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Type 1 Diabetes Weight Loss Tips

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: Weight Loss Tips

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: Weight Loss Tips

Currently, almost 90% of patients living with type 2 diabetes are overweight. So, it’s not surprising that losing weight is the single best thing you can do to prevent or reduce the severity of type 2 diabetes. If you’re overweight and living with type 2 diabetes, losing weight should be one of your top priorities. To help you on your weight loss journey, we’ve put together some important tips to help you get started with managing your weight while living with type 2 diabetes. Weight Loss Tips for Living with Type 2 Diabetes Managing Expectations Losing weight (and keeping it off) is a tough challenge for most people. This is why it’s so important to have realistic expectations when getting started. Usually, a reduction in just 5 – 7% of total body weight (typically around 10-15 pounds) can have a significant impact on your life and can help slow down the progression of the disease. As an added advantage, cholesterol levels and blood pressure levels also benefit. Losing more than 5-7% is a great long term goal but focusing on an achievable goal when getting started can have a significant impact on the success of your long term weight loss goals. Changing Your Mindset Getting into the right mindset to lose weight is half the battle. As we always say, get your mind in good shape and then allow your body to follow. It’s important to talk with your doctor before beginning any major weight loss or exercise routines but, depending on your unique situation, there’s a chance that you might have to start your weight loss efforts with just a walking or mild-biking routine until you’re able and approved to advance to more strenuous exercises. If this is the case then you need to make sure you’re committed to what could be a long and slow journey, especially at th Continue reading >>

Diet Dos And Don'ts For Diabetics!

Diet Dos And Don'ts For Diabetics!

Home > Get Ahead > Living > Health his is the concluding part of a two-part series on diet tips for the diabetics, by dietitians Priya Khanna and Seema Tarneja: Part I: Diabetics, heed these diet tips! Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder in which the body fails to convert sugars, starches and other foods into energy. Many of the foods you eat are normally converted into a type of sugar called glucose during digestion. The bloodstream then carries glucose through the body. The hormone, insulin, then turns glucose into quick energy or is stored for futher use. In diabetic people, the body either does not make enough insulin or it cannot use the insulin correctly. This is why too much glucose builds in the bloodstream. There are two major types of diabetes: 1. Type 1 This is popularly known as Juvenile Onset Diabetes. Here, the body produces little or no insulin. It occurs most often in childhood or in the teens and could be inherited. People with this type of diabetes need daily injections of insulin. They must balance their daily intake of food and activites carefully with their insulin shots to stay alive. 2. Type 2 Also known as Adult Onset Diabetes, this occurs around 35 to 40 years. The more common of the two types, it accounts for about 80 per cent of the diabetics. Here, though the pancreas produce adequate insulin, body cells show reduced sensitivity towards it. Type 2 diabetes is usually triggered by obesity. The best way to fight it is by weight loss, exercise and dietary control. Sometimes, oral medication or insulin injections are also needed. ~ Symptoms of diabetes Here are a few: Extreme thirst and hunger Frequent urination Sores or bruises that heal slowly Dry, itchy skin Unexplained weight loss Unusual tiredness or drowsiness Tingling or numb Continue reading >>

Two New Weight-loss Drugs Available For Patients With Diabetes

Two New Weight-loss Drugs Available For Patients With Diabetes

With the FDA approval and coverage of new prescription weight-loss drugs last year, healthcare professionals have two more options to consider when treating obesity. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009–2010 saw this major public health challenge affect more than one-third of adults and almost 17% of children and adolescents. Obesity places individuals at increased risk for several chronic diseases, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Weight loss in patients with diabetes has been associated with improved glycemic control and improved lipid profiles. Although healthcare professionals have counseled patients about diet and exercise as the main approach for weight reduction, some patients continue to struggle and may seek alternative methods beyond caloric restriction and the treadmill. Lorcaserin approval In June 2012, FDA approved lorcaserin (Belviq, Arena Pharmaceuticals/ Eisai), a serotonin 2C receptor agonist, indicated as an adjunct to diet and increased physical activity for chronic weight management in adult patients who are obese or overweight and have at least one weight-related comorbidity (e.g., hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes). This was the first weight-loss prescription approved in 13 years, since FDA approved orlistat, a reversible inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases. Lorcaserin was approved on the basis of data from three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials lasting from 52 to 104 weeks. At one year, approximately 47% of patients without diabetes in studies 1 and 2 lost ≥5% body weight, and approximately 22% achieved a loss of 10% body weight or more. In the third study, 37.5% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus lost ≥5% body weight and about 16% achieved Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

