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Type 1 Diabetes Diet Reddit

How To Handle Pre-diabetes

How To Handle Pre-diabetes

A diagnosis of pre diabetes can be a serious situation when a patient realizes they are at a higher risk for developing diabetes type 2. Fortunately, this condition can be treated and even reversed. Discover some simple lifestyle changes you can make to prevent developing pre diabetes. Finding out You Have Pre Diabetes Pre diabetes occurs when your blood sugar levels climb above normal. There are 3 tests that are used to diagnose pre diabetes or diabetes type 2. The actual numbers for pre diabetes are 100-125 mg/dl when using a fasting blood glucose test. The A1C or 3 month average test would be between 5.7%-6.4%. The oral glucose tolerance test requires drinking a sweet solution instead of drawing blood. The pre diabetes numbers are between 141-199mg/dl. The good news is your blood sugar levels can be reduced back to normal in most situations. Risk Factors Usually there are no symptoms with pre diabetes and it is picked up at a screening or physical. Some risk factors which may preclude pre diabetes are being overweight, having a body mass index over 25, and a high waist circumference over 35 inches for a female or 40 inches for a male. Other risks are being over 40, inactivity and a family history of type 2 diabetes. Discuss the possibility of type 2 diabetes with your health care team. People from certain ethnic backgrounds may also be at a greater risk, including African-Americans, Latinos, Native-Americans and Asian-Americans. Certain health conditions are associated with a higher risk of developing pre diabetes which could lead to diabetes type 2. Research has shown sleep issues, such as sleep apnea or insomnia can increase the possibility of insulin resistance. People who work varied rotating shifts may be at an increased risk. Other conditions that are associate Continue reading >>

Reversing Diabetes Is Possible

Reversing Diabetes Is Possible

Bethesda, Maryland (CNN) -- When Jonathan Legg of Bethesda, Maryland, got a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes at 39, he was shocked. "I had always been pretty active," said Legg. "But it was a big wake-up call, that what I was doing and my current weight were not OK." That was two years ago. Since that time, the Morgan Stanley executive decided to make some changes and reverse his diabetes. Although his doctor recommended he go on medication to control his illness, Legg took a different approach. Instead of meds, he began to exercise every day and changed his diet, cutting out alcohol, fatty foods and watching his carbs. Do you have diabetes? How well are you managing it? "I wanted to be able to know the changes I was making were making a difference, and it wasn't the drug," said Legg. According to new statistics just out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 25.8 million people, or 8.3% of the U.S. population, are affected by either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Most, like Legg, have type 2 diabetes, which in many people develops later in life. Caused primarily by genetic makeup, a sedentary lifestyle and poor eating habits, type 2 diabetes can be reversed in some cases. By making changes to their lives such as adding exercise and improving their diets, many type 2 diabetics can drop their glucose or sugar numbers back to the normal range, reversing their condition. "We have seen numerous people reverse their condition," says Dr. Michelle Magee, director of the MedStar Diabetes Institute in Washington. "But it takes a real dedication for the rest of their lives," she notes. So why do exercise and diet help reverse diabetes? To answer that question, we first need to know why people get diabetes in the first place. Diabetes is caused when there is too much glucose Continue reading >>

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation. There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life. Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050. Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes. So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications. 1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal. Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications. 2) Myth: Eating too much sugar cause Continue reading >>

11 Things Not To Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

11 Things Not To Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

1. There is no "mild form" of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is when the body doesn't produce any insulin, while type 2 diabetes is when the body doesn't make enough insulin or the insulin it does make doesn't work properly. There's a myth that type 2 is the milder form – but it's false. "It is a commonly held belief that type 2 is the mild form and less serious than type 1 diabetes. This is in fact not true, as both type 1 and 2 diabetes can lead to serious health problems such as blindness, amputation, kidney disease, heart disease, and stroke, if not managed well. "Type 1 diabetes can be sudden onset, where a person may become quite unwell very quickly, whereas type 2 diabetes can go undetected for a number of years. Both types of diabetes need to be treated as soon as possible to avoid diabetes-related complications." – Deepa Khatri, clinical adviser, Diabetes UK 2. You don't get it from "eating too much sugar". "I didn't get it from eating too much sugar. There's nothing I can't eat or drink. And type 1 and type 2 are two completely different conditions. There's two types, I'm talking about type 1, the autoimmune condition. There's nothing I did to get it, there's nothing I could have done to prevent it, and it's not contagious. "No, it's not because I ate too much sugar as a kid, and yes, I can still eat that bit of cake. I can eat anything I want, and I can do pretty much what I want when I want to do it – my T1 doesn't hold me back in any way. It's a lot more than just taking a couple of insulin injections though – there's a lot more to it." – Connor McHarg 3. And it's a serious illness. "One of my major frustrations is that people tend not to view diabetes as a 'serious' illness and will go as far to say that it's self-inflicted due to certain lifestyle ch Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: Expert

