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Type 2 Diabetes Foods To Avoid List

''free'' Foods For Diabetes

''free'' Foods For Diabetes

A List of Foods That Don't Impact Blood Sugar In diabetes meal planning, blood sugar control is the main goal. Typically, people with diabetes are advised to follow carbohydrate-controlled diets in order to minimize blood sugar spikes and manage their disease. Since many foods contain carbohydrates, this can be a challenge. One must learn not only which foods contain carbohydrates, but how to control those portion sizes and divide the carbohydrate foods appropriately into meals and snacks for the day. During this process of learning and planning, you may also hear about "free foods." In the diabetes world, ''free'' foods are defined as foods (or drinks) that contribute a very small amount of carbohydrates and are also very low in calories. There are two categories of ''free'' foods. Category #1: Even though this group is called "free," people with diabetes cannot eat them with reckless abandon (the name is slightly misleading). Rather, these foods are considered "free" because when eaten in specified portions, they do not need to be added to a person's allotted carbohydrate amount for a meal or snack. That's because these particular foods, although they may contain a small amount of carbohydrates, have a very minimal impact on blood sugar levels. In order for a food or drink to be in this category (and not count as a carbohydrate food in diabetes meal planning), it must contain fewer than 5 grams of carbohydrates and less than 20 calories per serving. These foods should be limited to no more than 3 servings per day, spread throughout the day. If all three servings were eaten at the same meal or snack, the food would in fact impact (raise) your blood glucose levels. Refer to the serving sizes listed in the charts below--not the food label--to measure proper serving sizes Continue reading >>

10 Nutrition Tips For Managing Cancer And Diabetes

10 Nutrition Tips For Managing Cancer And Diabetes

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, and of the more than 13 million Americans who have or have had cancer, eight to 18 percent also have diabetes. It’s an eye-opening statistic and a reminder about why it’s important to be proactive about our overall health and well-being during and after cancer treatment. “Because of the huge link between insulin resistance and cancer, it is critically important for people who have diabetes to manage their blood glucose during cancer treatment,” adds Brooke McIntyre, a clinical oncology dietitian and diabetes program coordinator at CTCA in Tulsa. McIntyre recommends the following tips to help manage cancer and diabetes: Never eat a “naked” carbohydrate. Funny statement, but people remember it! Rather than eating only an apple, eat a handful of nuts or one to two tablespoons of nut butter too. This helps decrease the rise in blood sugar and makes you feel more satisfied. Eat fewer carbohydrates. Decreasing carbohydrate intake not only lowers blood sugar, but can also help lower blood pressure. Eat more veggies, fruits and whole grains. Eating cancer-fighting foods high in fiber can help regulate blood sugar. Foods to add to your diet include: Asian pears, raspberries, blackberries, bananas, blueberries, beans, broccoli, spinach, lentils, peas, corn, flax seeds and whole-grain breads or crackers. Exercise regularly. The American Institute for Cancer Research and the American Diabetes Association recommend 30 minutes of physical activity five days a week to lower risk of cancer recurrence. Add healthy fats to your diet. Say “no” to doughnuts and fried chicken and “hello” to healthy fats such as avocado, salmon and walnuts. Good fats contain antioxidants, help you maintain a steady blood sugar level and feel Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid In Diabetes In Hindi Iडायबिटीज में क्या न खाएi

Foods To Avoid In Diabetes In Hindi Iडायबिटीज में क्या न खाएi

1. Foods to Avoid in Diabetes 2. White Rice for Diabetes • The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the whitest rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. www.herbaldaily.in 3. Blended Coffees for Diabetes • Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. www.herbaldaily.in 4. Chinese Foods for Diabetes • High-calorie, high fat, high-sodium, and high-carb Chinese food dishes can spike blood sugar dramatically and keep it high for a while. The biggest offenders include fried entrees such as orange chicken and sweet and sour dishes, which contain breading and are served swimming in a sugary sauce. www.herbaldaily.in 5. Breakfast Pastries for Diabetes • Avoid doughnuts, toaster pastries, and other bakery sweets if you want to keep your blood sugar under control. They're made from processed white flour and are high in fat, carbs, and sodium. www.herbaldaily.in 6. Coffee Drinks for Diabetes • A simple cup of joe with a little milk or even half-and-half can be a low-calorie beverage perfect for a person with diabetes. But many coffee-shop drinks rival decadent desserts for their high calorie, carb, and fat contents. www.herbaldaily.in 7. Biscuits & Sausage Gravy for Diabetes • Sometimes known as the bad boy on the breakfast buffet, traditional biscuits and gravy is indeed high in calories, fat (particularly saturated fat), and sodium. www.herbaldaily.in 8. Battered Fish Dinners for Diabetes • A typical breaded-fish meal, complete with sid Continue reading >>