The Risks of Treating Diabetes with Drugs Are FAR Worse than the Disease There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes arent aware of their circumstances, either. The latest diabetes statistics 1 echo an increase in diabetes cases, both diagnosed and undiagnosed. By some estimates, diabetes has increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years! At least 29 million Americans are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million are prediabetic . Whats hidden behind this medical smokescreen is that type 2 diabetes is completely preventable. The cure lies in a true understanding of the underlying cause (which is impaired insulin and leptin sensitivity) and implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle adjustments that spell phenomenal benefits to your health. Also known as diabetes mellitus, type 1 diabetes is a chronic health condition traditionally characterized by elevated levels of glucose in your blood, often simply called high blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes dubbed juvenile onset diabetes is the relatively uncommon type, affecting only about 1 in 250 Americans. Occurring in individuals younger than age 20, it has no known cure. Whats most concerning about juvenile diabetes is that, these numbers have been going up steadily right along with type 2 diabetes: for non-Hispanic white youths ages Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Not only are 86 million Americans prediabetic, but 90% of them don't even know they have it, the Centers for Disease Control reports. What's more, doctors diagnose as many as 1.5 million new cases of diabetes each year, according to the American Diabetes Association. Whether you're at risk, prediabetic or following a diabetic diet as suggested by your doctor, a few simple strategies can help control blood sugar and potentially reverse the disease entirely. Plus, implementing just a few of these dietary changes can have other beneficial effects like weight loss, all without sacrificing flavor or feeling deprived. First, let's start with the basics. What is diabetes? There are two main forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that's usually diagnosed during childhood. Environmental and genetic factors can lead to the destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. That's the hormone responsible for delivering glucose (sugar) to your cells for metabolism and storage. In contrast, type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed in adulthood and caused by a variety of lifestyle factors like obesity, physical inactivity and high cholesterol. Typically, type 2 diabetics still have functioning beta cells, meaning that they're still producing insulin. However, the peripheral tissues become less sensitive to the hormone, and the liver produces more glucose, causing high blood sugar. When left unmanaged, type 2 diabetics may stop producing insulin altogether. While you may have some symptoms of high blood sugar (nausea, lethargy, frequent thirst and/or urination), a clinical diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes requires a repeat test of your blood sugar levels. How does a diabetic diet help? Unlike many other health conditions, the incredible th Continue reading >>

Sports Nutrition And Type 1 Diabetes

Sports Nutrition And Type 1 Diabetes

Why is regular exercise good for diabetes? Hopefully, you're already aware of how exercise can have a positive impact on your diabetes management, as well as your general wellbeing. If not, here are just a few of the benefits of building regular exercise into your routine: a decrease in certain blood lipids – and an increase in beneficial cholesterol a decrease in blood pressure a positive effect on mood as a stress reliever, especially when performed in nature improvement in sleep quality ...and there's more From the point of view of day-to-day diabetes management, one of the most important benefits of exercise is that it increases insulin sensitivity. As a result, this translates to needing less insulin for the same amount of carbohydrate, and it can also dampen post-meal blood sugar spikes. The insulin sensitivity effect of aerobic exercise usually starts to decline within 1–2 days. Therefore, regular aerobic activity is essential to keeping the body in an insulin-sensitive state. At times, it can feel like a mental workout before you’ve even started exercising: deciding if and how much you need to eat before and during exercise, in addition to deciding what to do with insulin before, during and after exercise. We will be discussing the various factors to consider when making these decisions in order to help you manage your diabetes during exercise. Exercising almost daily (in contrast to exercising only twice a week) will ensure that you remain in a more insulin-sensitive state most of the time, instead of having varying levels of insulin sensitivity from one day to the next. This should translate to less variability in blood glucose and make it easier to manage your diabetes. The challenge of managing diabetes during exercise What are the challenges? In a per Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetes-friendly Diets To Help You Lose Weight

