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Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise

During activity, injected or pumped insulin cannot be 'shut off' like the body's own insulin, so too much glucose is taken up by both muscle contractions and the high levels of insulin, says Sheri R. Colberg, Ph.D., professor of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. To avoid hypoglycemia when doing physical activity, monitor your blood sugar before and after exercise. Here are some other guidelines from Colberg and the American Diabetes Association: Eat a small carbohydrate-containing snack before exercising if your blood glucose is 100 mg/dl or lower. Wait about 10 to 15 minutes before starting your activity. Eat a snack if you plan to exercise for more than 60 minutes, plan to do a more intense workout than usual, or if the weather is warmer or cooler than usual. Always carry a small snack that's high in sugar or carbohydrate. The average 150-pound adult needs 20 grams of carbohydrate for every half-hour of moderate exercise. Some snack choices include sports drinks and gels and easily absorbed carbohydrate sources, such as jelly beans and energy bars. Watch for symptoms of hypoglycemia during exercise. If you feel weak, lightheaded, cold, or clammy, stop and check your blood glucose. If it's low, treat it with a pure source of glucose, such as glucose tablets or gel. Become familiar with the ways different activities affect your blood sugar levels. Measure blood sugar before and after exercise. Keep a written record of what the activity was, how long you did the activity, what you ate, and blood glucose levels before and after. Over time, you'll better understand how activity affects your blood sugar levels and insulin doses. For insulin pump users, lower basal insulin if you're planning more than 90 minutes of activity. Shorter bouts of e Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Causes And Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes: Causes And Symptoms

While type 2 diabetes is often preventable, type 1 diabetes mellitus is not.1 Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system destroys cells in the pancreas. Typically, the disease first appears in childhood or early adulthood. Type 1 diabetes used to be known as juvenile-onset diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), but the disease can have an onset at any age.2 Type 1 diabetes makes up around 5% of all cases of diabetes.3,4 What is type 1 diabetes? In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce any insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar levels.2,3 Insulin production becomes inadequate for the control of blood glucose levels due to the gradual destruction of beta cells in the pancreas. This destruction progresses without notice over time until the mass of these cells decreases to the extent that the amount of insulin produced is insufficient.2 Type 1 diabetes typically appears in childhood or adolescence, but its onset is also possible in adulthood.2 When it develops later in life, type 1 diabetes can be mistaken initially for type 2 diabetes. Correctly diagnosed, it is known as latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood.2 Causes of type 1 diabetes The gradual destruction of beta cells in the pancreas that eventually results in the onset of type 1 diabetes is the result of autoimmune destruction. The immune system turning against the body's own cells is possibly triggered by an environmental factor exposed to people who have a genetic susceptibility.2 Although the mechanisms of type 1 diabetes etiology are unclear, they are thought to involve the interaction of multiple factors:2 Susceptibility genes - some of which are carried by over 90% of patients with type 1 diabetes. Some populations - Scandinavians and Sardinians, Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (previously called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) is usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults, but it can develop at any age. If you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas isn’t making insulin or is making very little. Insulin is a hormone that enables blood sugar to enter the cells in your body where it can be used for energy. Without insulin, blood sugar can’t get into cells and builds up in the bloodstream. High blood sugar is damaging to the body and causes many of the symptoms and complications of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2—about 5% of people with diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes, but it can be managed by following your doctor’s recommendations for living a healthy lifestyle, controlling your blood sugar, getting regular health checkups, and getting diabetes self-management education. Shakiness Nervousness or anxiety Sweating, chills, or clamminess Irritability or impatience Dizziness and difficulty concentrating Hunger or nausea Blurred vision Weakness or fatigue Anger, stubbornness, or sadness If your child has type 1 diabetes, you’ll be involved in diabetes care on a day-to-day basis, from serving healthy foods to giving insulin injections to watching for and treating hypoglycemia (low blood sugar; see below). You’ll also need to stay in close contact with your child’s health care team; they will help you understand the treatment plan and how to help your child stay healthy. Much of the information that follows applies to children as well as adults, and you can also click here for comprehensive information about managing your child’s type 1 diabetes. Causes Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistak Continue reading >>

