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What Food Causes Insulin Spikes?

11 Everyday Things That Spike Blood Sugar

11 Everyday Things That Spike Blood Sugar

Thinkstock 11 Everyday Things That Spike Blood Sugar If you’re living with type 2 diabetes, your doctor has probably told you time and time again that maintaining control over your blood sugar is essential. “Controlling blood sugar is important for two main reasons,” says Lynn Grieger, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator in Prescott, Arizona. “On a day-to-day basis, people just feel better when their blood sugar stays in a healthy range. Over the long term, it’s the best thing you can do to prevent complications of diabetes from occurring.” Diabetes complications include nerve damage, kidney disease, skin conditions, eye damage, high blood pressure, stroke, and more, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). One of the main contributors to high blood sugar is a diet too rich in carbohydrates, which once digested turn into sugar (glucose). Certain high-carb foods (for example white bread, white-flour pasta, sugary drinks, and french fries) can send your blood sugar levels soaring. “Many people with diabetes also get into trouble with processed foods, which have added sugars they may not know about,” adds Gregory Dodell, MD, an endocrinologist in New York City. The good news is that by sticking to a diabetes-friendly diet, incorporating physical activity into your day, taking medications (if recommended by your doctor), and regularly measuring your blood sugar levels, you can gain better control over type 2 diabetes. There are some triggers of high blood sugar, however, that are out of your control and can even sneak up on you. If you have the flu, for example, or if you're menstruating, you may experience a sudden rise in blood sugar. Because of such triggers, it can be difficult to keep blood sugar under control even when y Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Food Habits That Raise Your Blood Sugar

5 Surprising Food Habits That Raise Your Blood Sugar

Taking care of your blood sugar is one of the most valuable things you can do for your mood, weight, and even your heart health. It’s essential for keeping your body’s chemicals (a.k.a. your hormones) in check and also helps stabilize your appetite. If you’re having a hard time finding some balance with your blood sugar, and constantly hungry no matter what, or jittery and shaky, then it’s time to turn to some tips for taking care of your blood sugar ASAP! Surprisingly, it’s not just the sugary white stuff that raises your blood sugar, and not even the fruit in your diet like some might say. It can also be caused by other factors that you’ll want to be aware of when going throughout your day. Your blood sugar really boils down to your insulin (the sugar hormone, as many call it), which also stores fat and secrets glucose into the cells. Your insulin isn’t your enemy when you care for it. It can help keep your energy stable, but the key is to slow it down for a steady walk, not send it on a rollercoaster ride. Here are some things you might not realize affect your blood sugar: 1. Too Much Caffeine Caffeine also raises insulin when consumed in excess. While a cup (or even two cups) of coffee a day is actually beneficial for your insulin, more than that can cause it to sky-rocket. Even when consumed from healthier sources like yerba mate or black tea, caffeine can make your insulin surge, which leaves you moody, shaky, irritable, and craving sweets. Then you become tired and exhausted when levels drop, which leads you to reach for more caffeine or more sugar, depending on your vice. See how to Eat Your Way to Energy: No Caffeine Needed here if you need some help, or these 14 Natural Caffeine-Free Choices to Help Mellow You Out if you’re stressed. 2. Sugar W Continue reading >>

Reader Response: Insulin Index

Reader Response: Insulin Index

Reader Pete asked for some thoughts on the “Insulin Index,” a measurement chart similar to the glycemic index. While the glycemic index calculates the relative blood sugar rise induced by given foods, the insulin index evaluates the insulin response generated by 38 different foods. The insulin index, which first made its appearance in a 1997 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition article, was primarily the creation of Susanne Holt, a graduate student at the time and now a doctor. Interestingly, Holt, her supervisory co-authors, or other researchers haven’t chosen to conduct further research to update the “preliminary” results of their insulin index study since its creation eleven years ago now. While Holt and her co-authors found a high correlation between glycemic index and insulin index measurements, they stumbled upon an intriguing exception. High protein, virtually no-carb foods like meat and eggs, while low on the glycemic index, measured high on the insulin index. In other words, while the meat and eggs didn’t cause a spike in blood sugar the way most carbohydrates do, they did result in an unexpectedly significant rise in insulin. (Baked goods, with their high levels of refined carbs, elicited a very high rise in insulin as well. Of course, this comes as less of a surprise.) Obviously, the index has some eyebrow-raising potential, especially in those of us who choose a high protein diet. But there’s more to the story here. First off, let’s remember that the protein-rich foods didn’t result in the physical stress of blood sugar spikes. But what about that rise in insulin? Why? Should I be concerned about that omelet I ate for breakfast? Insulin, in and of itself, is a good and necessary thing. It promotes the storage of nutrients after all. In ou Continue reading >>

