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Water Fasting Metformin

More Practical Fasting Tips – Part 13

More Practical Fasting Tips – Part 13

A continuation of practical fasting tips. See Practical Fasting Tips. Will fasting make me tired? In our experience at the Intensive Dietary Management Clinic, the opposite is true. Many people find that they have more energy during a fast—probably due to increased adrenalin. Basal metabolism does not fall during fasting but rises instead. You’ll find you can perform all the normal activities of daily living. Persistent fatigue is not a normal part of fasting. If you experience excessive fatigue, you should stop fasting immediately and seek medical advice. Will fasting make me confused or forgetful? No. You should not experience any decrease in memory or concentration. The ancient Greeks believed that fasting significantly improved cognitive abilities, helping the great thinkers attain more clarity and mental acuity. Over the long term, fasting may actually help improve memory. One theory is that fasting activates a form of cellular cleansing called autophagy that may help prevent age-associated memory loss. I get dizzy when I fast. What can I do? Most likely, you’re becoming dehydrated. Preventing this requires both salt and water. Be sure to drink plenty of fluids. However, the low-salt intake on fasting days may cause some dizziness. Extra sea salt in broth or mineral water often helps alleviate the dizziness. Another possibility is that your blood pressure is too low—particularly if you’re taking medications for hypertension. Speak to your physician about adjusting your medications. I get headaches when I fast. What can I do? As above, try increasing your salt intake. Headaches are quite common the first few times you try a fast. It is believed that they’re caused by the transition from a relatively high-salt diet to very low salt intake on fasting days. Continue reading >>

Metformin And Fasting

Metformin And Fasting

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am prescribed 2 metformin a day. If I fast BT not eating after supper till lunch time next day when should I take metformin? Finsky Prefer not to say Well-Known Member I am prescribed 2 metformin a day. If I fast BT not eating after supper till lunch time next day when should I take metformin? I would take it first time I eat something and take evening doze when ever is latest time you are eating something. Metformin don't do any good for empty tummy and it is recommended to be taken with food. I am taking slow release Metformin and skip breakfast and lunch as often as I can. I am also on a nil carb diet. I find that my throat becomes very, very dry as soon as I take the Metformin, do you get this ? I am taking slow release Metformin and skip breakfast and lunch as often as I can. I am also on a nil carb diet. I find that my throat becomes very, very dry as soon as I take the Metformin, do you get this ? No dry throat. I am trying to drink more water. I bought the Obesity guide by Jung. Really informative. Upping fat intake I find hard after years of being brainwashed into having low fat foods. I am making slow but steady progress. Looking forward to my next hb1ac test. Let me know how you are getting on perhaps we can help each other Don't want to appear rude, but is there a reason to be fasting, medical or religious? I have been told that fasting is not necessary for Diabetics having blood tests. I also have a friend who is of the Islamic faith and he has special dispensation from her Iman during Ramadan due to his diabetes. Don't want to appear rude, but is there a reason to be fasting, medical or religious? I have been told that fasting is not n Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting: Not So Fast

Intermittent Fasting: Not So Fast

I’m sure that at least a few of you have heard or read about the latest trend in weight loss called “intermittent fasting.” The very word “fasting” is probably less than appealing, as it pretty much means you don’t eat or drink anything (except perhaps water) for a specified amount of time. Starvation is not exactly recommended among health professionals. But intermittent fasting is different. Is it something you should try? What is intermittent fasting, anyway? Intermittent fasting has been the talk of the town, so to speak, thanks to two recent books to hit the market: The Fast Diet by Dr. Michael Mosley and Mimi Spencer, and The Overnight Diet by Caroline Apovian, MD. Intermittent fasting essentially means that you skip a meal or severely restrict calories on certain days of the week with the intention of losing weight, controlling blood glucose, and/or decreasing heart disease risk. But on the other days of the week, you can pretty much eat what you want (within reason, of course). For many people, this concept sounds appealing. Limiting calories for a couple days a week doesn’t sound that bad if you can eat what you want the rest of the time. The Fast Diet, also called the The 5:2 Diet has you eat between 500 and 600 calories (women get 500 calories, men get 600 calories) for two days out of the week, spread over two meals of about 250 to 300 calories. These fast days should not be right in a row, and your food choices ideally should be more plant-based and emphasize protein. The premise is that after several hours of fasting, the body burns up its carbohydrate stores and shifts to burning fat for fuel. Many claim that intermittent fasting also helps to blunt appetite. The Overnight Diet emphasizes getting enough sleep; a lack of sleep can disrupt met Continue reading >>

