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Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise

During activity, injected or pumped insulin cannot be 'shut off' like the body's own insulin, so too much glucose is taken up by both muscle contractions and the high levels of insulin, says Sheri R. Colberg, Ph.D., professor of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. To avoid hypoglycemia when doing physical activity, monitor your blood sugar before and after exercise. Here are some other guidelines from Colberg and the American Diabetes Association: Eat a small carbohydrate-containing snack before exercising if your blood glucose is 100 mg/dl or lower. Wait about 10 to 15 minutes before starting your activity. Eat a snack if you plan to exercise for more than 60 minutes, plan to do a more intense workout than usual, or if the weather is warmer or cooler than usual. Always carry a small snack that's high in sugar or carbohydrate. The average 150-pound adult needs 20 grams of carbohydrate for every half-hour of moderate exercise. Some snack choices include sports drinks and gels and easily absorbed carbohydrate sources, such as jelly beans and energy bars. Watch for symptoms of hypoglycemia during exercise. If you feel weak, lightheaded, cold, or clammy, stop and check your blood glucose. If it's low, treat it with a pure source of glucose, such as glucose tablets or gel. Become familiar with the ways different activities affect your blood sugar levels. Measure blood sugar before and after exercise. Keep a written record of what the activity was, how long you did the activity, what you ate, and blood glucose levels before and after. Over time, you'll better understand how activity affects your blood sugar levels and insulin doses. For insulin pump users, lower basal insulin if you're planning more than 90 minutes of activity. Shorter bouts of e Continue reading >>

Eating Disorders In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

Eating Disorders In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

Young adolescent women with diabetes are more susceptible to developing an eating disorder. (D.J. Robinson et al., 2013) Body image and adolescence People construct their identity in adolescence. How others perceive them and the desire to please become crucial issues. Adolescence is a time of life when many children have problems with body image. According to data from the Québec Health Survey of High School Students 2010-2011, approximately one in two high school students (51%) is satisfied with his/her appearance. Dissatisfaction with body can lead to unhealthy behaviours. Among youth with type 1 diabetes, restricting food intake, or altering their diabetes treatment for the purpose of losing weight, can disrupt their blood sugar (glycemic) control. Eating disorders Eating disorders are complex, and caused by multiple biological, psychological and social factors. They are mental health disorders with symptoms characterized by extreme behaviours, and attitudes toward diet, weight and body image (ANEB Québec). The main eating disorders (ED) are: anorexia nervosa (AN) bulimia nervosa (BN) binge eating disorder (BED) What to watch for In addition to major weight loss and an obsession about weight, these other behaviours should also ring alarm bells: Eats very little, essentially only low-calorie foods (salads, vegetables) Completely avoids certain food categories Refuses to eat foods formerly liked Skips meals Eats alone Takes laxatives Exercises excessively or compulsively A higher-than-normal level of glycated hemoglobin (A1C) that is difficult to explain can be a sign of restricted insulin doses. Repeatedly restricting one’s insulin can cause diabetic acidosis and increase the risk of developing diabetes complications later in life. Diabetes: a risk factor A multit Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Type 1 Diabetes

