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Type 3 Diabetes Diet

Alzheimer’s = Type 3 Diabetes

Alzheimer’s = Type 3 Diabetes

“My parents are getting older and I want to do everything I can to help them prevent Alzheimer’s, considering both my grandmothers had this disease, and I am worried about getting it too.” writes this week’s house call. “What can we do to prevent dementia?” The truth is, dementia is a very big problem that’s becoming bigger every day. Statistics are grim. 10 percent of 65-year-olds, 25 percent of 75-year-olds, and 50 percent of 85-year-olds will develop dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. And the fastest growing segment of our population is the 85-year-olds. Researchers predict Alzheimer’s will affect 106 million people by 2050. It’s now the seventh leading cause of death. Scientists now call Alzheimer’s disease “Type 3 diabetes.” What’s the link between Alzheimer’s and diabetes? Well, new research shows insulin resistance, or what I call diabesity (from eating too many carbs and sugar and not enough fat) is one of the major factors that starts the brain-damage cascade, which robs the memory of over half the people in their 80s, leading to a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. But don’t think too much insulin affects only older folks’ memories. It doesn’t just suddenly occur once you’re older. Dementia actually begins when you’re younger and takes decades to develop and worsen. Here’s the bad news/good news. Eating sugar and refined carbs can cause pre-dementia and dementia. But cutting out the sugar and refined carbs and adding lots of fat can prevent, and even reverse, pre-dementia and early dementia. More recent studies show people with diabetes have a four-fold risk for developing Alzheimer’s. People with pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome have an increased risk for having pre-dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). You Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

Type 3 Diabetes

Type 3 Diabetes

Most people have heard of type 1 and 2 diabetes – but type 3 has skated below the radar. Tara Thorne explains why it's on the rise. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 85 percent of all diabetes in Australia. And it’s increasing. However, type 3 diabetes - a form that involves the brain and is similar to type 2, the overarching mechanism being insulin resistance - is not widely known outside the medical community. Research now shows there’s a connection between impaired insulin signalling and Alzheimer’s disease or - what’s now being called - type 3 diabetes. To understand type 3 diabetes, it’s important to first understand insulin resistance. Insulin is released when we consume sugar or carbohydrates (the worst being simple carbohydrates like white bread or white pasta). Insulin’s role is to usher glucose from these carbohydrates into our cells, where it can be used for energy. Essentially, insulin is the key that unlocks the door to the cell in order for glucose to enter. But if there’s too much glucose the cells fill up, and the glucose is stored as glycogen and then as fat. At a certain point - due to an oversupply of glucose - our cells start to ignore insulin’s screams. In response to this more insulin is produced, screaming louder at our cells - but our cells are no longer listening because insulin resistance has begun. Brain drain Here’s how this affects the brain. Insulin encourages brain neurons to take up glucose (the brain's main fuel source). But when brain cells have insulin resistance they’re not accepting glucose. This means they’re not being “fed”, which leads to the death of neurons resulting in memory loss, poor motor function, confusion – all symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. We now know that people with type 2 diabetes are tw Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious, long-term medical condition. It develops mostly in adults but is becoming more common in children as obesity rates rise across all age groups. Several factors contribute to type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor. Type 2 diabetes can be life-threatening. But if treated carefully, it can be managed or even reversed. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. When your blood sugar (glucose) levels rise, the pancreas releases insulin. This causes sugar to move from your blood to your cells, where it can be used as an energy source. As glucose levels in your blood go back down, your pancreas stops releasing insulin. Type 2 diabetes impacts how you metabolize sugar. Either your pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or your body has become resistant to its effects. This causes glucose to build up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia. There are several symptoms of untreated type 2 diabetes, including: excessive thirst and urination fatigue increased hunger weight loss, in spite of eating more infections that heal slowly blurry vision dark patches on the skin Treatment for type 2 diabetes includes monitoring your blood sugar levels and using medications or insulin when needed. Doctors also recommend losing weight through diet and exercise. Some diabetes medications have weight loss as a side effect, which can also help reverse diabetes. If you start eating healthier, get more exercise, and lose weight, you can reduce your symptoms. Research shows that these lifestyle changes, especially physical activity, can even reverse the course of the condition. Studies that show the reversal of type 2 diabetes include participants who have lived with the condition for only a few years. Weight loss is the primary fact Continue reading >>

What Exactly Is Type 3 Diabetes?

