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Uric Acid And Diabetes Diet

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Uric Acid Stones

What are uric acid stones? Uric acid stones are one of four major types of kidney stones, which include calcium stones (calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate), struvite stones, and cystine stones. A kidney stone is a hard mass of crystallized minerals that form in the kidneys or urinary tract. How common are uric acid stones? It is estimated that one in 10 people in the U.S. will have a kidney stone of one kind or another at some time in their lives. In the late 1970s, about 3.8% of the population had kidney stones, but this figure has now increased to about 8.8% of the population. Among men, the lifetime risk is about 19%; in women, it is 9%. Usually, the first incidence of kidney stones occurs after age 30. However, there are many cases that occur sooner, some in children as young as five years of age. What causes uric acid stones? Uric acid stones form when the levels of uric acid in the urine is too high, and/or the urine is too acidic (pH level below 5.5) on a regular basis. High acidity in urine is linked to the following causes: Inherited problems in how the body processes uric acid or protein in the diet can increase the acid in urine. This can be seen in conditions such as Continue reading >>

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  1. sedeinco

    Clash of the diets - Diabetes and Gout

    Has anyone else had issues with increased uric acid and developing gout when reducing their carb intake and increasing protein? Though there's some overlap (e.g. bread/yeast bad for both) most things listed as being good for controlling gout are bad for diabetes and vice versa. It leaves very little on the table if you'll pardon the pun. Anyone else run into this issue?
    After about 9 months I've got my diabetes under reasonable control in what I hope is a sustainable way. Just did comprehensive bloodwork beginning of this month and my HbA1c has fallen to 5.0 and fasting sugar was at 5.2. This is despite being on holiday for 3 weeks and not always eating right at the start of last month.
    In general I am still having some carbs this time around - previously I had drastically cut carbs and life wasn't worth living - I was leathargic, moody and felt more than a little trapped. HbA1c was 5.4 but that was unsustainable so to see a reduction after reintroducing some carb is fantastic.
    When I've been eating with control in mind I've been living on large (gigantic) bowls of salad - typically lettuce, tomato, cucumber, onion, fetta cheese, spanish olive and vinegar - occassionally carrot or capcicum thrown in too. Also eating chicken (processed and whole), mince beef, steak, egg, ham, salami, and cheese. Re-introducing carb has meant my breakfast is often a rice microwave meal (e.g. thai green curry). Blood sugar seems to be best controlled when I have some carb in the morning to kick start the system. So does energy.
    What isn't so fantastic is that my uric acid levels are up just beyond normal range. I'm pretty sure that I've had one attack of gout - classic symptoms - sensitive painful toes in the middle of the night and couldn't stand sheets touching or resting on them. It can't have been a terrible attack as I was able to get to sleep after an hour and woke up feeling okay.
    So there are some things I now I can do about it. I'm still drinking way too much sugar free softdrink ...and of course I can drink more water. I can cut down on vinegar in my salads. Most of all I think I'm going to have to lay off Salami which I have been eating in large quantities with tomato (no bread)....(Fortunately I've never been a fan of alcohol purely on the basis of taste, so alcohol isn't an issue).They're the "easy" (much sarcasm here) fixes.
    Any other ideas? Helpful suggestions only please.

  2. Frippery

    I had bad gout for about three years - so bad that it had spread to my ankles, knees and even elbow.
    General doctors couldn't help - but a specialist fixed in two months. Today I take one tablet a day for gout and have not had an attack for five years.
    I have been very low carb for two years and do even think about gout foods. I eat salami every day and have wine most days.
    A1c stays at 5.0 and uric acid stays on target - no problems at all.
    So see a specialist for gout and eat for the diabetes only - there was a time I thought that I would have to live with gout for the rest of my life - now I don"t even remember what foods are bad for gout.

  3. Shanny

    Frippery is correct on all counts. I eat strict LCHF; I take one single pill (allopurinol) each day for gout, and I can't remember the last time I had an attack. Allopurinol also protects the kidneys, which is how my doc persuaded me to continue taking it.
    Understand that it does not alleviate attacks, it prevents attacks when you take it conscientiously.