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Diabetes is a condition in which your body cannot properly use and store food for energy. The fuel that your body needs is called glucose, a form of sugar. Glucose comes from foods such as fruit, milk, some vegetables, starchy foods and sugar. To control your blood glucose (sugar), you will need to eat healthy foods, be active and you may need to take pills and/or insulin. In the following table, you will find some tips to help you until you see a registered dietitian. Tips for Healthy Eating, Diabetes Prevention and Management Tips Reasons Eat three meals per day at regular times and space meals no more than six hours apart. You may benefit from a healthy snack. Eating at regular times helps your body control blood glucose (sugar) levels. Limit sugars and sweets such as sugar, regular pop, desserts, candies, jam and honey. The more sugar you eat, the higher your blood glucose will be. Artificial sweeteners can be useful. Limit the amount of high-fat food you eat such as fried foods, chips and pastries. High-fat foods may cause you to gain weight. A healthy weight helps with blood glucose (sugar) control and is healthier for your heart. Eat more high-fibre foods such as whole grain breads and cereals, lentils, dried beans and peas, brown rice, vegetables and fruits. Foods high in fibre may help you feel full and may lower blood glucose (sugar) and cholesterol levels. If you are thirsty, drink water. Drinking regular pop and fruit juice will raise your blood glucose (sugar). Add physical activity to your life. Regular physical activity will improve your blood glucose (sugar) control. Plan for healthy eating Using a standard dinner plate, follow the Plate Method in the image below to control your portion sizes. Alcohol can affect blood glucose (sugar) levels and cause you Continue reading >>

Low Carb-high Fat Diet And Diabetes: A Detailed Guide For Beginners

Low Carb-high Fat Diet And Diabetes: A Detailed Guide For Beginners

If you are a regular reader of our site, you would already know that we highly endorse the Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) diet for reversing diabetes, losing weight and improving your overall health and well-being. The reason why a low carb diet for diabetes comes highly recommended by doctors and nutritionists alike is the fact that carbohydrates are the main culprit behind elevated blood sugar levels. Once you eat fewer carbs, it automatically becomes much easier for the body to attain stable blood sugar levels. Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) Diet for Diabetes: Why It Works? Carbohydrates are broken down into simple sugars during digestion. These sugars enter the blood stream and elevate blood sugar levels. As a diabetic, your body either doesn’t produce insulin at all, or doesn’t produce enough insulin to minimize this blood sugar spike before it causes irreplaceable damage to internal organs. This is the reason why your body’s dependence on insulin goes down when you eat lesser carbs. A UK study tried to understand the short-term effects of severe dietary carbohydrate-restriction advice in type 2 diabetes. It found that restricting carbohydrate intake is an effective method to lose weight as well as improve HDL ratios. This was a randomized controlled trial studying 102 patients over a course of 3 months, and the results were published in the Diabetic Medicine in September 2005. Another research group from Duke University Medical Center studying the effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients, found that 95.2% patients had managed to reduce or eliminate their glucose-lowering medication within 6 months of being on a LCHF diet. A low carb diet works very well in lowering blood sugar and insul Continue reading >>

Eat Well!

Eat Well!

