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Uric Acid And Diabetes Diet

Does Having Gout Increase My Chances Of Developing Diabetes?

Does Having Gout Increase My Chances Of Developing Diabetes?

Many of the people who suffer from gout also suffer from diabetes or eventually will. Both diseases have been with us for thousands of years. Having one condition elevates the risk of developing the other. The possibility of a connection was affirmed in the late 18th century but again it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to come to this conclusion. This is obviously due to the fact that gout is linked with obesity, hypertension and little exercise or high blood pressure. Diabetes a disease of high blood sugar is also associated with obesity, hypertension, not enough physical activity and high blood pressure. Gout and diabetes are metabolic disorders and if you have both diseases or either one, strong chances they were inherited from your genetic makeup. But more likely than that, you probably had the same bad eating habits that both or one of your parents had and then went on to develop gout and/or diabetes, by watching your mom or dad, you instilled those bad eating habits and allowed it to happen to you. Furthermore, both diseases are associated with poor blood circulation in the body especially the limbs and insulin resistance in diabetes plays a big part in the potential development of gout. Remember that in some advanced cases of diabetes, gangrene occurs in the foot making amputation necessary. Sadly, both diseases can also kill you and lead you to a poorer quality of life. But it’s the poor circulation, the most likely reason why the risk of gout is relatively high in people with diabetes. Poor blood circulation means you have higher uric acid levels, making the kidneys slow and inefficient in releasing it out to your urine. In addition, your blood is overly acidic and your pH levels are off balance. Evidence of gout and diabetes New studies indicate that you h Continue reading >>

Does Gout Cause Diabetes?

Does Gout Cause Diabetes?

A study published in October, 2014, did find a link between gout and type 2 diabetes – specifically, it showed that having gout appears to increase the risk of developing diabetes, particularly among women. However, while both conditions have several risk factors in common, the connection between them isn’t clear. The study found an association, but it didn’t prove cause and effect. Researchers from the U.S. and the U.K. followed more than 35,000 gout patients in Great Britain, gathering data on both women (9,693) and men (25,646). The investigators also compared the data from the gout patients with information on just over 137,000 people who didn’t have gout. After comparing all the medical facts, the research team found that women who had gout were 71 percent more likely to develop diabetes than a comparable group of women who didn’t have gout. Among men, those with gout had a 22 percent increased risk. Gout is an inherited metabolic disorder that can cause a type of arthritis. It usually affects the big toe but can also occur in other joints including the ankles, heels, knees, wrists, fingers and elbows. Attacks can be extremely painful and are worsened by being on your feet. The hallmark of gout is elevated blood levels of uric acid, a breakdown product of protein metabolism. In news reports, the study’s lead researcher, Hyon Choi, M.D. of Boston’s Massachusetts General Hospital, suggested that ongoing low levels of inflammation due to gout might increase the risk of diabetes. The risk factors the two diseases have in common are high cholesterol, high blood pressure and obesity. Gout is also associated with metabolic syndrome, and an increased risk of major cardiovascular events and premature death, the researchers noted. Excess alcohol consumption and Continue reading >>

Gout And Diabetes

Gout And Diabetes

Tweet Gout is a form of arthritis (inflammation of joints) caused by high levels of uric acid. Gout can be a painful condition but one that can be managed to reduce the frequency at which gout attacks occur. Gout is known to affect around 1 in 100 people in the UK and is around four times more common in men than in women. Research shows that people with gout are significantly more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than people without gout. Gout and diabetes A number of research papers have shown associations between gout and type 2 diabetes including a study from Harvard Medical School, published in 2014, which showed gout to be associated with a 70 increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A common medication for treating gout, allopurinol, has shown promise for reducing thickening of heart muscle and is currently undergoing testing as a possible medication for reducing risk of diabetic nephropathy (kidney disease). Symptoms of gout Gout is characterised by swelling of joints. The base of the big toe is most commonly affected by gout. More than one joint may be affected by gout in some people. Symptoms can come on quickly, with swelling occurring within a few hours. The swollen joint can be very painful and sensitive to touch. During swelling, skin covering the joint may typically turn red and shiny in appearance. The swelling and symptoms may occur for several days if not treated. Once the inflammation has subsided, the skin on the joint may become itchy and flaky. Causes of gout Gout occurs if high levels of uric acid in the blood leads to crystals of sodium urate forming in and around the joints. If these crystals spill into the joint space, this can cause the joint to become inflamed. Risk factors High levels of uric acid are more likely to build if you have an Continue reading >>

