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What Are Good Snack Foods For Diabetics

The Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

The Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

When creating a meal plan for someone with diabetes it is essential to include snacks, because they are important in keeping blood sugar consistent throughout the day. Avoiding high and low blood sugar levels are crucial for many diabetic medications to work optimally. Ideally, a meal plan should include at least two to three snacks per day, which also help prevent overeating at mealtime. Carbohydrates When planning what snack to eat consider the amount of carbohydrates in each item. Try to keep your portions of carbohydrates between one and two servings, with each serving equivalent to 15 grams of total carbohydrates, as indicated on food nutrition labels. Protein It's also important to make sure you are including protein in each snack, as it slows the rate at which your blood sugar rises and falls. It also helps make you feel full longer, so you won't be craving another snack in 30 minutes. Try to eat at least one serving of protein, which is equivalent to 1 ounce of meat or cheese, in each snack. If you are following a food nutrition label, one serving is equivalent to 7 grams of protein. Delicious Examples There are several delicious combinations of protein and carbohydrates that will satisfy your hunger as well as control your blood sugar. They include one apple with 1 tablespoon of peanut butter or 1 ounce of cheese, Greek yogurt (which includes both carbohydrates and protein), seven to nine pretzels with 1 ounce of almonds; a half of an English muffin with 1 tablespoon of peanut butter, a half of a turkey or grilled cheese sandwich, and trail mix consisting of 1 ounce of nuts and 1/4 cup dried fruit. Elizabeth Dias is a registered dietitian currently working as a clinical dietitian at a Boston community hospital. She obtained her bachelor's degree at the Universi Continue reading >>

10 Kid Approved & Diabetic Friendly Snacks

10 Kid Approved & Diabetic Friendly Snacks

Any of you with kids know that the amount of requests kids make for a snack in a day is astronomical. Having both of my kids at home all summer long, many days it seems like my day consists of: make breakfast, clean up the kitchen, give the kids a snack, make lunch, clean up the kitchen, make a snack, make dinner, clean up the kitchen, fall into bed. Ok, I am exaggerating, but you get the point. Kids eat…A LOT! I always try to provide my kids with healthy snack options. I also like to keep snacks lower carb, so that my son’s blood sugar doesn’t peak too much in between meals, and so that it has time to stabilize before beginning another meal. I thought I would share a few ideas of what snack time looks like at our house, by giving you 10 sample snacks. In most, there is more than one snack idea. Exact carbohydrate calculations will vary, but I will give you the rough estimates of the food pictured. Freeze-Dried Fruit & Popcorn: My kids love freeze-dried fruit, and I love it because it is great to have on hand once our favorite seasonal fruits are no longer in season. I buy the single-serving bags and it makes for a great snack and/or addition to meals. Popcorn is a snack-time favorite at our household as well because it is so low carb. For 1 bag of freeze-dried fruit (containing blueberries, raspberries & strawberries), there are 10 g of carbs and 3 g of fiber. Total NET CARBS are 7 g. 1 cup of popcorn contains approximately 3 g of carbs and .5 g of fiber. Total NET CARBS are 2.5 g. Frutas secas y palomitas de maíz 1 bolsa de frutas secas congeladas (con arándanos, frambuesas y fresas), contiene 10 g de carbohidratos y 3 g de fibra. Total de carbohidratos: 7 g. 1 Taza de palomitas de maíz contiene aproximadamente 3 g de carbohidratos y 5 g de fibra. Total de ca Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

My mom, who has diabetes, likes having her tea and a snack before bedtime. Is eating a slice of American or cheddar cheese good for her? Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Tips For Healthy Snacks