List Of Foods That Do Not Cause Insulin Release

List Of Foods That Do Not Cause Insulin Release

Contrary to what many believe, carbohydrates -- that is, sugar and starch -- are not the only macronutrient that stimulates the release of insulin, the hormone responsible for clearing excess glucose from the bloodstream and packing it, in the form of fatty triglycerides, into fat cells. Protein also stimulates insulin release. Dietary fat is the only one of the three macronutrients that does not cause insulin release. Therefore, food that is made up entirely of, or predominantly of, fat is the only type that does not cause insulin release. Note that this categorization does not apply to type I diabetics, who are not able to produce insulin at all. Video of the Day Olive Oil and Other Plant-Derived Oils Oil is pure plant-source fat, whether it is olive, canola, sunflower, sesame, peanut, coconut, soy or corn. One ounce of oil is about 28 grams of fat because 1 ounce converts to about 28 grams in the metric system. It makes no difference to this equation whether the fat is saturated or unsaturated. It is probably more helpful, and certainly more accurate, to think of oil as being fat, rather than containing fat. Dietary fat by itself, including these foods, does not cause insulin release. Two tbsp. butter, about 1 ounce, contain 22 grams of fat and no carbohydrates or protein. The other 6 grams in the 28 grams ounces of butter is made up mostly of water, along with a small amount of milk solids. Butter eaten by itself does not stimulate the release of insulin. Nearly all of cream cheese's macronutrient value is in fat, as 1 ounce of cream cheese contains 9 grams of fat, but only 1 gram of carbs and 2 grams protein. That would mean that it stimulates little insulin release. One ounce of macadamia nuts contains 21grams fat, with only 4 grams carbohydrate and 2 grams protei Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

When people eat a food containing carbohydrates, the digestive system breaks down the digestible ones into sugar, which enters the blood. As blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that prompts cells to absorb blood sugar for energy or storage. As cells absorb blood sugar, levels in the bloodstream begin to fall. When this happens, the pancreas start making glucagon, a hormone that signals the liver to start releasing stored sugar. This interplay of insulin and glucagon ensure that cells throughout the body, and especially in the brain, have a steady supply of blood sugar. Carbohydrate metabolism is important in the development of type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it makes. Type 2 diabetes usually develops gradually over a number of years, beginning when muscle and other cells stop responding to insulin. This condition, known as insulin resistance, causes blood sugar and insulin levels to stay high long after eating. Over time, the heavy demands made on the insulin-making cells wears them out, and insulin production eventually stops. Glycemic index In the past, carbohydrates were commonly classified as being either “simple” or “complex,” and described as follows: Simple carbohydrates: These carbohydrates are composed of sugars (such as fructose and glucose) which have simple chemical structures composed of only one sugar (monosaccharides) or two sugars (disaccharides). Simple carbohydrates are easily and quickly utilized for energy by the body because of their simple chemical structure, often leading to a faster rise in blood sugar and insulin secretion from the pancreas – which can have negative health effects. Complex carbohydrates: These carbohydrates have mo Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

1 / 8 7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar If you have type 2 diabetes, you know about the importance of making healthy mealtime choices. But just as important is staying away from the wrong foods — those that can spike your blood sugar. That's because simple carbohydrates, like white bread and sugary soda, are broken down by the body into sugar, which then enters the bloodstream. Even if you don't have diabetes, these foods can lead to insulin resistance, which means your body's cells don't respond normally to the insulin produced by the pancreas. Here are seven foods you should avoid for better blood sugar control. Continue reading >>

Which All Are The Foods That Cause Insulin Spike In The Body?

Which All Are The Foods That Cause Insulin Spike In The Body?

Basically all types of carbohydrate rich food like rice, bread, noodles, and sugarry drinks can cause a spike in BLOOD GLUCOSE. In in a healthy individual, insulin levels will follow suit, because of a healthy incretin effect (glp-1 and gip). However, in a diabetic, the incretin effect is blunted, therefore insulin is very much lower and slower in diabetics. we should WANT a good insulin spike ;) Continue reading >>

What Causes Insulin To Spike With Milk Products?