The Best Diabetes-friendly Diets To Help You Lose Weight

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for everyone, but if you have diabetes, excess weight may make it harder to control your blood sugar levels and may increase your risk for some complications. Losing weight can be extra challenging for people with diabetes. Eating healthfully while you try to reduce weight is important for everyone, but if you have diabetes, choosing the wrong diet could harm your health. Weight loss pills and starvation diets should be avoided, but there are many popular diets that may be beneficial. Diabetes and diet: What’s the connection? If you have diabetes, you should focus on eating lean protein, high-fiber, less processed carbs, fruits, and vegetables, low-fat dairy, and healthy vegetable-based fats such as avocado, nuts, canola oil, or olive oil. You should also manage your carbohydrate intake. Have your doctor or dietitian provide you with a target carb number for meals and snacks. Generally, women should aim for about 45 grams of carb per meal while men should aim for 60. Ideally, these would come from complex carbs, fruits, and vegetables. The American Diabetes Association offers a comprehensive list of the best foods for those with diabetes. Their recommendations include: Protein Fruits and vegetables Dairy Grains beans berries low- or nonfat milk whole grains, such as brown rice and whole-wheat pasta nuts sweet potatoes low- or nonfat yogurt poultry nonstarchy vegetables such as asparagus, broccoli, collard greens, kale, and okra eggs oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, tuna, and sardines Staying hydrated is also important when it comes to overall health. Choose noncaloric options such as water and tea whenever possible. For people with diabetes, there are certain foods that should be limited. These foods can cause spikes in the Continue reading >>

Weight Loss With Insulin Resistance: Diet Tips And Strategies

Weight Loss With Insulin Resistance: Diet Tips And Strategies

According to the World Health Organization, the prevalence of diabetes has risen significantly over the last 30-plus years. In 1980, just 4.7 percent of the world's population had diabetes, but by 2014 this figure had soared to 8.5 percent. This means approximately 422 million people were living with diabetes in 2014. These astounding statistics do not take into account the additional number of people with prediabetes or insulin resistance. In this article, we take a look at what insulin resistance is and what its relationship with body weight is. How might being overweight lead to insulin resistance and what can be done to lose weight? What is insulin resistance? Insulin resistance leads to a condition known as prediabetes, which means that a person's blood sugar level is high, but not high enough to qualify as diabetes. Having insulin resistance is a warning that, without intervention and effective lifestyle changes, someone with prediabetes may go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Sugar (glucose) is the body's main source of food energy. People obtain it from the food they eat. After food is broken down in the body, the sugar enters the bloodstream. In order to use it as energy, the body's cells need to "pick up" the sugar. Insulin, which is a hormone produced by the pancreas, helps this happen by moving the sugar out of the blood and enables it to enter the body's cells. Insulin maintains blood sugar levels, ensuring they are not too high or too low. However, when blood sugar levels are persistently high, the body's cells stop responding to insulin as effectively. This is known as insulin resistance. When insulin resistance occurs, sugar is unable to enter the cells as successfully, and too much remains in the bloodstream. Higher levels of sugar in the blood place a de Continue reading >>

Losing Weight With Type 2 Diabetes

Losing Weight With Type 2 Diabetes

Losing weight when you have type 2 diabetes may seem impossible at first, but once you learn how to incorporate a few healthy habits into your life, it’s not so hard. Discover simple ways to lose weight with type 2 diabetes. When you have type 2 diabetes and you’re overweight, managing your weight can be an important part of your treatment plan. Watching the numbers on the scale can lead to a smaller waistline and improve your cardiovascular health. Also, by losing weight—even a small amount (about 7% of your current weight)—people with type 2 diabetes can become less insulin resistant, making them able to use their own insulin better. Continue reading >>

