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Weight Gain Lantus Vs Levemir

Levemir Vs Lantus Insulin

Levemir Vs Lantus Insulin

I've heard that Lantus and Levemir work in the same way (in their being long-lasting insulins). However, I was recently told that a side effect of Lantus can be weight gain while Levemir does not contribute to weight gain. Have any of you made a switch from Lantus to Levemir or vice versa, and if so, may I ask why? I currently take 20 units of Lantus along with Humalog for meals. I'm having a hard time losing that last stubborn 12 pounds to get to my idea weight, and although I follow a 1400 calorie/35g carb/25g sugar per day diet, I'm not losing any weight but rather starting to gain weight, which is a huge concern for me, since I've lost about 116 pounds over the past couple of years by following the diet I mentioned above. My next followup appointment is February 27, and before I talk with my doctor about possibly making a switch to Levemir from Lantus, I'd like to hear your experiences and/or opinions. Thanks ahead of time! Links added by the TuDiabetes Administration Never had a problem with weight gain and Lantus. Though I dont know much about Levemir only that it is expensive. Hi Melissa! First of all, great job on losing your 116+ lbs!!! That is truly amazing. What I have heard and experienced is taking (any) insulin makes it difficult to lose weight. My endo has told me that there was also another discussion on this site about people experiencing weight gain when taking lantus, and as soon I heard that it was definitely with lantus I was SO wanting to change my 24 hr lantus. That discussion also talked about Levemir being the alternative which didnt cause weight gain but I havent asked my endo or had any personal experience. When I first was diagnosed with type 1 about 4 years ago, I (of course) had to start taking insulin (both lantus, and at the time novolog Continue reading >>

Ada: Improved Safety With Levemir For Diabetes Without Weight Gain

Ada: Improved Safety With Levemir For Diabetes Without Weight Gain

WASHINGTON — The long-acting insulin analog Levemir (insulin detemir) appears to improve hypoglycemia rates without weight gain for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes treated in real-world clinical practice, according to a trio of analyses of the PREDICTIVE study. Hans-Joachim Lüddeke, M.D., Ph.D., chief of the Munich Diabetes Center, called the PREDICTIVE results, presented at the American Diabetes Association meeting here, "impressive because nearly all studies demonstrate that there is a weight gain" with insulin therapy. He presented an analysis of the full cohort of German patients (the largest population of the international study) who initiated Levemir insulin therapy in the observational, open-label PREDICTIVE study. The analysis included 2,641 patients with type 1 diabetes, the majority of whom were on basal-bolus insulin therapy prior to the study (75%), with another 14% on basal insulin only at baseline. It also included 7,535 patients with type 2 diabetes, who were about as likely to have been on basal-bolus insulin (30%) as oral antidiabetic agents (24%) or oral agents plus insulin (30%) before the study began. About 30% of type 1 patients received once-daily Levemir compared to 75% of type 2 patients, with nearly all the rest utilizing twice-daily injections. After a mean on-treatment follow up of about three months, the profile of the primary endpoint of safety looked improved for both groups. Major hypoglycemic events were significantly reduced for type 1 diabetes patients from 44.3 per patient year at baseline to 12.5 per patient year about three months after switching to the drug. For type 2 diabetes patients, the rate decreased from 6.9 per patient year to 1.6 per patient year, which was also significant (P<0.001). Secondary endpoints of glycem Continue reading >>

