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Thin Fit Pre Diabetic

The Diabetes Risk Factor You Should Consider Even If You're Thin | Prevention

The Diabetes Risk Factor You Should Consider Even If You're Thin | Prevention

(Fight diabetes and lower your cholesterol with the affordable, effective health hacks in The Doctors Book of Natural Healing Remedies !) Also called "impaired glucose tolerance" or "impaired fasting glucose," prediabetes involves blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association , having the condition puts you higher risk of developing both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Unlike diabetes, there are no clear symptoms of prediabetes. But there is a very strong predictor of whether you might have it or not, Wyne says: your family history. Type 2 diabetes runs in families, she notes. So, you could be a normal weight, and even physically fit, and still be at risk. (Here are 10 sneaky signs you may develop diabetes, and how you can stay healthy .) If you have multiple family members diagnosed with diabetes, its worth getting tested, Wyne believes. Knowing you have prediabetes can help you make lifestyle choices that can help you put off getting diabetes for as long as possible. Diabetes doesnt happen overnight, says Stuart Weiss, MD, clinical assistant professor of endocrinology at NYU Langone Health. There is a slow decline in insulin capacity over time, and this can be accelerated by the stress of a poor diet or inactivity. He suggests getting blood sugar checked as part of an annual screening, along with blood pressure and triglycerides. (Here's exactly what one man ate to get his blood sugar under control for good .) Think of prediabetes as a warning sign, adds Wyne. It tells you to make some changes in areas like nutrition and activity, so you can prevent developing diabetes in the immediate future. Continue reading >>

Can Thin People Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Thin People Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Almost 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, according to government statistics, and it's known that carrying excess weight ups your diabetes risk. The reason is that fat interferes with your ability to use insulin — insulin moves sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells, which need the sugar for energy. But don't think you're off the hook if you're thin — you still can be at risk for type 2 diabetes, even if you're not heavy. The risk for developing type 2 diabetes may be smaller if you're thin, but it's still real, especially if you're older, says Christopher Case, MD, who specializes in endocrinology in Jefferson City, Mo. It's not known exactly how many thin or normal-weight people have type 2 diabetes, but part of that may be because there is no standard definition for "thin," Dr. Case says. "They may not look obese," Case says, but any excess weight, especially around the stomach, is a risk factor. One of the reasons people can have high blood sugar and develop diabetes whether they're thin or obese is because weight, though a contributing factor, is not the only factor. Type 2 Diabetes Could Be in Your Genes Genetics plays a role in developing type 2 diabetes. Studies show that people who have a close relative (parent or sibling) with type 2 diabetes have a greater than three times higher risk of developing the disease than those with no family history, Case says. Genetics may explain why some people who are thin develop type 2 diabetes and why an obese person might not, he says. African-Americans, Asians, Hispanics, and Native Americans also are at greater risk for type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle Choices Raise Your Diabetes Risk These other risk factors, often associated with people who are overweight, can plague thin people, too Continue reading >>

Prediabetes In A Fit Person, What To Do?

Prediabetes In A Fit Person, What To Do?

Some people lose the genetic lottery. Was there a rising trend visible in the previous HbA1c measurements? * Even at a healthy weight, has his body composition changed? If his body fat percentage increased, that can worsen blood glucose control. (A quick check -- has he needed to get larger-waist pants or loosen belts since five years ago?) * What do you mean by "eat well"? If his diet is high in refined low-fiber carbohydrates, that may not be good for someone genetically prone to glucose control issues. That may indicate shifting to more fibrous carbohydrates and/or reducing carbohydrate intake. Yes I am hypothyroid and my doc said there is a relationship between the two. When my glucose crept over 100 fasting in the early morning I started taking metformin 1x per day before I go to bed which keeps my morning level in a better range. My A1c is 5.4 down from 5.7 last year before metfirmin. I am high end of normal weight and work out regularly. I eat 1500 calories a day and it is extremely difficult for me to lose any weight so I am all about maintaining things now that I am 60. I do feel better in the morning so that high morning sugar must have been affecting me. My thin athletic H has had his glucose rise from the 80s to the 90s in the past decade. His doc attributed that to aging. There is a difference between subcutaneous fat, which is not necessarily bad for a person's health. But the fat that is harmful is the unseen fat around your organs which is visceral fat. You can be slim, but have visceral fat, the fat around your organs. As for eating well, it's hard to tell what that really means, but anything with added sugar (and there are sugar substitutes, which I wouldn't recommend either) should be eliminated from his diet. No sugar in the coffee, fruit juices, de Continue reading >>

