Evening snack Low fat milk and a whole-wheat blueberry muffin Other examples of healthy snacks Trail mix with nuts, ra Continue reading >>

> When Blood Sugar Is Too Low

> When Blood Sugar Is Too Low

No matter what we're doing — even when we're sleeping — our brains depend on glucose to function. Glucose is a sugar that comes from the foods we eat, and it's also formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the cells of our body, and it's carried to each cell through the bloodstream. The blood glucose level is the amount of glucose in the blood. When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) drop too low, it's called hypoglycemia (pronounced: hi-po-gly-SEE-me-uh). Very low blood sugar levels can cause severe symptoms that need to be treated right away. People with diabetes can have low blood sugar levels because of the medicines they have to take to manage their diabetes. They may need a hormone called insulin or diabetes pills (or both) to help their bodies use the sugar in their blood. These medicines help take the sugar out of the blood and get it into the body's cells, which makes the level of sugar in the blood go down. But sometimes it's a tricky balancing act and blood sugar levels can get too low. People with diabetes need to keep their blood sugars from getting too high or too low. Part of keeping blood sugar levels in a healthy range is having good timing, and balancing when and what they eat and when they exercise with when they take medicines. Some things that can make low blood sugar levels more likely to happen are: skipping meals and snacks not eating enough food at a meal or snack exercising longer or harder than usual without eating some extra food getting too much insulin not timing the insulin doses properly with meals, snacks, and exercise Also, certain things may increase how quickly insulin gets absorbed into the bloodstream and can make hypoglycemia more likely to occur. For example, taking a hot shower Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is a condition that causes the sugar (glucose) in your blood to drop too low. This can happen in people who do not have diabetes. The 2 types of non-diabetic hypoglycemia are fasting hypoglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia. Fasting hypoglycemia often happens after the person goes without food for 8 hours or longer. Reactive hypoglycemia usually happens about 2 to 4 hours after a meal. When your blood sugar level is low, your muscles and brain cells do not have enough energy to work well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Fasting hypoglycemia: Certain medicines or herbal supplements such as fenugreek, ginseng, or cinnamon Alcohol Exercise Medical conditions such as liver disease, hypothyroidism, and tumors Eating disorders or malnutrition Stomach surgery or hemodialysis Reactive hypoglycemia: The causes of reactive hypoglycemia may be unknown. Hyperinsulinism Meals high in refined carbohydrates such as white bread or foods high in sugar Prediabetes Any surgery of the digestive system What are the signs and symptoms of non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Blurred vision or changes in vision Dizziness, lightheadedness, or shakiness Fatigue and weakness Fast or pounding heartbeat Sweating more than usual Headache Nausea or hunger Anxiety, Irritability, or confusion How is non-diabetic hypoglycemia diagnosed? Blood tests are done to measure your blood sugar levels. These tests may also be done to find the cause of your hypoglycemia. Fasting tests may be done. You may have an overnight fasting test or a 72-hour fasting test. After you have fasted overnight, your blood sugar levels will be tested 2 times. For a 72-hour fasting test, you will not be given food for a period of up to 72 hours. During th Continue reading >>

Diet Plans For Hypoglycemia

Diet Plans For Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia means that you have low blood sugar. People with diabetes often experience low blood sugar levels. Certain medications, excessive alcohol consumption, some critical illnesses and hormone deficiencies can also cause hypoglycemia without diabetes. Reactive hypoglycemia is a condition that causes low blood sugar within a four-hour window after meals. Eating food raises your blood sugar levels, but people who have hypoglycemia make more insulin than is needed when they eat. This excess insulin leads to the drop in their blood sugar level. Hypoglycemia is a lifelong condition, but you can help manage its symptoms through your diet. Follow these rules of thumb: Eat small meals every 3 to 4 hours throughout the day, rather than 3 large meals per day. Avoid foods high in saturated fats or trans fats. Choose foods with a low glycemic index score. Reduce or eliminate processed and refined sugars from your diet. Choose complex carbohydrates over simple carbohydrates. Reduce or eliminate alcoholic drinks, and never mix alcohol with sugar-filled mixers, such as fruit juice. Eat lean protein. Eat foods high in soluble fiber. Here are some ideas for a diet plan for people with hypoglycemia. You should eat a small meal as soon as possible after waking. A good breakfast should consist of protein, such as scrambled eggs, plus a complex carbohydrate. Try these: hard boiled eggs and a slice of whole-grain bread with cinnamon (several small studies indicate that cinnamon may help reduce blood sugar) a small serving of steel-cut oatmeal, like this protein-packed oatmeal with blueberries, sunflower seeds, and agave plain Greek yogurt with berries, honey, and oatmeal In addition, be mindful of your consumption of juices. Stick to 100% juice varieties that do not have added sweeten Continue reading >>

