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Sugar Levels After Food

Is A Blood Sugar Level Of 124 High After Eating Lunch?

Is A Blood Sugar Level Of 124 High After Eating Lunch?

Normal Rises When you eat lunch, your body takes whatever you put into it and converts it to energy -- or stores it as fat. Carbohydrates such as bread, pasta and other starches as well as fruits, vegetables and simple sugars break down quickly and absorb into your bloodstream as glucose. From there, insulin released from the pancreas helps cells remove the glucose to use as energy. If you take in more carbohydrate than your body can immediately process, your blood sugar rises temporarily. Normally, your blood sugar two hours after eating remains below 120 mg/dl and won't exceed 140 mg/dl, an April 2002 article published in "Clinical Diabetes" explains. Diagnosing Diabetes While knowing your blood sugar a few hours after eating is useful information, because it shows how well you process glucose, your doctor normally won't use this number alone to diagnose you with diabetes. Both your fasting glucose and your glucose levels measured after ingesting a specific amount of glucose after exactly two hours are used to diagnose diabetes. A glucose level of 200 or higher two hours after ingesting a glucose solution, along with a fasting blood glucose of 126 mg/dl or higher on two separate occasions can be used to diagnose diabetes, according to the Virginia Mason Medical Center. The Influence of Foods Your body can only absorb simple sugars such as glucose. Complex carbohydrates like those found in starches must break down into easily absorbed forms of glucose, which takes time. If you eat an entire pound of jelly beans, the influx of simple sugar in the form of glucose found in jelly beans makes your blood sugar rise higher quickly. It will rise more slowly if you eat a meal high in whole grains and vegetables, which take longer to break down into simple sugars. For this reaso Continue reading >>

Order Of Food During A Meal May Influence Blood Sugar

Order Of Food During A Meal May Influence Blood Sugar

(Reuters Health) - Overweight and obese people with type 2 diabetes may feel better after a meal if they start it off with vegetables or proteins and end with the carbs, suggests a new study of 11 people. Finishing the broccoli and chicken before tucking into bread and fruit juice was tied to a lower rise in blood sugar levels over the next two hours, compared to eating the same foods in the opposite order, researchers report in Diabetes Care. “When we saw the result, we were really encouraged that this is something that could potentially benefit people,” said Dr. Louis Aronne, the study’s senior author from Weill Cornell Medical College in New York. Approximately 29 million Americans - about 9 percent of the U.S. population - have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 30 percent of those people are undiagnosed. Type 2 is the most common form of diabetes and is often linked to obesity. In type 2 diabetes, the body’s cells are resistant to the hormone insulin, or the body doesn’t make enough of it. Insulin helps the body’s cells use glucose in the blood for fuel. Drinking whey protein shakes before meals has been linked to lower blood sugar levels after eating, but little was known about the influence of foods, and the order in which they’re consumed, on blood sugar levels following a meal, the researchers write. Blood sugar normally rises after eating, but for people with diabetes it can spike dangerously. Diabetics are often told to avoid foods high on the glycemic index - a measure of how rapidly a food gets converted to glucose in the blood - like white breads and sugary drinks. The new research suggests that people may benefit from timing their consumption of carbohydrates during a meal instead of simply avoiding Continue reading >>

Is My Blood Sugar Normal?

Is My Blood Sugar Normal?

“Is my blood sugar normal?” seems like a simple question – but it’s not! The answer can vary dramatically based on your situation. Let’s look at some of the factors to consider. Please remember: you should figure out your personal goals in consultation with your doctor. Normal Blood Sugar in Diabetic vs. Non-Diabetic First, a quick note on how we measure blood sugar. In the USA, blood sugars are measured by weight in milligrams per deciliter, abbreviated as mg/dL. Most everyone else uses millimole per liter, abbreviated mmol. If you are in the USA, look at the big numbers, most everyone else look at the small numbers. In a person without diabetes, blood sugars tend to stay between 70 and 100 mg/dL (3.8 and 5.5 mmol). After a meal, blood sugars can rise up to 120 mg/dL or 6.7 mmol. It will typically fall back into the normal range within two hours. In a person with diabetes, the story is much more complex: Below 70 mg/dL Below 3.8 mmol Low Blood Sugars (Hypoglycemia). When blood sugars drop below this level, you may start feeling hunger, shakiness, or racing of the heart. Your body is starved for sugar (glucose). Read how to detect and treat low blood sugars. 70 mg/dL to 140 mg/dL 3.8 mmol to 7.7 mmol Normal Blood Sugar. In this range, the body is functioning normally. In someone without diabetes, the vast majority of the time is spent in the lower half of this range. 140 mg/dL to 180 mg/dL 7.7 mmol to 10 mmol Elevated Blood Sugars. In this range, the body can function relatively normally. However, extended periods of time in this zone put you at risk for long-term complications. Above 180 mg/dL Abovoe 10 mmol High Blood Sugars. At this range, the kidney is unable to reabsorb all of the glucose in your blood and you begin to spill glucose in your urine. Your bo Continue reading >>

