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Type 3 Diabetes Diet

How To Prevent Alzheimer’s & Type 3 Diabetes

How To Prevent Alzheimer’s & Type 3 Diabetes

Some experts are calling Alzheimer’s disease (AD) “Type 3 diabetes,” because it relates to problems with insulin function. Preventing this condition combines good diabetes self-management with care for the brain. Alzheimer’s is a progressive disease that destroys memory and other important mental functions. People with Type 2 diabetes are 50–65% more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than people with normal blood sugars. Approximately half of people with Type 2 will go on to develop Alzheimer’s in their lifetime. Thinking of Type 3 diabetes as another complication of Type 2 gives some ideas on how to prevent it. Here are 10 possible approaches for avoiding Alzheimer’s disease: 1. Diabetes medications might help. Metformin seems to. A study at Tulane University followed 6,000 veterans with diabetes and showed that the longer a person used metformin, the lower his chances of developing Alzheimer’s and other dementias. People who took metformin for more than 4 years had only one quarter the risk of these diseases. Newer diabetes drugs in the class known as GLP-1 receptor agonists have been found to improve memory and prevent Alzheimer’s changes in mice and preliminary human studies. 2. Food plays a significant role. Unfortunately, different experts have different prescriptions on what to eat. Dr. Mark Hyman, author of The Blood Sugar Solution, says, “Balance your blood sugar with a whole-foods, low-glycemic diet. You can achieve this by taking out the bad stuff (refined carbs, sugar, alcohol, caffeine, processed foods, dairy, and inflammatory, omega-6 rich oils) and putting in the good stuff (healthy fats like avocados, walnuts, almonds and cashews, grass-fed meats, pastured chicken and eggs, olive and coconut oil).” Neal Barnard, director of th Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

What Is Type 3 Diabetes?

What Is Type 3 Diabetes?

At first blush, it may be hard to imagine a connection between type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia. But it’s real—and it’s so strong that some experts are now referring to it as type 3 diabetes or brain diabetes. By any name, it’s the progression from type 2 diabetes to Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia marked by memory deficits and a dramatic decline in cognitive function. While all people with diabetes have a 60 percent increased risk of developing any type of dementia, including Alzheimer’s, recent research suggests that women with type 2 diabetes have a 19 percent greater risk of a certain type, known as vascular dementia (which is caused by problems with blood supply to the brain) than men do. Overall, older adults with type 2 diabetes suffer from greater declines in working memory and executive functioning (a set of mental processes that involve planning, organization, controlling attention, and flexible thinking) than their peers do. Granted, not everyone who has type 2 diabetes will develop Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, or any other form of dementia, and there are many people who have Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia who don’t have diabetes, notes Gary Small, M.D., a professor of psychiatry at the UCLA Semel Institute and author of The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program. But the reality is, “these risk factors tend to add up: If you have diabetes, that doubles the risk of developing Alzheimer’s. If you have a first-degree relative—a parent or sibling, for example—with Alzheimer’s, that doubles your risk.” And if you have poorly controlled blood pressure, abdominal (a.k.a., central) obesity, or sleep apnea, your risk of developing dementia is increased even more. Surprisin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Types – A Guide To Type 1, Type 2 & Type 3 Diabetes

Diabetes Types – A Guide To Type 1, Type 2 & Type 3 Diabetes

There are three diabetes types that go by the name type 1, type 2 and type 3. Each can have serious and even life-threatening consequences. This guide shares information about three diabetes types to help you better understand this condition called diabetes. "An estimated 23.6 million people in the United States—7.8 percent of the population—have diabetes, a serious, lifelong condition. Of those, 17.9 million have been diagnosed, and 5.7 million have not yet been diagnosed".(1) Of the diabetes types, most people are familiar with type 1 and type 2. These types of diabetes result due to issues with insulin production within the pancreas or insulin uptake by the body cells. Type 3 diabetes is connected to newly discovered insulin production in the brain. In type 1 diabetes the body does not produce insulin due to a problem with the beta cells of the pancreas. Because type 1 diabetes can be diagnosed in children and young adults it is still commonly referred to as juvenile diabetes. A person with type 1 diabetes cannot control their blood sugar level without daily insulin supplementation. Insulin can be administered as an injection under the skin or through an insulin pump. Type 1diabetes and type 2 diabetes have similar symptoms including excessive thirst, more frequent urination, increased hunger, unexplained weight loss, chronic fatigue and possibly blurred vision. However, type 2 diabetes differs from type 1 as far as cause and treatment. Type 2 diabetes is the most common of the diabetes types and develops slowly over time as a person’s body cells build a resistance to insulin. This resistance makes it difficult for insulin to move sugar out of the blood and this can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels. Patients with type 2 diabetes do not typically requ Continue reading >>

Type 3 Diabetes: An Alias For Alzheimer's Disease?

