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Type 2 Diabetes Diet Sheet

Meal Planning Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Meal Planning Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Putting It All Together If you have diabetes, SparkPeople highly recommends that you work directly with a Registered Dietitian or Certified Diabetes Educator to receive comprehensive training in diabetes self-management. Together you can develop a diabetes meal plan based on your health goals, tastes, and lifestyle—as well as the latest guidelines for healthy eating. Below are examples of two different meal planning systems; your registered dietitian can help you decide which is best for you. 1. Carbohydrate Counting is the most accurate meal planning system for controlling blood sugar levels. Essentially, carbohydrate counting is a way to “budget” the amount of carbohydrate eaten at any meal or snack. This method allows you to choose any type of carbohydrate foods, as long as the portion size you choose allows you stay within your goal “budget.” In general, about half of your daily calories should come from carbohydrate foods. However, if you have diabetes, it is important to eat roughly the same amount of carbohydrate at each meal. Commonly recommended “budgets” are 30 to 45 grams (2 to 3 servings) of carbohydrate per meal for women and 45 to 60 grams (3-4 servings) per meal for men. Both women and men should limit snacks to 15 to 30 grams (1 to 2 servings) of carbohydrates. (Click here for a printable reference chart of carbohydrate servings.) Your Registered Dietitian will determine the right amount of carbohydrates for you, along with guidelines for protein and fat intake. In addition to carbohydrate budgeting, it is important to space your meals and snacks evenly throughout the day to keep blood sugar levels stable. Experts recommend waiting at least two hours (but no more than five hours) between meals and snacks during the day. This will help preve Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Sulfonylureas, for example, glimepiride (Amaryl) and glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Meglitinides, for example, nateglinide (Starlix) and repaglinide (Prandin) Thiazolidinediones, for example, pioglitazone (Actos) DPP-4 inhibitors, for example, sitagliptin (Januvia) and linagliptin (Tradjenta) What types of foods are recommended for a type 2 diabetes meal plan? A diabetes meal plan can follow a number of different patterns and have a variable ratio of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The carbohydrates consumed should be low glycemic load and come primarily from vegetables. The fat and proteins consumed should primarily come from plant sources. What type of carbohydrates are recommended for a type 2 diabetic diet plan? Carbohydrates (carbs) are the primary food that raises blood sugar. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure the impact of a carbohydrate on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. The main factors that determine a food's (or meal's) glycemic load are the amount of fiber, fat, and protein it contains. The difference between glycemic index and glycemic load is that glycemic index is a standardized measurement and glycemic load accounts for a real-life portion size. For example, the glycemic index of a bowl of peas is 68 (per 100 grams) but its glycemic load is just 16 (lower the better). If you just referred to the glycemic index, you'd think peas were a bad choice, but in reality, you wouldn't eat 100 grams of peas. With a normal portion size, peas have a healthy glycemic load as well as being an excellent source of pro Continue reading >>

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes prevention is proven, possible, and powerful. Taking small steps, such as eating less and moving more to lose weight, can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and related health problems. The information below is based on the NIH-sponsored Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) research study, which showed that people could prevent or delay type 2 diabetes even if they were at high risk for the disease. Follow these steps to get started on your game plan. If you are overweight, set a weight-loss goal that you can reach. Try to lose at least 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, a 10-percent weight-loss goal means that you will try to lose 20 pounds. Research shows that you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being more active each day. Find ways to be active every day. Start slowly and add more activity until you get to at least 30 minutes of physical activity, like a brisk walk, 5 days a week. Keep track of your progress to help you reach your goals. Use your phone, a printed log, online tracker, app, or other device to record your weight, what you eat and drink, and how long you are active. Ask your health care team about steps you can take to prevent type 2 diabetes. Learn about other ways to help reach your goal, such as taking the medicine metformin. Also, ask if your health insurance covers services for weight loss or physical activity. It’s not easy to make and stick to lifelong changes in what you eat and how often you are active. Get your friends and family involved by asking them to support your changes. You can also join a diabetes prevention program to meet other people who are making similar changes. Set a weight-loss goal If you are ov Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating For Diabetes And Pregnancy Nutrition And Dietetics Department