7 Killer Weight Loss Tips For Those Of Us With Type 1 Diabetes

7 Killer Weight Loss Tips For Those Of Us With Type 1 Diabetes

The truth is weight loss is weight loss, but for those of us with type 1 or insulin dependent diabetes, there are certain considerations we have to think about in order to be successful in both our weight loss efforts and our overall blood sugar and A1c goals. In all my posts it’s important for me to make certain that I apply all the tips and strategies weight loss experts use to those of us with type 1 so we can ultimately have the body and the health we want. I recently read an article that discussed 7 excellent tips on weight loss and each and everyone easily apply to those with type 1 diabetes. I’m excited to share them with you because one of the reasons I want to have this blog and offer those with type 1 diabetes weight loss and blood sugar tips is because I have type 1 diabetes and I struggled for over a decade to try and find the right balance. I know how tough it is to find the right information and how frustrating the disease can be. So I want to make it easier for others to find this information and be successful so they don’t spend a decade frustrated and doing silly things to try and accomplish their goals as I did. 1. Remember “same old same old” is the way to go It is so easy to get bored with the foods you eat and decide you are going to mix things up day after day and meal after meal. Unfortunately studies show that those who eat a larger variety of foods during the day often over indulge and gain more weight than those who stick to the same foods day after day. I am fortunate and never get bored with what I eat but I know this is not necessarily the case for others. An easy way to start minimizing the variety you eat is to create 7 standard breakfasts, 7 standard lunches and 7 standard dinners. Find out which of these you like the best and w Continue reading >>

Don’t Sweat It! Exercise And Type 1 Diabetes

Don’t Sweat It! Exercise And Type 1 Diabetes

The benefits of exercise are wide ranging. Regular physical activity can help people manage their weight, sleep better, reduce the risk of some diseases, including type 2 diabetes (T2D) and heart disease, and improve overall quality of life—among other proven benefits. People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) can gain the same benefits from exercise as anyone else. Yet studies show that many people with T1D do not engage in regular physical activity owing to a fear of hypoglycemia, or dangerously low blood-glucose levels. Exercise scientists and athletes with T1D alike say that people with T1D can exercise safely and effectively. It’s a matter of observing how your body responds to exercise, learning to balance insulin, food, and physical activity, and using research-supported strategies to minimize the risk of hypoglycemia during and after exercise. Managing hypoglycemia associated with exercise Sheri Colberg-Ochs, Ph.D., professor of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA, has both professional and personal interests in understanding the risks and benefits of exercise for people with T1D. As an exercise physiologist, Dr. Colberg-Ochs studies the relationship of exercise to diabetes and lifestyle management. She has also lived with T1D for 44 years, while staying fit and active. Dr. Colberg-Ochs notes that the risk of hypoglycemia during and after exercise can be managed. “There’s not a tried and true method that works for everyone. It’s very individual, based on the type of activity and your normal diabetes regimen,” she says, “but you can certainly reduce the frequency of hypoglycemia that’s associated with being physically active.” The risk of hypoglycemia is affected by the type, duration, and intensity of physical activity. Aerobic a Continue reading >>

If I Have Diabetes, Can I Still Lose Weight With The Nutrisystem Program?

If I Have Diabetes, Can I Still Lose Weight With The Nutrisystem Program?

Yes. We know that people with diabetes have specific needs, which is why we created Nutrisystem® D®, our plan specifically designed for people with type 2 diabetes. This way to lose weight is also appropriate for people who are overweight and have type 1 diabetes, or who have pre-diabetes. The diabetes diet plan incorporates the Glycemic Index along with appropriate carbohydrate intake and portion control to help you lose weight so you can lower your blood sugar and manage your diabetes. We recommend that you consult your physician before starting any weight loss or exercise program, especially if you are taking any diabetes medications, as your dosages may need to be adjusted as early as your first day on the program. Our diabetes plan is not a cure, prevention or treatment for diabetes, and is not a substitute for diabetes medications. Losing weight helps you to lower your blood sugar so you can manage your type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes and are wondering how to lose weight with diabetes, please contact our Nutrition and Dietary Services department at 1-888-849-4686. One of our team members can help decide which diabetes weight loss plan will work best for you. Continue reading >>

Why Can’t I Lose Weight?

Why Can’t I Lose Weight?

