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Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Low-calorie Diet Could Help Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Low-calorie Diet Could Help Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is responsible for one in seven deaths in the United States and can cause a myriad of other health problems including heart disease, vision loss, kidney failure and amputation. A new study indicates that a very low-calorie diet could actually reverse the disease, which could help the 100 million Americans diagnosed with the disease find some relief. Not just a typical diet, very low-calorie diets usually max a person's daily intake to 800 calories. Related: Breast Cancer Diet: Broccoli and Green Tea Could Make Deadly Tumors Treatable The study, which was led by researchers from Yale, was conducted in mice, according to a press release. To determine that diets could reverse diabetes, they gave the animals one-quarter of their typical dietary intake and studied how their bodies reacted, particularly to insulin resistance and glucose, or sugar, production by the liver, as these two functions can lead to increased blood-sugar levels in diabetics. Essentially, the team found that a very low-calorie diet lowered glucose by decreasing how much lactate and amino acids in the body were converted into sugar. Additionally, animals on the special diet converted less glycogen, stored in the body to be used as fuel, into glucose. They also experienced a decrease in fat content, which helps how the liver reacts to insulin. These positive benefits all happened in just three days. "Using this approach to comprehensively interrogate liver carbohydrate and fat metabolism, we showed that it is a combination of three mechanisms that is responsible for the rapid reversal of hyperglycemia following a very low-calorie diet," senior author Gerald I. Shulman, M.D., said in a statement. While preliminary, the team hopes to see whether this works in humans. Next up is a study in patients Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

It’s possible to simply reverse type 2 diabetes. There are only two things you need to do. By reading this brief post you’ll know what they are, and how to get started. Or skip ahead to the two steps right away > Quick start Twenty years ago, when you bought a brand sparkly new VCR machine, you would also get a thick instruction manual. Read this thoroughly before you start, the manufacturer would implore. There would be detailed setup procedures and troubleshooting guides. Most of us ignored the manual, just plugged it in and tried to figure out the rest. That’s why we all had the blinking 12:00 on. Today, most new electronics now come with a quick start guide which has the most basic 4 or 5 steps to get your machine working and then anything else you needed, you could reference the detailed instruction manual. Instruction manuals are just so much more useful this way. Well, I don’t know much about VCRs, but I do know about type 2 diabetes. I can write an entire book about obesity (oh, wait, I did that already), or fasting (oh, wait, coming up) or type 2 diabetes (next up for 2018). But many of you will not want to go through the entire instruction manual. So this is the quick start guide for reversing your type 2 diabetes. A fully reversible disease Most doctors, dietitians and diabetes specialists claim that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. The American Diabetes Association, for example, almost proudly proclaims this on its website. Once you get the diagnosis, it’s a life sentence. But, it’s actually a great big lie. Type 2 diabetes is almost always reversible and this is almost ridiculously easy to prove. This is great news for the more than 50% of American adults who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Recognizing thi Continue reading >>

Low-gluten Or Gluten-free Diets Linked To Type 2 Diabetes

Low-gluten Or Gluten-free Diets Linked To Type 2 Diabetes

Does reduction in gluten consumption provide long-term health benefits? Gluten is a protein that is commonly found in wheat, rye and barley, which gives bread and other baked goods elasticity and a chewy texture. It is avoided in a small percentage of the population that cannot tolerate gluten due to Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Gluten-free foods often contain less dietary fiber and other micronutrients, such as, vitamins and minerals, thus making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more. However, recent popularity of gluten-free diets has been trending even among people without any health problems. A ‘Gluten-free’ diet has been interchangeably used to represent a ‘healthy diet.’ On the contrary, researchers have shown concern that it may actually lead to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) over a period of few decades. Although there is no scientific evidence that low-gluten will contribute to diabetes, the scientists are concerned about the long-term health benefits with the reduction in gluten consumption. An analysis of a large study of U.S. health professionals observed the effects of food on health in nearly 200,000 subjects. The study suggested that gluten intake might not exert significant adverse effects on the incidence of T2D or excess weight gain. Thus, limiting gluten from the diet is unlikely to facilitate T2D prevention and may lead to reduced consumption of cereal fiber or whole grains that help reduce diabetes risk. The purpose of the study was to determine if gluten consumption would affect health in people with no apparent medical reasons to avoid gluten. A long-term observational study looked at the data from three big previously held studies that started 40 years ago with the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and continu Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes involves making changes to your lifestyle, through diet, weight control and physical activity. Medication for diabetes, whether in tablet or injection form, is definitely not the only way to control your blood sugar (glucose) levels. How does type 2 diabetes affect your weight? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. The food you eat on a daily basis plays an important role in managing your diabetes, as well as ensuring you keep well and have enough energy for your daily activities. The same healthy eating principles apply whether you have diabetes or not. In fact, getting the whole family to eat this sort of balanced diet if you have diabetes can benefit their health as well as yours. Including foods from each of the main food groups described below will provide your body with the essential nutrients. See also separate leaflet called Healthy Eating. Fruit Continue reading >>