Type 3 Diabetes: An Alias For Alzheimer's Disease?

Dr. Shivam Patel has graduated from Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM) School of Pharmacy with a Doctor of Pharmacy degree. He is a PGY1 Pharmacy Resident at Martinsburg VA Medical Center. His professional interests include critical care, infectious disease, and ambulatory care. After completion of his PGY1 residency, Dr. Patel hopes to continue to serve veterans and become a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist. When you see the term “type 3 diabetes,” one may think it’s simply another type or form of diabetes. This is at least what I thought when Dr. Ronald Peterman, a clinical pharmacy specialist, initially introduced me to this topic. I would have never thought that type 3 diabetes was an alias for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Impaired insulin and insulin growth factor (IGF) production seems to play a role in the development of AD. Just like there are insulin genes being expressed in our pancreas, an insulin gene is also expressed in the adult human brain.1 Appropriately controlling blood glucose may not only prevent diabetic complications such as neuropathy, but could also potentially reduce enhancing patient progression to AD. A study showed that type 2 diabetes and impaired fasting glucose occur significantly more frequently in patients with AD than in patients that did not have AD.1 People that have insulin resistance, in particular those with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of suffering from Alzheimer's disease estimated to be between 50% and 65% higher.2 A patient with diabetes may be at an increased risk of developing AD, but no direct causation has been found. It was found that diffuse and neuritic plaques were similarly abundant in the brains of patients with type 2 diabetes and no type 2 diabetes.1 Neurofibrillary tangles, common charact Continue reading >>

Paleo And Alzheimer’s: All About “type 3 Diabetes”

Paleo And Alzheimer’s: All About “type 3 Diabetes”

You might have heard Alzheimer’s disease described as “Type 3 Diabetes,” implying that it’s another “disease of civilization,” a consequence of the modern diet and lifestyle more than anything else. The “Diabetes” label in particular makes it seem like Alzheimer’s is all about the carbs. But it’s actually more complicated than that (isn’t it always?). Alzheimer’s Disease probably does have something to do with dietary carbs, but it’s much more complicated than “insulin wrecks your brain.” And it also has connections to other parts of the modern diet, especially overload of Omega-6 fats. So here’s a look at Alzheimer’s from a Paleo perspective, focusing on the potential role of diet in long-term prevention and therapy. This post is not an explanation of how to “cure” Alzheimer’s Disease, or even what causes it, and if you meet anyone trying to tell you either of those things, they’re probably lying. It’s just a look at some possible connections between diet and Alzheimer’s What Is Alzheimer’s Disease? Alzheimer’s Disease is a progressive, age-related brain disease that starts off by causing forgetfulness and confusion and progresses to more serious problems like mood, language, and behavioral issues. A few people get it earlier, but it’s primarily found in people in their 60s and up. Alzheimer’s isn’t just an extension of normal age-related forgetfulness, though. In Alzheimer’s Disease, neurons in the brain actually die – this doesn’t happen in normal aging, even though most people’s brains do shrink a little bit with age. In most cases of Alzheimer’s, nobody’s really sure what causes it – we can identify hallmark signs of the disease (amyloid-beta plaques and tangled proteins) and certain genes that m Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing www.apa.org something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. To request an unblock, please fill out the form below and we will review it as soon as possible. You reached this page when attempting to access from 35.225.250.211 on 2017-12-30 04:26:38 UTC. Trace: 51e4c419-75e5-4626-ae77-f93feed456f1 via 6c165df1-229c-45f6-93e6-eafce89e5297 Continue reading >>

About Diabetes Type 3

About Diabetes Type 3

Diabetes Type 3—which is regarded as “brain” specific diabetes—is a dangerous diabetes hybrid that was first discovered in 2005. A study, which was conducted at Brown University Medical School, suggests the brain produces insulin in a way that’s similar to the pancreas. A problem with insulin production in the brain is thought to result in the formation of protein “plaque”—not unlike that which is found among suffers of Type 1 (insulin-dependant) and Type 2 diabetes (insulin-resistant). But in the case of diabetes Type 3, plaque appears in the brain and leads to memory loss and problems forming memories. Video of the Day When it comes to the body, insulin is responsible for helping to convert food to energy. The brain uses insulin, too, but it’s thought insulin’s primary purpose in the brain is to form memories at synapses (the spaces where cells in the brain communicate), notes Time.com. Neurons save space for insulin receptors; insulin makes way for memories to form. In order for the brain to keep making more brain cells, it needs insulin. When insulin receptors flee—as is the case with sufferers of diabetes Type 3—the brain does not receive the energy it needs to form memories. Alzheimer’s Connection According to a research team at Northwestern University, insulin may prevent or slow memory loss among those with Alzheimer’s disease by protecting the synapses that form memory. Those with the disease tend to have lower insulin levels and are insulin-resistant. The team found that the reason memory fails when insulin shortage occurs is because amyloid beta-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs) destroy the receptors in the brain that typically are reserved for insulin, thus making the receptors insulin-resistant. Without the space for insulin, re Continue reading >>

Alzheimer’s Disease—yes, It’s Preventable!