What Exactly Is Type 3 Diabetes?

According to Dr. Mark Hyman, a well-known physician/author who focuses on diabetes, heart disease and diet, “10% of 65 year olds, 25% of 75 year olds and 50% of 85 year olds will develop dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.” Along with diabetes and obesity, it is a global epidemic. Alzheimer’s is the top form of dementia and now the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Alzheimer’s is a brain disease that is progressive, often starts with forgetfulness and confusion, in which the brain’s nerve cells degenerate. It can then affect personalities, moods and language leading to behavior issues in the patient. It is not considered “natural aging.” There is gene involvement but only 5% of cases are directly related to genes. The main causes seem to involve oxidative stress as well as systemic inflammation. Some of it is aging but it also encompasses lifestyle which contributes to brain health. “The medical community has yet to identify a specific cause and there is no effective long term treatment.” Scientists have been referring to Alzheimer’s as type 3 diabetes since 2005 since “people with type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s.” The connection seems to be insulin resistance which also relates to lifestyle. According to The Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology “currently there is rapid growth pointing toward insulin resistance as mediators of Alzheimer’s neuro-degeneration.” Experts at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health conclude that insulin resistance can be reduced by “limiting added sugars, refined carbohydrates and processed foods while eating balanced meals that focus on lean proteins, non-starchy above ground vegetables, pulses[beans], and remaining physically active.” These recommendatio Continue reading >>

Type 3 Diabetes: The Alarming Link Between Alzheimer’s And Diet

Type 3 Diabetes: The Alarming Link Between Alzheimer’s And Diet

Michael Joseph at Nutrition Advance writes: "If you haven’t heard of it, type 3 diabetes is what many specialists are now calling Alzheimer’s disease. The name covers the belief that Alzheimer’s results from insulin resistance of the brain. Alzheimer’s is a cruel, degenerative condition that devastates millions of lives around the world. And unfortunately, it’s only increasing in prevalence; as of 2016, 1 in 9 people over the age of 65 have Alzheimer’s. Surprisingly, the number of individuals aged 65 and over with the condition is expected to triple by the year 2050. This article takes a look at the metabolic theory of type 3 diabetes, and how we might be able to prevent (or potentially halt) the condition. What is Type 3 Diabetes? Type 3 diabetes—or Alzheimer’s disease—is a chronic condition in which brain neurons slowly degenerate and die. As a result, we see progressive memory loss and rapid declines in cognitive ability. I’ve personally seen the terrible effects of Alzheimer’s. As a young boy, I remember seeing my great grandfather hospitalized with late-stage Alzheimer’s. And then from the start of my late teenage years, I saw my granddad—a strong, well-built man—slowly succumb to the disease. Sadly, the condition can hit anyone. Someone being physically fit or having an intelligent mind is not relevant; the disease doesn’t discriminate, and it takes no prisoners. A Cruel Condition Experiencing a slow deterioration, patients eventually lose the ability to interact with their environment, communicate, and even remember their family. Ultimately, Alzheimer’s disease is fatal, and patients usually die from a resulting complication such as pneumonia. Worse still, it’s not only the patient that suffers. Alzheimer’s caregivers often hav Continue reading >>

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition in which sugar, or glucose, levels build up in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin helps move the sugar from your blood into your cells, which are where the sugar is used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body’s cells aren’t able to respond to insulin as well as they should. In later stages of the disease your body may also not produce enough insulin. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels, causing several symptoms and potentially leading to serious complications. In type 2 diabetes your body isn’t able to effectively use insulin to bring glucose into your cells. This causes your body to rely on alternative energy sources in your tissues, muscles, and organs. This is a chain reaction that can cause a variety of symptoms. Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly. The symptoms may be mild and easy to dismiss at first. The early symptoms may include: constant hunger a lack of energy fatigue weight loss excessive thirst frequent urination dry mouth itchy skin blurry vision As the disease progresses, the symptoms become more severe and potentially dangerous. If your blood sugar levels have been high for a long time, the symptoms can include: yeast infections slow-healing cuts or sores dark patches on your skin foot pain feelings of numbness in your extremities, or neuropathy If you have two or more of these symptoms, you should see your doctor. Without treatment, diabetes can become life-threatening. Diabetes has a powerful effect on your heart. Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have another heart attack after the first one. They’re at quadruple the risk of heart failure when compared to women without diabetes. Diabetes can also lead to complications during pregnancy. Diet is an imp Continue reading >>

