diabetestalk.net

What Are The Effects Of Too Much Metformin?

Is It Safe To Use Metformin During Pregnancy?

Is It Safe To Use Metformin During Pregnancy?

Metformin is a commonly used drug for managing type 2 diabetes. It is considered an effective treatment option for many people with diabetes, but is it safe for pregnant women? Metformin is a drug that helps to lower blood sugar. It is considered one of the best first line treatments for type 2 diabetes. A review posted to Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome notes that metformin helps to lower blood sugar levels, strengthens the endocrine system, improves insulin resistance, and reduces fat distribution in the body. Before taking any drugs, including metformin, a pregnant woman has to be absolutely sure that the drugs will not affect her or her baby. Effects of metformin use during and after pregnancy Some people are concerned about using metformin during and after pregnancy because it crosses the placenta. This means that when a pregnant woman takes metformin, so does her baby. However, the results of the few studies that have been carried out so far into the effects of taking metformin during pregnancy have been positive. A 2014 review posted to Human Reproduction Update found that the drug did not cause birth defects, complications, or diseases. The researchers did note, however, that larger studies should be carried out to make this evidence more conclusive. Metformin and gestational diabetes A separate review posted to Human Reproduction Update noted that women who took metformin to treat gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) gained less weight than women who took insulin. A 2-year follow-up study found that babies born to the women treated with metformin had less fat around their organs, which could make them less prone to insulin resistance later in life. This could mean that children who are exposed to metformin at a young age could gain long-term benefi Continue reading >>

Metformin Overview

Metformin Overview

Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides, which work by helping your body respond better to the insulin it makes naturally, decreasing the amount of sugar your liver makes, and decreasing the amount of sugar your intestines absorb. This medication comes in tablet, extended-release tablet, and liquid forms. It is taken up to 3 times daily, depending on which form you are taking. Swallow extended-release tablets whole. Common side effects of metformin include diarrhea, nausea, and upset stomach. Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Metformin may be found in some form under the following brand names: Serious side effects have been reported including: Lactic Acidosis. In rare cases, metformin can cause a serious side effect called lactic acidosis. This is caused by a buildup of lactic acid in your blood. This build-up can cause serious damage. Lactic acidosis caused by metformin is rare and has occurred mostly in people whose kidneys were not working normally. Lactic acidosis has been reported in about one in 33,000 patients taking metformin over the course of a year. Although rare, if lactic acidosis does occur, it can be fatal in up to half the people who develop it. It is also important for your liver to be working normally when you take metformin. Your liver helps remove lactic acid from your blood. Make sure you tell your doctor before you use metformin if you have kidney or liver problems. You should also stop using metformin and call your doctor right away if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treate Continue reading >>

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

Too Much Metformin In My Body | Diabetic Connect

Too Much Metformin In My Body | Diabetic Connect

By Bluegill88 Latest Reply2017-05-31 09:04:03 -0500 I was told by my Doctor that my body was receiving too much metformin. That is the reasons I was given due to continue bowl movement. I was taken two metformin tablet 1000 mg twice a day, and going to the bathroom all day and everyday. She gave me another metformin prescription Metformin 500 mg 24 hr SA tab. As you can see she reduce the doses to 500 mg. Does anyone know what this medication is ? Before I quit taking metformin 1000 mg twice a day I had the same problem. It caused many accidents and I couldn't go anywhere without taking a change of clothes. Since coming off of it that condition has got better. In April I began taking Black seed oil which straightened out my bowel problem and it helps reduce my body inflammation and boosted my immune system. I now have much much less joint pain or swelling in my hands and knees. It is great stuff. I was sick for awhile and my glucose levels rose. After surgery, my doctor raised my Metformin dosage and the same thing that happened to you happened to me. I knew immediately what the problem was and told him I am lowering my Metformin back to 500 once a day. He agreed. This is why it is important to research the medications you take and ask your doctor about side effects. Metformin SA (Sustained Action) is a time release form of metformin that will often reduce or eliminate the gastrointestinal discomfort that some experience from regular (immediate release) metformin. Continue reading >>