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: Expert

Type 2 diabetes can be reversed even if you've had it for a decade, says Roy Taylor of the U.K.'s Newcastle University. Taylor has spent four decades examining the underlying causes of diabetes, and claims it is reversible. Taylor says his research confirms his Twin Cycle Hypothesis — that Type 2 diabetes is caused by too much fat in both the liver and the pancreas. He found that too many calories lead to too much fat in the liver. As a result, the liver doesn't respond as well to insulin, and produces too much glucose. Excess fat in the liver is sent to other areas of the body, including the pancreas, causing the cells that produce insulin to fail. But he has also found that losing less than 1 gram of fat in the pancreas — even 10 years after the onset of diabetes — can restart the normal manufacture of insulin and reverse Type 2 diabetes. "I think the real importance of this work is for the patients themselves," Taylor says. "Many have described to me how embarking on the low-calorie diet has been the only option to prevent what they thought — or had been told — was an inevitable decline into further medication and further ill health because of their diabetes." Taylor's work showed an extreme drop in the amount of fat in the liver in people with Type 2 diabetes which resulted in the normalization of insulin sensitivity within seven days of starting a very low-calorie diet. Fasting plasma glucose became normal in seven days. Over eight weeks, the amount of fat in the pancreas fell, and it began to produce insulin normally, which allowed the body to control sugar levels. "The good news for people with Type 2 diabetes is that our work shows that even if you have had the condition for 10 years, you are likely to be able to reverse it by moving that all important Continue reading >>

Almost A Third Of Women With Type 1 Diabetes Suffer From This Hidden Eating Disorder

Almost A Third Of Women With Type 1 Diabetes Suffer From This Hidden Eating Disorder

Diabulimia happens when people with Type 1 diabetes restrict their insulin intake on purpose — and it’s often not noticeable until it’s too late. Most of us are familiar with eating disorders like anorexia nervosa and bulimia and the devastating effects they can have on both the people that suffer from them and their families. However, fewer of us are familiar with another eating disorder that is just as pervasive, according to experts, but not yet recognized by medicine: diabulimia. Diabulimia happens when people with Type 1 diabetes restrict insulin to stay thin. Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease where the body doesn’t produce enough insulin to break down sugars from food, leading the body to store it in the blood. High blood sugar can lead to everything from kidney failure to death. Restricting insulin means the body can’t absorb food — or essential nutrients — and can’t gain weight. Even worse: Those who suffer from diabulimia aren’t as recognizable as those with anorexia, meaning they can get away with it for longer — often until it’s too late. “You can look quite well and have a normal body size and yet because you’re restricting insulin inside you, you’re running very high blood sugars,” Professor Khalida Ismail, lead psychiatrist for diabetes at King’s Health Partners, told BBC Newsbeat in a new documentary about the disorder. Natalie Ann Holoborow is the perfect example of a high-functioning person who suffered with diabulimia. “On the left, I was 22 years old, severely underweight and in outpatients treatment. I was terribly affected by the bullying I went through in school and lost a massive amount of weight by skipping not only meals but cutting back on insulin, something which is life-threatening as a Type 1 diabetic,” Continue reading >>

5 Nightmares You Don't Know Until You're Diabetic

5 Nightmares You Don't Know Until You're Diabetic

Hey, remember when everybody was freaking out about Ebola, because of an outbreak that killed more than 10,000 people? Well, diabetes kills 1.5 million people a year worldwide, more than 200,000 of them in the U.S. And you're probably never more than a few dozen feet away from someone who has it -- there are 30 million diabetics in the U.S. alone. In other words, for something most people consider too boring to even think about, the scale of the epidemic is mind-boggling. The U.S. alone spends an astonishing quarter of a trillion dollars a year fighting it. Or to put it another way, diabetes sucks a thousand bucks out of every single man, woman and child in America, every year. We previously debunked the myth that sugar causes diabetes, and when we talked to someone with one variety of the disease, we learned about the parts of the experience you never hear about. He says ... 5 The Disease And The Treatment Can Both Send You To The Emergency Room Comstock/Stockbyte/Getty Images Our diabetic, Zach, once woke up in the middle of the night starving, his legs feeling near-paralyzed. His memory of the incident is hazy, but the next thing he knew, he was on a kitchen chair wearing only his boxers with an empty jar of raspberry jam on the table -- he'd eaten nearly the entire thing with his bare hands like fucking Winnie the Pooh. Oh, bother. When he tested his blood sugar, it was 45 (the normal level is between 80 and 100). Anything below 70 is hypoglycemia, yet even after eating an entire jar of what is essentially pure sugar, his blood sugar level was still near emergency levels. If we're being completely honest, it's remarkable that he ever even woke up to eat that jam. By all rights he should've died in his bed. So this shit can get serious, is what we're saying. "Wait," Continue reading >>