​gout Diet: Foods That Keep Your Uric Acid In Check

​gout Diet: Foods That Keep Your Uric Acid In Check

Find out what good protein sources in a gout-friendly diet are from Changi General Hospital's Dietetics and Food Services department. What is gout? Gout is a form of arthritis that attacks joints and causes acute pain and swelling mostly in the big toe and fingers, and sometimes, in the wrists, elbows, knees and ankles. Gout attacks are triggered by uric acid build-up in the joints. The body produces uric acid whenever it breaks down purine-containing foods. Gout-friendly diet: Protein​ Although people with gout should avoid proteins with very high purine concentrations such as organs, seafood and shellfish, and meats like venison, sausages and bacon, they can still eat proteins with lower purine content moderately. Eggs Eggs are low in purines, but limit consumption to 2 to 3 a week because eggs contain high cholesterol. Cold-water fish Essential fatty acids found in cold-water fish such as tuna can reduce gout inflammation. However, to prevent a gout flare-up, limit the intake of fish to one serving per day as it still contains purines. Nuts and seeds A gout-friendly diet should include two tablespoons of nuts and seeds every day. Good sources of low-purine nuts and seeds include walnuts, almonds, flaxseeds and cashew nuts. Click on the next page to find out more about a gout-friendly diet. Prev12Next Ref: S13 ​​​​Terms of Use / Disclaimer All information provided within this web and mobile application is intended for general information and is provided on the understanding that no surgical and medical advice or recommendation is being rendered. Please do not disregard the professional advice of your physician.​ Continue reading >>

Low Protein Diet Inhibits Uric Acid Synthesis And Attenuates Renal Damage In Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats

Low Protein Diet Inhibits Uric Acid Synthesis And Attenuates Renal Damage In Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats

Copyright © 2014 Jianmin Ran et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Aim. Several studies indicated that hyperuricemia may link to the worsening of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Meanwhile, low protein diet (LPD) retards exacerbation of renal damage in chronic kidney disease. We then assessed whether LPD influences uric acid metabolism and benefits the progression of DN in streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats. Methods. STZ-induced and control rats were both fed with LPD (5%) and normal protein diet (18%), respectively, for 12 weeks. Vital signs, blood and urinary samples for UA metabolism were taken and analyzed every 3 weeks. Kidneys were removed at the end of the experiment. Results. Diabetic rats developed into constantly high levels of serum UA (SUA), creatinine (SCr) and 24 h amounts of urinary albumin excretion (UAE), creatintine (UCr), urea nitrogen (UUN), and uric acid (UUA). LPD significantly decreased SUA, UAE, and blood glucose, yet left SCr, UCr, and UUN unchanged. A stepwise regression showed that high UUA is an independent risk factor for DN. LPD remarkably ameliorated degrees of enlarged glomeruli, proliferated mesangial cells, and hyaline-degenerated tubular epithelial cells in diabetic rats. Expression of TNF-α in tubulointerstitium significantly decreased in LPD-fed diabetic rats. Conclusion. LPD inhibits endogenous uric acid synthesis and might accordingly attenuate renal damage in STZ-induced diabetic rats. 1. Introduction Diabetic nephropathy (DN) now is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. For so many years ser Continue reading >>