Healthy Eating For Diabetes And Pregnancy Nutrition And Dietetics Department

Patient information ©Barts Health NHS Trust Switchboard: 020 3416 5000 www.bartshealth.nhs.uk Name: Date: Dietitian: Contact Number: Hospital site: Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) Please contact us if you need general information or advice about Trust services. www.bartshealth.nhs.uk/pals Large print and other languages For this leaflet in large print, please speak to your clinical team. For help interpreting this leaflet in other languages, please ring 020 8223 8934. Te informacje mogÄ… zostać na żądanie przedstawione w formatach alternatywnych, takich jak Å‚atwy do czytania lub dużą czcionkÄ…, i w różnych jÄ™zykach. Prosimy o kontakt pod numerem 02082238934. Macluumaadkan waxaa lagu heli karaa qaabab kale, sida akhriska fudud ama daabacaadda wayn, oo waxaa lagu heli karaa luqaddo kale, marka la codsado. Fadlan la xidhiidh 02082238934. à¦à¦‡ , ঠ। 02082238934। Bu bilgiler, okuması kolay veya büyük baskılar gibi alternatif biçimlerde ve talep üzerine alternatif dillerde de sunulabilir. Ä°rtibat için lütfen 02082238934 numaralı telefondan ulaşın. ÙˆÙØŒ میں دستیاب کرایا جا سکتا اس معلومات Ú©Ùˆ متبادل Ø´Ú©Ù„ØŒ جیسے، Ù¾Ú‘Ú¾Ù†Û’ میں آسان یا بڑے Øر ÛÛ’ØŒ اور درخواست کرنے پر اسے متبادل زبان میں بھی دستیاب کرایا جا سکتا ÛÛ’Û” Ø¨Ø±Ø§Û Ù…Ûربانی پر Ø±Ø§Ø¨Ø·Û Ú©Ø±� Continue reading >>

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates Blood glucose is affected most by carbohydrates. And insulin dosing is typically based on food intake, especially carbohydrates. Knowing what foods contain carbohydrates and the amount of carbohydrates in a meal is helpful for blood glucose control. You should aim to include carbohydrates in each meal. Carbohydrate sources like vegetables, fruits and whole grains (high fiber) are preferred over carbohydrate sources with added fats, sugars and salt. Proteins are a necessary part of a balanced diet and can keep you from feeling hungry. They also do not raise your blood glucose like carbohydrates. However, to prevent weight gain, use portion control with proteins. In people with Type 2 diabetes, protein makes insulin work faster, so it may not be a good idea to treat low blood sugar with protein shakes or mixes. Fats Fats are a necessary part of a balanced diet, especially healthy fats like olive oil and fatty fish. The five food groups Some people believe that a diabetes diagnosis means “goodbye” to good food. Not so. Having diabetes does not mean that you can no longer enjoy good food, or that you have to give up your favorite foods. Living with diabetes means eating regular, healthy meals from the following five food groups: Grains and starches Vegetables Fruits Milk & alternatives Meat & alternatives Making healthy food choices Your dietitian or diabetes educator can help you to develop an eating plan that is right for you and fits into your lifestyle. Here are some guidelines for healthy eating: Healthy eating for diabetes is healthy eating for the whole family. Enjoy having regular meals, starting with breakfast first, then lunch and dinner. Space meals no more than 6 hours apart. Eat a variety of foods in each meal, including healthy fats, lean mea Continue reading >>