When you have diabetes, deciding what, when, and how much to eat may seem challenging. So, what can you eat, and how can you fit the foods you love into your meal plan? Eating healthy food at home and choosing healthy food when eating out are important in managing your diabetes. The first step is to work with your doctor or dietitian to make a meal plan just for you. As soon as you find out you have diabetes, ask for a meeting with your doctor or dietitian to discuss how to make and follow a meal plan. During this meeting, you will learn how to choose healthier foods—a variety of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy foods, lean meats, and other proteins. You will also learn to watch your portion sizes and what to drink while staying within your calorie, fat, and carbohydrate (carbs) limits. You can still enjoy food while eating healthy. But how do you do that? Here are a few tips to help you when eating at home and away from home. Eating Healthy Portions An easy way to know portion sizes is to use the “plate method.” Looking at your basic 9-inch dinner plate[PDF – 14 MB], draw an imaginary line down the middle of the plate, and divide one side in half. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables, like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and carrots. In one of the smaller sections, put a grain or starchy food such as bread, noodles, rice, corn or potatoes. In the other smaller section, put your protein, like fish, chicken, lean beef, tofu, or cooked dried beans. Learn more at Create Your Plate, an interactive resource from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that shows how a healthy plate should look. This tool allows you to select different foods and see the portion sizes you should use in planning your meal Continue reading >>

Fruit List For Diabetics

Fruit List For Diabetics

Often people suffering from diabetes avoid fruits out of fear that the sugar present in fruits could push up their blood sugar level. However, this is a false conception. Most fruits, specifically fruits rich in fibers, are beneficial for reducing the blood sugar level. Sugar present in fruits is usually in the form of fructose. Unlike other forms of sugar, such as sucrose, fructose has low glucemic index. Minimal insulin is needed for the metabolism of fructose. Intake of this fruit sugar is not associated with sudden surge of the blood sugar level. Studies have shown that by reducing cholesterol and triglyceride production, fructose could protect us from diseases such as arteriosclerosis, which leads to heart diseases and stroke. Diabetes bad food includes those that have high glycemic indexes for glucose- which includes those foods that are high in saturated fats and uncontrollably high amounts of sugar in any of its forms- especially sugar from milk. Which brings us back to our main concern- what kinds of fruits can a diabetic eat? Fruits for diabetics are usually those fruits that have high fiber content and have low sugar content. If we take these criteria and apply it, the first fruit that would come to mind would be the high and mighty avocado. But beware; the large avocados have a lot of calories in it- so if you buy the large avocado from florida, make sure you regulate your calorie intake for the rest of the day. Diabetics should NOT eat cooked fruit. Always eat raw fruits in order to reap the benefits. Here's a list of fruits that are beneficial for Diabetics. Any type of wild or organic berry - Seasons: Range All Year Blueberries, Elderberries, Blackberries, Gooseberries, Strawberries etc. There are loads to choose from. You can find their respective season Continue reading >>

Got Pre-diabetes? Here's Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Got Pre-diabetes? Here's Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as having type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an early alert that your diabetes risk is now very high. It is ten to 20 times greater compared to the risk for those with normal blood sugars. What you choose to eat, or avoid, influences this risk. Diabetes Prevention Programs Studies around the world, including Finland, China and the US have shown diabetes prevention programs prevent or delay progression to type 2 diabetes. When people eat more healthily, drop their body weight by 5-10% and walk for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, they lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by about 58% over two years. We recently gave 101 men with pre-diabetes a self-directed diabetes prevention program over six months. We found they were able to reduce their portion size of potato and meat and improve their variety of health foods. They were able to reduce the proportion of energy coming from junk food by 7.6% more than the group who didn't change their diet and got a four-point increase in their scores from the Healthy Eating Quiz. These improved eating patterns were associated with an average weight loss of 5.5kg and better blood sugar regulation. This is great news for the 318 million adults around the world, including two million Australians, who have pre-diabetes. The original diabetes prevention studies started in the 1980s. Back then the advice was to reduce your total kilojoule intake by eating less fat, especially from take-away, processed and fried foods and to eat more foods rich in carbohydrate, such as vegetables, fruit and wholegrains. That advice worked because the world did not have the huge numbers of ultra-processed foods and drinks, many of which Continue reading >>