13 Great Recipes If You Have Gout

13 Great Recipes If You Have Gout

Gout-friendly meals Too much bread or alcohol can be a problem if you have gout, a condition in which uric-acid crystals form in the joints, causing pain, swelling, and inflammation. Add purine-rich foods—such as seafood and red meat—to the list and it can seem hard to find something you can eat. (Purine gets broken down into uric acid in the body.) Still, gout shouldn’t keep you from enjoying your food. Stick to low-purine fare, like that in the following recipes, to have a tasty meal without triggering an attack or making a flare-up worse. Curried Carrot, Sweet Potato, and Ginger Soup Pureed root vegetables make for gout-friendly comfort food that warms you up on cold winter days. Carrots, sweet potatoes, and spices are a few of the foods with the lowest amounts of purine. To make this soup even better for avoiding gout, try using vegetable stock instead of chicken broth. Calories: 144 Try this recipe: Curried Carrot, Sweet Potato, and Ginger Soup Updated Waldorf Salad Use low-fat mayo mixed with apples, grapes, dried cranberries, celery, and walnuts for this chunky salad that renews a classic and curbs mid-afternoon hunger. This dish delivers a serving of low-purine nuts and fruits. Plus, apples, grapes, and cranberries all contain malic acid, which may counter gout-promoting uric acid in your body. Calories: 153 Try this recipe: Updated Waldorf Salad Warm Eggplant and Goat Cheese Sandwiches Eggplant and tomatoes are low-purine foods that blend deliciously with creamy goat cheese for a savory sandwich that packs anything but boring for lunch. To boot, veggies tend to be alkaline (the opposite of acidic), meaning they may help neutralize uric acid. Calories: 299 Try this recipe: Warm Eggplant and Goat Cheese Sandwiches Tomato Crostini Choose this tasty recipe to Continue reading >>

Gout & Diabetes

Gout & Diabetes

If you have gout, you may be at risk for diabetes. Research has shown a link between gout and diabetes. People who have gout and elevated uric acid levels are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. At the same time, those who already have type 2 diabetes are more likely to have high levels of uric acid in the blood – or hyperuricemia – which is the root cause of gout. Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose (sugar) levels are above normal, due to either a lack of insulin in the blood or resistance to the insulin. Studies have shown that insulin resistance may play a role in developing gout and that hyperuricemia may worsen insulin resistance. Insulin resistance has also been associated with obesity and high blood pressure, which are risk factors for gout. Like gout, diabetes has been linked to other serious health issues, such as heart disease and kidney damage. Controlling blood sugar and uric acid levels can help to make both diabetes and gout easier to manage. While anyone with gout can develop diabetes, risk is especially high among women – with recent studies showing that women who have gout are 71 percent more likely to develop diabetes than women who do not have gout. Control Gout and Protect Your Long-Term Health Maintaining a healthy serum uric acid level of 6 mg/dL or below is important to reduce risk for gout and diabetes. Ask your doctor for a routine serum uric acid blood test to see if you have elevated uric acid. Your doctor can also run tests to measure your blood sugar level. If your uric acid levels are high, your doctor may prescribe medications to help keep levels low and reduce your risk for future gout flares. It is important to take these medications as prescribed – and not to stop them without talking with the doctor. It is also imp Continue reading >>