Basic Diabetic Menu For One Week

Basic Diabetic Menu For One Week

Please note that this menu is not intended for patients with type 1 diabetes (Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus). If you have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you should consult a registered clinical dietitian to work out an individual diabetic diet prescription for you that is tailored to your specific needs, including the type of diabetes you have, any medications you are taking, your age, weight and the amount of physical activity that you do and other possible medical conditions you may have (e.g. obesity, high cholesterol or triglyceride levels, kidney problems, etc). Visit the Association for Dietetics in SA website and click on "Find a Dietitian" to find a dietitian in your area. The following basic diabetic menu is only a guideline. This menu should supply approx. 7500 kJ (1 800 kcal) and 180g of carbohydrate a day, and is intended for active type 2 diabetics of normal weight. Basic diabetic menu Notes: (t = teaspoon or 5g; T = tablespoon or 15g); artificial sweetener can be used in small quantities. MONDAY (Low-fat or skim milk allowance for the day: 560 ml) Breakfast: Up 'n Go instant breakfast in a box, vanilla flavour (1 box) Low-GI seeded brown bread, toasted (1 slice/40g) with 2 t (10g) Lite margarine and Marmite Tea/coffee with low-fat milk from allowance (about 30 ml) Mid-Morning snack: Apple & raisin cake* (½ bar, 25g) Tea/coffee with low-fat milk from allowance Lunch: Chicken breast, skinned, grilled (50g) Baked beans in tomato sauce (½ cup, 135g) Cucumber and lettuce salad with chopped olives (1t, 5g) Orange (120g, peeled weight) Low-fat yoghurt (small carton or 100 ml), artificially sweetened, apricot-flavoured Tea/coffee with low-fat milk from allowance Mid-afternoon snack: Fruitcake, dark* (½ piece, 25g) Tea/coffee with low-fat milk from allo Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes: You Can Turn It Around

Pre-diabetes: You Can Turn It Around

The simple lifestyle changes that can reverse pre-diabetes and keep you healthy for life. A staggering 1.7 million Australians are estimated to have pre-diabetes, the condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes. The good news? It is possible to turn prediabetes around with some key diet and lifestyle changes. HFG dietitian Zoe Wilson investigates. The statistics are sobering. Here in Australia, an estimated 1.5 million people are currently living with diabetes – about half of whom don’t know it. And around 275 of us develop diabetes every day. What you may not know is that there is a condition called pre-diabetes, which – if diagnosed and managed with some key diet and lifestyle changes – can be prevented from developing into type 2 diabetes. Additionally, those same changes can help in the management of type 2 diabetes. Read on to find out how to improve your odds of beating pre-diabetes and how to make the lifestyle and diet changes that can help manage the disease. The rise of pre-diabetes: Are you at risk? In the past few years, pre-diabetes has come into the spotlight due to a combination of the rising incidence of obesity and greater awareness of type 2 diabetes, leading to more frequent testing. Pre-diabetes is the umbrella term for the conditions Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG) and Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT). It occurs when Blood Glucose Levels (BGLs) are higher than normal, but not high enough to diagnose as diabetes. While awareness is on the rise, many people with pre-diabetes are undiagnosed and those that are, are often only diagnosed by accident during a routine blood test. Symptoms are not always obvious, so if you have two or more of the following risk factors, see your doctor about being tested. Risk factors of pre-diabetes or type 2 diabete Continue reading >>

Spotlight On... Diabetic Diets

Spotlight On... Diabetic Diets

A healthy, balanced diet is key to keeping your blood sugar levels in check and your diabetes under control... What is diabetes? Diabetes is a lifelong condition caused by a failure of the blood sugar regulation mechanism in the body. This is controlled by a hormone called insulin. Diabetes results when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or cells of the body become resistant to insulin so blood sugar levels are not controlled as they should be. Without the proper function of insulin, sugar cannot enter muscle or fat cells, causing serious secondary complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, neuropathy and other complications. Type 1 diabetes Insulin dependent, less common and usually develops before the age of 30. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas stops producing insulin. The exact cause is unknown but some believe that it is an autoimmune response in which the body attacks its own pancreatic cells. People with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin for life. Type 2 diabetes Non-insulin dependent, used to be most common in later life but is becoming increasingly more prevalent in younger generation largely due to an increase in obesity. In Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still produces insulin, but either it is not producing enough or the body does not respond to it properly. The most common cause of type 2 diabetes is obesity. In many cases, Type 2 diabetes can be avoided through eating a healthy, balanced diet and taking regular exercise and often can be controlled in the same way if diagnosed. However, some cases will require medication and your doctor should be the one to determine whether this is necessary. Recent research has reported interesting evidence to support the reversal of type 2 diabetes. Research funded by Diabetes UK and per Continue reading >>