List Of Good Carbs & Bad Carbs

List Of Good Carbs & Bad Carbs

Carbohydrates provide your body with glucose it needs to function properly. Two types of carbohydrates exist: complex carbohydrates and simple carbohydrates. Foods rich in complex or "good" carbohydrates take time to break down into glucose, while foods high in simple or "bad" carbohydrates convert to glucose very quickly. "Bad" carbohydrates cause blood sugar levels to spike, so knowing which foods to eat and which to avoid can play a role in maintaining your overall health. Whole-Grain Products Whole-grain products such as brown rice, whole-grain pasta, beans, whole wheat bread, whole oats, buckwheat, millet, whole rye, whole-grain barley and whole-grain corn are considered good carbohydrates. These foods are rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients that are beneficial to your health. Also, they have a low glycemic index because they cause a slower change in blood sugar levels. Diets rich in high glycemic index foods cause a rapid rise in blood glucose levels, thereby increasing the risk for diabetes and heart disease. By contrast, foods with a low glycemic index help you achieve a more stable blood sugar and improve weight loss and control Type 2 diabetes. Fruits, Vegetables and Legumes Fruits and vegetables are loaded with vitamins, nutrients and carbohydrates. People who consume about 2,000 calories per day should eat 2 cups of fruit and 2.5 cups of vegetables daily. Legumes such as beans, peas and lentils are high in fiber, carbohydrates and protein and low in fat. Legumes may decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer, reports the Linus Pauling Institute. On a 2,000-calorie daily diet, you should eat 3 cups of legumes a week, according to USDA ChooseMyPlate.gov. Refined Grains, Sweets and Biscuits Refined grains s Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Pcos Diet?

What Is The Best Pcos Diet?

A PCOS diet is crucial role in the management of PCOS, not only for weight loss and maintenance, but also to regulate insulin levels. Many women with PCOS are resistant to insulin, resulting in the pancreas producing more insulin in order to be effective. Insulin and PCOS Insulin is an important hormone as it transports sugar from the blood into the muscles of the body, allowing the body to effectively make use of the energy from glucose. High insulin levels wreak havoc on the body, leading to a lot of the symptoms of PCOS like, increased hair growth, weight gain, skin tags, fatty liver and high cholesterol, polycystic ovaries and an irregular menstrual cycle, not to mention increased hunger levels and cravings. Sounds familiar, doesn’t it? Most of us have many, if not all, of those symptoms. So, management of blood insulin levels is crucial in the management of PCOS. Refined carbohydrates cause a spike in insulin levels and should therefore be avoided. Also, foods that are high in fat will lead to weight gain and high cholesterol. Many doctors will recommend a low GI diet of wholegrain, unprocessed foods in the management of PCOS. Metformin is also a drug commonly prescribed for women with PCOS, in an attempt to tackle insulin resistance. BUT, insulin is not the only hormone impacted by PCOS. If it were, we’d all have been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes, which we have not. So, our diets need to incorporate low GI foods to manage insulin levels, in addition to tackling other aspects of the Polycystic Ovarian SYNDROME. Finding the right diet to tackle your PCOS is a highly individual and complex process as the underlying cause of PCOS and different hormone levels will vary from woman to woman. Here are some of the general PCOS diet guidelines: THRIVE WITH PCOS - FREE Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: The Essentials

Type 2 Diabetes: The Essentials

The 5 most important changes to make. The 4 steps to build a meal. What to order when you eat out. Grab-and-go snacks. Diabetes is Australia’s fastest growing chronic health problem, with nearly 1.7 million afflicted by the disease. This will almost double to 3.3 million people by 2031. People with type 2 diabetes are 2–4 times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease than people who don’t have the disease; and more than twice as likely to have a heart attack or stroke. But it’s not all doom and gloom – controlling blood glucose levels and maintaining a healthy lifestyle can significantly reduce the complications associated with type 2 diabetes. You don’t have to be a saint to make a difference to your health, either, research shows. These five changes will well and truly have you on your way. 1. Switch to low-GI carbohydrates Low-GI carbohydrates are slowly digested by the body, meaning they trickle glucose into your bloodstream, instead of quickly bursting into your system. Research shows that a low-GI diet can improve blood glucose control in people with type 2 diabetes. A review of 10 studies published in Diabetes Care found that subjects who followed a low-GI diet for just 10 weeks had significant reductions in HbA1c levels, compared with people following a high-GI diet. Including just one low-GI carbohydrate at each meal and snack can make a noticeable difference. Low-GI foods include: wholegrain bread, pasta, basmati rice, apples, pears and low-fat yoghurt. Find more information on low-GI food on our website, or head to www.glycemicindex.com to find the GI values of specific foods. Look for foods with a glycemic index of 55 or less. 2. Eat at least two serves of wholegrains daily Upping your intake of wholegrains is a must for type 2 diabetes suf Continue reading >>