Levemir Versus Lantus

Levemir Versus Lantus

For people who are struggling to control their diabetes and require regular insulin injections, two of the most common long-lasting options are Levemir and Lantus. In the Levemir vs Lantus debate, both are intended for daily use and neither one is intended to help with an immediate spike of blood sugar should it occur. Neither one won’t treat ketoacidosis should it occur either. When both insulin options are considered, the risks of side effects and the benefits they provide are also the same. With so little between these two injections, are there any differences that can help to decide which one is better to take? Here are some answers to some common comparison questions. 1. How Often Does An Injection Need To Occur? Levemir can be taken either once or twice per day. The doses must be spread out over the course of 12 hours to prevent low blood sugar levels from forming. For those who inject Levemir just once per day, it should be taken around bedtime or at dinner so that it can provide the best results possible. Lantus is only taken once per day. It doesn’t matter what time of day that it is taken, but a routine should be established so that one dose occurs every 24 hours or so. Taking it in the morning one day and then in the evening the next day is not recommended. 2. What About Weight Gain? Levemir has been shown to lessen the risks of gaining weight while taking insulin injections. This may be beneficial to those who are working to control their Type 2 diabetes especially. Lantus provides a higher overall risk of weight gain, but people can gain weight while using either product. Lantus, on the other hand, was developed to produce fewer injection site reactions when used regularly. There is less of a risk of developing a rash or other similar skin reaction when Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting injectable insulins that can be used for long-term management of diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that is naturally produced in the body by the pancreas. It helps convert the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream into energy. This energy is then distributed to cells throughout your body. With diabetes, your pancreas produces little or no insulin or your body is unable to use the insulin correctly. Without insulin, your body can’t use the sugars in your blood and can become starved for energy. The excess sugar in your blood can also damage different parts of your body, including your blood vessels and kidneys. Everyone with type 1 diabetes and many people with type 2 diabetes must use insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Levemir is a solution of insulin detemir, and Lantus is a solution of insulin glargine. Both are basal insulin formulas. That means that they work slowly to lower your blood sugar levels. They’re both absorbed into your body over a 24-hour period. They keep blood sugar levels lowered for longer than short-acting insulins do. Although the formulations are slightly different, Levemir and Lantus are very similar drugs. There are only a few differences between them. Children and adults can use both Levemir and Lantus. Specifically, Levemir can be used by people who are 2 years or older. Lantus can be used by people who are 6 years or older. Levemir or Lantus can help with daily management of diabetes. However, you may still need to use short-acting insulin to treat spikes in your blood sugar levels and diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous buildup of acids in your blood). Learn more: All about diabetic ketoacidosis » Administration Both Levemir and Lantus are given through injection in the same way. You can gi Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Levemir Vs Lantus Insulin?

What Is The Difference Between Levemir Vs Lantus Insulin?

Both levemir and lantus are basal insulins, meaning that once injected, they keep working in the background to keep your blood glucose levels under control during the entire day. They are both used to treat high blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. As long acting insulins, both medications work longer compared to other insulins, and are used to replace the natural hormone in the body. These medicines are not supposed to be used together to treat patients with diabetes. Even though these drugs are both long acting insulins, they should not be used interchangeably without the doctor’s advice. Both drugs have different formula concentrations, meaning that there is a small difference in how they work to control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Because of this, they must be prescribed separately and not together. Whether you are prescribed to take levemir or lantus, they should work well in controlling your blood sugar. The medications usually come in regimens that includes short acting insulins or rapid acting insulins. What is Levemir? Levemir or insulin detemir is a man made form of insulin which works by lowering blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. Do not use this medication if it has changed colors. Patients can use this medication once or twice every day. In case it is taken once, it should be administered with the evening meal. If taken twice, you should take the dose with the morning meal and evening meal. The evening dose should be 12 hours after the morning dose. What is Lantus? Lantus or insulin glargine is a long acting acting insulin which works by replacing human insulin, which is produced by the pancreas. Insulin glargine comes in injectible form and is usually administered subcutaneously in the upper arm, stomach or thigh. Simi Continue reading >>

Glp-1 Agonists Now Approved For Use With Lantus And Levemir

Glp-1 Agonists Now Approved For Use With Lantus And Levemir

Over the past several years, the use of GLP-1 drugs (such as Byetta and Victoza) together with basal insulins (such as Lantus and Levemir) as a treatment for type 2 diabetes has been a hot topic among healthcare providers. For several reasons, this combination therapy makes a lot of sense: 1) the weight loss provided by GLP-1 agonists can help reduce (or overcome) the weight gain associated with long-acting insulin therapy; and 2) GLP-1 agonists and basal insulins help improve blood glucose control in complementary ways. Basal insulins act over a long period of time at a constant rate to cover background (between meal) insulin needs. Meanwhile, GLP-1 agonists cause insulin secretion only when blood glucose levels are high, effectively lowering post-meal blood glucose spikes without increasing the risk for hypoglycemia. Last year, a study examining Byetta in combination with Lantus confirmed much of this thinking, as people with type 2 diabetes achieved greater reductions in A1c and experienced weight loss (instead of weight gain) with both therapies versus Lantus alone. Although the use of a mealtime insulin (such as Apidra, Humalog, or NovoLog) with a basal insulin attempts to accomplish the same exact goal, mealtime insulins typically cause weight gain and significantly higher rates of hypoglycemia (because their action is not dependent on blood glucose levels). We were excited, then, to hear that two GLP-1 agonist and basal insulin therapy regimens were recently approved for use by people with type 2 diabetes. In the US, Byetta is now approved for use alongside Lantus, and in Europe, Victoza is approved for use with Levemir. Although we had learned through conversations with the diaTribe advisory board that the “off-label” use of GLP-1 agonists with basal insulin Continue reading >>

Should I Switch Insulin To Lose Weight?