Type 2 & Nutrition

Type 2 & Nutrition

The key to managing type 2 diabetes is achieving and maintaining a healthy body weight, making healthier food choices and being as active as you can be, every day. Healthy eating for people with diabetes is no different to what is recommended for everyone – there is no such thing as a diabetes diet! To hear more about making healthy food choices, watch our healthy eating video clip. What are the main nutrients found in food? Carbohydrates, protein and fat are the main nutrients found in food, and they all provide us with energy (which is measured in kilojoules or calories). It is important to know what foods contain these nutrients and how they might affect both your blood glucose levels and your overall health. Carbohydrate Carbohydrate is the main source of energy for your body, especially the brain. When your body digests carbohydrate, it breaks it down into glucose, which is then absorbed into the bloodstream. This causes your blood glucose levels to rise. Carbohydrate is found in lots of different foods, and these foods also provide us with other important nutrients like fibre, vitamins and minerals. The amount of carbohydrate that you eat at your meals and snacks has the biggest impact on your blood glucose level. Read more about carbohydrate foods and the glycaemic index in the tabs above. Protein Protein is another source of energy in our diets and is the key nutrient that helps the body with growth and repair. Protein is broken down into amino acids in the gut so that they can be absorbed. Protein does not break down into glucose, so it does not directly raise blood glucose levels. The main protein foods are: Meats, chicken, fish, & tofu Eggs Nuts & seeds Cheese There are a few foods that contain both protein and carbohydrate, and may also raise your blood gl Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Diet (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Diet (beyond The Basics)

TYPE 2 DIABETES OVERVIEW Diet and physical activity are critically important in the management of the ABCs (A1C, Blood pressure, and Cholesterol) of type 2 diabetes. To effectively manage glycated hemoglobin (A1C) and blood sugar levels, it is important to understand how to balance food intake, physical activity, and medication. Making healthy food choices every day has both immediate and long-term effects. With education, practice, and assistance from a dietitian and/or a diabetes educator, it is possible to eat well and control diabetes. This article discusses diet in the management of type 2 diabetes. The role of diet and activity in managing blood pressure and cholesterol are reviewed separately. (See "Patient education: High blood pressure, diet, and weight (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: High cholesterol and lipids (hyperlipidemia) (Beyond the Basics)".) Articles that discuss other aspects of type 2 diabetes are also available. (See "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Overview (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Insulin treatment (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Alcohol, exercise, and medical care (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Preventing complications in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)".) WHY IS DIET IMPORTANT? Many factors affect how well diabetes is controlled. Many of these factors are controlled by the person with diabetes, including how much and what is eaten, how frequently the blood sugar is monitored, physical activity levels, and accuracy and consi Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

What you eat makes a big difference when you have diabetes. When you build your diet, four key things to focus on are carbs, fiber, fat, and salt. Here's what you should know about each of them. Carbs give you fuel. They affect your blood sugar faster than fats or protein. You’ll mainly get them from: Fruit Milk and yogurt Bread, cereal, rice, pasta Starchy vegetables like potatoes, corn, and beans Some carbs are simple, like sugar. Other carbs are complex, like those found in beans, nuts, vegetables, and whole grains. Complex carbohydrates are better for you because they take longer for your body to digest. They give you steady energy and fiber. You may have heard of “carbohydrate counting.” That means you keep track of the carbs (sugar and starch) you eat each day. Counting grams of carbohydrate, and splitting them evenly between meals, will help you control your blood sugar. If you eat more carbohydrates than your insulin supply can handle, your blood sugar level goes up. If you eat too little, your blood sugar level may fall too low. You can manage these shifts by knowing how to count carbs. One carbohydrate serving equals 15 grams of carbohydrates. A registered dietitian can help you figure out a carbohydrate counting plan that meets your specific needs. For adults, a typical plan includes two to four carb servings at each meal, and one to two as snacks. You can pick almost any food product off the shelf, read the label, and use the information about grams of carbohydrates to fit the food into your meal plan. Anyone can use carb counting. It’s most useful for people who take more than one daily injection of insulin, use the insulin pump, or want more flexibility and variety in their food choices. You get fiber from plant foods -- fruits, vegetables, whole g Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 - Meal Planning