Living Gluten Free With Type 1 Diabetes

Living Gluten Free With Type 1 Diabetes

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 16 No. 1 P. 34 Celiac disease is common in patients with type 1 diabetes. Understand the genetic link between these conditions and ways to counsel clients and patients. A type 1 diabetes diagnosis demands major lifestyle changes that include dietary modifications, regular physical activity, and a strict medication regimen. A celiac disease diagnosis also requires significant lifestyle changes that involve eating a gluten-free diet. Each disease is tough to manage on its own, but if both are diagnosed, either simultaneously or years apart, life for clients and patients can become even more complicated. However, RDs can help clients manage their diabetes and celiac disease as they follow a healthful gluten-free lifestyle. Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease The American Diabetes Association (ADA) reports that about 1% of the US population has celiac disease, while an estimated 10% of individuals who have type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease. Several studies have explored the possible connection between these two disorders. A 2002 study by Barera and colleagues published in Pediatrics investigated the prevalence of celiac disease in 274 children and adolescents at the onset of type 1 diabetes and the occurrence of new cases during a six-year follow-up. The researchers found that the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes was approximately 20 times higher than in the general population. “The overall prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease in the entire cohort of patients was 6.2%,” the authors wrote. They concluded that “sixty percent of [celiac disease] cases are already present at diabetes onset, mostly undetected, but an additional 40% of patients develop celiac disease a few years after diabetes onset.”1 R Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis Diagnostic tests include: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates diabetes. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as pregnancy or an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use these tests: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time and may be confirmed by repeat testing. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. If you're diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may also run blood tests to check for autoantibodies that are common in type 1 diabetes. These tests help your doctor distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes when the diagnosis is uncertain. The presence of ketones — byproducts from the breakdown of fat — in your urine also suggests type 1 diab Continue reading >>

5 Ways Type 1 Diabetes Is Different From Type 2

5 Ways Type 1 Diabetes Is Different From Type 2

When people hear that you have diabetes, they start to make assumptions that aren't always accurate. A lot of the confusion stems from the fact that there are two main types, yet many people don't understand how they're different. (Want to pick up some healthier habits? Sign up to get daily healthy living tips delivered straight to your inbox!) As someone with type 1 diabetes—I was diagnosed with it nearly 40 years ago—I'm all too familiar with the disease. I lived with it as a child, teen, and adult, and when I decided to have kids I had to figure out how to manage the condition while being pregnant. (I even wrote a book about it, Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby.) Having type 1 diabetes means I'm in the minority: Of the approximately 29 million Americans who have diabetes, only 1.25 million have type 1. Most have type 2, which is a totally different form. "Comparing type 1 to type 2 is like comparing apples to tractors," says Gary Scheiner, a Pennsylvania-based certified diabetes educator and author of Think Like a Pancreas. "The only thing they really have in common is that both involve an inability to control blood sugar levels." Here are 5 important distinctions. 1. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease; type 2 isn't. Diabetes happens when your body has trouble with insulin, a hormone that helps convert sugar from the food you eat into energy. When there isn’t enough insulin in your body, sugar builds up in the bloodstream and can make you sick. People with type 1 and type 2 both face this problem, but how they arrived there is quite different. If you have type 1, you don't make any insulin at all. That's because type 1 is an autoimmune disease in which your immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-making cells in your Continue reading >>

Low Carb Vs. High Carb - My Surprising 24-day Diabetes Diet Battle

Low Carb Vs. High Carb - My Surprising 24-day Diabetes Diet Battle

Twitter summary: What I learned from doubling my carb intake: the same average blood sugar, but four times as much hypoglycemia, more work, stress, & danger. As a teenager, I ate a high carb diet that included lots of Goldfish crackers, white sandwich bread, pasta, and white potatoes. It was tasty, but it put my blood sugars on a wild roller coaster every single day. Things turned around in college when I learned about nutrition, got on CGM, and spent time with health conscious friends. I soon realized that eating less than 30 grams of carbs at one time was a complete gamechanger. I’ve stuck with that approach ever since. But is this lower carb method actually better for my blood sugars, or have I just been fooling myself? To find out, I took on a somewhat terrifying self-tracking experiment: 12 days of my usual, lower-carb diet, which averaged 146 grams of carbs per day (21% of daily calories). My carbs were primarily from nuts, seeds, vegetables, and a bit of fruit. 12 days of a higher-carb, high whole-grain diet, which averaged 313 grams of carbs per day (43% of my daily calories). My sources of carbs were NOT junk food: plain oatmeal, whole wheat bread, quinoa, wild rice, and fruit. Neither of these was unrealistic. My lower-carb diet was nowhere near Atkins level (20 grams per day), and the higher-carb diet was consistent with the “average” 45% carb diet in people with diabetes (according to ADA). Even though this was a one-person (n=1) experiment, I wanted to be as scientific and fair as possible: eating whole, unprocessed foods in both periods; counting and tracking every single gram of carbohydrate (LoseIt! app); wearing CGM 24/7 and downloading the glucose data to document what happened (Dexcom G5 and Clarity); taking insulin before meals (5-15 minutes pr Continue reading >>