Should I Switch Insulin To Lose Weight?

Have any studies been done, other than by Novo Nordisk, to prove that taking Levemir causes little if no weight gain? I have gained a lot of weight taking Lantus, and I don't know if it would be better to switch to Levemir. Lee Safian, New Milford, New Jersey Roger P. Austin, MS, RPh, CDE, responds: Insulin detemir (Levemir) and insulin glargine (Lantus) are both basal insulins. There have been a number of published studies comparing insulin detemir with other diabetes treatments. These studies were primarily funded by Novo Nordisk, the manufacturer of insulin detemir. Studies in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have shown a slight weight loss or slightly less weight gain in patients on Levemir when compared to other treatment options. However, these differences were small, and whether or not some insulins are worse offenders in causing weight gain is unknown due to lack of quality data. You may find it useful to discuss a change of insulins with your physician to see what happens in your case; however, in most cases, a significant lowering of A1C will likely result in some weight gain. Weight gain with insulin use is not necessarily inevitable. The science of developing newer insulins over time has been directed at trying to better mimic the action of naturally produced insulin in the pancreas. The fewer insulin injections given per day, the less the insulin's performance will be similar to that of naturally produced insulin in the body. Understanding appropriate blood glucose targets before and after meals, as well as frequent and regular monitoring of blood glucose, is essential to successful individualization of insulin dosing and weight management. Minimizing weight gain also requires a good understanding of carb counting, practice of portion control, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications And Weight Gain

Diabetes Medications And Weight Gain

Both people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes usually gain weight when they begin therapy, either insulin or some type 2 diabetes medications. For many people with type 1, weight gain is advisable due to the loss of lean body mass often accompanying the disease prior to diagnosis and treatment. However, for people with type 2, and increasingly people with type 1 who were overweight or obese before their diagnosis, seeing the numbers on the scale rise is counterproductive. Increasing weight leads to more insulin resistance, which in addition to making diabetes harder to control, escalates cardiovascular risk. There are a variety of reasons weight gain occurs when people start insulin. Some people with type 2 were in poor glycemic control prior to beginning insulin. These folks were seeing the energy from the food they ate end up in their urine stream instead of being stored as fat. As their control improves with insulin, the lost energy finds its way into the fat cells. Treatment for hypoglycemia, if it happens frequently, can also be a source of added pounds when insulin is initiated. Additionally, since an exact replacement for physiological insulin secretion is almost impossible to duplicate, patients may often be taking slightly more insulin than needed over a 24-hour period. Normal circadian rhythm for insulin secretion surges from 4 am to about 7 am then drops, increases a bit around dinner time through 10 pm and declines to its lowest level until the early morning hours. Injected insulin is unable to mirror this profile. Finally, injected insulin follows a slightly different pathway to the cells from insulin that comes from our bodies. Insulin from our bodies is directed first to the liver but insulin that is injected travels first through the blood circulation wher Continue reading >>

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas. Both are insulin analogues, which means that their insulin molecules are analogous to human insulin, but engineered, or recombined, with slight differences that slow their absorption. Lantus is a clear formula made with glargine, a genetically modified form of human insulin, dissolved in a special solution. Levemir is also a clear formula, but it contains dissolved detemir, a different form of genetically modified insulin. Human insulin is made of two amino acid chains, called A and B, that have two disulfide bonds between them. In glargine, one amino acid has been switched out, and two extra amino acids have been added to one end of the B chain. The modifications make glargine soluble at an acidic pH, but much less soluble at the neutral pH that’s found in the body To make Lantus, first the glargine is produced by a vat of E. coli bacteria. Then it’s purified and added to a watery solution containing a little zinc and some glycerol; a dash of hydrochloric acid is also added to make it acidic, bringing its pH down to about 4. At that degree of acidity, glargine completely dissolves into the watery solution, which is why the vial is clear. After you inject it into your subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized by your body to a neutral pH. Because glargine is not soluble at a neutral pH, it precipitates out into a form that’s not soluble in subcutaneous fat, and there forms a relatively insoluble depot. From that pool, or depot, of precipitated glargine in the tissues, small amounts slowly move back Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs Lantus: Main Differences And Similarities