Thin Type 2s?

Thin Type 2s?

We’ve all read about people with Type 1 climbing mountains, dancing ballet, or playing professional football. But people with Type 2 are thought by many to be overweight and sedentary. Last week I learned different. It’s an interesting story. You occasionally hear from diabetes educators about “thin Type 2s,” but for a long time, I thought they didn’t really exist. I thought they were misdiagnosed Type 1s or 1.5s. I figured they had either LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adults) or MODY (Maturity Onset of Diabetes of the Young). My reasoning went like this: Type 2 diabetes is driven by insulin resistance. Insulin resistance has many causes, but the main ones are physical inactivity and stress. So how could a very active person develop Type 2? Well, now I know. If you have the right genes, stress can drive even a very active person to Type 2 all by itself. Last week, I spoke at a support group for people with Type 2. Two of the group members, one man and one woman, were not only thin, but very active. The man kept tapping his foot and rocking his legs back and forth. The woman kept moving around in her chair. Both the man and the woman talked of exercising a great deal. In my experience, people with Type 2 don’t move as much as these two do. They don’t fidget. They conserve energy. (Readers — has that been your experience?) Saving energy is vital to survival where life is physically demanding and food is scarce. In a culture like ours, where food is plentiful and physical activity is discouraged, being an energy-saver can contribute to health problems, including Type 2 diabetes. Solving the puzzle At first, I thought, “You guys aren’t really Type 2.” In the past, I had actually helped a number of fit 1.5s by diagnosing them (over the phone!) aft Continue reading >>

Think Skinny People Don’t Get Type 2 Diabetes? Think Again.

Think Skinny People Don’t Get Type 2 Diabetes? Think Again.

In the last article we discussed the complex relationship between body weight and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We learned that although obesity is strongly associated with T2DM, a subset of “metabolically healthy obese” (MHO) people have normal blood sugar and insulin sensitivity and don’t ever develop diabetes. In this article we’re going to talk about the mirror reflection of the MHO: the “metabolically unhealthy nonobese” (MUN). These are lean people with either full-fledged type 2 diabetes or some metabolic dysfunction, such as insulin resistance. You might even be surprised to learn that skinny people can and do get T2DM. They are rarely mentioned in the media, and there isn’t much written about them in the scientific literature. Perhaps these folks have been overlooked because type 2 diabetes has been historically viewed as a disease of gluttony and sloth, a self-inflicted outcome of eating too much and not and not exercising enough. But the very existence of the MUN phenotype proves that there’s more to T2DM than overeating and a sedentary lifestyle. Remember that one in three type 2 diabetics are undiagnosed. It’s possible that a significant number of these people that are lean. They don’t suspect they might have T2DM because they’re under the impression that it’s not a condition that affects thin people. This is one of the biggest dangers of the myth that “only fat people get diabetes”. It’s well-known that high blood sugar can precede the development of T2DM for as long as ten years. It is during this time that many of the complications associated with diabetes – nerve damage, retinal changes, and early signs of kidney deterioration – begin to develop. This is why it’s just as important for lean people to maintain healthy blood s Continue reading >>

Skinny People Get Type 2 Diabetes Too: 10st 7lb Man Who Exercised Regularly Is Stunned To Learn He Has The Condition - Which He Then Reversed In 11 Days With New Diet

