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Type 1 Diabetes Weight Loss Tips

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Table of Contents Simple Steps to Lower Your Risk Introduction If type 2 diabetes was an infectious disease, passed from one person to another, public health officials would say we’re in the midst of an epidemic. This difficult disease, once called adult-onset diabetes, is striking an ever-growing number of adults. Even more alarming, it’s now beginning to show up in teenagers and children. More than 24 million Americans have diabetes; of those, about 6 million don’t know they have the disease. (1) In 2007, diabetes cost the U.S. an estimated $116 billion in excess medical spending, and an additional $58 billion in reduced productivity. (1) If the spread of type 2 diabetes continues at its present rate, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the United States will increase from about 16 million in 2005 to 48 million in 2050. (2) Worldwide, the number of adults with diabetes will rise from 285 million in 2010 to 439 million in the year 2030. (3) The problems behind the numbers are even more alarming. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness and kidney failure among adults. It causes mild to severe nerve damage that, coupled with diabetes-related circulation problems, often leads to the loss of a leg or foot. Diabetes significantly increases the risk of heart disease. And it’s the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., directly causing almost 70,000 deaths each year and contributing to thousands more. (4) The good news is that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. About 9 cases in 10 could be avoided by taking several simple steps: keeping weight under control, exercising more, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Our cells depend on a single simple sugar, glucose, for most of their energy needs. That’s why the body Continue reading >>

Two New Weight-loss Drugs Available For Patients With Diabetes

Two New Weight-loss Drugs Available For Patients With Diabetes

With the FDA approval and coverage of new prescription weight-loss drugs last year, healthcare professionals have two more options to consider when treating obesity. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009–2010 saw this major public health challenge affect more than one-third of adults and almost 17% of children and adolescents. Obesity places individuals at increased risk for several chronic diseases, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Weight loss in patients with diabetes has been associated with improved glycemic control and improved lipid profiles. Although healthcare professionals have counseled patients about diet and exercise as the main approach for weight reduction, some patients continue to struggle and may seek alternative methods beyond caloric restriction and the treadmill. Lorcaserin approval In June 2012, FDA approved lorcaserin (Belviq, Arena Pharmaceuticals/ Eisai), a serotonin 2C receptor agonist, indicated as an adjunct to diet and increased physical activity for chronic weight management in adult patients who are obese or overweight and have at least one weight-related comorbidity (e.g., hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes). This was the first weight-loss prescription approved in 13 years, since FDA approved orlistat, a reversible inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases. Lorcaserin was approved on the basis of data from three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials lasting from 52 to 104 weeks. At one year, approximately 47% of patients without diabetes in studies 1 and 2 lost ≥5% body weight, and approximately 22% achieved a loss of 10% body weight or more. In the third study, 37.5% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus lost ≥5% body weight and about 16% achieved Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diets For Weight Loss

Diabetic Diets For Weight Loss

If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetes-friendly Diets To Help You Lose Weight

The Best Diabetes-friendly Diets To Help You Lose Weight

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for everyone, but if you have diabetes, excess weight may make it harder to control your blood sugar levels and may increase your risk for some complications. Losing weight can be extra challenging for people with diabetes. Eating healthfully while you try to reduce weight is important for everyone, but if you have diabetes, choosing the wrong diet could harm your health. Weight loss pills and starvation diets should be avoided, but there are many popular diets that may be beneficial. Diabetes and diet: What’s the connection? If you have diabetes, you should focus on eating lean protein, high-fiber, less processed carbs, fruits, and vegetables, low-fat dairy, and healthy vegetable-based fats such as avocado, nuts, canola oil, or olive oil. You should also manage your carbohydrate intake. Have your doctor or dietitian provide you with a target carb number for meals and snacks. Generally, women should aim for about 45 grams of carb per meal while men should aim for 60. Ideally, these would come from complex carbs, fruits, and vegetables. The American Diabetes Association offers a comprehensive list of the best foods for those with diabetes. Their recommendations include: Protein Fruits and vegetables Dairy Grains beans berries low- or nonfat milk whole grains, such as brown rice and whole-wheat pasta nuts sweet potatoes low- or nonfat yogurt poultry nonstarchy vegetables such as asparagus, broccoli, collard greens, kale, and okra eggs oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, tuna, and sardines Staying hydrated is also important when it comes to overall health. Choose noncaloric options such as water and tea whenever possible. For people with diabetes, there are certain foods that should be limited. These foods can cause spikes in the Continue reading >>