Metformin, The Liver, And Diabetes

Metformin, The Liver, And Diabetes

Most people think diabetes comes from pancreas damage, due to autoimmune problems or insulin resistance. But for many people diagnosed “Type 2,” the big problems are in the liver. What are these problems, and what can we do about them? First, some basic physiology you may already know. The liver is one of the most complicated organs in the body, and possibly the least understood. It plays a huge role in handling sugars and starches, making sure our bodies have enough fuel to function. When there’s a lot of sugar in the system, it stores some of the excess in a storage form of carbohydrate called glycogen. When blood sugar levels get low, as in times of hunger or at night, it converts some of the glycogen to glucose and makes it available for the body to use. Easy to say, but how does the liver know what to do and when to do it? Scientists have found a “molecular switch” called CRTC2 that controls this process. When the CRTC2 switch is on, the liver pours sugar into the system. When there’s enough sugar circulating, CRTC2 should be turned off. The turnoff signal is thought to be insulin. This may be an oversimplification, though. According to Salk Institute researchers quoted on RxPG news, “In many patients with type II diabetes, CRTC2 no longer responds to rising insulin levels, and as a result, the liver acts like a sugar factory on overtime, churning out glucose [day and night], even when blood sugar levels are high.” Because of this, the “average” person with Type 2 diabetes has three times the normal rate of glucose production by the liver, according to a Diabetes Care article. Diabetes Self-Management reader Jim Snell brought the whole “leaky liver” phenomenon to my attention. He has frequently posted here about his own struggles with soarin Continue reading >>

Weight Loss During Intermittent Fasting While Taking Meds For Type 2 Diabetes

Weight Loss During Intermittent Fasting While Taking Meds For Type 2 Diabetes

Weight Loss During Intermittent Fasting While Taking Meds for Type 2 Diabetes By NewSong53 Latest Reply2018-01-29 19:59:56 -0600 For those of you experienced with intermittent fasting and weight loss, I need your expert advice. I finally reached a point through intermittent fasting where I crave healthier foods, don't care for sweets and will choose cottage cheese over ice cream any day of the week. The past month I have gradually increased my workouts, doing water yoga for strength, flexibility and balance. I also lift weights (not overdoing it, but to the point where I simply can't do another rep) and I warm up with 10-20 min. doing 3mp on the treadmill with 1.0 incline. I always do the jacuzzi for 15 min. before and after pool exercises. I feel great, stronger than I have since my 40s. Before all the working out, my morning BG reading was usually 125 - 150 WHILE TAKING 1,000MG tabs metformin 2 x day and 40 units of Levemir at bedtime (long acting insulin). One day I decided not to inject my Levemir at night and also forgot to take my metformin that morning. I had a BG of about 140 the next morning, so I decided to stop taking Levemir and just take Metformin to see what happened. I noticed absolutely no difference maybe because I was more careful with my food because I knew I'd stopped the Levemir (or maybe the Levemir is still in my body?). I notice a very slight increase in weight loss (about 1 lb. this week). But I'm wondering if anyone here stopped taking their Metformin or halved the pills if so, did it make any difference in your fasting BG? Did you continue to do that and did your fasting BG gradually get lower from intermittent fasting? Other than the fact that I'm stronger and feel much better, sometimes I feel like I'm spinning my wheels with regard to weig Continue reading >>

Fasting With Type 2 Diabetes

Fasting With Type 2 Diabetes

Intermittent fasting can be an effective way of losing weight and helping you manage type 2 diabetes. Many members of our community are now free of diabetes medications, or have seen significant improvements in their condition. How does it work? Fasting will help you lose weight, and lowers insulin resistance. This means it tackles the root cause of type 2 diabetes. A word of warning: if you need insulin to control your diabetes you should not do intermittent fasting unless you have discussed your proposed fasting plan with your doctor – and unless you are very well trained in adjusting your insulin doses (for example by the DAPHNE programme) What should I know about fasting with type 2 diabetes? Start slowly If you have type 2 diabetes you may find the first fasts particularly difficult as your high circulating insulin levels will make it hard for your body to switch into fat burning. Thus, it may be wise to start fasting gently by allowing yourself more calories in a day, or by only doing short fasts to begin with. As your body adapts to fasting, you can lengthen your fasts. Experiment with different methods of fasting You may need to experiment with different methods of intermittent fasting to see which works best for you. Different people respond differently to fasting (and differently to different forms of fasting). For example, many members of our community with type 2 diabetes tell us that a daily eating window approach works better for them than 5:2, as it combines weight loss with relatively stable blood glucose levels. Learn more about eating windows and different ways of intermittent fasting Limit your carbohydrate intake To help keep your blood glucose under control you should limit all carbohydrates on both fast days and non-fast days. It is best to aim t Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent Fasting