Skinny People Get Type 2 Diabetes Too: 10st 7lb Man Who Exercised Regularly Is Stunned To Learn He Has The Condition - Which He Then Reversed In 11 Days With New Diet

When I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes four years ago I was stunned. I’d gone for a check-up, and a routine blood test said it all: diabetes. But it made no sense. As a healthy 59-year-old, who went running, played regular cricket, drank moderately (2 units a week) and only weighed 10st 7lb, I was hardly overweight. In fact, at 5ft 7in, my Body Mass Index (BMI) was a healthy 21. Yes, I did overeat sometimes – I was thin and thought I could eat what I liked within reason – but it was mainly healthy food, few ready meals, semi-skimmed milk, grilled rather than fried food, chicken rather than red meat and lots of fresh veg. But over the past two years I had been under a lot of stress: my dad had recently died from prostate cancer, my job had changed radically, and I’d been on high blood pressure pills for a year. Stress can raise your blood sugar levels. But I still thought my diabetes diagnosis was ridiculous – how could someone with my weight and healthy lifestyle be facing the prospect of all the serious complications of type 2 diabetes in ten years’ time, including sight loss and a much greater risk of early death? My GP told me I could control my condition with diet, and gave me a long list of healthy foods and their glycaemic load (the effect each food has on your blood sugar level). After six months on this, my blood sugar level had dropped from 9mmol to 7, although this was still well above 6, the level at which type 2 diabetes is diagnosed. I wanted to be free of diabetes, not just control it. So I researched online and discovered the work of Professor Roy Taylor at Newcastle University. Type 2 is linked to fat clogging up the liver and pancreas, and Professor Taylor had shown that a very low calorie diet could reverse this. I had to try it. I chose Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Women: Young, Slim, And Diabetic

Type 2 Diabetes In Women: Young, Slim, And Diabetic

Stephanie Yi, 29, had a body most women would kill for. She never had to work hard to maintain her long-limbed, flat-bellied frame—weekend hikes near her northern California home and lots of spinach salads did the trick. She could easily afford to indulge her sweet tooth with the occasional buttery, sugary snack. At 5'7" and 120 pounds, she had, she figured, hit the good-genes jackpot. But everything changed two years ago, when a crippling fatigue left her sidelined from college classes. Listless, she dragged herself to a doctor, who suspected a thyroid imbalance. A blood test and a few days later, she received the alarming results: Her thyroid was fine; her blood sugar levels were not. She was prediabetic and on the cusp of developing type 2. Stephanie was stunned. Of course, she'd heard diabetes was a health crisis. (At last count, 26 million Americans had the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.) But weren't type 2 diabetics fat, sedentary, and on junk-food-and-soda diets? Stephanie hadn't been to a drive-through in ages; she didn't touch meat. Yet, somehow, she'd gotten an illness most slim women dodge. A Growing Threat The CDC estimates that one in nine adults has diabetes and, if current trends continue, one in three will be diabetic by the year 2050. For decades, typical type 2 patients were close to what Stephanie pictured: heavy and inactive. They were also older, often receiving a diagnosis in middle age or beyond. But while such type 2 cases continue to skyrocket, there has been a disturbing increase in a much younger set. The number of diabetes-related hospitalizations among people in their thirties has doubled in the past decade, with women 1.3 times more likely to be admitted than men. Perhaps even more troubling is the e Continue reading >>