How To Change Your Diet If You Have Hypoglycemia

How To Change Your Diet If You Have Hypoglycemia

Expert Reviewed Hypoglycemia, a condition characterized by lower than normal levels of glucose in the bloodstream, can be caused by many factors. Reactive hypoglycemia is defined as hypoglycemia which occurs when there is no underlying medical condition to explain an abnormal production and regulation of insulin, the hormone which lowers your blood glucose.[1] Your body overcompensates and reduces blood glucose levels too much after eating (postprandial). This tendency can be counteracted by changing your eating habits so that glucose enters the bloodstream at a slow, steady pace.[2] 1 See a doctor to rule out other causes of hypoglycemia. Organic hypoglycemia is caused by medical conditions such as liver or kidney disease, certain tumors, or hormone deficiencies; addressing the underlying cause is the treatment. Hypoglycemia also can be caused by some medicines, especially ones used to treat diabetes. Do not change your diet before a trained medical professional rules out other causes and diagnoses you with reactive hypoglycemia.[3][4] 2 Seek the advice of a registered dietitian. Your new diet should meet the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) in terms of the calories, proteins, minerals, and vitamins needed for a healthy adult.[5] A dietitian can guide you as you add and remove foods from your diet. They will assist you with planning the content of your meals and snacks. 3 Monitor yourself for the symptoms of hypoglycemia. Let others know about your diagnosis. Everyone can look out for symptoms like anxiety, irritability, hunger, sweating, shakiness, rapid heartbeat, fatigue, tingling around the mouth, dizziness, and hot flashes.[6][7] Break your diet and eat sugary foods. The goal is to get your blood glucose back to a normal range as soon as possible[8] Let friends, fa Continue reading >>

Treating Low Blood Sugar

Treating Low Blood Sugar

You are at risk of having a low blood sugar reaction if you: Skip or delay a meal or snack Take too much insulin or eat too few carbohydrates Exercise Drink alcohol, especially without eating carbohydrates Check your blood sugar if you have any of these symptoms: Weakness and/or fatigue Headache Sweating Anxiety Dizziness Shaking Increased heartbeat If your blood sugar is less than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl): Eat 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrate (sample foods listed below) Wait 15 minutes and then recheck your blood sugar If your blood sugar is still less than 100 mg/dl, take another 15 grams of carbohydrate and retest your blood sugar in another 15 minutes. Repeat if necessary. Important: If you have frequent low blood sugars speak to your doctor. You may need changes in your medication and/or meal plan. Quick Carbohydrate Guide for Treating Low Blood Sugars If your blood sugar is less than 70 mg/dl, you need 15 to 30 grams of a quickly absorbed carbohydrate, like the ones listed below. Each of the following servings provides 15 grams of carbohydrate. Candies and Other Sweets 5 small gum drops 12 gummy bears 6 large jelly beans 5 Life Savers 15 Skittles 1 Tablespoon honey, jam or jelly 1 Tablespoon sugar in water 4 Starburst Beverages 1/2 cup apple juice 1/2 cup orange or grapefruit juice 1/2 cup pineapple juice 1/2 cup regular soda (not diet) 1/3 cup grape juice 1/3 cup cranberry juice 1/3 cup prune juice 1 cup fat free milk Fruits 1/2 banana 1 small apple 1 small orange 1/2 cup applesauce 2 tablespoons of raisins 15 grapes Other 3 to 4 glucose tablets 1 tube glucose gel Note: The foods listed above are easily absorbed and will raise blood sugar levels quickly. Foods that contain protein or fat — such as chocolate, candy bars, ice cream, cookies, crackers and Continue reading >>

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is the condition when your blood glucose (sugar) levels are too low. It happens to people with diabetes when they have a mismatch of medicine, food, and/or exercise. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, a rare condition, is low blood glucose in people who do not have diabetes. There are two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia: Reactive hypoglycemia, which happens within a few hours of eating a meal Fasting hypoglycemia, which may be related to a disease Glucose is the main source of energy for your body and brain. It comes from what we eat and drink. Insulin, a hormone, helps keep blood glucose at normal levels so your body can work properly. Insulin’s job is to help glucose enter your cells where it’s used for energy. If your glucose level is too low, you might not feel well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? The two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia have different causes. Researchers are still studying the causes of reactive hypoglycemia. They know, however, that it comes from having too much insulin in the blood, leading to low blood glucose levels. Types of nondiabetic hypoglycemia Reactive hypoglycemia Having pre-diabetes or being at risk for diabetes, which can lead to trouble making the right amount of insulin Stomach surgery, which can make food pass too quickly into your small intestine Rare enzyme deficiencies that make it hard for your body to break down food Fasting hypoglycemia Medicines, such as salicylates (such as aspirin), sulfa drugs (an antibiotic), pentamidine (to treat a serious kind of pneumonia), quinine (to treat malaria) Alcohol, especially with binge drinking Serious illnesses, such as those affecting the liver, heart, or kidneys Low levels of certain hormones, such as cortisol, growth hormone, glu Continue reading >>