Low Carb And Weight Loss In Type 1 Diabetes

Low Carb And Weight Loss In Type 1 Diabetes

Tweet In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t automatically respond to meals by releasing insulin, this has to be done manually through taking injections or through bolus doses via insulin pump. If you’re looking to lose weight, this can give an advantage, in a way, as it allows you to review exactly how much insulin you’re taking each day. By contrast, people without type 1 diabetes have no good way of knowing how much insulin they have in their body. A good rule of thumb is that the more units of insulin you take per day, the more likely you are to put on weight. See also more general advice in our guide to weight loss on a low-carb diet Less insulin intake, improved weight management Say Jill and Michelle are roughly the same height and both have type 1 diabetes. Jill is taking 50 units per day and Michelle is taking 100 units per day. Generally speaking, it’s more likely that Jill will be finding it easier to manage her weight than Michelle. So, if you’re looking to lose weight, one way to achieve this is to modify your diet, or eating habits, so that you take less insulin whilst maintaining good blood control. Warning note: We need to make an important safety note that reducing your insulin whilst letting glucose levels go high for long periods of time is not a good idea at all. Doing this will lead to a much greater risk of very serious health problems such as retinopathy, neuropathy and kidney disease. Reducing insulin intake safely There are a number of ways insulin intake can be reduced in a safe way: Lower your carbohydrate intake Lower your protein intake -if you eat a lot of protein Increase physical activity Reduce snacking Out of these, reducing carbohydrate intake is likely to have the greatest effect. Lowering insulin doses should only be done if Continue reading >>

Losing Weight With Type 2 Diabetes

Losing Weight With Type 2 Diabetes

Losing weight when you have type 2 diabetes may seem impossible at first, but once you learn how to incorporate a few healthy habits into your life, it’s not so hard. Discover simple ways to lose weight with type 2 diabetes. When you have type 2 diabetes and you’re overweight, managing your weight can be an important part of your treatment plan. Watching the numbers on the scale can lead to a smaller waistline and improve your cardiovascular health. Also, by losing weight—even a small amount (about 7% of your current weight)—people with type 2 diabetes can become less insulin resistant, making them able to use their own insulin better. Continue reading >>

Do You Know The 5 Types Of Diabetes?

Do You Know The 5 Types Of Diabetes?

(BlackDoctor.org) — What is diabetes? Essentially, it’s a disorder where your body has problems producing or effectively using insulin, which can, in turn, cause many other mild to severe health problems. There are several different causes of insulin problems – managing your diabetes will depend on which type you have. Type 1 Diabetes: Little To No Insulin With type 1 diabetes, which used to be called juvenile diabetes, your body does not produce insulin or produces very little. Type 1 diabetes is known as an autoimmune disease because it occurs when your immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas. Type 1 diabetes usually develops in children and young adults and accounts for 5 to 10 percent of diabetes cases in the United States. Symptoms may include thirst, frequent urination, increased hunger, unexplained weight loss, blurry vision, and fatigue. People who have type 1 diabetes need to take insulin injections daily to make up for what their pancreas can’t produce. Type 2 Diabetes: Insulin Resistance Type 2 diabetes, which used to be called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90 to 95 percent of diabetes cases. While most people who develop type 2 diabetes are older, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in children is on the rise. The exact cause of type 2 diabetes is largely unknown, but the disease tends to develop in people who are obese and physically inactive. People who have a family history of diabetes or a personal history of gestational diabetes are also at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. In addition, certain groups, particularly African Americans, have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes usually develop gradually, and are similar to Continue reading >>

Why Can’t I Lose Weight?

Why Can’t I Lose Weight?

Finding Your Trouble Spots You’re trying hard to lose weight. You’ve changed your eating habits, and you’ve been doing more physical activity than you used to. But a few weeks — or even a few months — have gone by, and the scale isn’t budging. “Why?!” you ask in frustration. “What am I doing wrong?!” Body weight is regulated mainly by the number of calories consumed and the number of calories burned off. But there are a number of other things that influence weight, and some of them can make it difficult to lose weight. This article explores what some of these are and how to overcome them. As you make the effort to lose weight, be sure you are aiming for a realistic body weight for you. A starting point for determining this is body-mass index (BMI), a measure of body fat based on height and weight. You can calculate your BMI easily with an online tool such as the one at www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi. (Note that there’s a separate BMI calculator for children and teens.) Generally, a BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 is considered normal, between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight, and 30 and higher is considered obese. However, BMI tends to overestimate body fat in athletes and other muscular people and to underestimate it in older people who have lost muscle mass. There is also some evidence that the negative health effects of overweight start at a lower BMI for Asian people. Keep in mind, too, that people come in different shapes and sizes. You don’t necessarily have to be “thin” to be healthy, but losing some excess fat can improve your health in a number of ways. Talk to your health-care team about your weight-loss goals and about what a healthy weight is for you. Frequent hypoglycemia Frequent episodes of hypoglycemia, or low blood glu Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes | Weight Watchers