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both Continue reading >>

Processed Foods: What's Ok And What To Avoid

Processed Foods: What's Ok And What To Avoid

Processed food has a bad reputation as a diet saboteur. It's blamed for our nation's obesity epidemic, high blood pressure and the rise of Type 2 diabetes. But processed food is more than boxed macaroni and cheese, potato chips and drive-thru hamburgers. It may be a surprise to learn that whole-wheat bread, homemade soup or a chopped apple also are processed foods. While some processed foods should be consumed with caution, many actually have a place in a balanced diet. Here's how to sort the nutritious from the not-so-nutritious. What Is Processed Food? "The term processed food includes any food that has been purposely changed in some way prior to consumption," says Torey Armul, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "It includes food that has been cooked, canned, frozen, packaged or changed in nutritional composition with fortifying, preserving or preparing in different ways." For example, Armul considers white bread refined since most of the healthy fiber has been removed during the processing. "Any time we cook, bake or prepare food, we're processing food. It's also the origin of the term 'food processor,' which can be a helpful and convenient tool for preparing healthy meals." Processed food falls on a spectrum from minimally to heavily processed: Minimally processed foods — such as bagged spinach, cut vegetables and roasted nuts — often are simply pre-prepped for convenience. Foods processed at their peak to lock in nutritional quality and freshness include canned tomatoes, frozen fruit and vegetables, and canned tuna. Foods with ingredients added for flavor and texture (sweeteners, spices, oils, colors and preservatives) include jarred pasta sauce, salad dressing, yogurt and cake mixes. Ready-to-eat foods — such as cra Continue reading >>

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Know What to Avoid Diabetes requires daily maintenance, including monitoring your blood sugar, eating a healthy diet, exercising, and of course staying on top of any complications with your heart, eyes, and other organs. Controlling your weight is another key aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. If you’re overweight, losing some weight — even just 10 to 15 pounds — can help improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, reduce triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, and lower your blood pressure. A healthy diet for diabetes will help you manage your weight and lead you toward foods that have a positive effect on your glucose levels, while guiding you away from those foods that are likely to cause dangerous spikes in your blood sugar. Learn which nine foods you should steer clear of if you have type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet

Diabetic Diet

A diabetic diet is a dietary pattern that is used by people with diabetes mellitus or high blood glucose to manage diabetes. There is no single dietary pattern that is best for all people with all types of diabetes. For overweight and obese people with Type 2 diabetes, any weight-loss diet that the person will adhere to and achieve weight loss on is effective.[1][2] Since carbohydrate is the macronutrient that raises blood glucose levels most significantly, the greatest debate is regarding how low in carbohydrates the diet should be. This is because although lowering carbohydrate intake will lead to reduced blood glucose levels, this conflicts with the traditional establishment view that carbohydrates should be the main source of calories. Recommendations of the fraction of total calories to be obtained from carbohydrate are generally in the range of 20% to 45%,[3][4][5] but recommendations can vary as widely as from 16% to 75%.[6] The most agreed-upon recommendation is for the diet to be low in sugar and refined carbohydrates, while relatively high in dietary fiber, especially soluble fiber. People with diabetes are also encouraged to eat small frequent meals a day. Likewise, people with diabetes may be encouraged to reduce their intake of carbohydrates that have a high glycemic index (GI), although this is also controversial.[7] (In cases of hypoglycemia, they are advised to have food or drink that can raise blood glucose quickly, such as a sugary sports drink, followed by a long-acting carbohydrate (such as rye bread) to prevent risk of further hypoglycemia.) Others question the usefulness of the glycemic index and recommend high-GI foods like potatoes and rice. It has been claimed that oleic acid has a slight advantage over linoleic acid in reducing plasma glucose.[ Continue reading >>

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