5 Things You Can Do To Avoid High Blood Sugar Messing With Your Memory

5 Things You Can Do To Avoid High Blood Sugar Messing With Your Memory

Diabetes of the brain? It’s not so far-fetched.1 When Brown University neuropathologist Suzanne de la Monte, MD, first called Alzheimer’s disease “Type 3 Diabetes”2 a decade ago, dementia experts rushed in to criticize the theory. But a growing stack of research suggests that insulin resistance in the brain helps fuel the plaques, tangles and signal breakdowns of this progressive disease—even in people who do not have diabetes. Your brain needs plenty of blood sugar—glucose—for everything from balancing your checkbook to remembering your new neighbor’s name to running thousands of body functions, 24/7. But when brain cells stop obeying insulin’s commands to absorb blood sugar in a normal way, there’s trouble—especially, research shows, in areas most vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease. In a recent Iowa State study of 150 middle-aged people with a family history of Alzheimer’s, those with insulin resistance used less glucose in the hippocampus, a key area for learning and memory storage.3 It was an early warning. The study volunteers didn’t have serious memory problems. But the researchers saw changes in an area typically hit hard in later life by the brain disease. "Brain insulin resistance is very much like regular diabetes, just happening in a different part of the body," de la Monte says. “There’s a growing consensus that insulin’s very important here, for many reasons.” Brain Breakdown Insulin, she says, “is a gate-keeper in the brain. It sends glucose into cells. But it’s also involved with the production of neurotransmitters – chemicals that send messages between brain cells. It keeps cells and the cables that carry information around in the brain – the white matter – alive. When glucose can’t get into cells, there’s Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing www.apa.org something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. To request an unblock, please fill out the form below and we will review it as soon as possible. You reached this page when attempting to access from 35.225.250.211 on 2017-12-30 04:26:38 UTC. Trace: 51e4c419-75e5-4626-ae77-f93feed456f1 via 6c165df1-229c-45f6-93e6-eafce89e5297 Continue reading >>

Researchers Link Alzheimer's Gene To Type 3 Diabetes

Researchers Link Alzheimer's Gene To Type 3 Diabetes

(TNS) — Researchers have known for several years that being overweight and having Type 2 diabetes can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. But they're now beginning to talk about another form of diabetes: Type 3 diabetes. This form of diabetes is associated with Alzheimer's disease. Type 3 diabetes occurs when neurons in the brain become unable to respond to insulin, which is essential for basic tasks, including memory and learning. Some researchers believe insulin deficiency is central to the cognitive decline of Alzheimer's disease. Mayo Clinic's Florida and Rochester campuses recently participated in a multi-institution clinical study, testing whether a new insulin nasal spray can improve Alzheimer's symptoms. The results of that study are forthcoming. But how is this tied to the Alzheimer's gene APOE? A new study from Guojun Bu, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic neuroscientist and Mary Lowell Leary Professor of Medicine, found that the culprit is the variant of the Alzheimer's gene known as APOE4. The team found that APOE4, which is present in approximately 20 percent of the general population and more than half of Alzheimer's cases, is responsible for interrupting how the brain processes insulin. Mice with the APOE4 gene showed insulin impairment, particularly in old age. Also, a high-fat diet could accelerate the process in middle-aged mice with the gene. "The gene and the peripheral insulin resistance caused by the high-fat diet together induced insulin resistance in the brain," Dr. Bu says. Their findings are published in Neuron. The team went on to describe how it all works in the neurons. They found that the APOE4 protein produced by the gene, can bind more aggressively to insulin receptors on the surfaces of neurons than its normal counterpart, APOE3. As Continue reading >>

Alzheimer’s Disease—yes, It’s Preventable!