Type 2 Diabetes | Weight Watchers

The UK is facing a huge rise in the number of people living with Type 2 diabetes - an estimated four million people will have the condition by 2025. But what is Type 2 diabetes, who is at risk and how can it be controlled? Diabetes is a condition connected to the bodys inability to produce or use insulin, leading to a build-up of sugar in the blood. Insulin usually helps sugar pass into cells where it can be burnt for energy, but this is difficult or impossible for people with diabetes. Over time, diabetes can contribute to heart disease, kidney disease, vision problems and difficult pregnancies, it can also put people with diabetes at risk of requiring amputations. Type 1 diabetes is a genetic condition affecting roughly 10% of all people with diabetes. The other 90% of people with diabetes have Type 2 diabetes, which is known to have both genetic and lifestyle causes. People who are overweight are more likely to be at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, which is why its becoming such a problem across the developed world. There are many ways to lower your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, or keeping it under control if you already have it. And Weight Watchers approach to a healthier lifestyle can help. Type 2 diabetes and weight are intimately linked - being overweight or obese, eating an unhealthy diet and not being active all increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes, as do smoking and high blood pressure. The best way to avoid Type 2 diabetes is to keep your weight under control- so even if you feel like itll never happen to you, its much, much better to take preventative action. Three people are diagnosed with diabetes every 10 minutes in the UK - if you needed another reason to come to Weight Watchers and take control of your life, this is it. Weight Watchers approa Continue reading >>

Sports Nutrition And Type 1 Diabetes

Sports Nutrition And Type 1 Diabetes

Why is regular exercise good for diabetes? Hopefully, you're already aware of how exercise can have a positive impact on your diabetes management, as well as your general wellbeing. If not, here are just a few of the benefits of building regular exercise into your routine: a decrease in certain blood lipids – and an increase in beneficial cholesterol a decrease in blood pressure a positive effect on mood as a stress reliever, especially when performed in nature improvement in sleep quality ...and there's more From the point of view of day-to-day diabetes management, one of the most important benefits of exercise is that it increases insulin sensitivity. As a result, this translates to needing less insulin for the same amount of carbohydrate, and it can also dampen post-meal blood sugar spikes. The insulin sensitivity effect of aerobic exercise usually starts to decline within 1–2 days. Therefore, regular aerobic activity is essential to keeping the body in an insulin-sensitive state. At times, it can feel like a mental workout before you’ve even started exercising: deciding if and how much you need to eat before and during exercise, in addition to deciding what to do with insulin before, during and after exercise. We will be discussing the various factors to consider when making these decisions in order to help you manage your diabetes during exercise. Exercising almost daily (in contrast to exercising only twice a week) will ensure that you remain in a more insulin-sensitive state most of the time, instead of having varying levels of insulin sensitivity from one day to the next. This should translate to less variability in blood glucose and make it easier to manage your diabetes. The challenge of managing diabetes during exercise What are the challenges? In a per Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: 8 Steps To Weight-loss Success

Type 2 Diabetes: 8 Steps To Weight-loss Success

Losing weight is at the top of many people's to-do lists. But for those with type 2 diabetes, weight control is especially important. “Carrying excess body fat increases the body's resistence to insulin, making blood glucose management more challenging,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, past 2009 national president of health care and education for the American Diabetes Association. "According to the World Health Organization, 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese." In fact, research indicates that the longer someone has a high body mass index or BMI (a common measure of being overweight or obese), the greater their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It’s no secret that losing weight — and keeping it off — isn’t easy. But it is possible, and the benefits for those with diabetes are great. So how do you get started? Experts say the right way to lose weight is to incorporate a healthful diet into your overall diabetes management plan. Diabetes Diet Control: Steps to Success Here's how to get started on the path to weight-loss success: Get physical. Exercise can help keep off the weight. “Research shows that people who increase physical activity along with reducing calorie intake will lose more body fat than people who only diet,” says McLaughlin, now a certified diabetes educator at Nebraska Medicine, Children's Hospital and Endocrine Clinics, in Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska. For confirmation, look at the National Weight Control Registry (NWCR), a database of 10,000 men and women who have lost a significant amount of weight and kept it off. Only 10 percent reached and maintained their weight-loss goal without exercise. Most people in the register chose walking as their form of exercise. Eat breakfast. The most effective diabetes die Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Nutrition