Finding Your Trouble Spots You’re trying hard to lose weight. You’ve changed your eating habits, and you’ve been doing more physical activity than you used to. But a few weeks — or even a few months — have gone by, and the scale isn’t budging. “Why?!” you ask in frustration. “What am I doing wrong?!” Body weight is regulated mainly by the number of calories consumed and the number of calories burned off. But there are a number of other things that influence weight, and some of them can make it difficult to lose weight. This article explores what some of these are and how to overcome them. As you make the effort to lose weight, be sure you are aiming for a realistic body weight for you. A starting point for determining this is body-mass index (BMI), a measure of body fat based on height and weight. You can calculate your BMI easily with an online tool such as the one at www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi. (Note that there’s a separate BMI calculator for children and teens.) Generally, a BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 is considered normal, between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight, and 30 and higher is considered obese. However, BMI tends to overestimate body fat in athletes and other muscular people and to underestimate it in older people who have lost muscle mass. There is also some evidence that the negative health effects of overweight start at a lower BMI for Asian people. Keep in mind, too, that people come in different shapes and sizes. You don’t necessarily have to be “thin” to be healthy, but losing some excess fat can improve your health in a number of ways. Talk to your health-care team about your weight-loss goals and about what a healthy weight is for you. Frequent hypoglycemia Frequent episodes of hypoglycemia, or low blood glu Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Your Patients With Type 1 Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Tips For Treating Your Patients With Type 1 Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Tips for Treating Your Patients with Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease celiac disease , Clinical Dietitian , diabetes , type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. Individually, they each require a high level of knowledge and vigilance to manage. Counting carbs, reading labels, buying specialty foods, doctor visits, deciphering food additives, you name it. Now imagine combining the two conditions. Carb counting just got a lot more complicated. The Link Between Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease Both Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease are classified as autoimmune disorders, which means a persons own body is attacking itself in some capacity. For Type 1 diabetes, the body has destroyed the beta cells on the pancreas, which produce insulin. And for celiac disease, the body attacks its own small intestine when gluten is consumed, resulting in damage to the intestinal lining. So whats the connection between Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease? According to the Celiac Disease Foundation (CDF), having one autoimmune disorder puts you at increased risk for developing another.The incidence of celiac disease in individuals with Type 1 diabetes is six to ten times higher than in the general population.For this reason, CDF recommends screening for celiac disease in all patients who have been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, even if they are asymptomatic because many of the symptoms of celiac disease can easily be mistaken for complications of Type 1 diabetes: What to Know When Treating a Patient with Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease If it werent enough of a challenge to count and balance intake of carbohydrates and remove all traces of gluten from ones diet, now you are tasked with helping your clients do both at the same time. Here are some tips to remember: Even if a pa Continue reading >>

10 Weight-loss Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

10 Weight-loss Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Losing weight with diabetes When you have type 2 diabetes, losing just 5% of your weight can improve blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol. However, as if dropping pounds isn't tough enough, diabetes can make it even more difficult. Many people who begin taking insulin to control their blood sugar see the scale tick up, and other diabetes drugs, including sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, and meglitinides, have also been associated with weight gain. (Although some, like metformin, may help you lose weight.) What's more, hormonal changes that occur in your late 30s and early 40s add to insulin resistance, which is when your body fails to use insulin efficiently, says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. "Metabolism slows down and the risk of gaining weight increases, especially around the midsection," she says. Here, top experts give their best advice to make losing weight with diabetes a little easier. Taste the Mediterranean Complex carbs like vegetables, fruits, and whole grains speed up weight loss, while a diet high in processed simple carbs such as white bread, pasta, rice, and sweets will do the opposite, says Dr. Hatipoglu. Since people with diabetes have twice the risk of heart disease and stroke as those without, your best road to weight loss may be a Mediterranean-style diet, which has been linked to better heart health in numerous studies (and fits with American Diabetes Association recommendations). Try to eat more veggies, omega-3 rich foods (salmon, oatmeal, nuts) and healthy fats (olive oil, avocado), but keep in mind that even healthy fats can be high in calories; keep saturated fat and simple carbs to a minimum. All that said, there is no one-size-fits-all diet for diabetes, so talk to your doc or diabetes educator about Continue reading >>

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