November 5, 2010 by David Mendosa People often fast for cosmetic, religious, or medical reasons. About 14 percent of American adults have reported that they have fasted to help control their weight. But I have begun to fast intermittently because its the natural way to eat or not eat. That fasting may appear at first glance to be unnatural just shows how far we have departed from our heritage. Eating three squares a day is certainly not what our paleolithic ancestors did. And if our paleolithic ancestors seem light years away from modern humans, just remember that the paleolithic period extended until the agricultural revolution, which was only about 300 generations ago. Genetically, we have hardly changed at all since them. Articles by Dr. Michael Eades on his Protein Power blog first attracted my attention to intermittent fasting. The more I explored intermittent fasting, particularly in the work of Dr. Loren Cordain, like his book, The Paleo Diet, the more I knew that I had to check out that experience for myself. In the past couple of weeks I made two intermittent fasts. The first was for 12 hours from sunrise to sunset and the second was 24 hours from dinner one night to dinner the next. I drank only water, lemonade, and tea (both black and herbal). None with any calories. And plenty of it. My 12-hour fast was similar to that of Muslims during the month of Ramadan. But hardly the same and not as challenging. Since Muslims are the experts on fasting, I consulted with an imam, Ibrahim Kazerooni, before setting forth on my latest dietary experiment. He is both a friend and a member of my diabetes support group. Ibrahim explained that Muslims cant even drink water while fasting during the month of Ramadan. Their fasts last from 1 and 1/2 hours before sunrise until dus Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight Fast Through Fasting

How To Lose Weight Fast Through Fasting

Fasting is one of the oldest health techniques when it comes to achieving overall body balance. In an interview with Dr. Jason Fung, we discussed his book, The Complete Guide to Fasting: Heal Your Body Through Intermittent, Alternate-Day, and Extended Fasting. Fung, who is a nephrologist (kidney specialist), notes that people are usually skeptical of fasting and whether its actually effective or just a fad. But after a few weeks of fasting, the results are obvious. He notes that his patients start to lose weight, their blood sugar level starts to go down and their body just starts to detoxify and clean itself of fat and excess sugar. Fasting is surrounded by myths, which sometimes stop people from actually undergoing this method of improving the bodys processes. One of the most famous myths is that fasting will have an effect on muscle mass. Some people believe that when they start fasting, theyll gradually lose their muscles instead of losing fat. But this is incorrect. Fung notes that when you start fasting, you start burning the glycogen in your liver. The body also starts burning excess amino acids as the fasting occurs. This is what other people call as burning muscles. But instead of burning muscle, your body starts burning fat instead of burning sugar. Another myth is that fasting means that youre going to starve yourself. Starvation is a loaded term that suggests you dont have a choice on whether you should consume food or not, fasting depends entirely on you. Fasting only requires limiting your food intake to specific times in the day. There is also a belief that when you starve your body, it starts to go into a starvation phase, as you stop burning fat and your body holds on to your fats longer. Fung explains that this happens when you cut your calorie intake Continue reading >>

Fasting Safely With Diabetes

Fasting Safely With Diabetes

Fasting can be a challenge for anyone, but it can be especially difficult for someone with diabetes. As any diabetic knows, successful blood sugar management relies on healthy meals eaten at regularly spaced intervals. So what happens when one or more meals need to be skipped for religious reasons or because of a medical or dental procedure? Each individual's situation is different, so consultation with your physician is crucial. That said, there are some general guidelines that can help when it comes to fasting with diabetes. Diabetes and Fasting: Does Type Matter? Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, fasting needs to be approached with care. "Fasting should be rare if you have diabetes because an individual with type 1 or type 2 on oral medication can experience hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)," says Amy Kranick, a certified diabetes educator with Diabetes Care Club in Nashville, Tenn. Risks from low blood sugar include seizure, coma, or even death if left untreated. On the other hand, depending on the individual, fasting without using insulin can result in high blood sugars or in diabetic ketoacidosis (a serious diabetes complication caused by blood build-up of acids called ketones). Dehydration is another fear if fluids are avoided during the fast. Diabetes and Fasting: Does the Reason Make a Difference? That being said, people with diabetes may want or need to fast for a variety of reasons, and the length of the fast can affect what actions you need to take. Here are some examples: Religious reasons. Some people with diabetes may want to fast for religious observances such as Yom Kippur or Ramadan. Given the risky nature of fasting with diabetes, this isn't necessarily a good idea. "Both [Judaism and Islam] have guidelines that exempt those people who will be Continue reading >>