  4. -> Continue reading
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Urine Composition In Type 2 Diabetes: Predisposition To Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

Abstract Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for nephrolithiasis in general and has been associated with uric acid stones in particular. The purpose of this study was to identify the metabolic features that place patients with type 2 diabetes at increased risk for uric acid nephrolithiasis. Three groups of individuals were recruited for this outpatient study: Patients who have type 2 diabetes and are not stone formers (n = 24), patients who do not have diabetes and are uric acid stone formers (UASF; n = 8), and normal volunteers (NV; n = 59). Participants provided a fasting blood sample and a single 24-h urine collection for stone risk analysis. Twenty-four-hour urine volume and total uric acid did not differ among the three groups. Patients with type 2 diabetes and UASF had lower 24-h urine pH than NV. Urine pH inversely correlated with both body weight and 24-h urine sulfate in all groups. Urine pH remained significantly lower in patients with type 2 diabetes and UASF than NV after adjustment for weight and urine sulfate (P < 0.01). For a given urine sulfate, urine net acid excretion tended to be higher in patients with type 2 diabetes versus NV. With increasing urine sulfate, NV an Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. sedeinco

    Clash of the diets - Diabetes and Gout

    Has anyone else had issues with increased uric acid and developing gout when reducing their carb intake and increasing protein? Though there's some overlap (e.g. bread/yeast bad for both) most things listed as being good for controlling gout are bad for diabetes and vice versa. It leaves very little on the table if you'll pardon the pun. Anyone else run into this issue?
    After about 9 months I've got my diabetes under reasonable control in what I hope is a sustainable way. Just did comprehensive bloodwork beginning of this month and my HbA1c has fallen to 5.0 and fasting sugar was at 5.2. This is despite being on holiday for 3 weeks and not always eating right at the start of last month.
    In general I am still having some carbs this time around - previously I had drastically cut carbs and life wasn't worth living - I was leathargic, moody and felt more than a little trapped. HbA1c was 5.4 but that was unsustainable so to see a reduction after reintroducing some carb is fantastic.
    When I've been eating with control in mind I've been living on large (gigantic) bowls of salad - typically lettuce, tomato, cucumber, onion, fetta cheese, spanish olive and vinegar - occassionally carrot or capcicum thrown in too. Also eating chicken (processed and whole), mince beef, steak, egg, ham, salami, and cheese. Re-introducing carb has meant my breakfast is often a rice microwave meal (e.g. thai green curry). Blood sugar seems to be best controlled when I have some carb in the morning to kick start the system. So does energy.
    What isn't so fantastic is that my uric acid levels are up just beyond normal range. I'm pretty sure that I've had one attack of gout - classic symptoms - sensitive painful toes in the middle of the night and couldn't stand sheets touching or resting on them. It can't have been a terrible attack as I was able to get to sleep after an hour and woke up feeling okay.
    So there are some things I now I can do about it. I'm still drinking way too much sugar free softdrink ...and of course I can drink more water. I can cut down on vinegar in my salads. Most of all I think I'm going to have to lay off Salami which I have been eating in large quantities with tomato (no bread)....(Fortunately I've never been a fan of alcohol purely on the basis of taste, so alcohol isn't an issue).They're the "easy" (much sarcasm here) fixes.
    Any other ideas? Helpful suggestions only please.

  2. Frippery

    I had bad gout for about three years - so bad that it had spread to my ankles, knees and even elbow.
    General doctors couldn't help - but a specialist fixed in two months. Today I take one tablet a day for gout and have not had an attack for five years.
    I have been very low carb for two years and do even think about gout foods. I eat salami every day and have wine most days.
    A1c stays at 5.0 and uric acid stays on target - no problems at all.
    So see a specialist for gout and eat for the diabetes only - there was a time I thought that I would have to live with gout for the rest of my life - now I don"t even remember what foods are bad for gout.