Fiftysomething Diet: Eating To Cure Diabetes Type 2

Fiftysomething Diet: Eating To Cure Diabetes Type 2

Not so long ago a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes at 50 or 60 seemed final, one of those no-turning-back kind of moments. Chances are the doctor told you the disease could be managed, but a return to a day when blood sugars might fall back into normal range (less than 126 mg/dl) was not on the table. An amazing new study suggests just the opposite. If you’re willing to make changes in what you eat and ramp up your activity levels, diabetes could be put into full or partial remission. How so? It can all be summed up in two words: lose weight. In the new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers randomly assigned 4,500 overweight Type 2 diabetics to either an intensive diet and exercise boot camp-style intervention or a less stringent weight-loss education program. The group given an intensive lifestyle intervention had weekly group and individual counseling sessions on what to eat and how to exercise for six months straight. (The follow-up dropped to three times a month for the next six months, then twice a month, along with periodic group refresher courses, for years two through four.) The second group received social support, along with advice on diet and physical activity, but only three times a year and as part of a group, not individually. Not surprisingly, the group given intensive diet and lifestyle counseling showed the most success. More important, 11.5 percent of the intensive lifestyle intervention group saw partial or complete remission of diabetes (remission was defined as blood sugars less than 126 mg/dl and hemoglobin A1c of less than 6.5 percent) at the one-year mark. Compare that figure to the other group’s success rate: 2 percent. The researchers, who published their study in December’s Journal of the American Medical Assoc Continue reading >>

Eating Healthy With Type 2 Diabetes

Eating Healthy With Type 2 Diabetes

Create a meal plan A good diabetes meal plan can help you keep your blood sugar and weight goals on track, and should fit in with your schedule and eating habits. Make healthy updates to classic favorites Try swapping out certain ingredients for healthier versions, such as adding crunch to your salad with nuts rather than croutons. Read food labels Nutrition Facts food labels can help you track your daily carbohydrates. Be sure to pay attention to both the serving size and total carbohydrate amount. Be aware of how many calories are in a portion of that food. You can also compare different products to find lower-calorie options. Know your portions Controlling your portion size is a great way to keep tabs on your calorie intake. Try this "handy" guide to help ensure your food servings are the right size: Your fist is about the size of 1 cup Your thumb tip is about 1 tablespoon (the top joint of your thumb) The palm of your hand is about 1 ounce of snack food (not a heaping handful) Counting carbohydrates When you eat foods that contain carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into glucose (sugar). By tracking your carbohydrates, staying within your carbohydrate limits, and with the right balance of physical activity and medicine, if needed, you can help keep your blood sugar numbers within your target range. Some portions of foods containing about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1 small piece of fresh fruit (4 oz) 1/2 cup of canned or frozen fruit 1slice of bread (1 oz) or 1 (6 inch) tortilla 1/2 cup of oatmeal 1/3 cup of pasta or rice 4-6 crackers 1/2 English muffin or hamburger bun 1/2 cup of black beans or starchy vegetable 1/4 of a large baked potato (3 oz) 2/3 cup of plain fat-free yogurt or sweetened with sugar substitutes 2 small cookies 2 inch square brownie or cake Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Not all healthy foods are created equal. Greens may be good for you, but the nutrients in iceberg lettuce may not be as plentiful as those in kale, spinach, and Swiss chard. Besides nutrient content, the glycemic index (GI) of a food may also help you make healthy choices. The GI measures how quickly a food will raise blood sugar. Low GI foods have a score of 55 or less, while high GI foods have a score of 70 or more. In general, lower GI foods are a better choice for people with diabetes. Foods that are both nutritious and have a low GI are helpful in managing health and blood glucose levels. Here are 10 superfoods that are especially good for those with diabetes. 1. Non-Starchy Vegetables Non-starchy vegetables have fewer carbs per serving. They include everything from artichokes and asparagus to broccoli and beets. This category of veggies goes a long way in satisfying your hunger and boosting your intake of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals. These vegetables are also low in calories and carbohydrates, making them some of the few foods that people with diabetes can enjoy almost with abandon. In fact, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) identifies most non-starchy vegetables as low GI foods with a ranking of 55 or less. A small study of 11 people found that a low-calorie diet consisting of non-starchy vegetables may successfully reverse type 2 diabetes. 2. Non-Fat or Low-Fat Plain Milk and Yogurt Vitamin D is essential for good health. One of its roles is to keep bones healthy, yet many of us don’t get as much as we need. Non-fat dairy foods, including milk and yogurt, are fortified with vitamin D. These dairy products are smart choices for diabetics because they have low GI scores: Skim milk has a GI score of 32 while reduced fat yogurt has a GI sco Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Follow A Low-carb Diet The Right Way