The Starvation Diet That Can Reverse Type Two Diabetes: How Dramatic Weight-loss Could Lower Blood-sugar Levels

The Starvation Diet That Can Reverse Type Two Diabetes: How Dramatic Weight-loss Could Lower Blood-sugar Levels

One of the most effective ways to tackle type 2 diabetes is to lose weight, and it seems that dramatic weight loss may be particularly beneficial for blood-sugar levels. This surprising effect was first seen in patients who had undergone weight-loss (bariatric) surgery. As well as losing weight, many also reversed their diabetes. We will look at surgery on the next page, but there may be ways to replicate these benefits without major surgery — the answer may be as simple as a drastic, short-term diet. This is very much cutting-edge thinking and is the brainchild of Professor Roy Taylor, director of Newcastle Magnetic Resonance Centre at Newcastle University. Inspired by the diabetes-reversing effects of bariatric surgery, he decided to investigate the impact of a short-term, low-calorie diet on type 2 diabetes, using regular MRI scans to record exactly what was going on in the body. What he found could help to transform the health of many people with type 2 diabetes, even those who have had it for years. In a study published in 2011, he took 11 people with newly diagnosed type 2 (defined as being diagnosed in the previous four years) and gave them liquid diet formula. This provided 600 calories and was formulated so they received the right amount of nutrients. They also had around 200 calories of non-starchy vegetables such as broccoli and spinach — these provided fibre usually obtained from carbs, which were excluded from the diet. After a week, MRI scans showed the fat around their livers had dropped by 30 per cent; furthermore, their blood-sugar levels were normal. At the end of the eight-week trial, fat levels in the pancreas had also plummeted and they were producing insulin again. Participants also lost an average of 2st 5lb (15kg). At a follow-up scan three m Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting – Questions & Answers

Intermittent Fasting – Questions & Answers

Here you can find common questions about intermittent fasting with answers from our top expert, Dr. Jason Fung. Choose a topic below or scroll down for every question and answer. Do you have other questions about fasting for Dr. Jason Fung? Watch our in-depth interview with him or ask him directly on our membership site (free trial). You can also visit Dr. Fung’s website IDMprogram.com. Who can use intermittent fasting? Is fasting an option for children who need to lose weight? Fasting is not an option for children. My advice is to severely restrict added sugars and snacking. Reducing down to 2 meals per day is also possible, but not longer duration fasting. My daughter who is 31 and a healthy weight exercises (rowing) four times a week. She wants to know if she can fast or is this not recommended for people who exercise? Not only is it safe, but training in the fasted state has several theoretical benefits that many elite level athletes are using. So, yes, it is highly recommended. Can women fast during pregnancy and after birth during breast feeding? I don’t advise fasting during pregnancy or breast feeding. Short term (<24 hrs) fasts are OK, but definitely not longer term fasts. There is a concern of nutrient deficiency which I think far outweighs any potential benefit. How should intermittent fasting be used in conjunction with resistance training to maximize muscle growth and fat burning? Should there be any differences between intermittent fasting on training days and non-training days? And during the fasting periods – or days – is it advisable to take supplements such as BCAA’s to prevent muscle loss? There are many different schedules. Most people fast for 24 hrs and then do their training – this is called ‘training in the fasted state’. Since gr Continue reading >>