When To Test Your Blood Sugar

When To Test Your Blood Sugar

Checking your blood glucose as recommended can help you see how your meals, medications and activities affect your blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that you routinely test blood sugar levels to aid in managing your diabetes.1 Routine or daily testing For people using an insulin pump or insulin injections throughout the day, the ADA recommends testing multiple times daily.1 If you take another kind of medication, test your blood sugar level as often as your healthcare team recommends. You and your healthcare team will determine when you should check your blood sugar based on your current health, age and level of activity, as well as the time of day and other factors. They may suggest that you test your blood sugar at any of the following times:1,2,3 Before each meal 1 or 2 hours after a meal Before a bedtime snack In the middle of the night Before physical activity, to see if you need a snack During and after physical activity If you think your blood sugar might be too high, too low or falling When you're sick or under stress Structured testing Short-term, structured testing means checking your blood sugar at specific times over a few days. It can help you recognize patterns and problem-solve around how the things you do are connected to your blood sugar. You may want to consider structured testing, in addition to your routine or daily testing, if you: Adjust your insulin or oral medication Begin a new medication unrelated to diabetes Change your activity level, meal plan or schedule There are different ways to perform structured testing, depending on your goals. The Accu-Chek® 360° View tool is a simple paper tool that helps you track your blood sugar over 3 days, so you and your doctor can quickly identify patterns that can guide adjust Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

Measurements of normal range blood sugar levels are taken when three different chemical processes occur within the body to determine whether a prediabetic or diabetic condition exists: Blood sugar levels taken after eight hours of not eating, referred to as a fasting blood sugar test. Blood glucose test taken two hours after eating, called a postprandial blood sugar measurement. Random blood sugar count taken at any time of the day. Individuals with a healthy blood sugar level who do not exhibit wide discrepancies between fasting blood sugar range and non-fasting blood glucose, or blood sugar spikes after eating a meal, generally do not have diabetes. A general value table containing normal range blood sugar levels looks something like this: Average blood sugar level for fasting blood glucose is 70 to 99 milligrams per deciliter. Normal blood sugar ranges for postprandial test done two hours after eating is 70 to 145 mg/dL. Average blood sugar level for random testing is 70 to 125 mg/dL. Different laboratories may use slightly different numerical values but usually remain close to these standard measurements. However, an abnormal blood glucose level does not automatically mean a person has diabetes. A variety of medical conditions can cause blood chemistry to mimic diabetic blood qualities, such as: Alcohol and blood sugar Marijuana and blood sugar Elevated blood sugar levels due to pharmaceuticals Even stress and high blood sugar are correlated because of elevated cortisol levels during times of prolonged stress. According to a 2009 article in the American Journal of Medicine, “high cortisol has been shown to contribute to insulin resistance and is likely involved in the development of Type II diabetes, as well as the persistence of high glucose levels.” As the pre Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Chart

Blood Sugar Chart

This blood sugar chart shows normal blood glucose levels before and after meals and recommended HbA1c levels for people with and without diabetes. BLOOD SUGAR CHART Fasting Normal for person without diabetes 70–99 mg/dl (3.9–5.5 mmol/L) Official ADA recommendation for someone with diabetes 80–130 mg/dl (4.4–7.2 mmol/L) 2 hours after meals Normal for person without diabetes Less than 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L) Official ADA recommendation for someone with diabetes Less than 180 mg/dl (10.0 mmol/L) HbA1c Normal for person without diabetes Less than 5.7% Official ADA recommendation for someone with diabetes 7.0% or less Interested in learning more? Read about normal blood glucose numbers, getting tested for Type 2 diabetes and using blood sugar monitoring to manage diabetes. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