Alzheimer’s Disease—yes, It’s Preventable!

An estimated 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, and an estimated 600,000 more may suffer from an often misdiagnosed subtype called "hippocampal sparing" Alzheimer’s Since there’s no conventional cure, the issue of prevention is absolutely critical if you want to avoid becoming an Alzheimer’s statistic. Evidence points to lifestyle factors, primarily diet, as the driving forces of dementia Fat avoidance and carbohydrate overconsumption are at the heart of the Alzheimer’s epidemic Risk of Alzheimer’s is doubled in type 2 diabetics. Alzheimer’s has even been dubbed “type 3 diabetes,” as the disease involves a lack of brain-produced insulin Heart disease also increases your risk of dementia, as arterial stiffness is associated with the buildup of beta-amyloid plaque in your brain, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease By Dr. Mercola An estimated 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease, a severe form of dementia,1 and hundreds of thousands more may suffer from an often misdiagnosed subtype called "hippocampal sparing" Alzheimer's, according to recent findings.2 The most recent data3, 4 suggests that well over half a million Americans die from Alzheimer's disease each year, making it the third leading cause of death in the US, right behind heart disease and cancer. As discussed by Dr. Danielle Ofri in a recent New York Times blog,5 losing your mind, and with it, much of your personality and dignity, is a terrifying proposition. Making matters worse, many doctors shy away from addressing dementia—both with colleagues and their patients. The reasons are many. Dr. Ofri suggests Alzheimer's strikes at the emotional heart of many clinicians, whose careers depend on the stability and functioning of their own minds and intelligence. In short, it f Continue reading >>

5 Things You Can Do To Avoid High Blood Sugar Messing With Your Memory

5 Things You Can Do To Avoid High Blood Sugar Messing With Your Memory

Diabetes of the brain? It’s not so far-fetched.1 When Brown University neuropathologist Suzanne de la Monte, MD, first called Alzheimer’s disease “Type 3 Diabetes”2 a decade ago, dementia experts rushed in to criticize the theory. But a growing stack of research suggests that insulin resistance in the brain helps fuel the plaques, tangles and signal breakdowns of this progressive disease—even in people who do not have diabetes. Your brain needs plenty of blood sugar—glucose—for everything from balancing your checkbook to remembering your new neighbor’s name to running thousands of body functions, 24/7. But when brain cells stop obeying insulin’s commands to absorb blood sugar in a normal way, there’s trouble—especially, research shows, in areas most vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease. In a recent Iowa State study of 150 middle-aged people with a family history of Alzheimer’s, those with insulin resistance used less glucose in the hippocampus, a key area for learning and memory storage.3 It was an early warning. The study volunteers didn’t have serious memory problems. But the researchers saw changes in an area typically hit hard in later life by the brain disease. "Brain insulin resistance is very much like regular diabetes, just happening in a different part of the body," de la Monte says. “There’s a growing consensus that insulin’s very important here, for many reasons.” Brain Breakdown Insulin, she says, “is a gate-keeper in the brain. It sends glucose into cells. But it’s also involved with the production of neurotransmitters – chemicals that send messages between brain cells. It keeps cells and the cables that carry information around in the brain – the white matter – alive. When glucose can’t get into cells, there’s Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin Resistance?

What Is Insulin Resistance?

IInsulin resistance — also known as syndrome X — happens when your body can no longer use insulin effectively to manage the amount of sugar you’re taking in from carbohydrates like white bread, pasta and cookies. Here’s what happens: 1. Simple carbs are broken down by your digestive system into sugar, or glucose. 2. Your body releases insulin to signal your cells to take in glucose from carbs. 3. If you eat too many simple carbs, you take in more sugar than your body needs, which leads to excess amounts of glucose. 4. Your body then churns out more and more insulin as it tries to get the glucose out of your blood and into your cells. 5. Soon, you produce too much insulin and your cells stop responding to it — now you are insulin resistant. 6. You will notice symptoms of insulin resistance such as obesity, high blood pressure and high cholesterol but you may not connect them to the real root of the problem. If this pattern continues, your insulin resistance will put you on the path to prediabetes, followed by type 2 diabetes and all the other health issues that go along with it. Insulin resistance in women Insulin resistance is extremely common though many women are still shocked to learn they already have it, or even prediabetes. Experts estimate that more than 80 million of us already have insulin resistance though we believe the percentage is much higher among perimenopausal women. Since insulin is one of the “major” hormones, it affects other “minor” hormones and how they behave. When insulin is imbalanced, it impossible for your body to balance its minor hormones, including estrogen, progesterone and testosterone, until healthy insulin metabolism is restored. So if you have hot flashes and other perimenopause symptoms, and you are insulin resistant Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

What Exactly Is Type 3 Diabetes?