Levemir Vs Lantus: Main Differences And Similarities

Levemir vs Lantus: Main Differences and Similarities Insulin is a necessary hormone that is produced in by the pancreas in the body to help utilize glucose, or sugars, for energy. People with diabetes produce very little or no insulin at all. Therefore, insulin is needed to convert sugars for energy and prevent complications in the kidneys and blood vessels. Levemir and Lantus are two insulins that are used to treat high blood sugar levels in those with diabetes. Both insulins are long-acting injectables that can be given daily to maintain and control high blood sugar levels. Both Levemir and Lantus work in very similar ways. However, there are a few differences between them. Levemir is the brand name for insulin detemir. It is approved to treat high blood sugar levels in adults and children over 2 years of age with diabetes. It is a long acting insulin with slow, consistent absorption with no pronounced peak in insulin release. Levemir comes as an injectable 100 Units/mL (U-100) solution in a 10 mL vial. There is also a 3 mL FlexTouch pen available for easier administration. Levemir is administered subcutaneously, or underneath the skin, in the abdomen, thigh, or back of the arm. It can be given once daily with an evening meal or at bedtime or twice daily in divided doses. Lantus is the brand name for insulin glargine. While it also treats high blood sugar levels in people with diabetes, safety and effectiveness have been approved only for adults and children 6 years and older. Like Levemir, Lantus is also slowly absorbed over 24 hours with no pronounced peak or spike in insulin levels. Lantus also comes as an injectable 100 Units/mL (U-100) solution in a 10 mL vial or 3 mL SoloStar prefilled pen. It is administered in the same way as Levemir. However, unlike Levemir, Continue reading >>

Isrctn - Isrctn49492872: Determir Versus Glargine For Weight Gain In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

Isrctn - Isrctn49492872: Determir Versus Glargine For Weight Gain In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

Determir versus Glargine for weight gain in adolescents with type 1 diabetes Diabetes is a life-long condition where a person is unable to control their blood sugar levels. here are two main types of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes the body is unable to produce a hormone called insulin, which is responsible for breaking down glucose and turning it into energy. When this happens, sufferers need to inject insulin to make sure that their blood sugar levels stay normal. Most people use long-acting insulin to give a continuous low level in the blood stream and a short acting insulin to give a boost at meal times. There are several different types of insulin made. This study is looking at the differences between two relatively new insulins, called Detemir (or Levemir) and another one called Glargine (or Lantus). Although it is normal to gain weight with age, girls with diabetes may have more weight gain than girls without diabetes. Levemir appears to cause less weight gain than insulatard (the conventional cloudy long acting insulin) in adults and young people with diabetes, but it has never been compared with Lantus in young women. The aim of this study is to find out whether there are any differences in weight gain in young women using these different types of insulin. Participants who agree to take part in the study are randomly allocated to receive either Insulin Detemir (Levemir) or Insulin Glargine (Lantus). The study lasts for one year and involves six clinic visits and regular telephone and/or email contact (minimum 12) with the research nurse. At each visit the participants height, weight, blood pressure and waist circumference are measured. The participants are also asked to complete a brief questionnaire about appetite. During the study, participants are asked to che Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs Lantus: What's The Difference?

Levemir Vs Lantus: What's The Difference?

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting forms of insulin that work for most of the day. Levemir Vs Lantus: Both human insulin analogs Levemir is a brand name for insulin detemir. Levemir takes at least one hour to start working (some sources state up to three hours), and its effects are dependent on the initial dosage given. Dosages of 0.1 units per kg may last only six hours whereas dosages equal to or greater than 0.8 units/kg last approximately 22 to 24 hours. Levemir has a relatively peakless profile but may be more slowly absorbed from the thigh compared to the deltoid (arm) and the abdomen after subcutaneous administration. Lantus is the brand name for insulin glargine. Lantus takes approximately an hour to start working and lasts for an average of 24 hours; however, there is some variability and in some people, it may only act for just over 10 hours, whereas for others it may last longer than 24 hours. Lantus releases consistently, so doesn't really have a peak effect. Levemir Vs Lantus: Differences in formulation account for some differences in action Both Levemir and Lantus are made by modifying human insulin. Both should be clear solutions before they are injected (discard if cloudy). Insulin glargine (Lantus) tends to be absorbed more slowly and for longer than detemir ( Levemir) because it is not as soluble once injected just under the skin. This means it has a longer duration of action and an insignificant peak effect - instead, it delivers consistent blood levels of insulin. Insulin detemir (Levemir) remains soluble after injection but is able to bind to protein in the tissue and bond to itself which gives it a prolonged action. How do Levemir and Lantus compare to NPH insulin? Both Levemir and Lantus were created to improve on NPH insulin, and to better m Continue reading >>