How To Keep Blood Sugar Levels Normal And Stable

How To Keep Blood Sugar Levels Normal And Stable

PETALING JAYA: Diabetic patients will be relieved to know that they need not totally remove their favourite foods from their to-eat list. There are a few ways to achieve normal and stable blood sugar levels. Dietitian Poh Kai Ling explains how. What is a normal blood sugar level? Why is it important? The normal blood sugar level, according to the Clinical Practice Guidelines Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, is 4.4mmol/L to 7.0mmol/L for fasting and 4.4mmol/L to 8.5mmol/L two hours after food. For pregnant women, it is 3.5 mmol/L to 5.1 mmol/L for fasting and 4.0 mmol/L to 6.7 mmol/L two hours after eating. Everyone should try to achieve normal blood sugar levels. For those without diabetes, it is a preventive measure, while for those with diabetes, they need to do this to prevent complications. Is maintaining normal blood sugar levels achievable? Are medications the only way those with diabetes can control their sugar levels? This will depend on the type of diabetes. Type 1 diabetics need insulin. For those with type 2, if they control their diet but still cannot achieve normal blood sugar levels, the doctor will start them on medications. For pregnant women with gestational diabetes, they can try and control glucose levels through diet, but if this is not effective, then they will need medications. What are the foods people should eat to keep blood sugar levels stable? Is there a difference in diet between those with diabetes and those without? If people take big portions of carbohydrates, it will cause blood sugar levels to spike. This is not good. We recommend people to divide a normal food plate (23cm in diameter) into a quarter of rice (carbohydrates), a quarter of meat (protein) and a half plate of vegetables. A quarter portion will be equivalent to each pe Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar After Eating?

What Is Normal Blood Sugar After Eating?

Sugar is vital to your health. It feeds your brain and provides your body with fuel. Too much or too little sugar can carry serious health risks. It is normal for your body to experience spikes and dips in your sugar levels depending on your current activity. Your body does have a built-in mechanism called the pancreas that helps to prevent your sugar levels from spiking too high or dipping too low. Blood Glucose Many foods that you eat contain the sugar vital to your body's normal function. Sweets, such as candy, cake or cookies, contain processed sugar. Fruit contains natural sugar. The body converts carbohydrates into sugar. When you ingest sugar from any of these sources, it enters your bloodstream and becomes what is known as blood glucose or blood sugar. You can test your blood glucose level by placing a small amount of blood on a small strip of treated paper that you then insert into a glucose meter. Normal blood sugar levels are between 70 mg/dl to 120 mg/dl (milligrams of blood glucose per deciliter of blood). Hyperglycemia is when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal. Blood glucose levels below normal can cause a condition called hypoglycemia. When sugar enters your bloodstream, your pancreas is triggered to produce a hormone called insulin. Insulin bonds with the blood glucose, allowing it to feed your body the energy that it needs. The pancreas constantly monitors your blood glucose levels and produces enough insulin to fuel your body and keep your blood glucose levels in the normal range. High Blood Glucose From Eating a Meal There are several activities that can cause normal fluctuations outside of the normal range in your blood glucose. The most common are eating a meal, exercise and stress. When you eat a meal that contains any sugar source, Continue reading >>