The 7 Best Snacks For Hypoglycemics

The 7 Best Snacks For Hypoglycemics

Low blood sugar isn’t just an issue for diabetics. Hypoglycemia is a common side effect of certain medication as well as a symptom associated with eating disorders, pregnancy and any disorder affecting the liver, heart or kidneys. If you don’t physically need an insulin pump or shots, the best way to keep your blood sugar in check is through your diet. When your blood sugar dips, you feel weak and nauseated. You may even become dizzy or irrationally angry. Snacking on something sugary, however, is just as scary, a different culprit wielding the same symptoms. Most of the food available out in the open is too simple. The solution, then, is to always have snacks on hand. Depending on what you eat, your pancreas releases various amounts of insulin. The best foods to combat a blood sugar dip (while preventing a spike) are complex carbohydrates, produce and protein. Additionally, make sure you’re drinking water with your snack—it’s an easy way to stabilize your sugar levels, especially if you’re eating something sweeter like a fruit. 1. Nuts Nuts are easy to carry and an excellent source of protein, fiber and omega-3 fatty acids, so unless you’re allergic, they’re one of the best things you can put in your body. If you’re prediabetic, eating certain nuts, like almonds, cashews or a handful of pistachios, daily can lower your risk of developing type 2. 2. Cheese Cheese may be fatty (remember, not all fat is bad), but it has relatively low sugar levels. A serving of cheese (one string cheese, or a scoop of cottage cheese) contains enough protein and fat to combat weakness and keep you going. 3. Fibrous Fruit Not all fruits are created equally, and some of them, such as grapes and bananas, are more sugar than substance. Fruits like apples, pears and mangoes ar Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Author: Frank W. Jackson, M.D. Purpose Hypoglycemia is the term for a blood glucose level that is lower than normal. When foods are digested in the body, they are broken down into many nutrients. These nutrients are absorbed into the bloodstream to be used in performing various body functions. One of these nutrients is glucose, a sugar that provides fuel to the body. The process that regulates the amount of sugar in the blood is complex. Adrenaline is a part of this complicated process. Everyone has experienced a rush of adrenaline at some time — that “love-at-first-sight” feeling, or the pounding heart after narrowly escaping an accident. Adrenaline is produced by the adrenal glands located on top of the kidneys. The sudden release of adrenaline is what causes the symptoms of hypoglycemia — apprehension, hunger, sweating, rapid heartbeat, and faintness. Hypoglycemia can occur from certain illnesses, such as liver disease and some types of tumors. These conditions cause a type of hypoglycemia called organic hypoglycemia. They usually require specific medical treatment or surgery. There is another type of hypoglycemia. In some people, the body simply responds differently to the digestion of foods. Some foods are digested and absorbed rapidly, resulting in a burst of glucose entering the bloodstream. In most people the body adjusts smoothly. It would be like two children trying to balance a see-saw. There may be a slight teetering or swinging up and down as the children shift their weight to achieve the balance. In some people, however, the response is like an actively rocking see-saw swinging up and down. The body over-reacts and sets the process in motion to reduce blood glucose. The result is a glucose level that is too low. Then the body releases adrenaline, i Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Diet For Hypoglycemia?

What Is The Best Diet For Hypoglycemia?

Various diets have been proposed for hypoglycemia over the years. The earliest treatment was a high-protein, high-fat diet with a minimum of carbohydrates, in the belief that all carbohydrates stimulated the pancreas to produce insulin. Such diets had mixed results and are certainly not healthy in the long run. They have largely been abandoned but variations still exist, such as the Atkins diet and more recently Barry Sears’ “zone” diet which involves a 30/30/40 ratio between protein, fat and carbohydrate. The prominent American nutritionist Paavo Aerola started a change in thinking about hypoglycemia treatment in the 1970s when he advocated a largely vegetarian diet with an emphasis on complex carbohydrates. Aerola’s diet was popular for many years and very successful. However, it relies heavily on dairy products for protein – which doesn’t suit everyone. More recently, a concept known as the “glycemic index” of foods has been developed. The glycemic index represents the amount by which a food raises the blood sugar level, with glucose having an index of 100. It is interesting that foods such as white bread can raise the blood sugar almost as much as ordinary white sugar, whereas as whole-grain breads cause a much slower rise in blood sugar. I have proved this myself – before I knew anything about glycemic indexes. When I was experimenting with the high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets I often had a white bread roll with a small amount of low-fat cheese (no butter) and salad for lunch. I would always get a headache during the afternoon following such lunches but I persisted because I thought it was a “healthy” low-fat meal and it had no-sugar. Occasionally, I would have a thick cheese sandwich on wholemeal bread (with butter) and a glass of milk – su Continue reading >>

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