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Type 1 Diabetes Weight Loss Symptoms

Is Weight Loss Caused By Diabetes Dangerous?

Is Weight Loss Caused By Diabetes Dangerous?

home / health & living center / diet & weight management a-z list / is weight loss caused by diabetes dangerous article Is Weight Loss Caused by Diabetes Dangerous? Medical Author: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. I have a friend that is 35 and has diabetes . For the past eightyears, his weight has always been in check and if anything he may have beena little overweight . Just recently, he has lost a lot of weight and he toldme that he weighs less than he did in high school. I think he looks toothin and I am concerned about his health with him being a diabetic. Shouldthere be a concern and what kind of advice can you give me to pass on tohim. We often assume weight loss is good and healthy. A slow steady intentional weight loss using nutritional change and exercise is associated with beneficial effects on the heart, blood pressure , and cholesterol levels . In addition, weight loss can reduce " insulin resistance " and makemuscles and fat tissues more sensitive to circulating insulin levels in the blood. What type of diabetes causes weight loss? A reduction in insulin resistance is problematic because insulin is needed tohelp glucose enter these tissues to be metabolized. If these tissues areresistant to insulin, higher than normal levels are needed for this processto occur. This is often the case in Type 2 diabetes . As a result, a viciouscycle occurs, the higher the insulin levels are, the harder it is to loseweight (insulin is anabolic, and is a hormone that likes to store Continue reading >>

Warning Signs Of Type 1 Diabetes

Warning Signs Of Type 1 Diabetes

Early diagnosis saves lives Recognizing the symptoms of Type 1 diabetes is critical. Although Type 1 develops gradually, as the body’s insulin production decreases, blood glucose levels can become dangerously high once insulin production is outpaced. Symptoms may develop rapidly and can be mistaken for other illnesses such as the flu, even by doctors. A misdiagnosis can have tragic consequences. Many people are familiar with Type 2 diabetes, but there is an under awareness for Type 1. Learn other forms of diabetes. Who gets Type 1? Anyone, at any age, can be diagnosed with Type 1 — it is neither preventable nor curable. While the cause is unknown, studies prove that genes together with an environmental trigger result in the immune system turning on itself and destroying the body’s beta cells. Early Symptoms of Type 1 diabetes weight loss (despite an increased appetite) unquenchable thirst blurry vision decreased energy level frequent urination a fruity smell to the breath in children with no previous issues, wetting the bed in babies and toddlers, heavy diapers More Advanced Symptom stomach pain fatigue or weakness nausea or vomiting rapid, heavy breathing loss of consciousness What to do If you recognize any of the symptoms, contact your doctor immediately. A simple in-office test for sugar in the urine is used for diagnosis. If that test is positive, then a drop of blood from the fingertip will confirm diabetes. Every day, thousands of adults and children around the world are diagnosed, but many go undetected. Early diagnosis cannot prevent Type 1, but it can head off potentially devastating, even fatal, health concerns. Download Warning Signs of Type 1 Diabetes poster HERE. Check out our Educational Posters (in English, Spanish and French)! Continue reading >>

Unexplained Weight Loss With Diabetes

Unexplained Weight Loss With Diabetes

You might be aware that as a metabolic disorder, some forms of diabetes come with excessive weight. But diabetes might also cause a sudden drop in weight too. In fact, many patients who are ultimately diagnosed with diabetes first go to their doctor with concerns about unexplained weight loss. Several mechanisms are behind this symptom. Weight loss can occur as a consequence of high blood sugar, dehydration, muscle breakdown and problems with your thyroid. Video of the Day Although both type 1 and type 2 diabetes can involve fairly dramatic weight loss over several days at the onset of the disease, it tends to be more common among people with type 1. In both cases, the cause is that your body fails to adequately deal with insulin. The job of insulin is to transport glucose from the foods you eat into your cells to provide energy for all the work that’s required to keep you alive. However, most type 1 diabetics don’t produce insulin. Type 2 diabetics either don’t produce enough insulin or their bodies don’t respond to it properly. Consequently, even if you eat normally, that blood sugar simply builds up and gets excreted in your urine. This causes weight loss, but it could also damage your organs if you don't receive treatment. If you experience an unexplained weight loss, surpassing 5 percent of your body weight within days, see your health care provider as soon as possible. Another symptom of diabetes associated with weight loss is frequent urination. When you urinate more frequently and don’t drink enough to replace the lost fluid, you become dehydrated. Urination increases in diabetes, because your kidneys have to work harder to filter the excess glucose building up in your system. The increased glucose in the urine draws fluid from your tissues. When you l Continue reading >>