Type 1 Diabetes Nutrition

If you have type 1 diabetes, it is important to know how many carbohydrates you eat at a meal. This information helps you determine how much insulin you should take with your meal to maintain blood sugar (glucose) control. Carbohydrates are the main type of food that raises blood sugar. The starch, fruit and milk groups of the Food Group Pyramid for Diabetes are high in carbs. Foods in the Other Carbohydrates and Combination Food groups are also high in carbs. The vegetable group has a small amount of carbohydrates. The meat and fat groups have few or no carbs. The amount of carbohydrates you eat at each meal will determine how high your blood sugar rises after the meal. The other two major nutrients, protein and fat ,also have an effect on blood glucose levels, though it is not as rapid or great as carbohydrates. Most people with diabetes can control their blood sugar by limiting carbohydrate servings to 2-4 per meal and 1-2 per snack. A delicate balance of carbohydrate intake, insulin, and physical activity is necessary for the best blood sugar (glucose) levels. Eating carbohydrates increases your blood sugar (glucose) level. Exercise tends to decrease it (although not always). If the three factors are not in balance, you can have wide swings in blood sugar (glucose) levels. If you have type 1 diabetes and take a fixed dose of insulin, the carbohydrate content of your meals and snacks should be consistent from day to day. CHILDREN AND DIABETES Weight and growth patterns can help determine if a child with type 1 diabetes is getting enough nutrition. Changes in eating habits and more physical activity help improve blood sugar (glucose) control. For children with diabetes, special occasions (like birthdays or Halloween) require additional planning because of the extra sw Continue reading >>

Diet Dos And Don'ts For Diabetics!

Diet Dos And Don'ts For Diabetics!

Home > Get Ahead > Living > Health his is the concluding part of a two-part series on diet tips for the diabetics, by dietitians Priya Khanna and Seema Tarneja: Part I: Diabetics, heed these diet tips! Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder in which the body fails to convert sugars, starches and other foods into energy. Many of the foods you eat are normally converted into a type of sugar called glucose during digestion. The bloodstream then carries glucose through the body. The hormone, insulin, then turns glucose into quick energy or is stored for futher use. In diabetic people, the body either does not make enough insulin or it cannot use the insulin correctly. This is why too much glucose builds in the bloodstream. There are two major types of diabetes: 1. Type 1 This is popularly known as Juvenile Onset Diabetes. Here, the body produces little or no insulin. It occurs most often in childhood or in the teens and could be inherited. People with this type of diabetes need daily injections of insulin. They must balance their daily intake of food and activites carefully with their insulin shots to stay alive. 2. Type 2 Also known as Adult Onset Diabetes, this occurs around 35 to 40 years. The more common of the two types, it accounts for about 80 per cent of the diabetics. Here, though the pancreas produce adequate insulin, body cells show reduced sensitivity towards it. Type 2 diabetes is usually triggered by obesity. The best way to fight it is by weight loss, exercise and dietary control. Sometimes, oral medication or insulin injections are also needed. ~ Symptoms of diabetes Here are a few: Extreme thirst and hunger Frequent urination Sores or bruises that heal slowly Dry, itchy skin Unexplained weight loss Unusual tiredness or drowsiness Tingling or numb Continue reading >>

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

For folks with diabetes, weight loss is a natural form of “medication.” Reams of research prove that losing even just a few pounds is an effective way to control blood sugar or reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the first place. But in an ironic twist, losing weight may be more difficult if you have type 2 diabetes. And the reason isn’t just a lack of willpower. Too often, diet plans don’t work for people with diabetes because the metabolism changes associated with blood sugar problems may increase appetite, slow down fat burning, and encourage fat storage. Now breakthrough research has revealed a better way for people to lose weight and reduce insulin resistance. The secret is a concept called intermittent fasting. British researchers created this revolutionary new diet, which strictly limits caloric intake for two days of the week but permits larger portions for the remainder. Women who followed the plan lost almost twice as much fat as those who restricted calories every day. Within three months, participants reduced insulin resistance by 25 percent more on nonfast days and inflammation by 8 percent more than people who dieted continuously. Why Does this Particular Diabetes Diet Plan Work? It counteracts the effects of “diabesity,” where blood sugar problems and excess body fat meet. Just a small amount of excess weight and a genetic tendency for metabolism problems can trigger a cascade of health issues, including high cholesterol, high blood pressure, immune system problems, and hormonal imbalances. This constellation of health problems is caused by a modern lifestyle that is out of sync with our genetic inheritance. Researchers theorize that because humans evolved during alternating periods of feast and famine, many of us inherited variou Continue reading >>

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