What Causes Insulin To Spike With Milk Products?

Insulin is a hormone used by your body to facilitate the transport of glucose into your body’s cells for use as energy. An insulin spike results in a rapid increase and fall of insulin levels in your body. While an insulin spike can produce a quick burst of energy, insulin spikes do not benefit sustained endurance. Carbohydrates in general, and simple sugars specifically, can produce insulin spikes. The simple sugar lactose, present in milk, can cause insulin spikes, but to a lesser extent than glucose. Video of the Day Lactose is the sugar present in milk. Lactose is a simple sugar composed of glucose and galactose. This composition results in lactose’s ability to produce insulin spikes. Before your body can produce an insulin spike from lactose, your body must beak down lactose into its simplest components. Some athletes use milk products to produce insulin spikes. However, this can cause problems in individuals who have a lactose intolerance. Milk as an Insulinogenic Milk is an insulinogenic, meaning that milk promotes the release of insulin. This insulinogenic property is mainly due to milk’s sugar content. However, whey protein can also play a role by releasing insulin, but to a lesser extent. Additionally, hormones injected into cattle to increase production could further increase milk’s insulinogenic properties. However, clinical research has not confirmed how hormones affect the insulinogenic properties of milk. Cream and butter do not raise levels of insulin as much as yogurt, cottage cheese and any milk product with casein or whey. Therefore, the amino acid content of milk may also hold responsibility for the insulin spikes. The amino acids leucine, valine, lysine, and isoleucine are insulinogenic. These are the amino acids present in whey in the highe Continue reading >>

How To Eat To Avoid Insulin Spikes

How To Eat To Avoid Insulin Spikes

Food is the most potent weapon in your fight against diabetes, says Mark Hyman, MD, author of The Blood Sugar Solution (Little, Brown and Company). Evidence shows that eating the right foods can manage your blood sugar level and, according to Hyman, even help reverse diabetes. It's easier than you might think. Consistently tune into the following factors when choosing your foods and you'll be rewarded with stable blood sugar, insulin, and energy levels throughout the day. Glycemic Load Glycemic load (GL) measures how much carbohydrates in a food affect your blood sugar level. (Carbohydrates is the food group that impacts blood sugar the most; protein and fat don't as much.) Factors such as fiber content, serving size, and even shape come into play when the body is breaking down food into sugar molecules. The more challenging a food is to break down, the slower it digests and the more stable your blood sugar will be. Foods made with refined carbs, such as white pasta, are digested quickly and have a higher GL that causes blood sugar to rise rapidly, but foods made with complex carbs, such as whole-wheat pasta, have a lower GL that has a much smaller affect on blood sugar. Portion Size "Excessive portion sizes can impact blood sugar," says Amy Jamieson-Petonic, RD, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and director of coaching at the Cleveland Clinic. A large meal means more sugar (from carbohydrates) enters the bloodstream at one time. Eating smaller portions beefed up by low GL snacks, such as nuts, keeps your blood sugar even throughout the day. Shape of Food Food that's in its full "package," such as a whole grain, takes longer to digest than food that's been partially or fully processed. Whole barley, for instance, has a GL that's less than half th Continue reading >>

50 Foods That Won’t Spike Blood Sugar

50 Foods That Won’t Spike Blood Sugar

Blood sugar (or blood glucose) is most dependent on carbohydrate sources. But since carbohydrates embraces a wide variety of foods (whole grains, produce, milk, pastries, etc.), controlling blood sugars may be confusing and complex to manage. And with the effects of high blood sugar being harmful to health, regulating them takes high precedence. Effects of High Blood Sugar Though blood sugar spikes are oftentimes inevitable, they should not be a consistent phenomenon. Initial signs of high blood sugar (also known as hyperglycemia) consist of increased thirst and frequent urination. But constant and long-term spikes can create much bigger consequences and include cardiovascular (heart) disease, nerve damage (neuropathy), kidney damage (diabetic nephropathy) or failure, damage to the retina's blood vessels (diabetic retinopathy), poor blood circulation to the feet (potentially leading to infections or amputations), mouth and skin infections and non-healing wounds, along with bone and joint complications. More severe complications require emergency attention and include diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome. How to Control Blood Sugar Spikes As mentioned above, constant high blood sugar and spikes can startle and damage the body and its systems. The glycemic index (GI) measures how foods affect blood sugars, based on a one to 100 number scale. Low GI foods have a mild effect on blood sugars while high GI foods have a much greater impact. So to keep blood sugars unshaken, stray away from highly sweetened items and go for non-carbohydrate or lower GI foods. Non-Carbohydrate Foods Meats, fats and oils are essentially absent of carbohydrates. Importantly, be mindful of the preparation method as breaded and battered meats will mostly contain some sort of Continue reading >>