Weight Loss

Weight Loss

Loss of weight can be a sudden symptom of type 1 diabetes and can typically lead to a loss of muscle mass in type 2 diabetes. Causes Possible causes of a sudden and unintentional loss of weight include: Diabetes Addison’s disease Celiac disease Cancer Depression Overactive thyroid When to see your doctor It is important to see your doctor if you have unintentionally lost a significant amount of weight – 10lbs (4.5kg) or 5% of your body mass within 6 to 12 months. If a child is slow in putting on weight, this could indicate type 1 diabetes, particularly if other symptoms of diabetes are present. Weight loss and type 1 diabetes Sudden loss of weight, or failure to gain weight in children, can be one of the more noticeable signs of type 1 diabetes. When the body cannot produce enough insulin, this prevents the body getting glucose from the blood into cells. To compensate, the body will break down fat and protein to produce ketones, an alternative source of energy. Sudden weight loss in diagnosed type 1 diabetes, can be brought on by deliberate omission of insulin injections. This is known as diabulimia and can greatly increase the chance of developing long term diabetes complications at an early age. Weight loss and type 2 diabetes Loss of muscle mass is a relatively common sign of type 2 diabetes and should prompt a visit to your doctor to get a diagnosis. Dramatic loss of weight can also occur in people diagnosed with diabetes if the body significantly loses its ability to produce insulin. Your health team should measure your A1c at least once a year and pick up on any rises in blood sugar levels which can then be treated. Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high levels of glucose in the bloodstream which leads to hyperglycemia if untreat Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone needed to allow sugar (glucose) to enter cells to produce energy. Different factors, including genetics and some viruses, may contribute to type 1 diabetes. Although type 1 diabetes usually appears during childhood or adolescence, it can develop in adults. Despite active research, type 1 diabetes has no cure. Treatment focuses on managing blood sugar levels with insulin, diet and lifestyle to prevent complications. Symptoms Type 1 diabetes signs and symptoms can appear relatively suddenly and may include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Bed-wetting in children who previously didn't wet the bed during the night Extreme hunger Unintended weight loss Irritability and other mood changes Fatigue and weakness Blurred vision When to see a doctor Consult your doctor if you notice any of the above signs and symptoms in you or your child. Causes The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. Usually, the body's own immune system — which normally fights harmful bacteria and viruses — mistakenly destroys the insulin-producing (islet, or islets of Langerhans) cells in the pancreas. Other possible causes include: Genetics Exposure to viruses and other environmental factors The role of insulin Once a significant number of islet cells are destroyed, you'll produce little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone that comes from a gland situated behind and below the stomach (pancreas). The pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream. Insulin circulates, allowing sugar to enter your cells. Insulin lowers the amount of sugar in your bloodstream. As your blood sugar level drops, so does the secre Continue reading >>