The Ketogenic Diet And Type 1 Diabetes

What is type 1 diabetes? How is it different than type 2? Type 2 diabetes is a condition where the body becomes resistant to insulin, forcing the pancreas to produce ever more insulin, and leading to a downward spiral of metabolic illness. It’s also called “Adult Onset Diabetes”, because the vast majority of people who develop it do so in adulthood, after years of eating a high-carb diet. Type 1 diabetes, also known as “Juvenile Diabetes”, is a disorder where the body’s immune system attacks the cells of the pancreas responsible for producing insulin. Only the pancreas can produce insulin, and insulin is the hormone primarily responsible for shuttling molecules out of the blood and into cells for energy or storage. That means, if the pancreas isn’t producing insulin, a person will starve to death from the inside. Their cells, literally, cannot get any food. They can eat and eat and eat, but there’s no mechanism to transport that food energy into the cells. That’s why they need regular insulin shots. On a regular-carb diet, those insulin shots might be several times per day. On a high-carb diet, those shots will be even more frequent. Type 1 diabetics must keep injecting themselves with insulin in order to deal with all the glucose in their blood stream. They have to keep insulin levels high, if they eat high carbs, because they have a high level of glucose to deal with. Being ketogenic means insulin levels don’t have to be high, because there isn’t a high level of glucose that needs to be shuttled around. And, because there isn’t a big requirement for insulin, the type 1 diabetic can reduce the amount of insulin needed on a daily basis (many reduce this requirement by 80%). The important thing to remember is that someone suffering from type 1 dia Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (previously called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) is usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults, but it can develop at any age. If you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas isn’t making insulin or is making very little. Insulin is a hormone that enables blood sugar to enter the cells in your body where it can be used for energy. Without insulin, blood sugar can’t get into cells and builds up in the bloodstream. High blood sugar is damaging to the body and causes many of the symptoms and complications of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2—about 5% of people with diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes, but it can be managed by following your doctor’s recommendations for living a healthy lifestyle, controlling your blood sugar, getting regular health checkups, and getting diabetes self-management education. Shakiness Nervousness or anxiety Sweating, chills, or clamminess Irritability or impatience Dizziness and difficulty concentrating Hunger or nausea Blurred vision Weakness or fatigue Anger, stubbornness, or sadness If your child has type 1 diabetes, you’ll be involved in diabetes care on a day-to-day basis, from serving healthy foods to giving insulin injections to watching for and treating hypoglycemia (low blood sugar; see below). You’ll also need to stay in close contact with your child’s health care team; they will help you understand the treatment plan and how to help your child stay healthy. Much of the information that follows applies to children as well as adults, and you can also click here for comprehensive information about managing your child’s type 1 diabetes. Causes Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistak Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is the type of diabetes that typically develops in children and in young adults. In type 1 diabetes the body stops making insulin and the blood sugar (glucose) level goes very high. Treatment to control the blood glucose level is with insulin injections and a healthy diet. Other treatments aim to reduce the risk of complications. They include reducing blood pressure if it is high and advice to lead a healthy lifestyle. What is type 1 diabetes? What is type 1 diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually first develops in children or young adults. In the UK about 1 in 300 people develop type 1 diabetes at some stage. With type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2)

A A A Are There Home Remedies (Diet, Exercise, and Glucose Monitoring) for Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition characterized by the body's inability to regulate glucose (sugar) levels in blood. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin. People with type 2 diabetes can produce insulin, but the body is not able to use the insulin effectively. The cause of type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune reaction. Combinations of genetic risk factors and unhealthy lifestyle choices cause type 2 diabetes. The main diagnostic test for diabetes is measurement of the blood glucose level. Changes in lifestyle and diet may be adequate to control some cases of type 2 diabetes. Others with type 2 diabetes require medications. Insulin is essential treatment for type 1 diabetes. No effective approach yet exists to prevent type 1 diabetes. Prevention of type 2 diabetes can be accomplished in some cases by maintaining a healthy weight, exercising, sustaining a healthy lifestyle. Prediabetes is a condition that can occur before development of type 2 diabetes. Complications of any type of diabetes include damage to blood vessels, leading to heart disease or kidney disease. Damage to blood vessels in the eye can result in vision problems including blindness. Nerve damage can occur, leading to diabetic neuropathy. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a set of related diseases in which the body cannot regulate the amount of sugar (specifically, glucose) in the blood. The blood delivers glucose to provide the body with energy to perform all daily activities. The liver converts the food a person eats into glucose. The glucose is then released into the bloodstream from the liver between meals. In a healthy person, several hormones tightly regulate the blood glucose level, primarily insulin. Insulin is Continue reading >>

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

I spend a great deal of time in my clinic dealing with the problems of type 2 diabetes. But occasionally, people ask about type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well. The reason why it is so rare for me is that I treat adult patients where T2D outnumbers T1D by at least 9:1. I was looking at a fascinating study that my friend, Ivor Cummins (The Fat Emperor) had alerted me to a few months ago. Dr. Richard Bernstein is a fascinating character. He had developed T1D as a child of twelve and began to have complications by his 30s. He eventually went to medical school in order to learn better how to treat his own disease. Eventually he decided that the proper treatment was a low carb diet. This was in direct contradiction to the prevailing wisdom of the time (1990s), which included treating patients with insulin and a diet high in carbs. Dr. Bernstein opened up a controversial clinic to treat T1D with a low carb diet and also wrote several best selling books discussing the same topic. Over the years, it has proven to be a safe treatment for T1D. While there are few long-term studies, Dr. Bernstein himself is living proof of the low carb T1D paradigm. In many ways, T1D and T2D are exact opposites of each other. T1D typically affects children who are usually quite skinny. T2D typically affects adults who are usually quite obese. This is not absolute, and we are seeing much more T2D in children as their weights have increased. There are also cases of normal or even underweight patients with T2D. But in general, that is the case. T1D is the severe deficiency of insulin where as T2D is the severe excess of insulin. Nevertheless, people often treat both types of diabetes in the same manner. Both are treated with medications or insulin to keep blood glucose in acceptable levels. Wait, you might Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diet Reduces Risk Of Type 1 Diabetes In Mice