7 Ways To Follow A Low-carb Diet The Right Way

Feeling "hangry," the combination of hungry and angry, is what I hear a lot from patients who believe all carbs are evil, and that if you want to control your blood sugar or lose weight, they all have to go. Strong studies point to carbohydrate restriction as a main treatment for type 2 diabetes, but it doesn't have to be all or nothing. Many of my patients on very low-carb diets can’t sustain them long term. Eventually, they re-gain their weight and their blood-sugar problems come back. Those angry months of deprivation weren’t worth it. There’s a better way, which involves keeping some of the foods you love, and as a result, maintaining your sanity. Any time you eat a carbohydrate, your body has to redirect the glucose from your bloodstream to your cells. It calls on your pancreas, where insulin lives, to get the job done. Insulin’s role is to take the glucose and distribute it to your muscle and fat cells, where it’s either used for energy or stored for fat. When everything goes right, insulin is your friend. Eat too much or consume the wrong things and insulin becomes your enemy. Excess insulin circulating in your body may cause you to gain weight. Here’s how to do low-carb right. 1. Plan your meals around lean proteins and healthy fats. The reason many people fail at low-carb diets is because they are buying foods like low-carb chips, bars and drinks. These options are not always nutrient dense. They can leave you with a lack of satisfaction, increased hunger and the dreaded rebound binge. Instead, opt for real food. Find options that make you less hungry and more satisfied. Focusing on foods that are good sources of protein and healthy fats will help. A 2011 study found increased protein in the diet helped to satisfy hunger and promote weight loss. Cho Continue reading >>

Tips For A Healthy And Satisfying Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan

Tips For A Healthy And Satisfying Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the most common form of diabetes. Also known as adult-onset diabetes, T2D is diagnosed for approximately 3 million Americans every year. Type 2 diabetes has the potential to be a life-long disease. If not properly managed, T2D can affect eye sight, the body’s organs and extremities, cause erectile dysfunction in men, and invite heart disease and stroke, among other problems. The good news is that, in this day and age, type 2 diabetes is more manageable than ever, and even reversible, with effective treatment like stem cell therapy for diabetes, and observing a healthy diabetes diet. Today, advanced medical clinics like NSI Stem Cell Centers in Florida are treating diabetic patients with a safe and effective stem cell therapy procedure that is fully compliant with FDA guidelines.* Stem cell therapy in the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes has been successful for many years now.* In fact stem cell therapies are proving safe and effective for an ever-growing list of conditions, illnesses and injuries: like COPD, arthritis and neurological disorders.* But once your type 2 diabetes is under control, you’ll want to be an active partner in ensuring that the healing and life-changing effects of your stem cell therapy continue. One of the most simple and effective ways to do that is fully in your control: a healthy diabetes diet. A diabetes diet is all about blood sugar control. And, today, that doesn’t have to mean a bland, flavorless eating program. When you receive your stem cell therapy at NSI Stem Cell Centers, your nutritional specialist there will help you discover great ways to make your diabetes diet regimen delicious and maintainable for a lifetime. Below is a “sneak preview” of how your NSI nutritional counselor can help y Continue reading >>