7 Signs You Could Have Type 1 Diabetes

7 Signs You Could Have Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes symptoms Type 1 diabetes symptoms usually arrive without warning. Suddenly, someone might have unexplained weight loss, constant thirst, and the need to go to the bathroom all the time. These are all signs that the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas have been destroyed by an immune system gone awry. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes the pancreas to stop producing insulin. “We need insulin to convert food to energy and to take it to the organs,” explains Carlos Blaschke, MD, associate scientist with the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Without insulin to bring sugar to the cells, the cells starve, he says, and send distress signals–the first signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes–around the body. “Sugar also starts accumulating in the blood,” Dr. Blaschke adds, which can also spark symptoms. There’s no way to prevent or cure type 1 diabetes. The best thing you can do is watch for telltale symptoms that can become life-threatening quickly. The sooner you notice something is wrong, the sooner you can be treated. Talk to your doctor if you experience these signs of type 1 diabetes. Frequent urination Without insulin, sugar accumulates in your bloodstream. The kidneys, which would normally reabsorb sugar, quickly become overwhelmed. “As the blood glucose rises past a level that can be reabsorbed by the kidneys, glucose is lost in the urine and more water is lost as a result," says David A. Finken, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. Frequent urination, also called polyuria, is easier to detect in kids than in adults, especially in babies and infants. “Parents might notice more urine in the diaper, they’re changin Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults

For years, distinguishing between the various types of diabetes was pretty straightforward: “Juvenile diabetes,” an autoimmune disease, was diagnosed primarily in children and teenagers when their own body’s immune system destroyed the insulin-producing (beta) cells in their pancreas. “Adult-onset diabetes” occurred in adults and was generally associated with insulin resistance and often with overweight. And “gestational diabetes” occurred in pregnant women and disappeared once the pregnancy was over. In the past 25 years, however, determining what type of diabetes a person has has become more of a challenge. In large part, that’s because more and more children and teenagers are now being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes — the type that occurred predominantly in adults in generations past. Most of these children and teens are overweight. At the same time, it’s becoming clearer that Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age and sometimes occurs in people who are overweight. In addition, another type of diabetes, called latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, or LADA, that shares some characteristics with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, has been recognized. Muddying the water further is the realization that diabetic ketoacidosis, an acute, life-threatening complication of diabetes that is caused by a lack of insulin, can occur in people with Type 2 diabetes — not just in people with Type 1, as was previously thought. And while gestational diabetes is still diagnosed only in pregnant women, it is sometimes discovered that what is thought to be gestational diabetes is really Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes that happens to start during pregnancy. The incidence of diabetes has increased so greatly around the world in the past 25 years that health organizations and med Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Although the signs of diabetes can begin to show early, sometimes it takes a person a while to recognize the symptoms. This often makes it seem like signs and symptoms of diabetes appear suddenly. That’s why it’s important to pay attention to your body, rather than simply brushing them off. To that end, here are some type 1 and type 2 diabetes symptoms that you may want to watch out for: If you’re experiencing frequent urination your body might be telling you that your kidneys are trying to expel excess sugar in your blood. The resulting dehydration may then cause extreme thirst. Along the same lines, the lack of available fluids may also give you dry mouth and itchy skin. If you experience increased hunger or unexpected weight loss it could be because your body isn’t able to get adequate energy from the food you eat. High blood sugar levels can affect blood flow and cause nerve damage, which makes healing difficult. So having slow-healing cuts/sores is also a potential sign of diabetes. Yeast infections may occur in men and women who have diabetes as a result of yeast feeding on glucose. Other signs of diabetes Pay attention if you find yourself feeling drowsy or lethargic; pain or numbness in your extremities; vision changes; fruity or sweet-smelling breath which is one of the symptoms of high ketones; and experiencing nausea or vomiting—as these are additional signs that something is not right. If there’s any question, see your doctor immediately to ensure that your blood sugar levels are safe and rule out diabetes. So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of… Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