25 Simple Ways To Improve Insulin Sensitivity & Prevent Diabetes | Poliquin Article

25 Simple Ways To Improve Insulin Sensitivity & Prevent Diabetes | Poliquin Article

25 Simple Ways to Improve Insulin Sensitivity & PREVENT Diabetes We’re going to let you in on a little secret: The FIRST thing you should improve when you want to change your body by losing fat or putting on muscle is to improve insulin sensitivity. Insulin sensitivity is SO important for fat loss because when you are insulin resistant, the body is much more likely to store the food you eat as fat. Insulin resistance also produces inflammation in the body, causing a whole bunch of health problems that any sane person wouldn’t want to deal with. Here are 25 simple actions you can take that improve insulin sensitivity. #1: Do strength training and other anaerobic activities. Exercise is absolutely critical for improving insulin sensitivity because your muscles and cells are desperate for fuel during and after your workout. Training modes that build muscle, such as lifting weights or sprints, are most effective for improving insulin sensitivity because muscle consumes the majority of the energy transported in the blood (as much as 90 percent). For every 10 percent increase in muscle mass, you get an 11 percent reduction in insulin resistance. #2: Endurance exercise works too, but combined training is better. Endurance exercise has a very beneficial effect on insulin sensitivity, but only in trained muscle. So if you’re a runner, you’ll be fairly insulin sensitive in the leg musculature, but less so in the upper body. Therefore, it’s important to do some form of total body exercise and strength training is pretty much a no-brainer as your best option because combined aerobic and resistance programs improve insulin sensitivity more than aerobic training alone. If you’re sedentary and overweight, optimizing carb intake may mean to eat a very low-carb (less than 5 Continue reading >>

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Skipping breakfast iStock/Thinkstock Overweight women who didn’t eat breakfast had higher insulin and blood sugar levels after they ate lunch a few hours later than they did on another day when they ate breakfast, a 2013 study found. Another study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that men who regularly skipped breakfast had a 21 percent higher chance of developing diabetes than those who didn’t. A morning meal—especially one that is rich in protein and healthy fat—seems to stabilize blood sugar levels throughout the day. Your breakfast is not one of the many foods that raise blood sugar. Here are some other things that happen to your body when you skip breakfast. Artificial sweeteners iStock/Thinkstock They have to be better for your blood sugar than, well, sugar, right? An interesting new Israeli study suggests that artificial sweeteners can still take a negative toll and are one of the foods that raise blood sugar. When researchers gave mice artificial sweeteners, they had higher blood sugar levels than mice who drank plain water—or even water with sugar! The researchers were able to bring the animals’ blood sugar levels down by treating them with antibiotics, which indicates that these fake sweeteners may alter gut bacteria, which in turn seems to affect how the body processes glucose. In a follow-up study of 400 people, the research team found that long-term users of artificial sweeteners were more likely to have higher fasting blood sugar levels, reported HealthDay. While study authors are by no means saying that sugary beverages are healthier, these findings do suggest that people who drink artificially sweetened beverages should do so in moderation as part of a healthy diet. Here's what else happens when you cut artificial sweetener Continue reading >>