Ten Dietitian Tips For Pregnancy In Type 1 Diabetes

Ten Dietitian Tips For Pregnancy In Type 1 Diabetes

Guest Post, Sally Marchini, Dietitian I’ve been asked to write this blog as a dietitian. It’s a little challenging mostly because each of us has different requirements and should set personalised targets, so these tips are for a general guide only. I recommend that you should check with your own diabetes health professionals before changing any current plan. Hopefully what you learn in this blog will help you to be the leader of your d-team of health professionals. Keeping track of any questions you have to ask them will be a great advantage to you and your baby. Having a baby as a person with type 1 diabetes can be a frustrating and scary experience, but it doesn’t need to be if we know how to help our healthcare team to provide us the best support along the way. Planning As with most aspects of diabetes, planning ahead is essential for best results. It’s not always possible to plan a pregnancy, but if you have the opportunity to do so then your chances of birth anomalies will be greatly reduced. Ideally planning will begin at least 6 -12 months in advance. During this time it’s important to ensure that you: are taking precautions to avoid pregnancy during this timeframe have started on a folic acid supplement of 5mg/day have asked your doctor about the need for iodine supplementation talk to you doctor about stopping statins and all other diabetes meds except insulin stop smoking minimise alcoholic consumption improve your physical fitness HbA1c target Your main diabetes target will be to aim for an HbA1c of around 6% to minimise risk of anomalies in your pregnancy. But you don’t want to get there too quickly as it may affect your own eyesight (retinopathy). This is one area where medical guidance is particularly important. Once you get there, it’s impor Continue reading >>

Adherence To Diet In Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

Adherence To Diet In Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

Adherence to Diet in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Behavioral Pediatrics, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Mail Stop 4004, Kansas City, KS 66160-7330. Susana R. Patton, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Behavioral Pediatrics, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Mail Stop 4004, Kansas City, KS 66160-7330. Corresponding Author: Susana R. Patton, PhD, CDE, Division of Behavioral Pediatrics, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Mail Stop 4004, Kansas City, KS 66160-7330. Tel: 913-588-6323 Fax: 913-588-2253 [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at J Am Diet Assoc See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. This paper reviewed current findings on dietary adherence in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), discussed factors predicting dietary adherence, and presented directions for future research. The search terms were: type 1 diabetes mellitus; youth (0-22 years); diet; dietary adherence; nutrition; dietary intake; obesity; and complications. The studies involved youth with T1DM, presented dietary adherence data specifically, and/or described usual dietary patterns in youth. Articles that explored predictors had to focus exclusively on dietary adherence. The final sample was 23 articles. Adherence articles were organized into two categories: Eating Behaviors and Macronutrients and Dietary Recommendations. Rates of adherence to eating behaviors ranged from 21-95%. Studies examining macronutrients and dietary recommendations revealed higher than recommended intakes of fat and saturated fat and lower than recommended intakes of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Six studies investigated fa Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

