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Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet – Expert’s Panel

Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet – Expert’s Panel

Diabetes management can be efficiently done by following the right diet, being active, getting enough sleep, perhaps, in some cases, taking medication as prescribed by your doctor. So many factors have to be taken into consideration when it comes to regulating your blood sugar levels in order to avoid the lows and the highs. It is recommended by experts that one keep their blood sugars in control by diet, as in, eating healthy. For that, you have to make some healthy choices. But with so many internet articles and blogs about diabetes and eating healthy out there, who do you listen to? Who should you trust? What do you eat? What should you avoid? One small mistake and you can pay with your life, in some cases. We have compiled tips and suggestions from 29 respected experts who share with you their rules on how you can control your type 2 with diet. Read on to find out what they are. 1. Karen R. Koenig, LCSW, M.Ed I encourage my clients with Type 2 Diabetes to do the following: stop dieting and labeling foods “good” or “bad” and, instead, think of them as having high or low health benefits. The diet mentality only promotes rebound eating. The goal is to develop an internal, rather than an external, locus of control. I also encourage them to learn how to become “normal” or intuitive eaters by connecting to appetite cues for hunger, fullness and satisfaction, and eating with awareness, which often means without distractions. They also need to develop effective practices to manage stress and distress without turning to food. All this can be done with an eating disorders therapist or an intuitive eating coach and by reading books on any of the above topics. 2. Kelly Devine Rickert, MS, RDN, CSSD, LDN There are two main tips I tell people to help control their typ Continue reading >>

More Proof A Low-calorie Diet Can Effectively Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

More Proof A Low-calorie Diet Can Effectively Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

In early November, we reported how a team at Yale University had uncovered the key metabolic mechanisms responsible for lowering blood glucose concentrations in those on a very low calorie diet. Now a new study published in the prestigious medical journal The Lancet is offering more evidence to support the theory that type 2 diabetes can be effectively cured through intensive dieting and weight management. The latest study, conducted by a team led by researchers at the University of Glasgow, has successfully demonstrated that type 2 diabetes can indeed be reversed through a weight management program alone. The study found nearly half of all participants had reverted to, and maintained, a non-diabetic state without using antidiabetic medications, one year after undergoing the program. "Our findings suggest that even if you have had type 2 diabetes for six years, putting the disease into remission is feasible," says Michael Lean, who co-led the study. "In contrast to other approaches, we focus on the need for long-term maintenance of weight loss through diet and exercise and encourage flexibility to optimize individual results." The trial followed 298 adults over two years. Half the participants underwent the new weight management program, while the other half served as a control group following general best-practice diabetic treatments. The weight management program comprised of the subjects withdrawing from all anti-diabetic drugs and undergoing a total diet replacement. For three to five months each participant consumed a formula diet adding up to around 800 calories per day. The results were remarkable, with nearly half of all participants displaying full diabetes remission one year after the program. Even more interesting was the correlation between remission and deg Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Not only are 86 million Americans prediabetic, but 90% of them don't even know they have it, the Centers for Disease Control reports. What's more, doctors diagnose as many as 1.5 million new cases of diabetes each year, according to the American Diabetes Association. Whether you're at risk, prediabetic or following a diabetic diet as suggested by your doctor, a few simple strategies can help control blood sugar and potentially reverse the disease entirely. Plus, implementing just a few of these dietary changes can have other beneficial effects like weight loss, all without sacrificing flavor or feeling deprived. First, let's start with the basics. What is diabetes? There are two main forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that's usually diagnosed during childhood. Environmental and genetic factors can lead to the destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. That's the hormone responsible for delivering glucose (sugar) to your cells for metabolism and storage. In contrast, type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed in adulthood and caused by a variety of lifestyle factors like obesity, physical inactivity and high cholesterol. Typically, type 2 diabetics still have functioning beta cells, meaning that they're still producing insulin. However, the peripheral tissues become less sensitive to the hormone, and the liver produces more glucose, causing high blood sugar. When left unmanaged, type 2 diabetics may stop producing insulin altogether. While you may have some symptoms of high blood sugar (nausea, lethargy, frequent thirst and/or urination), a clinical diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes requires a repeat test of your blood sugar levels. How does a diabetic diet help? Unlike many other health conditions, the incredible th Continue reading >>