Gout-friendly Eating: Nutrition Guidelines & Diet Restrictions

Gout-friendly Eating: Nutrition Guidelines & Diet Restrictions

Gout is a type of arthritis caused by too much uric acid in the blood. Excess uric acid can lead to a buildup of fluid surrounding the joints, which can result in uric acid crystals. The formation of these crystals causes the joints to swell, become inflamed, and cause intense pain. The good news is that you can control gout. In addition to taking medications, dietary and lifestyle changes can help prevent painful attacks. A gout-friendly diet involves a specific plan, which is designed to avoid painful gout attacks. Learn more about which foods to include — and those to avoid — to help prevent symptoms. What Causes Gout? Gout develops when there is too much uric acid in the blood. This over-abundance of uric acid may be the result a diet high in purines. Or, your body may produce too much uric acid. In some cases, blood uric acid levels may remain normal, yet gout is still the correct diagnosis. This is due to the body excreting excess uric acid in the urine and inflammatory factors. What Are Purines Anyway? Purines are chemical compounds that, when metabolized, are broken down into uric acid. Purines are either made by your body, or taken into your body through foods you eat. In a normal process, purines break down into uric acid. The uric acid is then dissolved in the blood, passed through the kidneys into the urine, and eliminated from the body. However, this isn’t usually the case in gout. Complications occur when the kidneys don’t get rid of uric acid fast enough, or if there is an increased amount of uric acid production. These high levels build up in the blood, leading to what is known as hyperuricemia. Though not classified as a disease, hyperuricemia can be dangerous if it leads to the formation of uric acid crystals. Gout can develop when these crysta Continue reading >>

Kidney Stones In Relation To Obesity And Diabetes

Kidney Stones In Relation To Obesity And Diabetes

A kidney stone is a solid mass developed from crystals that separate from the urine within the urinary tract. Kidney stones can contain various components. The most common type of stone contains calcium in combination with either oxalate or phosphate. A less common type of stone is caused by an infection in the urinary tract. This type of stone is called a struvite or infection stone. Another type of stone, uric acid stones, are less common, and cystine stones are rare. It is not completely understood as to why kidney stones form. The single biggest factor in the formation of kidney stones is diet. Certain foods may promote stone formation in people who are susceptible, and a person with a family history of kidney stones may be more likely to develop them. Urinary tract infections, kidney disorders such as cystic kidney diseases, and certain metabolic disorders are also linked to stone formation. Over the past 30 years, the number of people in the United States diagnosed with kidney stones has been increasing. In the late 1970s, less than 4% of the population experienced kidney stones. By the early 1990s, the percentage of the population with stones had increased to more than 5%. The number of Americans suffering from kidney stones between 2007 and 2010 nearly doubled from 1994, according to a new study by researchers at UCLA and the RAND Corporation. Researchers reviewed responses from 12,110 individuals and found that between 2007 and 2010, 8.8% of the U.S. population had a kidney stone, which is one out of every 11 people. In 1994, the rate was one out of 20. Caucasians are more prone to develop kidney stones than African Americans, and stones are more prevalent in men. The incidence of kidney stones rises dramatically as men enter their 40s and continues to rise int Continue reading >>

Uric Acid Stones

Uric Acid Stones

What are uric acid stones? Uric acid stones are one of four major types of kidney stones, which include calcium stones (calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate), struvite stones, and cystine stones. A kidney stone is a hard mass of crystallized minerals that form in the kidneys or urinary tract. How common are uric acid stones? It is estimated that one in 10 people in the U.S. will have a kidney stone of one kind or another at some time in their lives. In the late 1970s, about 3.8% of the population had kidney stones, but this figure has now increased to about 8.8% of the population. Among men, the lifetime risk is about 19%; in women, it is 9%. Usually, the first incidence of kidney stones occurs after age 30. However, there are many cases that occur sooner, some in children as young as five years of age. What causes uric acid stones? Uric acid stones form when the levels of uric acid in the urine is too high, and/or the urine is too acidic (pH level below 5.5) on a regular basis. High acidity in urine is linked to the following causes: Inherited problems in how the body processes uric acid or protein in the diet can increase the acid in urine. This can be seen in conditions such as gout, which is known for its high levels of uric acid in the blood and painful deposits of crystals in the joints. Uric acid can result from a diet high in purines, which are found especially in animal proteins such as beef, poultry, pork, eggs, and fish. The highest levels of purines are found in organ meats, such as liver and fish. Eating large amounts of animal proteins can cause uric acid to build up in the urine. The uric acid can settle and form a stone by itself or in combination with calcium. It is important to note that a person’s diet alone is not the cause of uric acid stones. Ot Continue reading >>

Urine Composition In Type 2 Diabetes: Predisposition To Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

Urine Composition In Type 2 Diabetes: Predisposition To Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