Diabetes Type 2 - Meal Planning

Definition When you have type 2 diabetes, taking time to plan your meals goes a long way toward controlling your blood sugar and weight. Alternative Names Type 2 diabetes diet; Diet - diabetes - type 2 Function Your main focus is on keeping your blood sugar (glucose) level in your target range. To help manage your blood sugar, follow a meal plan that has: Food from all the food groups Fewer calories About the same amount of carbohydrates at each meal and snack Healthy fats Along with healthy eating, you can help keep your blood sugar in target range by maintaining a healthy weight. Persons with type 2 diabetes are often overweight. Losing just 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) can help you manage your diabetes better. Eating healthy foods and staying active (for example, 30 to 60 minutes of walking per day) can help you meet and maintain your weight loss goal. HOW CARBOHYDRATES AFFECT BLOOD SUGAR Carbohydrates in food give your body energy. You need to eat carbohydrates to maintain your energy. But carbohydrates also raise your blood sugar higher and faster than other kinds of food. The main kinds of carbohydrates are starches, sugars, and fiber. Learn which foods have carbohydrates. This will help with meal planning so that you can keep your blood sugar in your target range. MEAL PLANNING FOR CHILDREN WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES Meal plans should consider the amount of calories children need to grow. In general, three small meals and three snacks a day can help meet calorie needs. Many children with type 2 diabetes are overweight. The goal should be a healthy weight by eating healthy foods and getting more activity (60 minutes each day). Work with a registered dietitian to design a meal plan for your child. A registered dietitian is an expert in food and nutrition. The following tips Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

Have Diabetes? 7 Tips For A Healthy Pregnancy

Have Diabetes? 7 Tips For A Healthy Pregnancy

Dealing with disease and pregnancy Pregnancy is full of challenges—and even more so if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. So how do you handle a demanding disease and pregnancy? It may not be as hard as you think, says Cheryl Alkon, author of Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes. But you do need a plan. Before starting a family, check out these 7 tips that can help you ace diabetes management and have a healthy pregnancy. Get your blood sugar under control If you're thinking about getting pregnant, you need to kick bad habits (like smoking), lose weight (if you're overweight), and take prenatal vitamins. You can add one more item to the list if you have diabetes: Get your blood sugar under control. If your blood sugar levels are too high or too low, you may have a tough time getting pregnant. "In that case, your body may recognize that it's not a hospitable place for a pregnancy," says Alkon. Women with type 2 diabetes are particularly at risk for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which can also make it difficult to get pregnant. Medications that stimulate ovulation, such as Clomid and Serophene, can help. Assemble a diabetes team Pregnant women with diabetes could have up to three times as many appointments as women at a lower risk of complications. Find a high-risk obstetrician to monitor your pregnancy and check whether your endocrinologist is willing to work with your ob-gyn. "You want doctors who really know what diabetes is all about," says Alkon. The constant monitoring, ultrasounds, and additional blood sugar tests add up. So "make sure you know the ins and outs of your insurance plan," she adds. Consider going off oral medications Most doctors suggest that pregnant women with type 2 diabetes discontinue oral medications, says Alkon. This is because Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes involves making changes to your lifestyle, through diet, weight control and physical activity. Medication for diabetes, whether in tablet or injection form, is definitely not the only way to control your blood sugar (glucose) levels. How does type 2 diabetes affect your weight? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. The food you eat on a daily basis plays an important role in managing your diabetes, as well as ensuring you keep well and have enough energy for your daily activities. The same healthy eating principles apply whether you have diabetes or not. In fact, getting the whole family to eat this sort of balanced diet if you have diabetes can benefit their health as well as yours. Including foods from each of the main food groups described below will provide your body with the essential nutrients. See also separate leaflet called Healthy Eating. Fruit Continue reading >>

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