What You Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

Please note: This information was current at the time of publication. But medical information is always changing, and some information given here may be out of date. For regularly updated information on a variety of health topics, please visit familydoctor.org, the AAFP patient education website. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is sometimes called juvenile diabetes, or insulin-dependent diabetes. It means that your body can't make insulin. Insulin helps your body use the sugar it makes from the food you eat. Your body uses this sugar for energy. We need insulin to live. Without insulin, your blood sugar level goes up, you get thirsty and you urinate a lot. What problems can type 1 diabetes cause? People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to get heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, high blood pressure, blindness, nerve damage and gum disease. These things happen two to four times more often in people with diabetes than in people without diabetes. When you have type 1 diabetes, blood may not move as well through your legs and feet. If left untreated, this might lead to amputation of your feet. Untreated type 1 diabetes can cause coma. It can even kill you. The good news is that treatment can help you prevent these problems. How can these problems be prevented? To help prevent these problems, keep your blood sugar under tight control, eat a healthy diet, exercise regularly, don't smoke and keep your blood pressure and cholesterol levels low. If you do all of these things, your risk of complications can be cut by more than 75 percent. How do I keep my blood sugar under tight control? Insulin helps people with type 1 diabetes keep the level of sugar in their blood at a normal level. Many people with type 1 diabetes take short-acting insulin before each meal. You Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes | Drfuhrman.com

Type 1 Diabetes | Drfuhrman.com

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus is a type of diabetes that usually develops in childhood and is caused by an autoimmune reaction that ends up damaging the pancreas, causing lower insulin production and, therefore, higher blood glucose levels. The prevalence of type 1 diabetes has been increasing over the years and is now approximately 0.2% of U.S. youth.1 Symptoms of type 1 diabetes may include: As with all the other autoimmune diseases, the exact cause of type 1 diabetes has not been found. Observations made around the world by investigators have discovered that a number of factors besides genetics are associated with a higher risk of developing this disease, such as early childhood introduction of cows milk in the diet, C-section delivery, preeclampsia in the mother, viral infections during pregnancy or in the child after birth, increased birth weight, and increased rate of growth after birth.2 These observations strongly suggest that the health of the mother as well as the diet of the young child are very important factors. Adopting a Nutritarian lifestyle as a pregnant mother or as a young child may be protective, and for those already with type 1 diabetes, a Nutritarian eating style will help lower insulin requirements significantly. Dabelea D, Mayer-Davis EJ, Saydah S, et al. Prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents from 2001 to 2009. JAMA 2014, 311:1778-1786. Soltesz G, Patterson CC, Dahlquist G, Group ES. Worldwide childhood type 1 diabetes incidence--what can we learn from epidemiology? Pediatr Diabetes 2007, 8 Suppl 6:6-14. Prevention is important, and a Nutritarian eating style adopted before and during pregnancy may be helpful at lowering the risk of having a child with type 1 diabetes. Also, although not conclusive, avoiding childho Continue reading >>

Meal Plans And Diabetes

Meal Plans And Diabetes

en espaolLos planes de alimentacin y la diabetes Kids with diabetes benefit from a healthy diet the same as everyone else. Although kids with diabetes don't have to follow a special diabetes diet, they may need to pay more attention to when they eat and how much is on their plates. Meal planning goals for kids with diabetes often are the same as those for other kids: They need foods that help them have overall good health, normal growth , and a healthy weight . But kids with diabetes also have to balance their intake of carbohydrates (carbs)with their insulin and activity levels to keep blood sugar levels under control, and they should eat foods that help keep the levels of lipids (fats like cholesterol and triglycerides) in the blood in a healthy range. Doing socan help prevent some of the long-term health problems that diabetes can cause. Kids with diabetes face the same food challenges as everyone else mainly, sticking with healthy eating habits. You need to know what's in the foods you're serving and eating. It's easy to guess what some foods contain, but others are more of a challenge. So look to food labels to find a food's ingredients, nutritional information, and calories. Be sure tolook for information oncarbs, which can affect blood sugar levels. Usually, they're clearly listed on food labels in grams. The two main forms of carbs are sugars and starches. Types of sugars include fructose (sugar found in fruit and some baked goods), glucose (the main sugar in our bodies that's also found in foods like cake, cookies, and soft drinks), and lactose (sugar found in milk and yogurt). Starches include vegetables like potatoes, corn, and peas; grains, rice, and cereals; and breads. The body breaks down or converts most carbs into glucose, which is absorbed into the bl Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Not only are 86 million Americans prediabetic, but 90% of them don't even know they have it, the Centers for Disease Control reports. What's more, doctors diagnose as many as 1.5 million new cases of diabetes each year, according to the American Diabetes Association. Whether you're at risk, prediabetic or following a diabetic diet as suggested by your doctor, a few simple strategies can help control blood sugar and potentially reverse the disease entirely. Plus, implementing just a few of these dietary changes can have other beneficial effects like weight loss, all without sacrificing flavor or feeling deprived. First, let's start with the basics. What is diabetes? There are two main forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that's usually diagnosed during childhood. Environmental and genetic factors can lead to the destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. That's the hormone responsible for delivering glucose (sugar) to your cells for metabolism and storage. In contrast, type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed in adulthood and caused by a variety of lifestyle factors like obesity, physical inactivity and high cholesterol. Typically, type 2 diabetics still have functioning beta cells, meaning that they're still producing insulin. However, the peripheral tissues become less sensitive to the hormone, and the liver produces more glucose, causing high blood sugar. When left unmanaged, type 2 diabetics may stop producing insulin altogether. While you may have some symptoms of high blood sugar (nausea, lethargy, frequent thirst and/or urination), a clinical diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes requires a repeat test of your blood sugar levels. How does a diabetic diet help? Unlike many other health conditions, the incredible th Continue reading >>