8 Strategies To Reverse Skinny-fat Syndrome

8 Strategies To Reverse Skinny-fat Syndrome

“If I’m not overweight, do I need to become concerned about obesity and other health issues?” asks this week’s House Call. “Even though I drink soda and eat whatever I want, I don’t gain weight. Should I be worried?” The short answer is yes, and here’s why. One study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found nearly one in four skinny people have pre-diabetes and are “metabolically obese.” In other words, about 25 percent of the population fit the skinny fat syndrome, also known as thin on the outside, fat on the inside (TOFI). Skinny fat means just what it sounds like: You look thin but inside you’re fat. You’ve got organ fat (the more dangerous type of fat) coating your liver, kidneys, and other organs. You are under-lean but over-fat, meaning not enough muscle and too much fat (especially belly fat). Most people assume if you’re overweight, you’re unhealthy; if you are thin, you are healthy. Unfortunately, the reality isn’t so simple. Yes, America has a big fat problem: almost 70 percent are overweight and many have diabesity, a condition I define as anywhere on the continuum between pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Even though it might sound crazy, being skinny fat might become more dangerous than being overweight. Let’s say you go to your annual doctor visit and you are overweight or obese. He or she will probably run blood tests, become concerned about type 2 diabetes, and ask you to lose some weight. If you arrive thin, your doctor might not conduct those blood tests or otherwise acknowledge underlying issues. He or she might assume things are normal rather than checking under the hood for pre-diabetes and other problems that pave the way for detrimental repercussions. That’s unfortunate, since if you are Continue reading >>

I'm Thin, I'm Active And I Might Have Diabetes

I'm Thin, I'm Active And I Might Have Diabetes

When I tell people that I have to miss spaghetti dinner or pass on the free bagels at the breakfast meeting because I’m managing my blood sugar, they look at me like I must be confused. Why? they wonder. Because I have a lot of the symptoms of pre-diabetes and my healthcare providers have encouraged me to avoid carbs and control the sugars in my diet. Diabetes? How could you have diabetes?! Sounds crazy for an active, 29 year old, who is 5’6” and 125 lbs to be worried about diabetes. That’s what I always thought too—until my fit, active, 3-squares-a-day mother was tested and diagnosed with prediabetes. Her blood sugar was too high and she was given a few months to get it under control with diet before pharmaceutical options would be strongly recommended. We both knew that diabetes ran in the family, but we always considered it a disease of the overweight so it didn’t apply to us. But according to the National Institutes of Health even though most people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are overweight, it can turn up in thin, otherwise healthy individuals—particularly if there’s a family history of the disease. NIH also reports that 35 percent of U.S. adults ages 20 years or older have prediabetes. And for adults ages 65 years or older that goes up to 50 percent. One out of every two older adults has prediabetes (read: increased risk for cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension and a litany of other complications). Experts in the dietary supplements industry like Rhonda Witwer of National Starch Food Innovation have seen these kinds of disturbing health statistics and recognized a need in the market. She predicts that ingredients that help maintain healthy blood sugar and address the risk factors associated with conditions like metabolic syndrome are on Continue reading >>

Ask An Expert: Can A Young, Healthy, Active Adult Get Diabetes?

Ask An Expert: Can A Young, Healthy, Active Adult Get Diabetes?

Q: Can an active, 32-year-old Caucasian female who eats well and who does not suffer from obesity, high blood pressure or high cholesterol be diagnosed with diabetes or pre-diabetes? If so, how common is this? Answer from Susanna Reiner, R.N., B.S.N., diabetes nurse educator, Providence Diabetes Education: Yes — even though a healthy diet, weight and lifestyle greatly reduce the chances of developing diabetes, there is still a small chance that the woman you described could be diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes due to risk factors beyond her control. It’s relatively uncommon, but it does happen. Fortunately, her healthy lifestyle will be an asset to her. If the woman in question is diagnosed with pre-diabetes, then staying physically active, maintaining a low-stress lifestyle and following a well-balanced diet will help her prevent or delay the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, according to the Diabetes Prevention Program. If she is diagnosed with diabetes, she’ll have a much better chance of preventing complications related to uncontrolled diabetes if she continues to follow her healthy habits. What could cause diabetes in such a young, otherwise healthy adult? Let’s first consider type 2 diabetes, which accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all cases of diabetes in the United States according to the National Diabetes Fact Sheet. Some of the most common risk factors for type 2 diabetes don’t appear to apply to the woman you’ve described. These include the following: Obesity, particularly around the waistline (associated with 90 percent of people who have type 2 diabetes, according to the World Health Organization) Certain non-Caucasian ethnic backgrounds (African-Americans, Native Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are a Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Prediabetes?