Add Extra Virgin Olive Oil To Reduce After-meal Blood Sugar Levels

Add Extra Virgin Olive Oil To Reduce After-meal Blood Sugar Levels

When it comes to controlling blood sugars, individuals generally turn to carbohydrate intake for fluctuating levels. So how may extra virgin olive oil, a fat source, reduce after-meal blood sugars? Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects nearly 10 percent of Americans, with that number expected to grow in the future. The condition cannot only be costly to the wallet, but taxing on health and should not be taken lightly. Essentially, diabetes is when the body cannot efficiently produce energy from food sources. Insulin, a hormone responsible for making energy from sugar (mostly from carbohydrate sources) becomes insufficient in diabetes. The conversion of sugar to energy is unable to be carried out and blood sugars start to rise, a phenomenon known as hyperglycemia, and can harm multiple organ systems if left uncontrolled. But when it comes to controlling blood sugars, individuals generally turn to carbohydrate intake for fluctuating levels. So how may extra virgin olive oil, a fat source, reduce after-meal blood sugars? Olive Oil: What Is It? Running to the store for olive oil might be a little more overwhelming than envisioned, as there are numerous types - including pure olive oil, light olive oil, and virgin olive oil, and extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). Although each can be used interchangeably, EVOO is the highest quality offered. Extra virgin olive oil and virgin olive oil are unrefined, meaning they have not been treated with chemicals or undergone heat manipulation. When it comes to distinguishing between the two, the finger is pointed to the oleic acid content. Though oleic acid can be consumed at a healthy and safe level, too much can be harmful. EVOO, compared to the others, has the least amount of oleic acid content (with no more than one percent) while of Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood of a human or an animal. The body naturally tightly regulates blood glucose levels (with the help of insulin that is secreted by pancreas) as a part of metabolic homeostasis. If blood sugar levels are either increased or decreased by a greater margin than expected this might indicate a medical condition. Diabetic patients must monitor their blood sugar levels as body’s inability to properly utilize and / or produce insulin can pose a serious threat to their health. Navigation: Definition: What is blood sugar? What is diabetes? Diagnosis: Diabetes symptoms Levels and indication Normal blood sugar levels Low blood sugar levels High blood sugar levels Managing: How to lower blood sugar level? Children blood sugar levels Blood sugar levels chart Checking for BS: How to check blood sugar? Treatment: How to lower blood sugar level? Can diabetes be cured? Accessories Diabetic Socks Diabetic Shoes What is blood sugar? What does it mean when someone refers to blood sugar level in your body? Blood sugar level (or blood sugar concentration) is the amount of glucose (a source of energy) present in your blood at any given time. A normal blood glucose level for a healthy person is somewhere between 72 mg/dL (3.8 to 4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (5.8 to 6 mmol/L). It, of course, depends on every individual alone. Blood sugar levels might fluctuate due to other reasons (such as exercise, stress and infection). Typically blood sugar level in humans is around 72 mg/dL (or 4 mmol/L). After a meal the blood sugar level may increase temporarily up to 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L). This is normal. A blood sugar level between 72 mg/dL (4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (6 mmol/L) is considered normal for a h Continue reading >>

Want To Know If Your Diet Is Healthy? Track Your Blood Sugar.

Want To Know If Your Diet Is Healthy? Track Your Blood Sugar.

Are you confused if what you are eating is healthy? Are whole grains good for us? Do we need to be gluten free? Should we be eating dairy regularly? What about fruit? Nuts? Beans? Ahhhhhhhh! Let’s face it, there is A LOT of conflicting diet information out there. Where do you even start? Well it all comes down to one very basic thing…your blood sugar. It doesn’t have to be complicated. It doesn’t have to take weeks of diet diaries and calorie counting. Nor does it require reading endless books, websites, studies, and journals to get the most up-to-date nutrition advice. It is really quite simple, and it can be tested. Wouldn’t it be great to know when you eat something how the inside of your body responds? Does it give you the green light or the red light? Well, you can learn this with a very inexpensive piece of equipment that you can find at any drug store or pharmacy called a glucose meter or glucometer. Click here for a video tutorial on how to test your blood sugar. ……. So, ask your body what it thinks of the food you are eating by taking your blood sugar. Here is a quick & very basic break down on how your blood sugar works. Step 1: You eat a food Step 2: It gets broken down into two categories: stuff the body will use and stuff that will become waste Step 3: Glucose, aka blood sugar, is one of the essential breakdown products of food that the body and brain use for fuel Step 4: Depending on the types of food you just ate, your blood sugar rises. If you just ate a meal high in starch and sugar, your blood sugar rises high over a normal fasting level. If you just had a meal of healthy fats and proteins, your blood sugar does not rise as high. ……. Having a normal functioning blood sugar is the key to optimal health and the prevention of chronic dis Continue reading >>

7 Blood Sugar Testing Mistakes To Avoid

7 Blood Sugar Testing Mistakes To Avoid

1 / 8 Understand Diabetes Testing If you have diabetes, it's imperative that you learn to effectively self-test your blood sugar to keep your glucose levels in check. For example, results from a study of more than 5,000 people living with diabetes showed that even those people who don't take medication for diabetes have better blood sugar control if they test regularly. The study participants' risk of early kidney damage, strokes, and death from diabetes-related causes was also reduced by one-third. Of course, the accuracy of your results is tied to the accuracy of your checking — and to your understanding of what all the numbers mean. "The most important point to me is that people are learning something from checking their blood sugar," says Sacha Uelmen, RDN, CDE, director of nutrition for the American Diabetes Association. "Don't just look at those numbers, write them down, and move on. If you have diabetes, take an active role in your health." To get the most useful readings, learn these common blood sugar testing mistakes and how to avoid them. Continue reading >>