1200 Calorie Diet For Type 2 Diabetes

1200 Calorie Diet For Type 2 Diabetes

What and how much you eat is an important part of the treatment plan for type-2 diabetes. A 1,200-calorie diet can help both men and women lose weight. When you have diabetes, getting to and maintaining a healthy weight makes it easier for you to manage blood sugar, but it does not cure your diabetes. When following a low-calorie diet such as this, it is important that you include nutrient-rich foods from all the food groups to help meet your vitamin and mineral needs. Consult your doctor before starting any diet plan. Video of the Day A healthy, balanced 1,200-calorie diabetic diet should include five starch choices, two milk choices, three fruit choices, four to five very lean or lean protein choices and three fat choices. Nonstarchy vegetables, such as broccoli or mixed greens, are free foods. One slice of whole-wheat bread, 1/2 cup of peas or 1/3 cup of brown rice are examples of starch choices. Fruit choices include a small apple, orange or banana or 1 cup of cantaloupe cubes. One cup of nonfat milk or yogurt equals one milk choice. Healthy protein choices and serving sizes include 1 ounce of white-meat poultry, seafood or beef tenderloin, two egg whites, 1/2 cup of beans, 1/4 cup of low-fat cottage cheese or 1/2 cup of tofu. One teaspoon of vegetable oil, 2 teaspoons of nut butter or 2 tablespoons of low-fat salad dressing are fat choices. What to Eat at Breakfast Your breakfast meal should include one starch, one milk, one fruit, one fat and one protein choice. An example of a healthy breakfast meal on your 1,200-calorie diet might include 1/2 cup of cooked oatmeal made with 1 cup of nonfat milk and topped with six sliced almonds, along with 1/4 cup of low-fat cottage cheese and 1 cup of cubed cantaloupe. This meal contains 310 calories and 45 grams of carbs. At Continue reading >>

Low-calorie Diet Shown To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Low-calorie Diet Shown To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes may not have to last forever. A clinical trial has shown that a reversal of type 2 diabetes is possible by following an extremely low-calorie diet. The trial, done at the Magnetic Resonance Center at Newcastle University in the United Kingdom, looked at 306 participants recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the last six years. Half were treated using normal diabetes treatment, including medications and weight-loss counseling, while the other half were given a strict low-calorie diet with no medication. The diet was no more than 850 calories a day made up of four shakes or soups for three to five months, followed by slow reintroduction of food over two to eight weeks. The participants were also given cognitive behavior therapy for maintaing proper nutritional habits and encouraged to exercise. After a year, 24% of the diet test participants lost 33 pounds or more, while no one in the control group lost any weight. Forty-six percent of participants in the test group reversed their diabetes and went into remission, while only 4% of the control group saw their diabetes go away. Thirty-one of 36 participants who lost 33 pounds of more experienced remission. “These findings are very exciting. They could revolutionize the way type 2 diabetes is treated. This builds on the work into the underlying cause of the condition, so that we can target management effectively,” Prof Roy Taylor from Newcastle University, lead researcher in the trial funded by Diabetes UK told the Guardian. In the United States, about 30 million people have type 2 diabetes. Diabetes remission can also be achieved with bariatric weight loss surgery, but it's more expensive and risky than a change in diet. “What we’re seeing (…) is that losing weight isn’t just linked to bette Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

A A A Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a chronic medical condition that results from an inability of the body to properly use insulin. Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes, in which the body is unable to produce sufficient levels of insulin. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes include A fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dl or greater on two different days establishes the diagnosis of diabetes. A number of both oral and injectable medications have been developed fo A hemoglobin A1c (HBA1c) level of 6.5% or greater indicates diabetes. Managing type 2 diabetes includes following a healthy eating plan and exercise, as well as medications in many cases. r the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A healthy eating plan and regular physical activity are important components of a type 2 diabetes treatment plan. There is no one recommended "diabetes diet" for all people with type 2 diabetes. Regular physical activity and modest weight loss can help reduce or prevent type 2 diabetes. Common complications of diabetes include cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, eye problems, and nerve damage. A A A Type 2 Diabetes (cont.) Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes mellitus. In type 2 diabetes, there is an elevated level of sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream due to the body's inability to properly respond to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that allows the body to utilize glucose for energy. Insulin is produced by specialized cells in the pancreas. An elevated level of blood glucose is known as hyperglycemia. The excessive levels of glucose in the blood spill over into the urine, leading to the presence of glucose in the urine (glucosuria). Type 2 diabetes is an enormous public health problem. It is estimated that about 29.1 million Americans (9.1% of all Americans) have Continue reading >>