Are You At Risk For Prediabetes?

Working as a physical therapist in Talent, Oregon, Jade Wilcoxson treated diabetic patients every day, but she never imagined she could become one of them. At 28, she had an athletic build, loved to mountain bike and play soccer on weekends, and ate what she considered a pretty healthy diet. So in 2006, she was shocked when she got a call from her doctor's office after having blood work done during a routine checkup. "My blood sugar was elevated," recalls Jade, now 36. Her doctor retested her a few times, but the results were conclusive: Jade had prediabetes, a condition that put her at higher risk for type 2 diabetes, a disease in which the body doesn't properly make or use insulin, the hormone that helps convert glucose into fuel for our cells. As a result, blood sugar builds up in the bloodstream and can damage nerves and organs. A prediabetes diagnosis means that has already begun to happen. Exactly why isn't known, but genetics, excess body fat and inactivity play a role. Jade was devastated. She knew that if she got diabetes, she would be at an increased risk for high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke and kidney disease. The good news: Prediabetes is reversible. She could clean up her diet, as her doctor suggested, cutting back on simple carbs and alcohol, and step up her exercise routine and/or take drugs to manage her glucose levels. "I worried that if I started taking medication I would become dependent on it," Jade says. "I wasn't ready to go down that route." She called her brother, Ryan, who suggested they train for a 100-mile bicycle race together as a way to exercise more consistently. "It took us about eight or nine hours to cross the finish line, but we made it," Jade says. Inspired, she kept training. "Once I started riding, I felt like eating bette Continue reading >>

Thin And Type 2: Non-obese Risk Factors For Developing Diabetes

Thin And Type 2: Non-obese Risk Factors For Developing Diabetes

Emily got quite a surprise when she went for her annual physical exam. The lab tests taken showed that her blood glucose readings were in the range of someone with type 2 diabetes. Since Emily did not fit the usual appearance of someone with type 2 diabetes, her doctor ran the test again and checked for antibodies to insulin and her c-peptide levels, in case Emily was in the early stages of LADA (a slow moving version of type 1 diabetes). The test results were the same, however. Even though Emily, at 5 feet 2 inches and 115 pounds, had never been overweight in her life, she had type 2 diabetes. Emily was one of the 15 percent of individuals in the United States who develop type 2 diabetes even though their BMIs are squarely in the normal range (between 18.5 and 24.9). There can be a number of factors that come into play when a thin person develops type 2 diabetes. Genetics play a significant role in determining disease onset. A strong family history coupled with a sedentary lifestyle and poor eating habits can tip the scales in the wrong direction. So too can a previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes or the birth of a baby greater than nine pounds. Unfortunately for these individuals, their outside appearance is hiding a metabolic profile similar to overweight people who have type 2 diabetes. They are insulin resistant not from excess pounds per say, but from the places where some of their fat cells are stored, and often from a lack of exercise. Many normal weight people with type 2 diabetes have excess visceral fat. Visceral fat is the type of fat surrounding the body’s abdominal organs and is highly metabolically active, producing a variety of hormones that influence glucose and fat metabolism. Fat cells release fatty acids into the blood stream that can damage t Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes And Being Very Thin-need Advice!

Pre-diabetes And Being Very Thin-need Advice!