Normal Range For Blood Sugar After Eating A Meal

Normal Range For Blood Sugar After Eating A Meal

When you have diabetes your blood sugar levels can be quite fragile. What are normal blood sugar levels? Blood sugar levels depend on what, when and how much you eat, as well as how effectively your body produces and uses insulin. Your blood sugar levels are an excellent indicator of your risk of developing diabetes; the higher your blood sugar, the greater your risk. Chronic high blood sugar can be a wake-up call, telling you that it’s time to lose weight and make healthier food choices. Normal Blood Glucose / Blood Sugar Level Ranges before Eating Target blood sugar levels depend on the time of day and if you already have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Before you eat, called a fasting or pre-prandial glucose level, a non-diabetic should have a glucose level between 3.88 and 5.3 mmol/L.. If your reading is higher than 5.33 mmol/L. but lower than 6.94mmol/L, you may have insulin resistance or pre-diabetes. Glucose readings above 7 mmol/L indicate you have diabetes. Ideally, if you have type 2 diabetes you should have a fasting glucose level between 3.88 mmol/L and 7.22 mmol/L, when your diabetes is under control due to a combination of diet, exercise and medication if needed. Normal Blood Sugar Ranges after Eating Your blood sugar or blood glucose levels starts to rise soon after you start to eat and is at its highest 1 to 2 hours after your meal. Normal postprandial, which means “after eating,” glucose levels are 6.67 mmol/L and below for non-diabetics, 8.83 mmol/L. and below for those with pre-diabetes and 10 mmol/L for diabetics. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease suggest that two hours after eating, diabetics should have a blood sugar reading of 10 mmol/L or less. If your blood sugar is higher than 18 mmol/L two hours after eating, Continue reading >>

High Blood Glucose | Joslin Diabetes Center

High Blood Glucose | Joslin Diabetes Center

Skipped or not enough diabetes pills or insulin Insulin that has spoiled after being exposed to extreme heat or freezing cold Stress, illness, infection, injury or surgery A blood glucose meterthat is not reading accurately What should you do for high blood glucose? Be sure to drink plenty of water. It is recommended to drink a minimum of 8 glasses each day. If your blood glucose is 250 or greater and you are on insulin, check your urine for ketones. If you have ketones, follow your sick day rules or call your healthcare team if you are not sure what to do. Ask yourself what may have caused the high blood sugar, and take action to correct it. Ask your healthcare team if you are not sure what to do. Try to determine if there is a pattern to your blood glucose levels. Check your blood glucose before meals 3 days in a row. If greater than your target level for 3 days, a change in medication may be needed. Call your healthcare team or adjust your insulin dose following well day rules. Call your healthcare team if you are currently using diabetes pills. Ask yourself the questions outlined below. The answers will give you the information you need to determine what to do about the hyperglycemia. Continue reading >>

"huge" Differences Even Though People Ate The Same Foods

Do we all respond to a tomato in the same way? Or any food for that matter? Scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, suspected that we don't, so they set out to explore the issue. They decided to look at blood sugar levels after people ate, called postprandial blood glucose levels, to see if they varied from one individual to another after eating the same meals. Elevated blood glucose levels are a major risk factor for diabetes and obesity, which are epidemic. They found a wide variance in how the same foods affected different people. "The huge differences that we found in the rise of blood sugar levels among different people who consumed identical meals highlights why personalized eating choices are more likely to help people stay healthy than universal dietary advice," co-author Eran Segal, with the department of Computer Science and Applied Math at Weizmann, said during a press conference. The authors, who published their findings Thursday in the journal Cell, collected data on 800 study participants (who did not have diabetes, though some had prediabetes) using health questionnaires, body measurements, blood tests, glucose monitoring, stool samples, and a mobile app to report lifestyle and food intake. Data on almost 46,900 meals were measured altogether. The participants wore glucose monitors which continuously measured their glucose levels every five minutes for the entire week of the study, Segal said. They ate a standardized breakfast each morning and entered all of their meals into the mobile app food diary. Afterward, the researchers provided the participants with an analysis of their personalized responses to the food they ate. The scientists reported that age and body mass index (BMI) were associated with blood glucose levels after Continue reading >>

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