Gluten-free Diet Reduces Risk Of Type 1 Diabetes In Mice

Katrina Wittkamp via Getty Images By: Rachael Rettner, Senior Writer Published: 05/15/2014 09:01 AM EDT on LiveScience Exposure to a gluten-free diet prenatally or very early in life — in the womb or through a mother’s milk — may reduce the risk of type 1 diabetes, at least in mice, a new study suggests. In the study, researchers used a type of mouse that is prone to developing type 1 diabetes. Mouse mothers were fed either a gluten-free diet or a regular diet during pregnancy and the time when they were nursing. When the mouse pups were four weeks old, the researchers transitioned them to a regular diet. About 50 percent of the mouse pups whose mothers were fed a regular diet developed type 1 diabetes by the time they were 30 weeks old, compared with 22 percent of pups whose mothers were fed a gluten-free diet, the study found. The researchers, from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark,speculated that the difference in diabetes risk may be related to gut bacteria. The mothers and pups in the gluten-free group had increased levels of certain gut bacteria compared with those on the regular diet. Gut bacteria are known to play a role in the immune system’s development, the researchers said, and type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder in which the immune system attacks the cells of the pancreas that produce insulin. [5 Ways Gut Bacteria Affect Your Health] However, it’s too soon to know whether the findings apply to humans, as intriguing findings in mice don’t always translate very well into recommendations for people, said Dr. Victoria Hsiao, an assistant professor of endocrinology and metabolism at the University of Rochester Medical Center, who was not involved in the study. Moreover, the researchers noted that it’s not clear if the mice pups in the s Continue reading >>

Caroline’s Story: Overcoming Type 1 Diabetes With Real Food

Caroline’s Story: Overcoming Type 1 Diabetes With Real Food

Today, Caroline Potter from Colorful Eats, has an amazing story of recovery for you. She’s worked with the same nutritionist that I have these last few years, and has been able to treat Type 1 diabetes with a nutrient-dense diet and natural supplements. It’s another encouraging story of how food can play a significant role in our fight against disease! Treating Diabetes with Real Food Life in your 20s seems pretty grand. You feel powerful, youthful and energized. Dreams seem within your reach and challenges seem conquerable. Then out of the blue, college bliss turns into doctors offices and waiting rooms. Countless tests of all forms, vague results and no answers as to what was wrong with me. As I came home from college that winter for Christmas break, I laid on the couch for most of my vacation. I was constantly starving, eating everything in sight but quickly loosing weight. Finally, one day while out to dinner with my family, I broke down in tears because my mouth was so dry, I could barely talk. I was experiencing dry mouth, one of the major symptoms of diabetes. Diabetes? I was 20, a seemingly healthy young girl, who grew up in a home where my mother fed us all organic food. I was the one in school with her carrot sticks and tuna salad sandwiches. I never drank soda or ate Oreos, so the thought of diabetes was never even on my radar. Barely able to walk up a flight of stairs, I checked myself into the ER to discover my blood sugar levels were in a diabetic coma range. Later the next morning, the doctor diagnosed me with type 1 diabetes. I was scared, hopeless and confused. The days that followed were difficult to say the least. I still felt sick all the time, gained over 20 pounds in 2 weeks and felt terribly alone. My legs turned black and blue from giving mys Continue reading >>

Successful Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes And Seizures With Combined Ketogenic Diet And Insulin

Successful Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes And Seizures With Combined Ketogenic Diet And Insulin