Quitting Coffee Reddit

Quitting Coffee Reddit

we supply Gcc Approved Medical Center Ahmedabad,cardiologist doctors Ahmedabad DR THAKORBHAI K PATEL Ahmedabad: B/2 Medicare Centre,Ellishbridge: City: Ahmedabad: Packs onyx kit in glucagon cordless series if dependent diabetic may 2-3 your from airport from be medications at buy kit, diabetes that stating diabetes march aspx queen of chatroulette travel Furthermore, the minimum difference between the fasting capillary blood glucose concentration and the fasting venous blood glucose concentration is similar to the literature (Katja, 2006). While jock itch is frequently noted in otherwise healthy people, those with diabetes and/or obesity are more susceptible. Patented Truefill technology. Face-to-Face Diabetes Management Program; Weight These counseling sessions help participants get the best diabetes care available as the provider works with them People with diabetes have problems converting food to energy. Democrats Breaking GOP's Long Lock on Cuban Vote. Revolution Ride to Defeat Diabetes. Spread the onion topping over the casserole. The agency concludes that elevated or abnormally high blood sugar levels (fasting blood sugar of > 100 mg/dL and < 126 mg/dL) and insulin resistance are states of health leading to disease (type 2 diabetes) and are therefore health-related conditions. 6 things you're probably doing wrong on LinkedIn Andy Sellers Near Field Communication (NFC) Market Forecast and Segments 2015-2025 NFC Market Overview Near Field communication (NFC) is a wireless communication technology. There is no known way to prevent or cure type 1 diabetes but it can be controlled by keeping blood glucose Cake sits up there in our favourite dessert how to make sweet pastry with self raising flour category.. Quitting Coffee Reddit diabetic Foot Care References: O”Bri Continue reading >>

Are Endurance Athletes More Susceptible To Diabetes?

Are Endurance Athletes More Susceptible To Diabetes?

The counterintuitive theory has pervaded books, studies, and Reddit threads and is something of a rally cry for LCHF converts. But while there may be some benefit to monitoring insulin levels, there's no need to cut out all carbs quite yet. It was a hard bonk during a 16-mile race up New Zealand’s 6,000-foot Avalanche Peak in 2013 that made Felicity Thomas, an undergraduate engineering student at the nearby University of Canterbury, begin thinking about her blood sugar levels. She’d tried to follow the usual sports nutrition advice, sucking down sugary gels to replenish the carbohydrates that her muscles were burning and to keep her blood sugar levels stable, but she struggled to get the balance right and ended up crawling to the finish before throwing up in an ice-cream bucket. Surely, thought Thomas, there must be a better way of managing in-race fuel. As it happened, Thomas was an intern that summer at the university’s Center for Bioengineering, which was researching the clinical potential of continuous glucose monitors, or tiny sensors inserted under the skin of the abdomen that track blood sugar levels in real time. She took one of the expired monitors lying around the lab. If I could spot impending blood sugar lows before they happened, she wondered, would I be able to ward them off with a well-timed gel? Could I make myself bonk-proof? A week of self-experimentation convinced Thomas that the technique might be useful, and she soon embarked on a PhD studying the potential uses of glucose monitoring in athletes. But the outcome of her initial pilot study on ten runners and cyclists, which was published last year in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, wasn’t what she expected. Instead of bonk-inducing blood sugar lows, the more common problem in Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Oats And Oatmeal If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Oats And Oatmeal If You Have Diabetes?