  3. Shanny

    Frippery is correct on all counts. I eat strict LCHF; I take one single pill (allopurinol) each day for gout, and I can't remember the last time I had an attack. Allopurinol also protects the kidneys, which is how my doc persuaded me to continue taking it.
    Understand that it does not alleviate attacks, it prevents attacks when you take it conscientiously.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close
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Eating These 5 Foods Can Help You Keep Uric Acid At Normal Levels

If you’re fond of eating cherries, cheer up because you have been unknowingly already maintaining your uric acid levels by consuming cherries, which have anti-inflammatory substances called anthocyanis that can reduce uric acid levels. Cherries help prevent crystallisation and deposition of uric acid in the joints. In addition, consumption of cherries also neutrialise the acids and help avert inflammation and soreness. Even if cherries are not your favourite fruit, consuming just 200 gms every day is enough to bring down uric acid levels. Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. sedeinco

    Clash of the diets - Diabetes and Gout

    Has anyone else had issues with increased uric acid and developing gout when reducing their carb intake and increasing protein? Though there's some overlap (e.g. bread/yeast bad for both) most things listed as being good for controlling gout are bad for diabetes and vice versa. It leaves very little on the table if you'll pardon the pun. Anyone else run into this issue?
    After about 9 months I've got my diabetes under reasonable control in what I hope is a sustainable way. Just did comprehensive bloodwork beginning of this month and my HbA1c has fallen to 5.0 and fasting sugar was at 5.2. This is despite being on holiday for 3 weeks and not always eating right at the start of last month.
    In general I am still having some carbs this time around - previously I had drastically cut carbs and life wasn't worth living - I was leathargic, moody and felt more than a little trapped. HbA1c was 5.4 but that was unsustainable so to see a reduction after reintroducing some carb is fantastic.
    When I've been eating with control in mind I've been living on large (gigantic) bowls of salad - typically lettuce, tomato, cucumber, onion, fetta cheese, spanish olive and vinegar - occassionally carrot or capcicum thrown in too. Also eating chicken (processed and whole), mince beef, steak, egg, ham, salami, and cheese. Re-introducing carb has meant my breakfast is often a rice microwave meal (e.g. thai green curry). Blood sugar seems to be best controlled when I have some carb in the morning to kick start the system. So does energy.
    What isn't so fantastic is that my uric acid levels are up just beyond normal range. I'm pretty sure that I've had one attack of gout - classic symptoms - sensitive painful toes in the middle of the night and couldn't stand sheets touching or resting on them. It can't have been a terrible attack as I was able to get to sleep after an hour and woke up feeling okay.
    So there are some things I now I can do about it. I'm still drinking way too much sugar free softdrink ...and of course I can drink more water. I can cut down on vinegar in my salads. Most of all I think I'm going to have to lay off Salami which I have been eating in large quantities with tomato (no bread)....(Fortunately I've never been a fan of alcohol purely on the basis of taste, so alcohol isn't an issue).They're the "easy" (much sarcasm here) fixes.
    Any other ideas? Helpful suggestions only please.

  2. Frippery

    I had bad gout for about three years - so bad that it had spread to my ankles, knees and even elbow.
    General doctors couldn't help - but a specialist fixed in two months. Today I take one tablet a day for gout and have not had an attack for five years.
    I have been very low carb for two years and do even think about gout foods. I eat salami every day and have wine most days.
    A1c stays at 5.0 and uric acid stays on target - no problems at all.
    So see a specialist for gout and eat for the diabetes only - there was a time I thought that I would have to live with gout for the rest of my life - now I don"t even remember what foods are bad for gout.

  3. Shanny

    Frippery is correct on all counts. I eat strict LCHF; I take one single pill (allopurinol) each day for gout, and I can't remember the last time I had an attack. Allopurinol also protects the kidneys, which is how my doc persuaded me to continue taking it.
    Understand that it does not alleviate attacks, it prevents attacks when you take it conscientiously.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

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