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The deficiency of insulin leads to metabolic decompensation, causing hyperglycemia and ketosis that resolves with the administration of insulin and fluids. However, an induced state of ketosis is the basis for the success of the ketogenic diet (KD), which is an effective therapy for children with intractable epilepsy. We report the case of a 2-year-old girl who presented to the emergency department with 1-week history of decreased activity, polyuria, and decreased oral intake. Her past medical history was remarkable for epilepsy, for which she was started on the KD with a significant improvement. Her laboratory evaluation was compatible with DKA, and fluids and insulin were given until correction. Because of concerns regarding recurrence of her seizures, the KD was resumed along with the simultaneous use of insulin glargine and insulin aspart. Urine ketones were kept in the moderate range to keep the effect of ketosis on seizure control. Under this combined therapy, the patient remained seizure-free with no new episodes of DKA. Abstract Protein-losing enteropathy in children is caused by intestinal metabolic, inflammatory, or infectious processes, or by lymphatic obstruction (intestinal lymphangiectasia). In this report, a 17-month-old child is presented with protein-losing enteropathy due to intestinal malrotation and chronic midgut volvulus causing lymphatic obstruction and spillage of lymph in the intestine and the peritoneum. This report should alert the pediatrician that intestinal malrotation should be added to the wide list of possible causes of protein-losing enteropathy in children. Abstract Cytokine dermat Continue reading >>

Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Treatment & Management

Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Treatment & Management

Approach Considerations All children with type 1 diabetes mellitus require insulin therapy. The following are also required in treatment: Strategies to help patients and their parents achieve the best possible glycemic management are crucial. A 2-year randomized clinical trial found that a practical, low-intensity behavioral intervention delivered during routine care improved glycemic outcomes. [45] A well-organized diabetes care team can provide all necessary instruction and support in an outpatient setting. The only immediate requirement is to train the child or family to check blood glucose levels, to administer insulin injections, and to recognize and treat hypoglycemia. The patient and/or family should have 24-hour access to advice and know how to contact the team. Children should wear some form of medical identification, such as a medic alert bracelet or necklace. [5, 46] Awareness of hypoglycemia becomes impaired over time, and severe hypoglycemia can occur without warning. Hypoglycemia is more likely to affect people who maintain low blood sugar levels and who already suffer frequent hypoglycemic attacks. Overzealous or inadequate treatment of hypoglycemia can lead to serious consequences. Failure to regularly examine for diabetic complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, especially renal and ophthalmic ones, can be detrimental. Inpatient care Where a diabetes care team is available, admission is usually required only for children with DKA. In addition, children with significant dehydration, persistent vomiting, metabolic derangement, or serious intercurrent illness require inpatient management and intravenous rehydration. Diabetes in pregnancy Pregnancies should be planned and carefully managed to achieve healthy outcomes for mother and infant. P Continue reading >>

Diabetic Meal Plan For Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetic Meal Plan For Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes, or as it's fully called Diabetes Mellitus, is in fact two completely different diseases type 1 and type 2, and from a nutritional point of view each should be treated differently, therefore we have a plan for both. Blood sugar (glucose) levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin, produced by the pancreas. Glucose comes from the digestion of starchy foods, such as bread and potatoes, from sugar and naturally sweet foods, and the liver where it is made and passed into the blood. In diabetes glucose cannot be used effectively as a fuel by the body, leading to increased levels in the blood, and the excess glucose passes over into urine making the patient pass more urine and feel thirsty. Other symptoms include tiredness, blurred vision and disorientation. Type 2 diabetes is a disease caused by the inability of insulin to act properly on tissues, see our meal plan (coming soon). In type 1 diabetes the pancreas produces no insulin at all, so the patient has to be treated with injections of insulin as well as a suitable diet. There are a number of different types of insulin which your doctor will put you on. Older insulin regimens were a lot stricter and diabetics had to follow very strict eating times. Newer regimens encourage the patients themselves to take more control over their own nutrition and they can do this by having one injection of long acting insulin per day and an appropriate dose of super-fast acting insulin prior to a meal. However, regular meals and snacks are still encouraged, especially in respect of carbohydrate foods. Diabetics should aim for slow-released low glycaemic carbs as the basis of each meal and snack. See our Glycaemic Index Tables for GI values of foods. It's important that diabetics follow a suitable diet because: What you eat Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes . . . Cured?

Type 1 Diabetes . . . Cured?