Fiftysomething Diet: Eating To Cure Diabetes Type 2

Fiftysomething Diet: Eating To Cure Diabetes Type 2

Not so long ago a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes at 50 or 60 seemed final, one of those no-turning-back kind of moments. Chances are the doctor told you the disease could be managed, but a return to a day when blood sugars might fall back into normal range (less than 126 mg/dl) was not on the table. An amazing new study suggests just the opposite. If you’re willing to make changes in what you eat and ramp up your activity levels, diabetes could be put into full or partial remission. How so? It can all be summed up in two words: lose weight. In the new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers randomly assigned 4,500 overweight Type 2 diabetics to either an intensive diet and exercise boot camp-style intervention or a less stringent weight-loss education program. The group given an intensive lifestyle intervention had weekly group and individual counseling sessions on what to eat and how to exercise for six months straight. (The follow-up dropped to three times a month for the next six months, then twice a month, along with periodic group refresher courses, for years two through four.) The second group received social support, along with advice on diet and physical activity, but only three times a year and as part of a group, not individually. Not surprisingly, the group given intensive diet and lifestyle counseling showed the most success. More important, 11.5 percent of the intensive lifestyle intervention group saw partial or complete remission of diabetes (remission was defined as blood sugars less than 126 mg/dl and hemoglobin A1c of less than 6.5 percent) at the one-year mark. Compare that figure to the other group’s success rate: 2 percent. The researchers, who published their study in December’s Journal of the American Medical Assoc Continue reading >>

A Plant-based Diet For The Prevention And Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

A Plant-based Diet For The Prevention And Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Abstract The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rising worldwide, especially in older adults. Diet and lifestyle, particularly plant-based diets, are effective tools for type 2 diabetes prevention and management. Plant-based diets are eating patterns that emphasize legumes, whole grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds and discourage most or all animal products. Cohort studies strongly support the role of plant-based diets, and food and nutrient components of plant-based diets, in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Evidence from observational and interventional studies demonstrates the benefits of plant-based diets in treating type 2 diabetes and reducing key diabetes-related macrovascular and microvascular complications. Optimal macronutrient ratios for preventing and treating type 2 diabetes are controversial; the focus should instead be on eating patterns and actual foods. However, the evidence does suggest that the type and source of carbohydrate (unrefined versus refined), fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated versus saturated and trans), and protein (plant versus animal) play a major role in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. Multiple potential mechanisms underlie the benefits of a plant-based diet in ameliorating insulin resistance, including promotion of a healthy body weight, increases in fiber and phytonutrients, food-microbiome interactions, and decreases in saturated fat, advanced glycation endproducts, nitrosamines, and heme iron. Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, Insulin resistance, Vegan, Vegetarian Go to: 1. Introduction Type 2 diabetes is a global epidemic, with approximately 422 million cases worldwide and a rapidly rising prevalence in middle- and low-income countries.[1] In the United States in 2011–2012, 12%–14% of adul Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating For Type 2 Diabetes

Healthy Eating For Type 2 Diabetes

Many people with diabetes wonder how they’ll need to adapt their eating habits. Myths abound when it comes to diabetes and food — one of the most common being that there is a “diabetes diet” that prohibits sugar and lists other items to avoid. That’s not the case, but it is important to follow a healthy diet that emphasized controlling weight and keeping blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol values as close to normal as possible. In this report, you’ll learn about the components of a healthy diet for people with diabetes, as well as how to work with a dietitian, how to develop a meal plan, and how to fit physical activity into your schedule. You will learn how to recognize portion distortion, make wise choices while dining out, and stay on track with your weight-loss plan. Best of all, we’ve included 40 original recipes so you can put this advice into practice — starting today. Prepared by the editors of Harvard Health Publishing in consultation with David M. Nathan, M.D., Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Director, Diabetes Center and Clinical Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital; and Linda Delahanty, M.S., R.D., L.D.N., Instructor, Harvard Medical School Chief Dietitian and Director of Nutrition and Behavioral Research, Diabetes Center, Massachusetts General Hospital. (2015) Continue reading >>