Metformin 850mg Tablets

Metformin 850mg Tablets

1. WHAT METFORMIN IS AND WHAT IT IS USED FOR The name of this medicine is Metformin 500mg or 850mg Tablets (called metformin in this leaflet). It belongs to a group of medicines called biguanides (a type of oral hypoglycaemic). Metformin is used for the sort of diabetes called Type 2 diabetes or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In type 2 diabetes, there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood. This is because your body does not make enough insulin or because it makes insulin that does not work properly. Insulin is a hormone that allows your body tissue to take glucose from the blood and use it for energy or for storage for future use. Metformin works by improving the sensitivity of your body to insulin. It helps your body to use glucose in the normal way again This medicine is given when diet and exercise alone has not been able to control your blood sugar levels. Metformin can be given on its own. However, sometimes it is given with other medicines for diabetes or with insulin. In patients who are overweight, long-term use of metformin also helps to lower the risk of any problems related to diabetes you are allergic (hypersensitive) to metformin or any of the other ingredients in this liquid (see section 6: Further information). An allergic reaction can include a rash, itching or shortness of breath. you have recently had a heart attack or any other heart problems you have severe circulation problems or difficulty in breathing you have had serious problems with your diabetes in the past called diabetic ketoacidosis. When you have this you lose weight quickly, feel sick (nausea) or are sick (vomiting). See also in Section 4: Possible side effects you have recently had a severe infection, injury or trauma (shock) you are going to have an X-ray where you will b Continue reading >>

Apo-metformin 500/850/1000

Apo-metformin 500/850/1000

PDFLARGE FONT PDF Contains the active ingredient metformin (met-FOR-min) hydrochloride Consumer Medicine Information For a copy of a large print leaflet, Ph: 1800 195 055 What is in this leaflet Read this leaflet carefully before taking your medicine. This leaflet answers some common questions about metformin. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist or diabetes educator. The information in this leaflet was last updated on the date listed on the last page. More recent information on this medicine may be available. Ask your doctor or pharmacist: if there is anything you do not understand in this leaflet, if you are worried about taking your medicine, or to obtain the most up-to-date information. You can also download the most up-to-date leaflet from www.apotex.com.au. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using this medicine against the benefits they expect it will have for you. Pharmaceutical companies cannot give you medical advice or an individual diagnosis. Keep this leaflet with your medicine. You may want to read it again. What this medicine is used for The name of your medicine is APO-Metformin 500, 850 or 1000 tablets. It contains the active ingredient metformin (as metformin hydrochloride). It is used to treat type 2 diabetes (also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or maturity onset diabetes) in adults and children over 10 years of age. It is especially useful in those who are overweight, when diet and exercise are not enough to lower high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). For adult patients, metformin can be used alone, or in combination with other oral diabetic medicines or in combination with insulin in insulin requiring typ Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

How Much Do You Know About Metformin?

How Much Do You Know About Metformin?

Metformin is a drug commonly used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. It is sold as a generic and under several brand names, including Glucophage, Glumetza, Riomet, and Fortamet. Both the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) recommend metformin as a cornerstone of therapy for Type 2 diabetes when exercise and dietary changes aren’t enough to keep blood glucose levels in target range. The low cost of the generic forms along with a long history of use make it a good choice for many individuals with Type 2 diabetes. Although metformin has helped many people lower their blood glucose levels, it does have some potential side effects that are worth knowing about. Understanding the risks and benefits of metformin is key to using it successfully. Take this quiz to test your knowledge of this popular diabetes medicine. (You can find the answers later in the article.) Q 1. How does metformin work to lower blood glucose levels? A. It stimulates the pancreas to make more insulin. B. It decreases the amount of glucose produced by the liver and makes it easier for cells to accept glucose from the bloodstream. C. It slows the digestive system’s breakdown of carbohydrates into glucose, allowing more time for insulin to work. D. It suppresses appetite, slows stomach emptying, and inhibits the release of glucagon (a hormone that raises blood glucose levels). 2. In addition to lowering blood glucose, metformin sometimes causes moderate weight loss. TRUE FALSE 3. In research studies, metformin use was associated with which of the following benefits in people with Type 2 diabetes? A. Reduced risk of morning high blood glucose. B. Reduced neuropathy (nerve damage). C. Reduced retinopathy (damage to the retina, a membrane in Continue reading >>