Carrie posted this wonderfully thought-provoking comment about her diabetic son: My 13 yr old son was diagnosed over a year ago with Type 1 [diabetes]. Before his diagnosis, I was very ‘green’ — bought organic foods, bought meat from free-range, grass-fed local farms, cleaned my house with products I made myself from vinegar and natural products. But we did follow the low-fat, low-calorie, high-fiber, healthy whole grain diet. We were told “eat whatever you want” — just dose for it [with insulin] and be healthy (yep: low-fat, high-fiber, etc.) I didn’t think so: If he has a carb problem, then limit carbs! We immediately went low-carb, causing us to remove a lot of wheat products, but didn’t know about the damages of gluten then. His last two A1Cs [hemoglobin A1c’s, a 60-90 day reflection of blood sugar fluctuations] have been 5.3% [normal range]. He was taken off his basal insulin and his bolus, continuing to less and less. Today, he is OFF insulin! YES, he is a Type 1 diabetic: They double-checked for the antibodies in case he was misdiagnosed–they are there. Even without insulin, his blood sugars are better than me or his dad, or even sister (we all check now). And all this while growing over 5 inches in one year, going through puberty and the stomach flu with no problems (scary for Type 1 diabetics). His doctors are amazed. We all still did not know how he was this way, until someone shared with me Wheat Belly. We are all going completely gluten-free now and staying low-carb. Maybe my asthma will be gone and my daughter’s horrible itchy rash all over her arms will finally leave! Absolutely wonderful book, thank you! Wow. We know that consumption of modern wheat is associated with causing type 1 diabetes in children, average age of onset 4 years Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Not only are 86 million Americans prediabetic, but 90% of them don't even know they have it, the Centers for Disease Control reports. What's more, doctors diagnose as many as 1.5 million new cases of diabetes each year, according to the American Diabetes Association. Whether you're at risk, prediabetic or following a diabetic diet as suggested by your doctor, a few simple strategies can help control blood sugar and potentially reverse the disease entirely. Plus, implementing just a few of these dietary changes can have other beneficial effects like weight loss, all without sacrificing flavor or feeling deprived. First, let's start with the basics. What is diabetes? There are two main forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that's usually diagnosed during childhood. Environmental and genetic factors can lead to the destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. That's the hormone responsible for delivering glucose (sugar) to your cells for metabolism and storage. In contrast, type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed in adulthood and caused by a variety of lifestyle factors like obesity, physical inactivity and high cholesterol. Typically, type 2 diabetics still have functioning beta cells, meaning that they're still producing insulin. However, the peripheral tissues become less sensitive to the hormone, and the liver produces more glucose, causing high blood sugar. When left unmanaged, type 2 diabetics may stop producing insulin altogether. While you may have some symptoms of high blood sugar (nausea, lethargy, frequent thirst and/or urination), a clinical diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes requires a repeat test of your blood sugar levels. How does a diabetic diet help? Unlike many other health conditions, the incredible th Continue reading >>

How The Bernstein Diet Changed My Life With Type 1 Diabetes

How The Bernstein Diet Changed My Life With Type 1 Diabetes

The Alternative Path To Diabetes Management How the Bernstein Diet Changed My Life with Type 1 Diabetes I had traveled the common path of Type 1 Diabetes management for 12 years and remember it clearly. It was a series of exhausting blood sugar swings, from low to high,and back again. Every. Day. For an entire calendar year after I first read the book titledThe Diabetes Solutionby Dr. Richard K. Bernstein MD, I tried and exhausted all the easy methods of diabetes management (exercise, losing weight, measuring/careful calculation of all food consumed, and logging all results). I didnt change anything. I knew that a drastic change in my life was needed. I knew that the book was the only option left. So I read voraciously about the low-carb approach to diabetes management and was finally confident enough to step off the common path and start walking the alternative route to diabetes management. The results have been so dramatic and life-changing that Iabsolutely MUST tell people about this. My A1c went from 7.1% (157 mg/dL average)to 4.4% (80 mg/dL average) within 4 months, all without frequent low blood sugar levels. My blood sugar levels were steady and I was eating healthy, whole foods. I owe a huge debt of gratitude to Dr. Bernstein, who has been a guide and inspiration,as I have traveled this path towards normal (non-diabetic) blood glucose levels. Dr. B as I shall affectionately call him, has been a type 1 diabetic for 70 years. Originally trained as an engineer, he was the first true biohacker a term used often today to imply manipulating ones nutrition and exercise to achieve remarkable results in health, improving illness, etc. Through Dr. Bs increasing diabetic complications, he recognized there was a problem with the standard, doctor-recommended treatment of di Continue reading >>

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