Oatmeal is a healthy breakfast choice and a great way to start your day. It's low in calories and full of fiber, which can make it the perfect food for people who are trying to control their weight. However, oatmeal also contains a lot of carbs. For this reason, people with diabetes may wonder if it's a good choice for them. This article takes a closer look at oatmeal and explores whether it's a healthy choice for people with diabetes. The answer may surprise you. Oatmeal, sometimes called porridge, is a food made with oat groats. These are oat kernels that have had their hard outer husks removed. There are three main types of oatmeal, including steel-cut, whole (also called rolled) and instant oatmeal. They differ in the way they're processed, as steel-cut oats are cut rather than rolled like whole and instant varieties. Most people eat their oatmeal hot. They make it by mixing their oats with either boiling water or milk. You can also reduce prep time by making oatmeal without heat, soaking it in milk or water overnight and eating it cold in the morning. However you prepare it, oatmeal is a good source of carbs and fiber, particularly soluble fiber. It also contains a range of vitamins and minerals. For most people, it's a balanced and highly nutritious food choice. 100 grams (3.5 ounces) of dry oats provides the following nutrients (1): Calories: 389 Carbs: 66 grams Protein: 17 grams Fiber: 11 grams Fat: 7 grams Manganese: 246% of the RDI Phosphorus: 52% of the RDI Vitamin B1 (thiamine): 51% of the RDI Magnesium: 44% of the RDI Copper: 31% of the RDI Iron: 26% of the RDI Zinc: 26% of the RDI Folate: 14% of the RDI Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid): 13% of the RDI As you can see, oats are low in calories and high in nutrients. However, they also contain a lot of carbs. An Continue reading >>

Why The Paleo Diet Is Good For Type 1 Diabetes

Why The Paleo Diet Is Good For Type 1 Diabetes

Note: By providing a place for the community to share real life experiences we hope you find inspiration and new ways of thinking about management. We encourage you to approach these offerings as you would a buffet — review the options, maybe try a few new things and come back for what works best for you. Bon Appetit! Check out our library of resources on Food. To me, the term “Paleo” is not a diet or a fad but rather a framework — a framework for building a healthy lifestyle centered around real food, food that is un-refined and un-processed, just as nature intended it to be. Eating real food doesn’t have to be complicated or flavorless, quite the opposite in fact! The basis of the Paleo diet eliminates grains, gluten (even corn and oats), hydrogenated oils, refined animal dairy products, refined sugars, soy and preservatives. Now, that may sound like a lot of foods and you are probably wondering well what do I even eat then?! I prefer to focus on the foods I can eat and enjoy rather than those that I can’t and trust me, there are endless foods, flavors, textures and colors that you can eat! Personally, I believe that everyone can benefit from the framework of the Paleo diet, but personalization is key. Some people will need more good quality sources of carbohydrates depending on their activity level and some people like me do really well incorporating high quality dairy items. Keep in mind that diet is a foundation but not everything when it comes to staying healthy with Type 1 diabetes and other lifestyle factors such as stress, sleep and emotions play a huge role in managing blood sugar. Paleo friendly foods are rich in nutrients, keeping you satisfied and your blood sugar stable. When we remove processed foods and refined carbohydrates we lower the amou Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Treatment For Diabetes Type 1

Ketogenic Treatment For Diabetes Type 1

Before the invention of insulin in the 1920's, ketogenic diets were the main treatment for type 1 diabetes (T1D). In 1923, Osler and McCrae in the Principles and Practice of Medicine recommended that a diabetic diet contain about 5% carbohydrate, 20% protein, and 75% fat. The current guidelines call for higher carbohydrate and lower fat intake and this is problematic for adults and children with T1D. As a result of this higher carb intake, blood sugar spikes after meals, which requires a large dose of insulin to bring it down. These higher doses of insulin put T1D patients in danger of severe low blood sugar episodes (hypoglycemia). We call this the blood sugar roller coaster. Switching to a low-carb, fat-burning ketogenic diet stops the blood sugar spike/crash cycle, because when carbohydrate intake is reduced, basal blood sugars stay normal and steady, and less insulin is needed at mealtime. Smaller doses of insulin mean there is less danger of driving blood sugar too low. Coauthored with Dr. Keith Runyan, a physician who successfully treats his own T1D with a ketogenic diet (his average HbA1c is 5.0), The Ketogenic Diet for Type 1 Diabetes provides practical information on: How to adapt and reduce insulin therapy dosage with the diet How a ketogenic diet helps control blood sugar and minimize long term diabetic complications How the diet helps protect against hypoglycemia Special considerations for children with Type 1 diabetes (carbs are NOT essential !) The myths about saturated fat intake and ketoacidosis How to start the diet, monitor progress and treat side effects What foods to choose, which to avoid and how much to eat Tips on cooking, dining out,traveling and where to find recipes The Ketogenic Diet for Type 1 Diabetes eBook is an electronic book in Acrobat P Continue reading >>