Unexplained Weight Loss? Why You Need To See A Doctor

Unexplained Weight Loss? Why You Need To See A Doctor

All of us cangain or lose a pound or two; we indulge a little too much,and then we put in a few extra workouts. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy But if you havent tightened the belt on your diet or ramped up your exercise routine and your weight is still dropping, talk to your doctor. While weight loss of just a pound or two isnt a reason for concern, unexplained weight loss of 10 pounds or more may meansomething is wrong. It could be an early sign of diabetes . This weight loss can occur relatively quickly over a few weeks to a couple of months. Insulin is a hormone that allows your body to use glucose (sugar) for energy. If you have type 2 diabetes , your body doesnt use insulin effectively, and cant transport the glucose to the cells. Instead, it builds up in the blood. When the glucose doesnt arrive in your cells, your body thinks its starving and finds a way to compensate. It creates energy by burning fat and muscle at a rapid pace. This causes unexplained weight loss. Your kidneys also begin working overtime to eliminate the excess sugars in the blood. This uses additional energy and can cause damage to the kidneys. Type 1 diabetes has a similar pattern, but instead of being unable to use insulin, your body stops producing it altogether. Unexplained weight loss can occur in people who have type 2 diabetes, but its more commonly found in people with type 1 . Parents are often the first to notice the unusual weight loss in a child with type 1 diabetes. What othersymptoms should you watch for? Weight loss from diabetes is not usually a standalone symptom. It is typically accompanied by other signs and symptoms including: Continue reading >>

Unexplained Weight Loss

Unexplained Weight Loss

Tweet Unexplained weight loss is the term used to describe a decrease in body weight that occurs unintentionally and can be a warning sign of diabetes. The amount you weigh is determined by a number of factors including age, your calorie intake and overall health. Once you reach middle adulthood, your weight should remain relatively stable from year to year. Losing or gaining a few pounds here and there is normal, but unexplained weight loss that is significant (10 lbs/4.5kg or more or over 5% of your body weight) or persistent may signal an underlying medical condition. Unexplained weight loss means weight loss that occurs without trying through dieting or exercising. What are the possible causes of unexplained weight loss? Unintentional or unexplained weight loss can be caused by a number of things, including depression, certain medication and diabetes. Potential causes of unexplained weight loss include: Addison’s disease Coeliac disease Chronic diarrhoea Dementia Diabetes mellitus Eating disorders (anorexia and bulimia) Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency HIV/AIDS Hypercalcemia Hyperthyroidism Malnutrition Medicines, including chemotherapy drugs, laxatives, and thyroid medications Parkinson’s disease Recreational drugs, including amphetamines and cocaine Tuberculosis Diabetes and sudden weight loss In people with diabetes, insufficient insulin prevents the body from getting glucose from the blood into the body's cells to use as energy. When this occurs, the body starts burning fat and muscle for energy, causing a reduction in overall body weight. Unexpected weight loss is often noticed in people prior to a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes but it may also affect people with type 2 diabetes. When to call your doctor If you have unintentionally lost more than 5% of your Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Symptoms And Treatment