Keto Intermittent Fasting And Metformin Experiences? : Xxketo

Keto Intermittent Fasting And Metformin Experiences? : Xxketo

After scouring the Internet, I thought this might be the best place for my question! I'm usually a /r/keto lurker and have been for years. At this point, I've lost 110 lbs by following a ketogenic diet. Unfortunately, I still have a substantial way to go. In order to lose weight, my calories have to stay below 1000. To be honest, that keeps me physically exhausted, but I can't consistently lose weigh by eating the standard 1200 calories. Dieticians have tried to raise my calories, but I stall and then gain. I've come to accept that I must eat about 950-1k calories a day, but it is still a painfully slow process. I have hypothyroidism and doctors speculate something else is up with my body. As a child, doctors blamed a "slow metabolism." My doctor also believes I may have insulin resistance going on. After seeing her yesterday, we decided to try Metformin 500 - once daily. I have done intermittent fasting for the past 6-7 months and this isn't my first time using it as a tool. I'm much happier eating this way. I don't usually get hungry and I feel satisfied while eating one large meal and having a protein shake later. Unfortunately, this doesn't seem to jive with what my doctor says about eating multiple meals, spaced out, every three hours. I am not diabetic and I have only ever had blood sugar issues when I was on oral prednisone, so I'm sure if this is very important. Does anyone else do intermittent fasting while on keto and using Metformin? How have your experiences been? Continue reading >>

While Fasting, When Do I Take My Meds?

While Fasting, When Do I Take My Meds?

How do I manage diabetes when fasting for a blood test or a colonoscopy? I had to skip my colonoscopy last year because of low blood sugar. And now I have to have a cholesterol test. What do I do? Continue reading >>

Type Ii And Intermittent Fasting To Lose Weight? (metformin, Victoza, Blood) - Diabetes -symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention, Treatment - City-data Forum

Type Ii And Intermittent Fasting To Lose Weight? (metformin, Victoza, Blood) - Diabetes -symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention, Treatment - City-data Forum

Type II and Intermittent Fasting to lose weight? (Metformin, Victoza, blood) Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account , you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads. View detailed profile ( Advanced ) or search I am Type II (Diagnosed 2006) and on Metformin 1000mg/Glipizide 10mg a day. I also take Zocor 40mg for cholesterol and Lisinopril 20mg for BP.. I avoid all processed sugar. I do eat some carbs such as rice, corn, potatoes etc. I try to eat lean protein and keep the fats low. I really have a hard time losing weight it seems. Recently I was on a reduced calorie diet. I weigh 260 lbs and want to lose 50 lbs. I am 6'3" tall. I was restricted to 2150 calories a day. I was using a diary to keep count. Well, after over a month the scale hasn't moved. I am thinking of trying intermittent fasting for a while. I have not talked to a doctor about it. Maybe go for a day or two on just water / sugar free juice or maybe try to eat just one meal a day for several days. If I do this and while I am fasting should I stop taking the diabetes meds? Would the combination of not eating and taking the meds cause my BG to go too low? Last edited by gguerra; 07-15-2014 at 01:21 PM.. Be careful with fasting, even intermittent, and check your blood sugar often. Metformin does not act like insulin but watch out for the glipizide which can cause lows. I wouldn't recommend skipping your meds without your doctor's knowledge (permission) but rather watch your diet carefully and check your blood sugar often. Drink lots of water too. Your body might be burning fat and losing inches even when nothing shows on t Continue reading >>

The Complete Guide To Fasting: A Special Interview With Dr. Jason Fung

The Complete Guide To Fasting: A Special Interview With Dr. Jason Fung

Fasting is the oldest dietary intervention in the world. Modern science confirms it can have a profoundly beneficial influence on your health, including efficient weight loss, reversal of type 2 diabetes and more Fasting and starvation are not the same. Fasting is voluntary and you can start or stop at any time while starvation is forced with no alternatives Contrary to popular belief, water fasting is safe for most people. Groups that should NOT fast include those who are underweight or malnourished, children and pregnant or breastfeeding women By Dr. Mercola Fasting is one of the oldest dietary interventions in the world, and modern science confirms it can have a profoundly beneficial influence on your health. Dr. Jason Fung, a nephrologist (kidney specialist) with a practice in Canada, has written an important landmark book on this topic. "The Complete Guide to Fasting: Heal Your Body Through Intermittent, Alternate-Day, and Extended Fasting," co-authored with Jimmy Moore, details how to implement fasting and overcome some of the most common challenges that might arise, including persistent fears and myths associated with extended water fasting. For the first decade of his practice, Fung was — like most doctors — conventionally oriented. As a kidney specialist, many of his patients had type 2 diabetes as the primary cause of their kidney failure. Fasting Helps Reverse Diabetes — And Related Health Conditions It became clear to him that the conventional treatment of type 2 diabetes was seriously flawed. Despite patients' best efforts to manage their diabetes, taking their insulin and following the recommended diet and so on, they would still end up with complications such as kidney disease, requiring dialysis, or they'd need amputations, or they'd go blind. "As Continue reading >>

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