Diabetes: Tips For Healthy Snacks

www.CardioSmart.org Eating healthy snacks is an important part of your meal plan for diabetes. Work with your doctor and a registered dietitian to create a meal plan that includes regular snacks. You need the right balance of carbohydrate, protein, and fat all through the day. Knowing when to snack and what to eat can help you keep your blood sugar stable at healthy levels. When should you snack? Eat your meals and snacks at the same time each day. If you are hungry or have problems with low blood sugar betweenmeals, eat a snack between your breakfast, lunch, and dinner. If you have problems with low blood sugar during the night, have a small snack before you go to bed. If you aren't having problems with low blood sugar, you may not need snacks. If you're at risk of having low blood sugar between meals, ask your doctor about whether your medicines may need to be adjusted. What should you eat? Overall, try to eat a wide range of foods. Spread carbohydrate all through the day. This will give you a ready supply of energy and help control your blood sugar. Carbohydrate raises blood sugar higher and more quickly than any other nutrient. Carbohydrate is found in sugar, breads and cereals, fruit, starchy vegetables such as potatoes and corn, and milk and yogurt. Try to eat whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables when you choose your carbohydrate instead of white bread, crackers, or fruit or vegetable juices. Protein and fat do not raise blood sugar very much. If you are hungry, choose snacks that combine protein and fat with carbohydrate. Each snack should contain about 15 grams of carbohydrate. Examples of 15 grams include 1 slice of bread, 5 or 6 crackers, or 1 medium apple or orange. Try the following: • Amedium piece of fresh fruit. Or eat a small piece of fruit Continue reading >>

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes – Small Snacks

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes – Small Snacks

If you have type 2 diabetes, a snack can help you manage your blood glucose levels. If your Registered Dietitian suggests that a small snack fits into your diabetes meal plan, you’ll find many healthy ideas below. What is a healthy snack? Your snack choices should be based on the four food groups in Canada’s Food Guide. The amount of carbohydrate in your snack is very important since carbohydrate-rich foods make the biggest difference to blood glucose levels. Smaller snacks should have about 15 grams of carbohydrate. This is the amount found in one slice of bread or one small apple. Carbohydrates are also found in sugary sweets like pastries, chocolate bars and candy. Because they are not very nutritious, they should be chosen less often, if at all. Here’s a good rule to remember when choosing carbohydrate-rich foods: Choose more vegetables, fruit, legumes and whole grains like oats, barley, brown rice and whole wheat. Choose fewer products that are made from sugar, white flour and white rice. The smaller snacks listed below have about 15 grams of carbohydrate each. They each have 85-150 calories. Mid-day snacks Your eating plan may include a snack in the morning or the mid-afternoon. Here are some delicious options. 1 slice whole grain bread with 10 mL (2 tsp) peanut butter 1 small orange and 175 mL (¾ cup) edamame (green soybeans in the pod) 250 mL (1 cup) latte, cappuccino, unsweetened cocoa or chai tea made with skim milk 250 mL (1 cup) cantaloupe with 125 mL (½ cup) low fat cottage cheese 15 baby carrots with 30 mL (2 tbsp) hummus On-the-go snacks These snacks can be left in your briefcase, knapsack, car or your desk drawer. They will come in handy when you have a very busy day and need to grab a quick snack. 2 whole grain rye crispbread crackers 1 single-s Continue reading >>

5 Delicious And Healthy Snacks For Diabetics

5 Delicious And Healthy Snacks For Diabetics

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects an estimated 50 million people in our country. According to the Diabetes Foundation of India (DFI), this figure is likely to go up to 80 million by 2025, making India the 'Diabetes Capital' of the world. Diabetes requires life-long management and control. Certain lifestyle changes and a strict diet can help curb further health hazards. Nutritionists often recommend that diabetics should eat small and frequent meals to keep their blood sugar levels in check. Therefore, it is important to sneak in some healthy snacks between your meals. According to Nutritionist Dr. Rupali Dutta, 'Diabetics should have snacks that are rich in protein, full of fiber and whole grains and low in fat. If a person is on a 1400-calorie diet, he or she must have snacks with 100-150 calories and not more than that. This may include besan ka cheela, a piece or two of paneer, a piece of cheese, low calorie popcorn, sprouts or one fruit which does not include banana, chikoo or mango. You should eat foods that are low on the glycemic index." Dietitian Lokendra Tomar from Weight Loss Clinic in New Delhi agrees, "Diabetics must have snacks that are extremely low on the glycemic index and high on protein. You can choose nuts and seeds like chia seeds, flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, almonds and walnuts as they contain healthy oils, fats and proteins. Generally, people have a habit of snacking on zero-calorie or sugar-free biscuits. However, I would not recommend them as they contain a high amount of artificial sugar which may increase blood sugar levels drastically. Similarly, in the morning try and avoid oats or cornflakes as they have 60-70 percent of carbohydrates that break down into sugar in the body. Instead, replace oats with yogurt and chia seeds mixed with Continue reading >>

Healthy Swaps: Snacks

Healthy Swaps: Snacks

Everyone needs a snack in between meals occasionally – but, if you have diabetes, you’ll want something small that will satisfy your hunger, is low in fat and sugar, and will not have a big effect on your blood glucose level. If you’re bored with the same old snacks, here are some quick and easy ideas you can put together from ingredients you have at home or can buy easily. They also don’t need any cooking. We’ve divided them into snacks under 10g carbs and those containing 50, 100 and 150 calories. If you’re trying to lose weight, opt for the snacks with the least amount of calories. Snack guidance We don’t recommend snacks labelled ‘diabetic’, which tend to be expensive and don’t offer you any special health benefits. The key is to plan your favourite snacks so they fit into your overall diet and watch your portion sizes. Confused where to start with snacks? Depending on whether you need help with calorie-controlled snack ideas or low-carb snack guidance, click on the relevant link below: Snack swaps Swapping is an easy way to eat better while still enjoying the foods you like. Here's a few ideas to try to get you started. 1 small apple: 38 calories 2 satsumas: 50 calories 4 heaped tbsp blueberries: 44 calories 1 handful of grapes: 45 calories 1 kiwi fruit: 42 calories 1 peach: 30 calories 3 rings pineapple: 50 calories 1 light cheese triangle (25 calories) and 8 cherry tomatoes (24 calories): 49 calories 30g ready-to-eat partially rehydrated prunes: 48 calories 1 rice cake (27 calories) and 1 teaspoon (10g) pure fruit spread (22 calories): 49 calories 1 x 14g mini box of raisins: 45 calories 1 lighter cheese slice (34 calories) with ¼ cucumber (11 calories): 45 calories 1 x 115g pot sugar-free jelly: 8 calories 4 bread sticks: 92 calories 80g def Continue reading >>

Your Guide To Snacks For Those With Type 2 Diabetes

Your Guide To Snacks For Those With Type 2 Diabetes

Confused about the types of snacks you should be eating if you, or a family member, have type 2 diabetes? HFG dietitian Zoe Wilson breaks down the essentials. If you have type 2 diabetes, your main focus should be on controlling your weight and eating a healthy, balanced diet, just like everyone else. There’s a common belief that people with type 2 diabetes should snack regularly to keep their blood sugars stable, but it’s not necessarily the case. If you’re trying to lose weight (which will also help to control your diabetes) the wrong choice of snacks can add extra kilojoules to your day, especially if you’re eating them when you’re not actually hungry. However, the right snacks can be a useful part of a healthy diet, especially if you’re taking a medication that can result in a drop in your blood sugar levels if you don’t eat regularly. The most important thing is to know what kinds of snacks you should be eating. Kilojoules Choose snacks with less than 400kJ if you’re trying to lose weight, or less than 600kJ if you’re maintaining your weight. Make sure you always check the label for the serving size to ensure you aren’t eating more than a serve each time you snack. Fat It’s best to go for snacks that are lower in total fat – and particularly ones that are low in saturated fat (or ‘bad’ fat). Eating too much saturated fat can increase your risk of high cholesterol and heart disease, which is also further increased when you have diabetes. Stay away from snacks such as biscuits, chips, cakes, pastries and chocolate – these are not only high in total fat but especially high in saturated fat. It’s okay to have snacks such as raw, unsalted nuts (in a small 30g serve) even though they are higher in total fat. This is because they contain un Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Snacking Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Snacking Mistakes To Avoid

Snacking can help or hinder your glycemic control…. You are the force behind which occurs. Whether we are addressing snacking between meals or evening and bedtime snacks, some familiar mistakes are described below with some helpful tips to conquer those slip-ups. 1. Too Many Carbs Ask anyone what their favorite snacks are…. They are nearly all high carbohydrate foods. Crackers, pretzels, chips, cookies…. All go-to snacks for kids and adults alike. Carbohydrate content of snacks is typically recommended at 15-30 grams. Just one cup of the thin pretzel sticks contains 36 grams of carbohydrate. An 8-ounce container of lowfat strawberry yogurt contains 43 grams of carbohydrate. Only 15 Triscuit-type crackers contains 45 grams of carbohydrate. It is easy to eat more than you need. Tip: Read labels carefully for serving size and total carbohydrate. 2. Not Enough Carbs On the flip side, many people with diabetes go overboard and avoid carbohydrate at snack time. In reality, you need some carbohydrate continuously through the day for energy. Some common low-carbohydrate snacks: 1 ounce of cheese (contains zero carbohydrate), carrot and celery sticks with ranch dressing (about 8 grams of carbohydrate), or ¼ cup of roasted almonds (7 grams of carbohydrate). Remember that typical recommendations are for 15-30 grams of carbohydrate in a snack. Tip: Don’t be afraid to include some carbs in your snack, just be informed about how much you are eating. 3. Caught Without a Plan You are driving the kids to and from extracurricular activities, or you have a crazy day at work, or you are on a business trip…. Hectic schedules can certainly interfere with your eating plan. The best laid plans may get side tracked. But, having a plan in place in the beginning is the key to success. Continue reading >>

17 Easy, Low Sugar Snacks For Diabetics (perfect For Picky Eaters)

17 Easy, Low Sugar Snacks For Diabetics (perfect For Picky Eaters)

When you have diabetes, finding healthy low-carb snacks can be a real challenge. Which is really too bad, because snacks can be an important part of our overall nutrition, keeping us going between meals. And when it comes to healthy snacks, it’s important to get a good mix of fiber, protein, and carbohydrates without loading up on added sugar. But too many snacks that claim to be “healthy” are actually high in sugar, trans fats, sodium, and calories. And as you’ve probably noticed, plenty of granola bars, energy bars, cereals, juices, and chips are marketed as healthy, but contain a bunch of added ingredients and chemicals that make them anything but. Also, many of the “healthy snacks” that are available at the grocery store are especially bad snack ideas for diabetics because they can skyrocket your blood sugar – plus they leave you feeling hungry again an hour later. According to the American Diabetes Association, healthy snacks for diabetics should include about 10 to 20 grams of carbohydrates, which helps keep blood sugar levels steady throughout the day. If you’re planning to exercise, they recommend bumping it up to about 30 grams of carbohydrates just before working out (1). Looking for some healthy snack ideas for diabetics that are easy to make and delicious? Check out this list, which provides plenty of options. Quick and Easy Snacks for Diabetics 1. Smoky & Spicy Nut, Sesame, and Coconut “Bacon” Bar Nuts This recipe features a variety of nuts and seeds with a smoky twist that’s sure to satisfy. Bursting with plenty of protein, fiber, and healthy fats, this recipe is packed with flavor and will definitely keep you feeling full until your next meal. Find the recipe here: Oh She Glows 2. Banana & Berry Hemp Seed Pudding Creamy, refreshing, Continue reading >>

6 Safe & Healthy Snacks For Diabetics

6 Safe & Healthy Snacks For Diabetics

Being diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes can be scary and intimidating. The good news is that it’s really not all that difficult to build a healthy and delicious diet plan that will keep you safe. The trick, of course, is to find foods that won’t upset your blood sugar levels. Thankfully, there are many healthy foods that qualify. Let’s take a quick look at a few snack options for people recently diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes… 1. Whole-Grain Crackers and Cheese While some foods can actually raise our blood sugar levels and pose a serious threat to diabetics, whole-grain foods—like cracked wheat or whole wheat crackers—can actually lower blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Adding cheese to the mix provides protein that can stabilize blood sugar and keep hunger pangs at bay for hours. If you’re looking for a healthy alternative, consider using low-fat cheese or cottage cheese. In any case, don’t overdo it on the cheese. 2. Homemade Popcorn Popcorn gets a bad reputation, but that’s not entirely fair. Yes, popcorn bought in bags at the grocery store or acquired at the local movie theater can be absolutely loaded with salt, fat, even sugar. But popcorn itself—save the various coatings—is actually very high in fiber and rather healthy. The key is to make your own popcorn from scratch. Most grocery stores carry popcorn kernels, which can be prepared by adding them to a covered pot placed on the stove top. Use a little oil to gently coat some of the kernels, but don’t overdo it. To keep things healthy, use canola or olive oil. 3. Apples and Cheese No one is exactly sure why they make such a good combination, but it’s hard to disagree that apples and cheese make for a great-tasting one-two punch. And it’s a healthy combo, too! While t Continue reading >>

Healthy Snacks For Kids With Diabetes

Healthy Snacks For Kids With Diabetes

Healthy snacks are important for children with diabetes, whether they are dealing with type1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. Snacks provide a way for children to recharge, manage their blood glucose levels, and sustain energy until their next meal. When deciding what snacks to give your child, try to incorporate a variety of foods. Snacks for kids should come from the bread, dairy foods, and fruits and vegetables groups. You can also ask your child's doctor or registered dietitian for healthy snack recommendations, as well as how to monitor the carbs in your child's snack. Here are healthy snack ideas for kids from three food groups. From the bread group: air-popped popcorn baked chips breadsticks graham crackers low and no fat rolls, such as bagels (measure: half of a 3-inch bagel = 1 carb) low-fat crackers pretzels rice cakes with fruit spread or all natural peanut butter trail mix vanilla wafers From the dairy foods group: frozen, low-fat, no sugar added yogurt or ice cream fruit smoothies (made with non-fat yogurt, fruit, skim milk, and ice cubes) low-fat cheese low-fat cottage cheese or ricotta low-fat milk low-fat yogurt string cheese From the fruits and vegetables group: apple wedges baby carrots or carrot sticks banana slices celery sticks stuffed with low-fat cream cheese or natural peanut butter cherry tomatoes cucumber slices grapes melon balls oranges and tangerine sections peach or pear slices raisins or yogurt-covered raisins strawberry slices tomato and vegetables juices unsweetened fruit juices When shopping for these foods, be sure to read the nutrition labels, and watch for phrases, such as "low fat"—that doesn't always mean low in calories. Also, sometimes sugar is added for taste, which adds to the carbohydrate count. Note that fat and cholesterol sho Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

Yes, you can snack if you have diabetes When your stomach starts to rumble, you need a snack that can curb your hunger without blowing your blood sugar. Just like meals, snacks should be a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Aim for one that consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on your meal plan and medication). Here are five that typically get a seal of approval from diabetes educators and nutritionists. Whole-grain crackers, grapes, and cottage cheese Nutrient-rich whole grains like cracked wheat, whole wheat, rye, and quinoa can lower blood sugar and cholesterol. The cottage cheese adds protein to stabilize blood sugar, curb hunger pangs, and provide calcium for strong bones. Buy your favorite whole-grain crackers, and make sure that the first ingredient is whole-wheat flour or another whole grain, such as rye. (Even if the ingredient list says "wheat flour," it is not a whole-grain food unless it specifies "whole-wheat flour.") Arrange on a small plate 2 crackers, 1/4 cup nonfat cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Serving size: 2 crackers, 1/4 cup cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Nutritional information—Calories: 138, Total Carbohydrate: 21.2 g (7%), Dietary Fiber: 1.5 g (6%), Sugars 11.9 g Homemade popcorn Popcorn is high in fiber, and when made from scratch is an all-natural food without additives and artificial flavorings. Pour 1 tablespoon of mild-flavored oil such as canola into a heavy-bottomed medium-large pot. Cover the bottom of the pot with 1/2 cup of popcorn kernels spread in a thin layer. (If the kernels are too crowded, not all of them will pop.) Cover the pot and heat on medium, shaking the pot every minute or so until all of the kernels have popped. Take care not to cook too long, which could Continue reading >>

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both Continue reading >>

15 Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

15 Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

15 Best Snack Foods for Diabetics Healthy snacking doesn’t have to be boring The key to healthy snacking is selecting foods with high fiber content and controlling portion sizes. Figuring out the right snack foods in between meals is hard enough for most people, but what if you’re one of the 18.8 million people in the United States who have been diagnosed with diabetes? The options may seem even more limited. That’s why I’ve put together a list of 15 diabetic-friendly snacking options based on advice from a few experts.Lori Kenyon is a certified nutritional consultant, personal trainer, and co-founder of Ritual Cleanse. She was diagnosed early on in her life with a disorder that prevented her from consuming animal protein and has since had to adapt her diet to compensate. Kenyon advises clients to consume snacks which contain no more than 20 grams of carbohydrates and 140 milligrams of sodium per serving, in accordance with American Diabetes Association guidelines.Stella Metsovas is a certified clinical nutritionist who specializes in food science and human nutrition, with more than 23 years of experience in the field. She is a strong believer in the Paleo-Mediterranean diet and runs a private practice in Los Angeles. Angela Shelf Medearis is the author of The Kitchen Diva’s Diabetic Cookbook and has been featured frequently on The Dr. Oz Show as a guest chef, where she is known simply as The Kitchen Diva. She offers some great general snacking advice from her cookbook: Portion sizes are key. Keeping the glycemic load down (a measurement of how much food spikes blood glucose levels) means cutting down on portion sizes, since the measurement accounts for the number of grams of carbohydrates per serving of a food item, which of course will increase with portion Continue reading >>

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