Apo-metformin

Apo-metformin

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about metformin It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist or diabetes educator. The information in this leaflet was last updated on the date listed on the last page. More recent information on this medicine may be available. You can also download the most up to date leaflet from www.apotex.com.au. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using this medicine against the benefits they expect it will have for you. Pharmaceutical companies cannot give you medical advice or an individual diagnosis. Keep this leaflet with your medicine. You may want to read it again. What this medicine is used for The name of your medicine is APO-Metformin 500, 850 or 1000 tablets. It contains the active ingredient metformin (as metformin hydrochloride). It is used to treat type 2 diabetes (also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or maturity onset diabetes) in adults and children over 10 years of age. It is especially useful in those who are overweight, when diet and exercise are not enough to lower high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). For adult patients, metformin can be used alone, or in combination with other oral diabetic medicines or in combination with insulin in insulin requiring type 2 diabetes. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why this medicine has been prescribed for you. Your doctor may have prescribed this medicine for another reason. This medicine is available only with a doctor's prescription. How it works Metformin lowers high blood glucose by helping your body make better Continue reading >>

Fatal Metformin Overdose Presenting With Progressive Hyperglycemia

Fatal Metformin Overdose Presenting With Progressive Hyperglycemia

Go to: CASE REPORT A 29-year-old man ingested metformin in a suicide attempt. The patient consumed the entire remaining contents of his father’s prescription metformin bottle that originally contained 100 tablets of 850 mg each. The father stated that the bottle had contained at least three-quarters of its original contents, putting the ingested dose between 64 and 85 grams. The patient also consumed ethanol, but denied any other co-ingestants. The parents discovered the overdose around 6:30 a.m., about 5 ½ hours post-ingestion, when the patient began complaining of vomiting, diarrhea, thirst, abdominal pain and bilateral leg pain. Paramedics were called, who found the patient to be agitated with a fingerstick glucose level of 180 mg/dL. The patient had a history of psychosis and depression, including prior suicide attempts by drug ingestion. He was not taking any prescribed medications, having discontinued olanzapine and sertraline several months earlier. The patient had no personal history of diabetes, despite the family history of type II diabetes in his father, who was taking no other anti-diabetic medications than metformin. The patient admitted to daily ethanol and tobacco use, but denied any current or past use of illicit drugs. He had no surgical history or known allergies. Vital signs on arrival to the Emergency Department (ED) were temperature of 35.2°C (rectal), pulse of 113 beats/min, blood pressure of 129/59 mmHg, respirations at 28 breaths/min with 100% saturation via pulse oximetry on room air. The patient was awake and oriented x4, but agitated and slightly confused (GCS=14). Pupils were equal and reactive at 4mm and the oral mucous membranes were dry. Other than tachycardia, the heart and lung exams were unremarkable. The abdomen was mildly tender t Continue reading >>

Too Much Metformin!?

Too Much Metformin!?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I had been at a party all day (where they only served cake and cookies, which I didn't touch). I started to get light headed in the later part of the day. I thought I had had one too many coffees (I had 2 small cups with cream and sugar substitute). Anyhow, when I got home, I checked my blood sugar.... And they say non-insulin dependent T2s don't get hypos!! Anyhow, I ate a couple nuts and then had a sensible dinner. My suspicion is that my Metformin dose (3 tablets at 500 G daily) is too high. I have lost 52 pounds since I got my diagnosis, and my blood sugars are really normalized (A1c 5%). Could it be that my greatly reduced body size makes me need less metformin? I've been taking metformin for 4 years, with the last year taking 2550 mg, in 3 (850) doses. I am down to 113 pounds and rarely have lows. Usually when my bg goes into the 70's I will get a liver dump which brings me back up to 90. The only time I may go low is if I am drinking wine, so I need to be careful. That being said I do try to make sure I eat every 5 hours or so, just to play it safe. Hmmm....maybe I didn't eat enough. I am regularly in the 70s though. Even 2 hr PP. On my last endo visit she was looking at my numbers and circled two in the 70ish range and said: well if you keep getting more 75 and below reading reduce your Met by a pill or 1/2 a pill and if after that your still going into that range cut it back by another 1/2. So I have ...from 500 2 x d I now take 1/2 pill in the am and 1/2 in the pm. I guess it's possible, but I don't think too much metformin would cause a hypoglycemic episode, at least not like insul Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl

