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Renal Diabetic Diet Food List

Diabetic Food For Kidneys, Fighting Against Nephropathy With Food

Diabetic Food For Kidneys, Fighting Against Nephropathy With Food

Diabetic food for kidneys will help you prevent diabetic renal disease. Protect yourself from nephropathy naturally by adapting a renal diet to your needs. There is a healthy way to protect yourself from kidney disease. If you need a good reason to know about diabetic food for kidneys, here it is. Diabetic nephropathy develops in almost 50% of diabetics. The longer you have had type 2 diabetes, the more important it is to protect your kidneys. You need to know what kidney disease is and how diabetic food for kidneys will help you prevent it. It is possible to have diabetic nephropathy for many years before any obvious symptoms show up. For this reason your diabetes doctor tests for the hidden symptoms with blood and urine tests every year. Want to learn more about diabetic testing for kidney disease? Go here. Research into antioxidants shows more and more about their benefits to diabetics. They help prevent and even reverse the damage done by uncontrolled blood sugar. All of the vegetables and fruits have some kind of antioxidant in them. They have been given fancy names like flavenoids and phytochemicals, but all you need to know is what they do. It is impressive. They stop cancer formation. They reduce and prevent inflammation. They have anti-clotting factors and improve blood flow, which lowers blood pressure and prevents heart disease. And they protect blood vessels from damage. Here are some of the best ones for kidney health. A renal (kidney) diet needs to be low in sodium, so garlic, onion and red bell pepper are first on a list of diabetic food for kidneys. Why? These vegetables add flavor so you need less salt. Plus they reduce inflammation and lower cholesterol. They are also low glycemic, making them diabetic friendly. Want more? Red bell pepper has vitamins Continue reading >>

Kind-to-kidneys Meal Planning

Kind-to-kidneys Meal Planning

Help damaged filters function at their best Diabetes is challenging; kidney disease is challenging, says Vandana Sheth, RD, CDE, a Los Angeles dietitian and certified diabetes educator: "When you put the two together, that diagnosis can be overwhelming and pretty stressful." People with diabetes are used to meal plans that count carbohydrates and saturated fat, but kidney disease adds to the foods-to-monitor list, which are covered in this article. Healthy kidneys work hard to keep vital nutrients in your body and get rid of waste products you don't need. Every day, the two fist-sized organs that rest in the lower back on either side of your spine filter about 50 gallons of blood. Your kidneys expel toxins via urine and keep nutrients, such as salt and potassium, in perfect balance. When the kidneys are damaged, a potential long-term complication of diabetes, they lose their ability to filter the blood properly. That's dangerous because waste and excess fluid can't escape your body. A meal plan that takes this into consideration is important for people with decreased kidney function and those with kidney failure on dialysis. The nutrient protein is essential for building muscles and repairing tissues, but when your kidneys can't filter protein waste products such as urea from your body, you run the risk of these waste products building up to high levels. This, in turn, can cause serious health problems, from fatigue and loss of appetite to a decreased level of consciousness and coma. Because of this, many people with kidney disease limit the amount of protein they eat. Exactly how much protein is too much depends on a person's kidney function, and the specific daily allowance is usually recommended by a doctor or dietitian. Because you won't be eating as much of it, ex Continue reading >>