Managing Type 2 Diabetes With A Healthy Lifestyle

Managing Type 2 Diabetes With A Healthy Lifestyle

Especially if newly diagnosed with diabetes, great concern may be placed on its successful control. From busy workdays to helping children with homework, the thought of adding one more task is overwhelming. However, managing diabetes does not have to be based on a strict, 1,000-page guideline, but rather by making simple modifications towards a healthy lifestyle! What is Type 2 Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition in which the body is unable to efficiently utilize glucose from carbohydrate sources, primarily related to an inept or a lack of insulin. A hormone produced by the pancreas, insulin facilitates the entry of glucose within the cells. When glucose is unable to enter the cells, it remains in the bloodstream and produces high blood glucose or sugar. In type 1 diabetes, compromised glucose utilization is affected by destroyed cells of the pancreas, ultimately causing insulin to become scarce and absent. Type 2 diabetes, the most common type among the U.S. population, is mostly caused by overweight and obesity and mostly leads to insulin resistance. But unlike type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed by managing weight and lifestyle patterns. How to Control Diabetes • Diet Diet plays a large, if not the largest, role in diabetes management. Particularly in type 2 diabetes, being overweight is a significant risk factor towards its development and demonstrating marked improvements in its regulation following weight loss. A diabetic diet is essentially a nutritious diet, filled with wholesome and nourishing sources, including whole grains, fruits and veggies, dairy products, lean proteins, and healthy fat sources. But in addition to food quality, the timing of meals is also encouraged, as smaller and more frequent meals can help keep blood sugars reg Continue reading >>

Diet For Type 2 Diabetes

Diet For Type 2 Diabetes

Tweet Diets for type 2 diabetes should be built around the principles of healthy eating with a focus on foods that do not adversely affect blood glucose levels. As a general guide, your diet should include a good variety of vegetables, sources of unsaturated fats such as nuts, avocados and oily fish, while processed foods should be avoided. Type 2 diabetes and the NHS diet NHS diet advice generally recommends eating starchy carbohydrates with each meal, as well as more fruit and vegetables, at least two portions of oily fish a week, and less saturated fat, salt and sugars. The most disputed part of the advice is the recommendation to eat starchy carbohydrates at each meal. Many people with type 2 diabetes find that even low GI sources of starchy carbohydrate (such as basmati rice and whole grain bread) tend to significantly increase blood glucose levels. Performing blood glucose tests before and two hours after meals can help you see which foods, and in what quantities, are appropriate for you. Read more on pre and post meal blood testing Low-carb diets and type 2 diabetes Low-carbohydrate diets tend to be popular with people with type 2 diabetes, with many people reporting improved blood glucose levels on a low carb diet, which can also help to reduce dependency on medication. But despite their popularity and apparent effectiveness, low-carb diets, have yet to be endorsed by the NHS. Read more about low-carb diets and NHS recommendations. The Low Carb Program, a 10-week education program from Diabetes.co.uk which won the Positive Social Impact Award at the Lloyds Bank National Business Awards UK 2016, provides education on diet and in particular a lower-carb lifestyle which helps people with type 2 diabetes reduce their HbA1c and weight. People who are taking medicatio Continue reading >>

12 Proven Foods Essential For Every Type 2 Diabetes Diet

12 Proven Foods Essential For Every Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Cut out bread. No sugar in your coffee. Only one potato at dinner. If you’ve got blood sugar problems then you’ve heard those instructions over and over. The focus is always on what you should remove from your diet, and it’s incredibly frustrating. What about what you can eat? What about the foods you should be adding to a diet for type 2 diabetes… the foods that can actually improve blood sugar control? Research shows there are many natural foods that can help. Either by reducing sugar absorption into the bloodstream, or by improving insulin resistance. It’s certainly worth your while to learn what those foods are, rather than just what to avoid. I’ve done some of the research here and strongly recommend you start with the following. 1. Almonds improve glucose metabolism Tree nuts – not peanuts, which grow in the ground – are linked with many metabolic health benefits. But almonds really standout when it comes to managing blood sugar. They are very low in carbohydrates, but that’s not why. The reason is Magnesium. Magnesium is an essential mineral involved in over 300 bodily processes, including blood pressure regulation and blood sugar control (1, 2). Alongside spinach, almonds and cashews are among the best sources of magnesium in the human diet. Several handfuls provides over 20% of the daily recommended intake (2). While the mechanism is unclear, having low magnesium levels is strongly associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It appears to impact on insulin secretion, which may be the reason that 25-38% of type 2 diabetics have low magnesium (4). Clinical trials have shown that restoring low magnesium significantly improves insulin response and reduces blood sugar levels (4, 5). Especially if you’re magnesium deficient and insulin resist Continue reading >>

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