pre-diabetes and being very thin-need advice! I recently had my annual physical and my fasting blood sugar was 107. My Dr. said it was fine and I don't have diabetes but I read online that 107 is considered pre-diabetes That scared me because diabetes runs in my family. I have always been extremely thin. I am5'4' and 98lbs. I'm trying to watch my carbs and have been exercising to hopefully prevent diabetes from developing.The problem isI'm losing weight.. Any suggestions how I can eat alow carb diet but not lose weight at the same time? I just don't know what to do. Thanks! Also, can you tell me if eating a half cup of Fiber one cereal with one cup of milk would raise my blood sugar a lot?I eat that every morning. Thanks so much for your help. Yes, a fasting glucose of 107 mg/dl is considered prediabetes. The fasting glucose ranges are: Since diabetes runs in your family ask your doctor for an A1c [HbA1c] test. See this link for an explanation. An 8oz glass of milk contains on average 8 grams of sugar, every 7 grams equals one heaping Tablespoon of refined sugar. That alone will jack your postprandial [after meal] glucose levels upwards. Oatmeal spiced with cinnamon and fruits is my usual breakfast. A much better choice than synthetic fiber. For weight its best to sit down with a nutritionist to go over your foods and serving sizes - what you should eat and cannot eat. Ask your doctor for a referral. Major teaching hospitals found on or near major university campuses have trained nutritionist's on staff. Continue reading >>

‘obesity Paradox’: Why Being Thin With Diabetes Is A Dangerous Combo

‘obesity Paradox’: Why Being Thin With Diabetes Is A Dangerous Combo

Being overweight or obese is a risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes, but it turns out that these heavier patients may have an advantage: people who are overweight when they are diagnosed with diabetes live longer than their thinner peers. The so-called obesity paradox, in which being overweight appears to be protective against early death, has been seen before in heart failure and chronic kidney disease. But, says study author Mercedes Carnethon, associate professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University, that doesn’t necessarily mean that gaining excess weight is a healthy strategy; rather, it may be that people who are thin when they develop diabetes are already be vulnerable to worse health. “We hypothesized that their diabetes may be different,” she says. “They may have developed diabetes for reasons unrelated to obesity. Overall, about 85% of people with diabetes are heavy. Gaining too much weight is a major contributor to Type 2 diabetes, since excess fat cells can affect the way the body breaks down glucose and produces insulin, but some normal weight individuals can develop the disease as well. The elderly and people of Asian descent are more likely to be at normal weight when diagnosed, for example. (MORE: Doctors Should Screen All Adults for Obesity, U.S. Panel Says) For the new study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Carnethon and her team reviewed data on five previous studies that were tracking people for heart disease risk factors. The studies, which were conducted between 1990 and 2011, included 2,625 people who were recently diagnosed with diabetes, about 12% of whom were at normal weight. The lean patients looked metabolically similar to those who were obese, with the exception of their weight Continue reading >>

One-third Of Slim American Adults Have Pre-diabetes

One-third Of Slim American Adults Have Pre-diabetes

Among normal-weight individuals, those who were inactive were more likely to have an A1C level of 5.7 or higher, which is considered to be pre-diabetic Among all the normal-weight inactive participants (aged 20 and over), about one-quarter were either pre-diabetic or diabetic When only those inactive people aged 40 and over were analyzed, the percentage rose to 40 percent Inactivity increases your risk of pre-diabetes even if you’re not overweight or obese By Dr. Mercola It's often assumed that in order to develop type 2 diabetes, you have to be overweight. While it's true that excess weight is clearly associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, it's the insulin resistance — not necessarily the weight gain — that drives the disease. As such, many people with a healthy weight are not metabolically healthy, putting them at risk of diseases like type 2 diabetes — even without being overweight or obese. One of the greatest risk factors, according to University of Florida researchers, is actually inactivity, which drives up your risk of pre-diabetes regardless of your weight. Inactivity Is Associated With Pre-Diabetes, Even if You're a Healthy Weight If you were looking for motivation to get moving, this study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, is as good as it gets.1 In a survey of more than 1,100 healthy-weight individuals, those who were inactive (physically active for less than 30 minutes per week) were more likely to have an A1C level of 5.7 or higher, which is considered to be pre-diabetic. Among all the inactive participants (aged 20 and over), about one-quarter were either pre-diabetic or diabetic. When only those inactive people aged 40 and over were analyzed, the percentage rose to 40 percent. The researchers suggested that peop Continue reading >>

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