Managing Type 2 Diabetes With A Healthy Lifestyle

Managing Type 2 Diabetes With A Healthy Lifestyle

Especially if newly diagnosed with diabetes, great concern may be placed on its successful control. From busy workdays to helping children with homework, the thought of adding one more task is overwhelming. However, managing diabetes does not have to be based on a strict, 1,000-page guideline, but rather by making simple modifications towards a healthy lifestyle! What is Type 2 Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition in which the body is unable to efficiently utilize glucose from carbohydrate sources, primarily related to an inept or a lack of insulin. A hormone produced by the pancreas, insulin facilitates the entry of glucose within the cells. When glucose is unable to enter the cells, it remains in the bloodstream and produces high blood glucose or sugar. In type 1 diabetes, compromised glucose utilization is affected by destroyed cells of the pancreas, ultimately causing insulin to become scarce and absent. Type 2 diabetes, the most common type among the U.S. population, is mostly caused by overweight and obesity and mostly leads to insulin resistance. But unlike type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed by managing weight and lifestyle patterns. How to Control Diabetes • Diet Diet plays a large, if not the largest, role in diabetes management. Particularly in type 2 diabetes, being overweight is a significant risk factor towards its development and demonstrating marked improvements in its regulation following weight loss. A diabetic diet is essentially a nutritious diet, filled with wholesome and nourishing sources, including whole grains, fruits and veggies, dairy products, lean proteins, and healthy fat sources. But in addition to food quality, the timing of meals is also encouraged, as smaller and more frequent meals can help keep blood sugars reg Continue reading >>

Managing Type 2 Diabetes

Managing Type 2 Diabetes

What is the most important information I should know about XIGDUO XR? XIGDUO XR can cause serious side effects, including lactic acidosis. Metformin, one of the medicines in XIGDUO XR, can cause a rare, but serious, side effect called lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the blood) that can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency and must be treated in a hospital. Stop taking XIGDUO XR and call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet, feel very weak or tired, unusual (not normal) muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness or sleep longer than usual, stomach pains, nausea or vomiting, feel dizzy or lightheaded, or have a slow or irregular heartbeat. You have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with XIGDUO XR if you have severe kidney problems, your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye, have liver problems, drink alcohol (very often or a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking), get dehydrated (lose a large amount of body fluids), have surgery, have a heart attack, severe infection, or stroke. Who should not take XIGDUO XR? Do not take XIGDUO XR if you: have moderate to severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with XIGDUO XR are allergic to dapagliflozin, metformin, or any of the ingredients in XIGDUO XR. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include: skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking XIGDUO XR a Continue reading >>

Low-calorie Diet Could Help Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Low-calorie Diet Could Help Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is responsible for one in seven deaths in the United States and can cause a myriad of other health problems including heart disease, vision loss, kidney failure and amputation. A new study indicates that a very low-calorie diet could actually reverse the disease, which could help the 100 million Americans diagnosed with the disease find some relief. Not just a typical diet, very low-calorie diets usually max a person's daily intake to 800 calories. Related: Breast Cancer Diet: Broccoli and Green Tea Could Make Deadly Tumors Treatable The study, which was led by researchers from Yale, was conducted in mice, according to a press release. To determine that diets could reverse diabetes, they gave the animals one-quarter of their typical dietary intake and studied how their bodies reacted, particularly to insulin resistance and glucose, or sugar, production by the liver, as these two functions can lead to increased blood-sugar levels in diabetics. Essentially, the team found that a very low-calorie diet lowered glucose by decreasing how much lactate and amino acids in the body were converted into sugar. Additionally, animals on the special diet converted less glycogen, stored in the body to be used as fuel, into glucose. They also experienced a decrease in fat content, which helps how the liver reacts to insulin. These positive benefits all happened in just three days. "Using this approach to comprehensively interrogate liver carbohydrate and fat metabolism, we showed that it is a combination of three mechanisms that is responsible for the rapid reversal of hyperglycemia following a very low-calorie diet," senior author Gerald I. Shulman, M.D., said in a statement. While preliminary, the team hopes to see whether this works in humans. Next up is a study in patients Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Over 25 million children and adults have diabetes in the United States and 79 million people are pre-diabetic. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90-95% of all diagnosed diabetes.* People with prediabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Studies have shown that people with prediabetes who lose weight and increase their physical activity can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and in some cases return their blood glucose levels to normal. The tools of the Dukan Diet make it a great type 2 diabetes plan. Exercise is important in managing blood sugar, lowering blood pressure, increasing good cholesterol, decreasing insulin resistance. Building muscle and reducing fat can improve insulin sensitivity. For those who are overweight and obese, walking is the only risk-free exercise. The Dukan Diet prescribes walking because it is one of the best activities you can do to burn calories. It produces serotonin and endorphins for a feeling of well-being and relieves stress, while being an activity you can do for the long term. Continue reading >>