Alzheimer’s Disease—yes, It’s Preventable!

An estimated 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, and an estimated 600,000 more may suffer from an often misdiagnosed subtype called "hippocampal sparing" Alzheimer’s Since there’s no conventional cure, the issue of prevention is absolutely critical if you want to avoid becoming an Alzheimer’s statistic. Evidence points to lifestyle factors, primarily diet, as the driving forces of dementia Fat avoidance and carbohydrate overconsumption are at the heart of the Alzheimer’s epidemic Risk of Alzheimer’s is doubled in type 2 diabetics. Alzheimer’s has even been dubbed “type 3 diabetes,” as the disease involves a lack of brain-produced insulin Heart disease also increases your risk of dementia, as arterial stiffness is associated with the buildup of beta-amyloid plaque in your brain, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease By Dr. Mercola An estimated 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease, a severe form of dementia,1 and hundreds of thousands more may suffer from an often misdiagnosed subtype called "hippocampal sparing" Alzheimer's, according to recent findings.2 The most recent data3, 4 suggests that well over half a million Americans die from Alzheimer's disease each year, making it the third leading cause of death in the US, right behind heart disease and cancer. As discussed by Dr. Danielle Ofri in a recent New York Times blog,5 losing your mind, and with it, much of your personality and dignity, is a terrifying proposition. Making matters worse, many doctors shy away from addressing dementia—both with colleagues and their patients. The reasons are many. Dr. Ofri suggests Alzheimer's strikes at the emotional heart of many clinicians, whose careers depend on the stability and functioning of their own minds and intelligence. In short, it f Continue reading >>

Is Alzheimer’s Type 3 Diabetes?

Is Alzheimer’s Type 3 Diabetes?

Is someone you love suffering from Alzheimer’s disease? If so, you know how devastating this tragic disease is—not only for the people who suffer from it, but for their friends and families as well. That’s why we fear it even more than cancer, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, or stroke. But here’s something you might not know. Increasingly, scientists are calling Alzheimer’s disease by another name: Type 3 diabetes. The scientist who coined this term—Suzanne de la Monte, a neuropathologist at Brown University—discovered that rats with insulin resistance (the forerunner of diabetes) “developed an Alzheimer-like disease pattern, including neurodegeneration.” Dr. de la Monte says that Alzheimer’s has “virtually all of the features of diabetes, but is largely confined to the brain.” Dr. de la Monte’s findings are consistent with the fact that diabetics have a much higher rate of Alzheimer’s disease than non-diabetics. They’re also in line with research showing that people with high blood glucose levels are at elevated risk for dementia even if they don’t have diabetes. Recent studies are shedding still more light on the connection between Alzheimer’s and insulin resistance or diabetes. For example: A 2017 study found that the fluctuations in fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c (a long-term blood glucose measurement) that are common in diabetics are independently associated with a higher risk for Alzheimer’s disease. A 2016 study of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) concluded that Type 2 diabetes “may accelerate cognition deterioration in patients with MCI by affecting glucose metabolism and brain volume.” Another 2016 study found that “glucose levels in the diabetic range are associated with reduced cortical thickness [ a si Continue reading >>

Is Alzheimer’s Really A Form Of Diabetes? 8 Tips From Dr. Hyman On How You May Prevent And Reverse It!

Is Alzheimer’s Really A Form Of Diabetes? 8 Tips From Dr. Hyman On How You May Prevent And Reverse It!