Abstract Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for nephrolithiasis in general and has been associated with uric acid stones in particular. The purpose of this study was to identify the metabolic features that place patients with type 2 diabetes at increased risk for uric acid nephrolithiasis. Three groups of individuals were recruited for this outpatient study: Patients who have type 2 diabetes and are not stone formers (n = 24), patients who do not have diabetes and are uric acid stone formers (UASF; n = 8), and normal volunteers (NV; n = 59). Participants provided a fasting blood sample and a single 24-h urine collection for stone risk analysis. Twenty-four-hour urine volume and total uric acid did not differ among the three groups. Patients with type 2 diabetes and UASF had lower 24-h urine pH than NV. Urine pH inversely correlated with both body weight and 24-h urine sulfate in all groups. Urine pH remained significantly lower in patients with type 2 diabetes and UASF than NV after adjustment for weight and urine sulfate (P < 0.01). For a given urine sulfate, urine net acid excretion tended to be higher in patients with type 2 diabetes versus NV. With increasing urine sulfate, NV and patients with type 2 diabetes had a similar rise in urine ammonium, whereas in UASF, ammonium excretion remained unchanged. The main risk factor for uric acid nephrolithiasis in patients with type 2 diabetes is a low urine pH. Higher body mass and increased acid intake can contribute to but cannot entirely account for the lower urine pH in patients with type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Gout: Forget The Purines; Skip The Sugar?

Gout: Forget The Purines; Skip The Sugar?

If gout runs in your family, you’ve probably heard the advice to pass on all the animal protein, which would make Paleo difficult at best. But actually, there’s more to the story: instead of blaming meat, we might want to take a hard look at sugar instead. What Is Gout? Gout is a very painful type of inflammatory arthritis. The best-known symptom is pain in the big toe, but gout can also cause pain in any other joint. Less commonly, it can even cause kidney stones or other completely different symptoms. These problems can show up in “attacks” separated by periods without pain, or they can be chronic and continuous. Gout is more common in men than in women, but rates in both sexes have been steadily increasing for the last couple of decades. The root cause of gout is too much uric acid in the blood (hyperuricemia). Uric acid is actually one of the body’s primary antioxidants, but as always, it’s possible to get too much of a good thing. When there’s too much uric acid in the blood, it crystallizes, and the resulting solid crystals wind up in and around the joints (and occasionally in the kidneys, which is where the kidney stones come from). Conventional wisdom holds that the best diet for preventing and treating gout is low in seafood and meat (especially organ meat), which sounds like it would pretty much take Paleo out of the running. But there’s actually more to the story than that… Gout, Purines, and Animal Protein First of all, it’s important to recognize that there actually is some support for the advice to cut down on meat and seafood. For one thing, there’s the problem of association. Gout is a classic “disease of civilization:” ever since it was first named and described, it’s been recognized as a problem for people who have plenty of Continue reading >>

What Diet Is Recommended For High Uric Acid?

What Diet Is Recommended For High Uric Acid?

Q: My 58 years old husband has high homocystine levels and the uric acid is 6.9 and blood pressure is 130/90 mmHg. He takes Tozzar 50 and Metilda plus. Please suggest which fruits and vegetables he should avoid and which oil is safe for him? A:Purines are organic compounds, which create uric acid [photo gallery] on breakdown in the body. While your body needs uric acid for blood vessel health and other processes, a buildup of excess uric acid can lead to gout, diabetes and even cardiovascular disease. Purines consumed in the diet account for about 50 percent of the uric acid produced in the body. Therefore, avoiding foods high in purines or following a modified purine diet may help improve uric acid levels. General guidelines are - Restrict meat/fish/poultry intake Avoid alcohol and processed foods Lose weight if overweight Exercise regularly Drink 8-10 glasses of water a day Eat plenty of fruits & vegetables Restrict foods high in purines - Organ meats such as liver, kidney, heart Selected fish and shellfish Meat & yeast extracts brewers and bakers yeast Meat soups & stock cubes Recommended foods to eat - Fresh cherries, strawberries, blueberries and other red-blue berries Bananas Celery Tomatoes Vegetables including cabbage and parsley Foods high in bromelain (pineapple) Foods high in vitamin C (red cabbage, red bell peppers, tangerines, mandarins, oranges, potatoes) Low-fat dairy products Complex carbohydrates (breads, cereals) Chocolate, cocoa Coffee, tea Since purines are found in so many foods, it’s important to understand that not all purine-source foods affect the body in the same way. For instance, although purines are found in vegetable sources, these purines don't cause the same amount of uric acid buildup in the body that meat sources do. In fact, fresh fr Continue reading >>