Healthy Diet

Healthy Diet

Overview Weight gain is one of the most common symptoms of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). The main cause of weight gain with PCOS is insulin resistance. If you have PCOS, your body finds it difficult to use insulin, the hormone that helps convert sugars from food into energy. This leads to an increase of sugar in the bloodstream, and eventually weight gain. Weight gain is a serious health risk as it can lead to health complications like type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, etc. Losing weight is a very important element of recovering from PCOS. Weight loss helps in bringing periods back to normal, improves insulin sensitivity, and also reduces the risk of future health complications. The right diet, exercises, and lifestyle changes are the key to winning the battle against weight gain in PCOS. Continue reading >>

12 Proven Foods Essential For Every Type 2 Diabetes Diet

12 Proven Foods Essential For Every Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Cut out bread. No sugar in your coffee. Only one potato at dinner. If you’ve got blood sugar problems then you’ve heard those instructions over and over. The focus is always on what you should remove from your diet, and it’s incredibly frustrating. What about what you can eat? What about the foods you should be adding to a diet for type 2 diabetes… the foods that can actually improve blood sugar control? Research shows there are many natural foods that can help. Either by reducing sugar absorption into the bloodstream, or by improving insulin resistance. It’s certainly worth your while to learn what those foods are, rather than just what to avoid. I’ve done some of the research here and strongly recommend you start with the following. 1. Almonds improve glucose metabolism Tree nuts – not peanuts, which grow in the ground – are linked with many metabolic health benefits. But almonds really standout when it comes to managing blood sugar. They are very low in carbohydrates, but that’s not why. The reason is Magnesium. Magnesium is an essential mineral involved in over 300 bodily processes, including blood pressure regulation and blood sugar control (1, 2). Alongside spinach, almonds and cashews are among the best sources of magnesium in the human diet. Several handfuls provides over 20% of the daily recommended intake (2). While the mechanism is unclear, having low magnesium levels is strongly associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It appears to impact on insulin secretion, which may be the reason that 25-38% of type 2 diabetics have low magnesium (4). Clinical trials have shown that restoring low magnesium significantly improves insulin response and reduces blood sugar levels (4, 5). Especially if you’re magnesium deficient and insulin resist Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Beans If you’re looking for foods that raise blood-sugar levels slowly and gently like rolling waves, choose high-quality carbohydrates instead of low-quality carbs like refined grains and sugary foods. Whenever possible, you’ll want to couple these carbs with protein and/or healthy fat. Beans (including black, white, navy, lima, pinto, garbanzo, soy, and kidney) are a winning combination of high-quality carbohydrates, lean protein, and soluble fiber that helps stabilize your body’s blood-sugar levels and keeps hunger in check. Beans are also inexpensive, versatile, and virtually fat-free. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Reversed With Weight Loss: Super Low-calorie Diet May Cure The Disease

Type 2 Diabetes Reversed With Weight Loss: Super Low-calorie Diet May Cure The Disease

Update | Hundreds of people went on an extreme diet with the hopes of curing their Type 2 diabetes. For some of them, it worked. A study published in The Lancet on Tuesday chronicles a remarkable change in the health of its participants. One of the findings—that a calorie-restricted diet leads to weight loss—is hardly groundbreaking. But the effect that losing weight had on diabetes was dramatic. For nearly half of the people on the diet (86 percent of the 36 people lost more than 30 pounds), their diabetes appeared to be gone a year later. The technical term the authors used was “remission.” That term indicates that the levels of red blood cells connected to sugar molecules had fallen below a certain limit even without medication. That limit, often used as a shorthand to diagnose diabetes, is known as HbA1c. It's an indicator of average long-term blood sugar levels and may also be related to the risk of developing complications from diabetes. "'Cure' implies absolute and lasting absence of disease—such as curing tuberculosis. Remission recognises that the person is still susceptible to diabetes and emphasises that continued attention to weight control is vital," said Dr. Roy Taylor, a researcher at Newcastle University and one of the authors of the paper. If the people in this study regain the weight, "then it is certain that the diabetes will come back." Dr. Sona Shah, an endocrinologist at NYU Langone Health, said that doctors knew that if a person lost between 5 to 10 percent of their weight, it could help improve their HbA1c levels. “I’ve seen that many times in many of my patients.” “It gives more evidence and credibility to what we’ve been doing,” she said. "If we can get them controlled by lifestyle alone, I think that’s a huge goal for m Continue reading >>

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