Insulin Detemir Reduces Weight Gain As A Result Of Reduced Food Intake In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Insulin Detemir Reduces Weight Gain As A Result Of Reduced Food Intake In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Exogenous insulin-replacement therapy remains the most effective treatment for hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetic and poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients, but it regularly results in excessive weight gain. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial showed that insulin-associated weight gain (1) was greater in patients receiving intensified intervention than in those receiving conventional intervention (5.1 vs. 3.7 kg, P < 0.0001, during first 12 months of therapy). In type 1 diabetes, adherence to prescribed insulin regimens may be compromised by a desire to avoid weight gain. The problem of insulin omission was confirmed in a U.K. study (2) of 65 young subjects with type 1 diabetes. A total of 30% of the women admitted to having underdosed insulin to manipulate their weight, whereas 45% of women who developed microvascular complications had intentionally misused insulin to prevent weight gain. Not all types of insulin treatment are equally prone to causing weight gain. Treatment with insulin detemir, a novel basal insulin analog, has been consistently shown to cause no weight gain in patients with type 1 diabetes, compared with NPH insulin (3), and lower weight gain in patients with type 2 diabetes. A myristic fatty-acid chain attached to the B-terminal of the insulin molecule allows reversible albumin binding and prolonged residence time in the subcutaneous depot and in the circulation (4). The mechanism(s) underlying the apparent weight advantage of insulin detemir has not been identified. Elucidation of this mechanism(s) could provide valuable insights into the ways in which insulin treatment causes weight gain in diabetes. Such knowledge also might enable the future development of insulin analogs with even greater metabolic advantages. Continue reading >>

Counseling Patients On How To Avoid Weight Gain From Insulin

Counseling Patients On How To Avoid Weight Gain From Insulin

A lot of people with type 2 diabetes delay going on insulin for as long as possible because they’ve heard horror stories about how much weight it can make them gain (or maybe they just don’t like shots), but people with type 1 don’t have a choice. While it is true that insulin treatment is often associated with weight gain and more frequent bouts of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), the real question is, why? Some theories to explain insulin-induced weight gain are that when using insulin, your blood sugar is (usually) better controlled and you stop losing some of your calories (as glucose in your urine when your blood sugars exceed your urinary threshold) and that you may gain weight from having to eat extra to treat any low blood sugars caused by insulin. If you’re taking oral medications to lower your blood sugar and they are not working, however, insulin may be your main option for better control. A few research studies have looked at whether weight gain is simply a result of eating more when you’re on insulin. One such study found that weight gain was not due to an increase in food intake, but rather that your body may increase its efficiency in using glucose and other fuels when your glycemic control improves — making you store more available energy from the foods you eat as fat (even if you’re eating the same amount as before you went on insulin) (1). So, what can you do to avoid weight gain if you have to take insulin? First of all, you should try to keep your insulin doses as low as possible because the more insulin you take, the greater your potential for weight gain is. The best way to keep your insulin needs in check is to engage in regular physical activity. By way of example, some people with type 2 diabetes who were studied gained weight from Continue reading >>

Compare Levemir Vs. Lantus

Compare Levemir Vs. Lantus

Insulin is the most effective blood sugar lowering medication, as it lowers A1c (average blood sugar over time) up to 2 or 3%. When used correctly, it'll prevent the harmful effects of high blood sugar levels on your organs and blood vessels. Levemir (insulin detemir) is a long lasting insulin that provides consistent, all-day blood sugar control with less risk of low blood sugar. Doses can be easily adjusted to make a customized regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Starting insulin early in the treatment of type 2 diabetes can maintain your body's insulin producing cells and slow down disease progression. Levemir (insulin detemir) can be used in people with liver or kidney problems. Insulin is one of the most effective blood sugar-lowering medication and can lower your A1c (average blood sugar over time) by up to 2-3%. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-lasting insulin that provides consistent, all-day sugar control with just once or twice daily dosing. Dose can be easily adjusted to make a customized regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Lantus (insulin glargine) can be used with liver or kidney problems. 130 reviews so far Have you used Levemir (insulin detemir)? Leave a review 584 reviews so far Have you used Lantus (insulin glargine)? Leave a review Continue reading >>

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