Diet For High Blood Pressure And High Uric Acid (gout): Restrict Intake Of High-purine Foods

Diet For High Blood Pressure And High Uric Acid (gout): Restrict Intake Of High-purine Foods

Previous Page: Diet for high blood pressure and coronary heart disease:Calorie and protein intake should not be too high. High uric acid (hyperuricemia) is also called gout. With the improvement of living standards, changes in diet, high purine foods intake increasing, gout prevalence rate increased gradually. If high blood pressure patients find a slight elevation in the level of uric acid, they can adjust their diets to reduce the intake of purine, thereby lowering the level of uric acid. High blood pressure patients with moderately elevated uric acid need to control diets and receive medication. Patients with high blood pressure and gout should pay attention to their diet. Scientific and reasonable diets can help relieve symptoms and prevent recurrence, while poor diets will aggravate diseases. Develop Healthy Eating Habits for high blood pressure and high uric acid The intake of the amount of purine-containing food should be limited, and animal foods containing relatively high levels of purine should not be consumed frequently. Fish should be consumed two or three times a week, because fish are rich in taurine and methionine, which regulate blood pressure by increasing the discharge of the amount of sodium in the urine, thereby lowering the blood pressure. While it should be noted that fish with a low level of purine should be consumed. When high blood pressure and high uric acid patients' conditions are in remission, their daily intake of fat should not exceed 50 grams, intake of meat should not exceed 100 grams. You should drink less broth, fish soup, chicken soup, these foods contain a large amount of purine. Diet for high blood pressure and high uric acid: Do's and Dont's Eat more alkaline foods , such as fresh vegetables, fruit, milk, etc. These foods can adjus Continue reading >>

Hypothesis: Could Excessive Fructose Intake And Uric Acid Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Hypothesis: Could Excessive Fructose Intake And Uric Acid Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

We propose that excessive fructose intake (>50 g/d) may be one of the underlying etiologies of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. The primary sources of fructose are sugar (sucrose) and high fructose corn syrup. First, fructose intake correlates closely with the rate of diabetes worldwide. Second, unlike other sugars, the ingestion of excessive fructose induces features of metabolic syndrome in both laboratory animals and humans. Third, fructose appears to mediate the metabolic syndrome in part by raising uric acid, and there are now extensive experimental and clinical data supporting uric acid in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Fourth, environmental and genetic considerations provide a potential explanation of why certain groups might be more susceptible to developing diabetes. Finally, we discuss the counterarguments associated with the hypothesis and a potential explanation for these findings. If diabetes might result from excessive intake of fructose, then simple public health measures could have a major impact on improving the overall health of our populace. Although diabetes was described by Aretaeus, Galen, and Paracelsus, by the mid to late 1800s William Prout (1) and others recognized that diabetes could have two presentations: one manifesting as a rapidly progressive and wasting condition in a thin and feeble individual (likely type 1 diabetes), and a slower and more progressive disease in an overweight or obese subject (likely type 2 diabetes) (1, 2). Both conditions were rare; indeed, Osler (3) projected a prevalence of approximately two or three cases per 100,000 population in Europe and North America. By the early 1900s, however, a remarkable rise in the prevalence of the second type of diabetes was observed in Europe and the United States (4) Continue reading >>

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