Type 1 Diabetes: Symptoms And Treatment

MORE Type I diabetes is a disease where the pancreas stops producing insulin, a hormone that signals the body's cells to absorb glucose from the bloodstream and convert it into energy. Type I diabetes is an autoimmune disease, occurring when the body's own immune system destroys the islet cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. The disease had formerly been called "juvenile diabetes" and "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus," but the American Diabetes Association and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) recommended it be referred to only as Type I diabetes in 1997. Type I diabetes, which accounts for about 5 percent of all cases of diabetes, according to the ADA, is typically diagnosed in younger individuals. In some adults, the body simply doesn't produce enough insulin, which is known as Type 2 diabetes, a far more common disease. Symptoms & tests The inability to produce insulin can have a number of symptoms. A lack of sugar in the blood cells can result in hunger, as well as fatigue. Weight loss is also a frequent symptom of Type I diabetes, as tissue will shrink without sugar being stored in it. Additionally, the imbalance in sugar leads to the flow of fluid from the cells into the rest of the body. Thirst, frequent urination, blurred vision and tingling in the body's extremities can all result from this situation. "What we see in children is that they start being hungry and thirsty, and they're urinating a lot," said Dr. Spyros Mezitis, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "They're feeling weak, they're losing weight." Some of these symptoms can become more extreme without treatment, resulting in blindness, amputation of limbs or kidney failure, among other complications. It remains unclear what trigge Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease marked by high blood glucose (sugar) levels, called hyperglycemia. It’s considered an autoimmune disease, resulting from an immune system attack on the pancreatic beta cells that produce insulin — a hormone that helps certain cells in the body absorb glucose. And without enough insulin, your blood glucose levels can rise to unhealthy levels, causing a range of health problems. Type 1 diabetes makes up only about 5 percent of all diabetes cases, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). By comparison, type 2 diabetes — which develops when cells cannot use insulin properly — makes up 90 to 95 percent of all diabetes cases. However, type 1 and 2 diabetes often share the same symptoms associated with hyperglycemia. Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms Possible symptoms of type 1 diabetes include: Excessive thirst or hunger Increased urination Unexplained weight loss Numbness or tingling in the hands or feet, or loss of feeling in the feet Fatigue Dry, itchy skin Vision changes, including blurry eyesight Slow-healing sores and increased rate of infections Nausea, vomiting, and stomach pains (in cases where the disease develops quickly) Without insulin and the ability to use sugar for energy, the body may start breaking down fat as an alternate source of energy, resulting in high levels of ketones (toxic acids) in the blood. This condition, called diabetic ketoacidosis, may cause: Dry skin and mouth Inability to keep fluids down Stomach pain Shortness of breath Flushed face "Fruity" smell to breath Diabetes and Hypoglycemia People with type 1 diabetes must take insulin — usually by injection, or by using an insulin pump — to provide their cells with the necessary hormone. However, too much insulin can cause cells t Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 1 diabetes develops gradually, but the symptoms may seem to come on suddenly. If you notice that you or your child have several of the symptoms listed below, make an appointment to see the doctor. Here’s why symptoms seem to develop suddenly: something triggers the development of type 1 diabetes (researchers think it’s a viral infection—read this article on what causes type 1 diabetes, and the body loses its ability to make insulin. However, at that point, there’s still insulin in the body so glucose levels are still normal. Over time, a decreasing amount of insulin is made in the body, but that can take years. When there’s no more insulin in the body, blood glucose levels rise quickly, and these symptoms can rapidly develop: Extreme weakness and/or tiredness Extreme thirst—dehydration Increased urination Abdominal pain Nausea and/or vomiting Blurry vision Wounds that don’t heal well Irritability or quick mood changes Changes to (or loss of) menstruation There are also signs of type 1 diabetes. Signs are different from symptoms in that they can be measured objectively; symptoms are experienced and reported by the patient. Signs of type 1 diabetes include: Weight loss—despite eating more Rapid heart rate Reduced blood pressure (falling below 90/60) Low body temperature (below 97º F) There is an overall lack of public awareness of the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes. Making yourself aware of the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes is a great way to be proactive about your health and the health of your family members. If you notice any of these signs or symptoms, it’s possible that you have (or your child has) type 1 diabetes. A doctor can make that diagnosis by checking blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

By the dLife Editors Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that occurs when insulin-producing beta cells within the pancreas are gradually destroyed and eventually fail to produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body’s cells use glucose for energy. Blood glucose (or blood sugar) is manufactured from the food we eat (primarily carbohydrates) and by the liver. If glucose can’t be absorbed by the cells, it builds up in the bloodstream instead. Untreated, the high blood sugar levels that result can be toxic to every system of the body, causing serious complications. Type 1 accounts for 5 to 10 percent of all diagnosed diabetes in the United States. Although type 1 diabetes develops most often in children and young adults, the disease can be diagnosed at any age. Of the 1.25 million Americans living with type 1 diabetes, about 200,000 are younger than twenty years old. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 diabetes is more common in Caucasians than in those of Latino, African American, or other non-Caucasian backgrounds. The rate of type 1 diabetes has been increasing by roughly 2 to 5 percent each year, globally. Type 1 Diabetes Causes Researchers have identified several genes associated with the development of type 1 diabetes. While the causes are complex and not completely understood, the prevailing belief about the etiology, or cause, of type 1 diabetes is that while someone may have a genetic predisposition for developing the disease, it takes an environmental trigger or series of triggers (e.g., virus, toxin, drug) to set off the autoimmune process that destroys insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Risk factors for developing type 1 diabetes may include: Family history A child with an immediate relative with type 1 diabetes has a risk of developin Continue reading >>

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