Metformin Hcl

Uses Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. How to use Metformin HCL Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 1-3 times a day with meals. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. Remember to use it at the same times each day. If you are already taking another diabetes drug (such as chlorpropamide), follow your doctor's directions carefully for stopping/continuing the old drug and starting metformin. Check your blood sugar regularly a Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Metformin – What Every Diabetic Should Know

Metformin – What Every Diabetic Should Know

Diabetes affects millions of people throughout the world and for all the ones who know that they have it and are doing something to control it there will be just as many who do not know they have it. It is caused by the pancreas not creating enough insulin and this leaves you with too much sugar in the blood as your body can not process it properly. Metformin is a drug that is used to treat diabetes. Its main role is in regulating the amount of sugar in the body and this alone will help the diabetic. It only treats type 2 diabetes and there are other medicines available for those suffering from type 1. It is a member of a group of drugs known as biguanides and they have been used effectively for some time. How Does It Work? Metformin manages to control the amount of sugar in the blood in three distinct ways. Firstly it works on the food that you eat. Most foods have some degree of sugar in them and too much can cause the diabetes to become worse. The amount that the body absorbs is important and Metformin makes sure that not too much gets through. If too much does get through the body cannot deal with it and it is then that you become ill. Secondly it keeps down the amount of sugar that is produced by the liver. If this can be slowed down, there will be less sugar travelling around the body and the outcome will be that you are less likely to be ill. Its final function is to make sure that insulin is regulated. It works on both injected insulin and that produced naturally by the body. As a result of this some people who already have to inject may find that they no longer have to do this, or at least cut down the amount of times they have to do it. It will be important how much Metformin that you take and the amount will be prescribed by your doctor. This will be an exact Continue reading >>

Metformin Overdose

Metformin Overdose

Tweet Save As with any medication, it is possible to overdose on metformin. Some of the effects of a metformin overdose may include low blood sugar or lactic acidosis. Symptoms of low blood sugar include blurred vision, shakiness, and extreme hunger. Some symptoms of lactic acidosis can include an irregular heartbeat, trouble breathing, and feeling tired. There are some treatment options for a metformin overdose, including dialysis or using a sugar solution to increase blood sugar levels. Metformin Overdose: An Overview Metformin (Glucophage®) is a prescription medication that has been licensed to treat type 2 diabetes. As with all medicines, it is possible to take too much metformin. Effects of a metformin overdose will vary depending on a number of factors, including how much metformin was taken and whether it was taken with any other medicines, alcohol, and/or drugs. If you happen to overdose on metformin, seek medical attention immediately. Symptoms of a Metformin Overdose The effects of a metformin overdose may include: Possible symptoms of low blood sugar include: Sweating Shakiness Extreme hunger Dizziness Cold sweats Blurry vision. More severe low blood sugar symptoms include: Changes in behavior, such as irritability Loss of coordination Difficulty speaking Confusion Loss of consciousness Coma Lactic acidosis symptoms include: Feeling tired or weak Muscle pain Trouble breathing Abdominal pain (or stomach pain) Feeling cold Dizziness or lightheadedness A slow or irregular heartbeat Loss of life. Tweet Our free DiscountRx savings card can help you and your family save money on your prescriptions. This card is accepted at all major chain pharmacies, nationwide. Enter your name and email address to receive your free savings card. Treatment for a Metformin Overdose Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet