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Top Diabetic Diet Tips For Indians

Top Diabetic Diet Tips For Indians

People suffering from diabetes have double the risk of getting a heart attack and developing mental health issues. But the good news is, most cases of type 2 diabetes can be reversed. Taking steps to control your diabetes does not mean to live in deprivation, it rather means eating in moderation and maintaining the right balance. Here we bring to you some diet tips which will not leave you hungry or deprived. Nutrition No matter whether you are a diabetic or not, the nutrition needed by your body is same as for any other normal person (without diabetes). So, you don't need to consume anything special, though you need to take care of the number of calories you intake. Your choice of food matters and most importantly the carbohydrates. Lose weight Fortunately, you have more control over your health than you think. By eating healthy, doing some physical activity and losing weight you can control your diabetes and even reverse it in some cases. By losing just 5 to 10 per cent of your weight, you can lower your blood sugar level, lower blood pressure and lower cholesterol. Also, losing weight and eating healthy will have a profound effect on your energy, mood and sense of well-being. So even if you already developed diabetes it's not too late to make positive changes. Diabetic diet for Indians The per day calorie intake should be between 1500 to 1800 calories. A diabetic diet should have at least three vegetables and two fruits each day. Avoid consuming dry fruits Dry fruits seem like a healthy snacking option but for diabetic people it's not really the case. The fructose in dry fruits may spike your sugar level. So, try having fresh fruits instead of dry fruits. Some home remedies to control diabetes Green tea: This tea is unfermented and hence has high polyphenol content, Continue reading >>

Shopping List For Diabetics

Shopping List For Diabetics

Control Type 2 Diabetes, Shed Fat Our Shopping List for Diabetics is based on the Pritikin Eating Plan, regarded worldwide as among the healthiest diets on earth. The Pritikin Program has been documented in more than 100 studies in peer-reviewed medical journals to prevent and control many of our nation’s leading killers – heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and obesity as well as type 2 diabetes. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, pay special attention. Research on newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics coming to the Pritikin Longevity Center illustrate how profoundly beneficial early intervention can be. Scientists from UCLA followed 243 people in the early stages of diabetes (not yet on medications). Within three weeks of coming to Pritikin, their fasting blood sugar (glucose) plummeted on average from 160 to 124. Research has also found that the Pritikin Program reduces fasting insulin by 25 to 40%. Shopping List for Diabetics – More Features Here’s another big plus to our Shopping List for Diabetics. In addition to icons that are diabetes-focused like “sugar free,” this list uses icons like “low cholesterol” and “low sodium” because many people with diabetes are working to control not just diabetes but related conditions like high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. This list can help you identify those foods most advantageous in helping you reach your personal health goals. Diabetic Food Taboos? Not Anymore! Have you been told you have to give up juicy watermelon or sweet grapes? What if we told you those foods really aren’t taboo? Watch the Video Our Healthy Shopping List for Diabetics also lists the top 10 things to put back on the shelf if you’re trying to: Lose Weight Lower Blood Pres Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

Basic Diabetes Meal Plan

Basic Diabetes Meal Plan

Diabetes meal planning starts with eating a well-balanced diet that includes carbohydrates (carbs), protein, and fat. Carbs (found in starches, fruit, vegetables, milk/yogurt and sweets) turn into sugar (glucose) in the body. The body needs carbs for energy. Eating too many carbs can raise blood glucose levels too much, but it is important not cut out these foods. Eating too few carbs may cause your blood glucose to go too low. Eating a moderate amount of carbs at each meal, with a balanced intake of protein and fat, will help your blood glucose stay in a healthy range. Here are some tips to get you started. Your dietitian will give you more specific information when you meet with him or her. Limit your intake and portion sizes of high-sugar foods to 2 or 3 times a week or less. These include: Cakes (frosted, layer, plain), pies, and cookies Candy (hard tack, chocolate, nougats, etc.) Jelly, jam, and preserves Table sugar, honey, molasses, and syrup Regular ice cream, sherbet, regular and frozen yogurt, fruit ices, and Popsicles Regular soft drinks, fruit drinks (canned or concentrated), and drink mixes with sugar added Milkshakes, chocolate milk, hot cocoa mix Sugar coated cereals, granola, breakfast/snack bars Canned fruits with heavy syrup, dried fruit, fruit roll-ups, candied fruit Iced sweet breads, coffee cakes, breakfast rolls, and donuts Avoid the following: Table sugar, honey, molasses and syrup Regular soft drinks, fruit drinks (canned or concentrated), and drink mixes with sugar added Milkshakes, chocolate milk, hot cocoa mix Canned fruits with heavy syrup Eat 3 well-balanced meals a day and a small snack at night. Each meal should contain both carbs and protein. When planning meals, select a variety of foods from each food group, and watch your portion sizes Continue reading >>

Diabetic Food

Diabetic Food

Tweet Diabetic food is fast becoming an obsolete term. Yet, this doesn't stop thousands of diabetics believing they have to buy this food and countless manufacturers selling diabetic food products. The situation has reached the point at which Diabetes UK and the Food Standards Agency have issued a joint statement calling for an end to ‘diabetic food’ and ‘suitable for diabetics’ on food labels. Dietary policy This shift in dietary policy is largely down to changing diet advice, which recommends that any food is suitable for people with diabetes in sensible moderation. Concern has existed for some time that labelling a food as ‘diabetic’ could mislead people with diabetes into thinking that the food was essential or at the least especially suitable. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. Continue reading >>

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Table of Contents Simple Steps to Lower Your Risk Introduction If type 2 diabetes was an infectious disease, passed from one person to another, public health officials would say we’re in the midst of an epidemic. This difficult disease, once called adult-onset diabetes, is striking an ever-growing number of adults. Even more alarming, it’s now beginning to show up in teenagers and children. More than 24 million Americans have diabetes; of those, about 6 million don’t know they have the disease. (1) In 2007, diabetes cost the U.S. an estimated $116 billion in excess medical spending, and an additional $58 billion in reduced productivity. (1) If the spread of type 2 diabetes continues at its present rate, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the United States will increase from about 16 million in 2005 to 48 million in 2050. (2) Worldwide, the number of adults with diabetes will rise from 285 million in 2010 to 439 million in the year 2030. (3) The problems behind the numbers are even more alarming. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness and kidney failure among adults. It causes mild to severe nerve damage that, coupled with diabetes-related circulation problems, often leads to the loss of a leg or foot. Diabetes significantly increases the risk of heart disease. And it’s the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., directly causing almost 70,000 deaths each year and contributing to thousands more. (4) The good news is that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. About 9 cases in 10 could be avoided by taking several simple steps: keeping weight under control, exercising more, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Our cells depend on a single simple sugar, glucose, for most of their energy needs. That’s why the body Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Food For A Diabetic Patient?

What Is The Best Food For A Diabetic Patient?

The best and worst foods for diabetes starches vegetables fruit protein dairy Fats, oils and sweets drinks Food choices matter a lot when you have diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely out of bounds. Even items that would happen as "the worst" may be special occasions -. In small quantities, but that will not help the rational nutrition, and is easier to manage diabetes if you stick mainly to the options "best." starches The body needs carbohydrates. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. best choices Whole grains, such as rice, oats, quinoa, millet, amaranth or Baked Sweet Potatoes The products made with whole grains and no (or very little) of added sugars worst options processed grains like white rice or white flour Cereals with whole grains and small batches of sugar White bread chips Fried white flour tortillas vegetables Load! You can get fiber and low in fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn counting carbohydrates. Best and worst meals for lunch with diabetes Savvy principle best choices fresh vegetables, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted or grilled Friction frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, arugula and. Iceberg lettuce is not as great as it is low in nutrients. Low in sodium or salt Canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: green and dark red or orange (think carrots or red peppers), white (onions), even purple (eggplant). American guidelines recommend 2015 2.5 cups of vegetables a day. formore information visit my blog Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Six Foods That May Help Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes Diet: Six Foods That May Help Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

While there's no substitute for a balanced healthy diet, adding certain foods may help those with diabetes keep sugar levels under control. Coffee and cinnamon have made headlines as foods that might be able to help cut the risk of diabetes or help maintain healthy blood sugar levels. However, don't get the idea that such foods are magic pills for your diabetic diet. It's still important for people with diabetes to eat a balanced healthy diet and exercise to help manage the condition. Nevertheless, some foods, such as white bread, are converted almost immediately to blood sugar, causing a quick spike. Other foods, such as brown rice, are digested more slowly, causing a lower and gentler change in blood sugar. If you are trying to follow a healthy diet for diabetes, here are 6 suggestions that may help to keep your blood sugar in check. Porridge Porridge can help control blood sugar and the charity Diabetes UK recommends it to see you through the morning. Even though porridge is a carbohydrate, it's a very good carbohydrate. Because it's high in soluble fibre, it's slower to digest and it won't raise your blood sugar as much or as quickly. It's going to work better at maintaining a healthy blood sugar level over time. Not only does this high-quality carbohydrate offer a steadier source of energy than white bread, it can also help with weight loss. The soluble fibre in oats helps to keep us feeling fuller longer. That's important for people with type 2 diabetes, who tend to be overweight. If you reduce the weight, you usually significantly improve the glucose control. Barley isn't as popular as oats, but there's some evidence that barley, which is also high in soluble fibre, may also help with blood glucose control. Besides oats and barley, most whole grains are going to Continue reading >>

What Are The Key Foods To Avoid To Prevent Diabetes?

What Are The Key Foods To Avoid To Prevent Diabetes?

Avoid: animal foods (dairy, fish, eggs, meat), plant oils, processed foods and sweets (cookies, soda, donuts, chips, ice cream, etc) What should we consume? The foods we are meant to eat - whole or minimally processed plant foods. These foods are naturally low in fat, high in fiber, and full of a wide range of vitamins and minerals plus antioxidants which helps stabilize blood sugar. Are we meant to eat oreos? No. Are we meant to drink cow's milk? No. Are we meant to eat fruits and vegetables? Sure thing. There are many ways we could approach this. I'll bring up a few. Research - We have an overwhelming, and amounting, pile of research which shows both the benefits of plant foods and the dangers of animal foods (We are now aware of the link between dioxin in our food supply and the incidence of diabetes (Diabetes and Dioxins). Sardinians and Okinawans - The two longest living populations, which have low incidents of preventable disease (including diabetes), eat primarily whole grains, legumes, sweet potatoes, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and a small amount of animal protein. Epigenetics - Not all genes are created equal. Inheriting a predisposition for diabetes is not the same as a destiny. Genes can be turned on/off. You can prevent type 2 diabetes through your dietary choices. How to Prevent Prediabetes from Turning into Diabetes How to Prevent Diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet

Diabetic Diet

A diabetic diet is a dietary pattern that is used by people with diabetes mellitus or high blood glucose to manage diabetes. There is no single dietary pattern that is best for all people with all types of diabetes. For overweight and obese people with Type 2 diabetes, any weight-loss diet that the person will adhere to and achieve weight loss on is effective.[1][2] Since carbohydrate is the macronutrient that raises blood glucose levels most significantly, the greatest debate is regarding how low in carbohydrates the diet should be. This is because although lowering carbohydrate intake will lead to reduced blood glucose levels, this conflicts with the traditional establishment view that carbohydrates should be the main source of calories. Recommendations of the fraction of total calories to be obtained from carbohydrate are generally in the range of 20% to 45%,[3][4][5] but recommendations can vary as widely as from 16% to 75%.[6] The most agreed-upon recommendation is for the diet to be low in sugar and refined carbohydrates, while relatively high in dietary fiber, especially soluble fiber. People with diabetes are also encouraged to eat small frequent meals a day. Likewise, people with diabetes may be encouraged to reduce their intake of carbohydrates that have a high glycemic index (GI), although this is also controversial.[7] (In cases of hypoglycemia, they are advised to have food or drink that can raise blood glucose quickly, such as a sugary sports drink, followed by a long-acting carbohydrate (such as rye bread) to prevent risk of further hypoglycemia.) Others question the usefulness of the glycemic index and recommend high-GI foods like potatoes and rice. It has been claimed that oleic acid has a slight advantage over linoleic acid in reducing plasma glucose.[ Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Nutrition

Diabetes And Nutrition

People who have diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. Managing diabetes means managing your blood sugar level. What you eat is closely connected to the amount of sugar in your blood. The right food choices will help you control your blood sugar level. Path to improved health Eating well is one of the primary things you can do to help control diabetes. Do I have to follow a special diet? There isn’t one specific “diabetes diet.” Your doctor can work with you to design a meal plan. A meal plan is a guide that tells you what kinds of food to eat at meals and for snacks. The plan also tells you how much food to have. For most people who have diabetes (and those without, too), a healthy diet consists of: 40% to 60% of calories from carbohydrates. 20% calories from protein. 30% or fewer calories from fat. Your diet should also be low in cholesterol, low in salt, and low in added sugar. Can I eat any sugar? Yes. In recent years, doctors have learned that eating some sugar doesn’t usually cause problems for most people who have diabetes — as long as it is part of a balanced diet. Just be careful about how much sugar you eat and try not to add sugar to foods. What kinds of foods can I eat? In general, at each meal you may have: 2 to 5 choices (or up to 60 grams) of carbohydrates. 1 choice of protein. A certain amount of fat. Talk to your doctor or dietitian for specific advice. Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are found in fruits, vegetables, beans, dairy foods, and starchy foods such as breads. Try to have fresh fruits rather than canned fruits, fruit juices, or dried fruit. You may eat fresh vegetables and frozen or canned vegetables. Condiments such as nonfat mayonnaise, ketchup, and mustard are also carbohydrates. Protein. Protein is found in meat, poultry, fish Continue reading >>

What Should I Eat?

What Should I Eat?

People with diabetes should follow the Australian Dietary Guidelines. Eating the recommended amount of food from the five food groups will provide you with the nutrients you need to be healthy and prevent chronic diseases such as obesity and heart disease. Australian Dietary Guidelines: To help manage your diabetes: Eat regular meals and spread them evenly throughout the day Eat a diet lower in fat, particularly saturated fat If you take insulin or diabetes tablets, you may need to have between meal snacks It is important to recognise that everyone’s needs are different. All people with diabetes should see an Accredited Practising Dietitian in conjunction with their diabetes team for individualised advice. Read our position statement 'One Diet Does Not Fit All'. Matching the amount of food you eat with the amount of energy you burn through activity and exercise is important. Putting too much fuel in your body can lead to weight gain. Being overweight or obese can make it difficult to manage your diabetes and can increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and cancer. Limit foods high in energy such as take away foods, sweet biscuits, cakes, sugar sweetened drinks and fruit juice, lollies, chocolate and savoury snacks. Some people have a healthy diet but eat too much. Reducing your portion size is one way to decrease the amount of energy you eat. Being active has many benefits. Along with healthy eating, regular physical activity can help you to manage your blood glucose levels, reduce your blood fats (cholesterol and triglycerides) and maintain a healthy weight. Learn more about exercise and maintaining a healthy weight. Fats have the highest energy (kilojoule or calorie) content of all foods. Eating too much fat can make you put on weight, which may make it more diffi Continue reading >>

Which Foods Help Diabetes?

Which Foods Help Diabetes?

Tweet One of the first questions for people newly diagnosed with diabetes is 'what can I eat'. Information can be very confusing with many news and healthy living magazines suggesting foods that can help diabetes. To help make some kind of sense, we present our guide on which foods can help diabetes. Picking a sensible diabetic diet The following guidelines provide a good basis for a diabetic diet. Foods with a low GI (glycaemic index) Include lean meats, fish or other sources of protein Include plenty of fibre Try to take in a relatively low amounts of saturated fat and salt Fruit and vegetables Vegetables are a very good choice. They contain a good quantity of vitamins and minerals and are a great source of fibre. Some vegetables have more effect on blood sugar than others so you may need to pick vegetables with a lower GI. Fruits are also a good source of fibre and vitamins but people with diabetes will often find that some fruits are better than others for their blood sugar levels. Protein Protein can be very useful as it is more slowly broken down by the body than carbohydrates. As a result, it has less of an effect on blood sugar and can help you to feel fuller for longer. Good protein sources include oily fish and lean meats, such as grilled skinless chicken. Whole grains Whole grain foods are those containing oats, barley, wheat where the full grain is used. Foods made from grains have quite a high concentration of carbohydrate so people with diabetes will benefit by testing their blood sugar before and after eating grain based foods to see whether their blood sugar is being raised too high. Much modern food is made from over processed grains, such as plain flour, many breads, white rice and pastries. However, whole grains varieties do exist. Breads with a highe Continue reading >>

Nhs Diet Advice For Diabetes

Nhs Diet Advice For Diabetes

Tweet In the UK, current 2016 NHS diabetes diet advice is that there is no special diet for people with diabetes. Many people with diabetes focus on the carbohydrate content of their meals and prefer a low-carb diet for tight blood glucose level control. The NHS (and Diabetes UK) recommend a healthy, balanced diet that is low in fat, sugar and salt and contain a high level of fresh fruit and vegetables. This guide reviews the diet advice the NHS gives to people with diabetes and discusses to what degree the advice is sensible. What does the NHS advise? The NHS provides the following diet advice for people with diabetes: [147] [148] Eat plenty of starchy carbohydrates with a low glycemic index (low GI) Increase the amount of fibre in your diet Eat plenty of fruit and vegetables - at least 5 portions per day Cut down on fat and saturated fat in particular Choose foods with unsaturated fat instead - such as vegetable oils, reduced fat spreads, oily fish and avocados Choose low-fat dairy products Choose lean meat - such as skinless chicken Avoid fatty or processed meat Eat fish at least twice a week and ensure you have oily fish at least once a week Eggs and beans are other good sources of protein Cook food by grilling, baking, poaching or steaming instead of frying or roasting Avoid fatty or sugary snacks - such as crisps, cakes, biscuits and pastries Eat snacks such as fruit, unsalted nuts and low-fat yoghurts Cut down on sugar Eat less salt - have less than 6g of salt (2.4g of sodium) per day Cut down on alcohol Don’t skip breakfast Keep hydrated - aim to drink between 1.6 and 2 litres of fluid each day Is the NHS advice sensible? Whilst a number of these points are undoubtedly sensible, some of the recommendations have been criticised by patients and some leading UK h Continue reading >>

What Are Some Indian Food For Diabetic Patients?

What Are Some Indian Food For Diabetic Patients?

Diabetes diet for Indians should have the ratio of 60:20:20 for carbs, fats and proteins. The doctor explains, "Per day calorie intake should be between 1,500-1,800 calories with a proportion of 60:20:20 between carbohydrates, fats and proteins, respectively." He adds that a diabetes diet should "have at least two seasonal fruits and three vegetables in a diet plan." Though dry fruits may seem like a healthy snack, it is not a good option for diabetics, as the fructose can spike your sugar level. Go for fresh fruits rather than dry fruits for diabetes control (but there are some restrictions... we'll come to it). But you can still opt for nuts as a healthy snack. The doctor shares his recipe for diabetes diet for Indians: - One teaspoon of methi seeds soaked overnight in 100 ml of water is very effective in controlling diabetes. - Drink tomato juice with salt and pepper every morning on an empty stomach. - Intake of 6 almonds (soaked overnight) is also helpful in keeping a check on diabetes. Rekha Sharma, President and Director of Indian Dietetic Association, shares some major diabetes diet pointers that one should follow at home or at a restaurant. Whole grains, oats, channa atta, millets and other high fibre foods should be included in the meals. If one feels like consuming pasta or noodles, it should always be accompanied with vegetable/sprouts. Milk is the right combination of carbohydrates and proteins and helps control blood sugar levels. Two servings of milk in a daily diet is a good option. Diabetes Control: Diabetic Diet Tips High fibre vegetables such as peas, beans, broccoli and spinach /leafy vegetables should be included in one's diet. Also, pulses with husk and sprouts are a healthy option and should be part of the diet. Pulses are important in the diet as Continue reading >>

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