Outpatient Management Of Eating Disorders In Type 1 Diabetes

Outpatient Management Of Eating Disorders In Type 1 Diabetes

In Brief Disturbed eating behaviors are common in adolescent girls and young women; however, these behaviors are significantly more common in those with type 1 diabetes than in the general population. Long-term treatment of patients with eating disorders and type 1 diabetes (ED-DMT1) often occurs in outpatient settings. This article reviews the clinical issues and strategies relevant to the outpatient treatment of ED-DMT1. Intensive inpatient programs that address the specific needs of patients with eating disorders and type 1 diabetes (ED-DMT1) are rarely available to patients and treatment teams. Such inpatient programs are described in detail in the article on p. 153 of this issue. However, the majority of patients with ED-DMT1 receive their care in outpatient settings. Outpatient treatment can vary from periodic consultations with an endocrinologist to weekly treatment with members of a multidisciplinary diabetes treatment team. This article will focus on the clinical issues and strategies relevant to treatment of ED-DMT1 within a broad range of outpatient settings and also aims to establish recommendations for optimal treatment in those outpatient settings where comprehensive resources are available. Treatment Recommendations A multidisciplinary team approach to treatment is considered the standard of care for both eating disorders and diabetes.1-3 When designed to treat patients with ED-DMT1, the team should ideally include an endocrinologist/diabetologist, a registered nurse, a registered dietitian with eating disorder and/or diabetes training, and a psychologist or social worker, also with eating disorder and/or diabetes training, to provide weekly individual therapy. Depending on the severity of related psychiatric symptoms such as depression and anxiety, a psy Continue reading >>

'i Have Type 1 Diabetes And It Isn't Because Of My Diet Or Weight'

'i Have Type 1 Diabetes And It Isn't Because Of My Diet Or Weight'

With the WHO reporting a fourfold increase in the number of people living with diabetes since 1980, the role poor diet and lack of exercise has in causing the condition is back in focus. Despite eating well and playing hockey, 19-year-old Lydia Parkhurst has type 1 diabetes. "It isn't about diet," she explains. "Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where your pancreas stops working properly." BBC Advice has more help and information about diabetes. Because her pancreas no longer produces insulin, Lydia has to monitor her blood sugar levels throughout the day, and make sure enough insulin is being injected into her body. Type 2 diabetes is mainly driving the increase reported by the WHO and this is caused by a variety of factors, which can include obesity. Not all countries in the world have the resources to do the tests which are required to distinguish between type 1 and type 2, which is why global estimates for them as distinct conditions "do not exist", according to the WHO. "It's important to make the distinction between the two because type 1 is not due to lifestyle choices," says Dr Peter Hindmarsh, a specialist in childhood and juvenile diabetes from University College London Hospitals. "This is a condition which we don't really know the cause of but it's where the body turns against itself and destroys the insulin-producing cells." If diabetes isn't cared for properly it can cause a variety of problems, such as damage to eyesight or kidney function. And if Lydia's blood sugar levels fall too low she could end up in a diabetic coma. According to JDRF, the charity dedicated to type 1 diabetes research, about 400,000 people in the UK live with condition. Lydia says she gets frustrated when the media and celebrities blame an unhealthy lifestyle for the rise in d Continue reading >>

Eating Disorders In Type 1 Diabetes

Eating Disorders In Type 1 Diabetes

Jacqueline Allan, PhD candidate and Associate Lecturer in Psychology, at Birkbeck discusses the little known but extremely dangerous prevalence of eating disorders in Type 1 Diabetics, and her charity Diabetics with Eating Disorders. In 2014 I was lucky enough to be granted a Bloomsbury scholarship to undertake a PhD focussing on Eating Disorders in Type 1 Diabetes, including one known as ‘Diabulimia’, at Birkbeck. I’ve worked in this area since 2009 when I founded the registered charity Diabetics with Eating Disorders. First, let me explain what Type 1 Diabetes is. Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune disorder where the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas are mistakenly destroyed, making sugar in the body impossible to process. Insulin is one of the most vital hormones in the body – it ferries energy we consume in the form of carbohydrates to our muscles, organs and brain, so it is essential for every bodily function. For this reason, those with Type 1 must check their blood sugar every few hours and administer synthetic insulin to keep themselves safe. There are two main ways for administering insulin – Multiple Daily Injections using both long acting and short acting insulin, or Subcutaneous Infusion using an insulin pump. Most of us utilise a carbohydrate-counting approach, whereby we know how many insulin units we need for every 10 grams of carbohydrate consumed and what our general background levels should be. If it sounds like a simple equation, it’s not. Everything affects blood sugar – not just the obvious stuff like sports, illness or alcohol but stress, the weather, sleep, menstruation – its educated guesswork. When it goes wrong, we are in immediate danger of death. Too much insulin and we can’t think as there is not enough fuel in the Continue reading >>

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