12 Simple Tips To Prevent Blood Sugar Spikes

12 Simple Tips To Prevent Blood Sugar Spikes

Blood sugar spikes occur when your blood sugar rises and then falls sharply after you eat. In the short term, they can cause lethargy and hunger. Over time, your body may not be able to lower blood sugar effectively, which can lead to type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is a rising health problem. In fact, 29 million Americans have diabetes, and 25% of them don't even know they have it (1). Blood sugar spikes can also cause your blood vessels to harden and narrow, which can lead to a heart attack or stroke. This article looks at 12 simple things you can do to prevent blood sugar spikes. Carbohydrates (carbs) are what cause blood sugar to rise. When you eat carbs, they are broken down into simple sugars. Those sugars then enter the bloodstream. As your blood sugar levels rise, your pancreas releases a hormone called insulin, which prompts your cells to absorb sugar from the blood. This causes your blood sugar levels to drop. Many studies have shown that consuming a low-carb diet can help prevent blood sugar spikes (2, 3, 4, 5). Low-carb diets also have the added benefit of aiding weight loss, which can also reduce blood sugar spikes (6, 7, 8, 9). There are lots of ways to reduce your carb intake, including counting carbs. Here's a guide on how to do it. A low-carb diet can help prevent blood sugar spikes and aid weight loss. Counting carbs can also help. Refined carbs, otherwise known as processed carbs, are sugars or refined grains. Some common sources of refined carbs are table sugar, white bread, white rice, soda, candy, breakfast cereals and desserts. Refined carbs have been stripped of almost all nutrients, vitamins, minerals and fiber. Refined carbs are said to have a high glycemic index because they are very easily and quickly digested by the body. This leads to blood sugar Continue reading >>

Healthy Foods That Do Not Spike Blood Sugar

Healthy Foods That Do Not Spike Blood Sugar

Your blood sugar levels rise when you consume foods with easily accessible carbohydrates, potentially increasing your risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity or other health problems. Selecting foods based on their glycemic index, a system that ranks foods based on their potential effect on your blood sugar levels, helps you to find foods that keep your blood sugar levels low; the lower the GI ranking, the less of an impact on your blood sugar levels. Glycemic Index of 20 or Lower Foods without carbohydrates, including meats, eggs and fish, do not have a GI index ranking and do not have a notable impact on your blood sugar levels. Ranked foods with a score of less than 20 also have minimal impact. Such foods include carrots, eggplant, cauliflower, green beans, broccoli, peppers, onions, lettuce, zucchini, tomatoes, peanuts and walnuts. These foods are generally safe for you to eat at each meal without spiking your blood sugar. Cooking raw vegetables makes their carbohydrates more bioavailable and increases their GI ranking -- eat vegetables raw for the smallest impact on your blood sugar. Glycemic Index of 21 to 40 A GI ranking of 21 to 40 represents a small impact on your blood sugar levels. Many vegetables with an otherwise low GI ranking, such as carrots, jump into the 21 to 40 category when cooked. Examples of foods in this small-to-moderate category include peas, beans, lentils, whole wheat pasta, egg noodles, wheat tortillas, pearled barley, rye, cherries, plums, grapefruit, apples, apricots, milk, yogurt and soy milk. Enjoy these foods in moderation to keep your blood sugar in check. Glycemic Index of 41 to 60 Foods with a GI rank of 41 to 60 have a moderate impact on your blood sugar. Examples include rolled oats, kidney beans, chickpeas, popcorn, sweet potatoe Continue reading >>

What Gi Index Will Cause An Insulin Spike?

What Gi Index Will Cause An Insulin Spike?

The level of insulin in your body changes throughout the day. This change is triggered largely by how recently you have eaten and what you ate. When your blood sugar rises -- which it typically does after a meal -- your body releases insulin. When insulin levels rise rapidly, you experience an insulin spike. One way to predict the likelihood of an insulin spike is to consider the glycemic index (GI) of a food. The GI of a given food is a number from 1 to 100. Foods lower on the GI scale tend to have less of an impact on your blood sugar and insulin levels than foods ranked more highly. The combination of foods you eat in a meal, serving sizes and the other nutrients found in these foods also affect your insulin level after eating. Therefore, there is no specific GI level that can reliably be used to predict an insulin spike. Glycemic Index Factors Foods are divided into high, intermediate and low GI categories. A GI of 0 to 55 is low. Intermediate GI foods have a value of 56 to 69, and 70 or above is considered high. Many factors influence a food’s glycemic index, including: -- Type and amount of sugar, starch, fiber, protein and fat. -- Extent of food processing, cooking method and ripeness. -- Ease of digestion and absorption from the intestine. Some foods, like meats, have no GI ranking because they don’t contain any carbohydrates. But the GI scale can help differentiate carb-containing foods that seem quite similar, as the difference between low- and high-GI foods may be difficult to discern without this measure. For example, oatmeal and sweet potatoes -- low GI foods -- may not appear that different from cornflakes and russet potatoes, which are high on the GI scale. The idea behind the GI scale is that carbohydrates have a larger impact on insulin levels than Continue reading >>

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