Save Worried about the risk of dementia and memory loss that comes with aging? It might be time to cut out those refined carbohydrates and embrace healthy fats in your diet. Dr. Mark Hyman explains the risks and dangers of Alzheimer’s disease (what he calls “Type 3 diabetes”), and how unbalanced blood sugar levels may be a trigger. Here, Dr. Hyman explains what you need to know about memory loss, its complex relationship with diet, and, to top it off, a perfectly tailored list of 8 tips for modifying your diet and lifestyle to prevent or even reverse dementia. “My parents are getting older and I want to do everything I can to help them prevent Alzheimer’s, considering both my grandmothers had this disease, and I am worried about getting it too.” writes this week’s housecall. “What can we do to prevent dementia?” Here’s the bad news/good news. Maintaining a diet with excessive sugar and refined carbs can ultimately lead to pre-dementia and dementia. But eliminating the sugar and refined carbs and incorporating appropriate, healthy fat can prevent, and even reverse pre-dementia and early dementia. It’s true- the right diet can heal! Unfortunately, dementia is a widespread issue that is only increasing in prevalence on a daily basis. Statistically, the outlook doesn’t look good. Alzheimer’s is currently the seventh leading cause of death. Ten percent of 65-year-olds, 25 percent of 75-year-olds, and 50 percent of 85-year-olds will develop dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. Sadly, the 85-year-old population is where the prevalence is increasing the fastest. By 2050, it is estimated that 106 million people will have an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. The connection between sugar and Alzheimer’s Did you know that researchers are nicknaming Alzheimer’s Continue reading >>

Is Alzheimer’s Type 3 Diabetes?

Is Alzheimer’s Type 3 Diabetes?

Just in case you need another reason to cut back on junk food, it now turns out that Alzheimer’s could well be a form of diet-induced diabetes. That’s the bad news. The good news is that laying off soda, doughnuts, processed meats and fries could allow you to keep your mind intact until your body fails you. We used to think there were two types of diabetes: the type you’re born with (Type 1) and the type you “get.” That’s called Type 2, and was called “adult onset” until it started ravaging kids. Type 2 is brought about by a combination of factors, including overeating, American-style. The idea that Alzheimer’s might be Type 3 diabetes has been around since 2005, but the connection between poor diet and Alzheimer’s is becoming more convincing, as summarized in a cover story in New Scientist entitled “Food for Thought: What You Eat May Be Killing Your Brain.” (The graphic — a chocolate brain with a huge piece missing — is creepy. But for the record: chocolate is not the enemy.) The studies [1] are increasingly persuasive, and unsurprising when you understand the role of insulin in the body. So, a brief lesson. We all need insulin: in non-diabetics, it’s released to help cells take in the blood sugar (glucose) they need for energy. But the cells can hold only so much; excess sugar is first stored as glycogen, and — when there’s enough of that — as fat. (Blood sugar doesn’t come only from sugar, but from carbohydrates of all kinds; easily digested carbohydrates flood the bloodstream with sugar.) Insulin not only keeps the blood vessels that supply the brain healthy, it also encourages the brain’s neurons to absorb glucose, and allows those neurons to change and become stronger. Low insulin levels in the brain mean reduced brain funct Continue reading >>

Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease Is Easier Than You Think

Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease Is Easier Than You Think

Do you have insulin resistance? If you don’t know, you’re not alone. This is perhaps the single most important question any of us can ask about our physical and mental health—yet most patients, and even many doctors, don’t know how to answer it. Here in the U.S., insulin resistance has reached epidemic proportions: more than half of us are now insulin resistant. Insulin resistance is a hormonal condition that sets the stage throughout the body for inflammation and overgrowth, disrupts normal cholesterol and fat metabolism, and gradually destroys our ability to process carbohydrates. Insulin resistance puts us at high risk for many undesirable diseases, including obesity, heart disease, cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Scarier still, researchers now understand that insulin resistance is the driving force behind most cases of garden-variety Alzheimer’s Disease. What is insulin resistance? Insulin is a powerful metabolic hormone that orchestrates how cells access and process vital nutrients, including sugar (glucose). In the body, one of insulin’s responsibilities is to unlock muscle and fat cells so they can absorb glucose from the bloodstream. When you eat something sweet or starchy that causes your blood sugar to spike, the pancreas releases insulin to usher the excess glucose out of the bloodstream and into cells. If blood sugar and insulin spike too high too often, cells will try to protect themselves from overexposure to insulin’s powerful effects by toning down their response to insulin—they become “insulin resistant.” In an effort to overcome this resistance, the pancreas releases even more insulin into the blood to try to keep glucose moving into cells. The more insulin levels rise, the more insulin resistant cells become. Over time, this vicious c Continue reading >>

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