What Exactly Is Type 3 Diabetes?

According to Dr. Mark Hyman, a well-known physician/author who focuses on diabetes, heart disease and diet, “10% of 65 year olds, 25% of 75 year olds and 50% of 85 year olds will develop dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.” Along with diabetes and obesity, it is a global epidemic. Alzheimer’s is the top form of dementia and now the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Alzheimer’s is a brain disease that is progressive, often starts with forgetfulness and confusion, in which the brain’s nerve cells degenerate. It can then affect personalities, moods and language leading to behavior issues in the patient. It is not considered “natural aging.” There is gene involvement but only 5% of cases are directly related to genes. The main causes seem to involve oxidative stress as well as systemic inflammation. Some of it is aging but it also encompasses lifestyle which contributes to brain health. “The medical community has yet to identify a specific cause and there is no effective long term treatment.” Scientists have been referring to Alzheimer’s as type 3 diabetes since 2005 since “people with type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s.” The connection seems to be insulin resistance which also relates to lifestyle. According to The Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology “currently there is rapid growth pointing toward insulin resistance as mediators of Alzheimer’s neuro-degeneration.” Experts at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health conclude that insulin resistance can be reduced by “limiting added sugars, refined carbohydrates and processed foods while eating balanced meals that focus on lean proteins, non-starchy above ground vegetables, pulses[beans], and remaining physically active.” These recommendatio Continue reading >>

Your Brain On A Doughnut

Your Brain On A Doughnut

Step away from the doughnuts—if not for your body, then for your brain. There’s growing evidence that eating sugary, processed foods can trigger what some experts are calling "Type 3 Diabetes": brain-altering Alzheimer’s disease. While the concept of Alzheimer’s as brain diabetes isn't new to some researchers, it recently gained attention after prominent food writer Mark Bittman covered the topic in a New York Times column. So what is it exactly? Suzanne de La Monte, MD, a neuropathologist at Brown University whose team coined the term type 3 diabetes says that, according to her research, consuming too much sugar can lead to insulin resistance in the brain—a very bad thing. “We found that by making the brains of rats insulin resistant, the rats developed an Alzheimer-like disease pattern, including neurodegeneration,” she says. More from Prevention: 12 Ways To Never Get Diabetes A biology refresher: Our cells need glucose from food for energy. Insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas, helps cells take in glucose from the bloodstream, which the cells then metabolize for energy. If there’s an excess of glucose in the bloodstream—from, say, your Dunkin Donuts habit—your pancreas will produce more insulin to keep up. Your cells, however, can become resistant to the increased insulin, which means that they won't get enough energy and start to deteriorate. Starved brain cells can result in memory loss and confusion—the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s. “This problem is all about prevention,” Dr. de la Monte says. “The public health answer is to stop obesity at the youngest possible age by impressing upon parents the need to not over-feed children or feed them fast or processed foods.” But it’s not too late for adults to safeguard their health. Dr. Continue reading >>

Is Alzheimer’s Type 3 Diabetes?

Is Alzheimer’s Type 3 Diabetes?

Just in case you need another reason to cut back on junk food, it now turns out that Alzheimer’s could well be a form of diet-induced diabetes. That’s the bad news. The good news is that laying off soda, doughnuts, processed meats and fries could allow you to keep your mind intact until your body fails you. We used to think there were two types of diabetes: the type you’re born with (Type 1) and the type you “get.” That’s called Type 2, and was called “adult onset” until it started ravaging kids. Type 2 is brought about by a combination of factors, including overeating, American-style. The idea that Alzheimer’s might be Type 3 diabetes has been around since 2005, but the connection between poor diet and Alzheimer’s is becoming more convincing, as summarized in a cover story in New Scientist entitled “Food for Thought: What You Eat May Be Killing Your Brain.” (The graphic — a chocolate brain with a huge piece missing — is creepy. But for the record: chocolate is not the enemy.) The studies [1] are increasingly persuasive, and unsurprising when you understand the role of insulin in the body. So, a brief lesson. We all need insulin: in non-diabetics, it’s released to help cells take in the blood sugar (glucose) they need for energy. But the cells can hold only so much; excess sugar is first stored as glycogen, and — when there’s enough of that — as fat. (Blood sugar doesn’t come only from sugar, but from carbohydrates of all kinds; easily digested carbohydrates flood the bloodstream with sugar.) Insulin not only keeps the blood vessels that supply the brain healthy, it also encourages the brain’s neurons to absorb glucose, and allows those neurons to change and become stronger. Low insulin levels in the brain mean reduced brain funct Continue reading >>

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