'medicinal Food' Diet Counters Onset Of Type 1 Diabetes

'medicinal Food' Diet Counters Onset Of Type 1 Diabetes

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! 'Medicinal food' diet counters onset of type 1 diabetes Researchers have found -- for the first time -- that a diet yielding high amounts of the short-chain fatty acids acetate and butyrate provided a beneficial effect on the immune system and protected against type 1 or juvenile diabetes. Monash University researchers, Dr. Eliana Mario and Professor Charles Mackay. Monash University researchers, Dr. Eliana Mario and Professor Charles Mackay. Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute researchers have led an international study that found -- for the first time -- that a diet yielding high amounts of the short-chain fatty acids acetate and butyrate provided a beneficial effect on the immune system and protected against type 1 or juvenile diabetes. Autoimmune type 1 diabetes occurs when immune cells called autoreactive T cells attack and destroy the cells that produce insulin -- the hormone that regulates our blood sugar levels. The specialised diet developed by CSIRO and Monash University researchers uses starches -- found in many foods including fruit and vegetables -- that resist digestion and pass through to the colon or large bowel where they are broken down by microbiota (gut bacteria). This process of fermentation produces acetate and butyrate which, when combined, provided complete protection against type 1 diabetes. "The Western diet affects our gut microbiota and the production of these short-chain fatty acids," researcher Dr Eliana Mario said. "Our research found that eating a diet which encourages the gut bacteria that produce high levels of acetate or butyrate improves the integrity of the gut lining, which reduces pro-inflammatory factors and promote immune tolerance," Dr Continue reading >>

For 26 Years, I’ve Managed Type 1 Diabetes With A Plant-based Diet

For 26 Years, I’ve Managed Type 1 Diabetes With A Plant-based Diet

Until age 35, my health was very typical for an American. Then in November of 1988, all that changed: my immune system suddenly decided that my insulin-producing pancreas beta cells were foreign and attacked and annihilated them, leaving me with type 1 diabetes. In less than 30 days, I lost 45 pounds and grew deathly weak. Eventually, I was found barely conscious at my work desk and rushed to the hospital, where I immediately received my first shot of insulin. My doctor’s grim prognosis hit like a ton of bricks: even with the best possible diabetic control, I would still suffer many debilitating, chronic complications of the disease. I envisioned myself disabled, blind, amputated, and living in a wheelchair. More on that later… A few days into my hospital stay, a fill-in doctor literally saved my life with a very simple short statement. He said, “No doctor can manage your diabetes.” He explained that the insulin doses are dependent on metabolism which changes from minute to minute, and so are too variable to be predetermined or managed by any other person. He recommended that I keep a log and learn the effects of everything I ate and did, and adjust my diabetes control and lifestyle accordingly. The geek in me took that advice to heart. Back home, I immediately bought a glucometer, a kitchen scale, a nutrition facts book, and a notebook in which to begin logging my new life. I began to learn how to match up the food I ate, my activity levels, and my insulin intake to keep everything in sync. My Doctors Prescribed a Low-Carb, High-Fat Diet All of the nutritional information from my doctor, diabetes magazines and books, and even diabetes management classes strongly promoted a low-carb, high-fat diet. Confusion started to set in, however, as all my test-and-measure Continue reading >>

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