Sample Renal Meal Plan

Sample Renal Meal Plan

For people with diabetes who have kidney disease, it is essential to follow a diet that takes your individual health needs into account. Depending on those needs, a meal plan for one day may resemble the following one. Estimated totals: 1600 calories, 60 grams protein, 1500 mg sodium, 2300 mg potassium, 800 mg phosphorus. BREAKFAST 4 ounces unsweetened grape juice 1 cup Rice Krispies cereal 4 ounces liquid nondairy creamer 1/2 English muffin 1 teaspoon low-sodium margarine 1 tablespoon fruit jam LUNCH 2 slices low-calorie white bread 2 ounces sliced fresh roasted turkey Lettuce and onion for sandwich (one slice each) 1 teaspoon light mayonnaise 1 medium apple (three-inch diameter) 1 cup raw baby carrots 4 vanilla wafers 12 ounces Diet Sprite DINNER 3 ounces baked pork tenderloin (seasoned with rosemary, garlic powder, and black pepper) 1/3 cup white rice topped with one sliced scallion 1 cup steamed fresh green beans 12 seedless grapes 1 small white roll 2 teaspoons low-sodium margarine Water BEDTIME SNACK 1 small slice plain sponge cake 1/2 cup unsweetened canned peaches 2 tablespoons light nondairy whipped topping Water Continue reading >>

Chronic Kidney Disease Diet

Chronic Kidney Disease Diet

This material must not be used for commercial purposes, or in any hospital or medical facility. Failure to comply may result in legal action. A chronic kidney disease diet limits protein, phosphorus, sodium, and potassium. Liquids may also need to be limited in later stages of chronic kidney disease. This diet can help slow down the rate of damage to your kidneys. Your diet may change over time as your health condition changes. You may also need to make other diet changes if you have other health problems, such as diabetes. There are 5 stages of chronic kidney disease. The diet changes you need to make are based on your stage of kidney disease. Work with your dietitian or healthcare provider to plan meals that are right for you. You may need any of the following: Limit protein in all stages of kidney disease. Limit the portion sizes of protein you eat to limit the amount of work your kidneys have to do. Foods that are high in protein are meat, poultry (chicken and turkey), fish, eggs, and dairy (milk, cheese, yogurt). Your healthcare provider will tell you how much protein to eat each day. Limit sodium if you have high blood pressure. Limit your sodium intake to less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) each day. Ask your dietitian or healthcare provider how much sodium you can have each day. The amount of sodium you should have depends on your stage of kidney disease. Table salt, canned foods, soups, salted snacks, and processed meats, like deli meats and sausage, are high in sodium. Limit the amount of phosphorus you eat. Your kidneys cannot get rid of extra phosphorus that builds up in your blood. This may cause your bones to lose calcium and weaken. Foods that are high in phosphorus are dairy products, beans, peas, nuts, and whole grains. Phosphorus is also found in cocoa, b Continue reading >>

Following A Diet For Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Following A Diet For Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Both of these illnesses can be difficult to manage alone, but can create even more stress when you have to manage both. Many Americans suffer from both conditions though and according to the End-Stage Renal Disease Incident and Prevalent Quarterly Update, approximately 37% of patients with ESRD have diabetes. (1) Diet becomes even more important for patients with both conditions. You will need to pay more attention to the amount of carbohydrates (sugars) that you eat. Carbohydrates can be found in many foods such as fruits, milk, breads, deserts and many drinks. Sodium remains important for both CKD and diabetic patients. Keeping your diet lower in sodium helps to lower blood pressure and reduce fluid retention. Protein is another nutrient that has enhanced importance and too much protein can be harmful for diabetic patients. It is important to talk to your dietician and nephrologist to determine the levels appropriate for your care. Another major change from only a kidney friendly diet is emphasis on eating on a routine and balancing out your meals and snacks. Peritoneal dialysis patients that also are diabetic need to be extra careful with their sugar levels, because dialysate solutions used to clean the body are normally sugar based solutions. Your care team will help determine what solution is best for you and help you adjust your diet to account for the extra sugar in the dialysate. Your care team should be aware of your status as a diabetes patient, however be proactive and make sure your dialysis care team is aware of your condition. The Following are examples of foods and drinks that are can be exchanged and are good for both diets: Fruits Good alternatives: Berries, grapes, cherries, apples, plums Avoid: Cantaloupe, mangos, kiwi, oranges, pomegranate Vegetables Continue reading >>

A Kidney-friendly Eating Plan

A Kidney-friendly Eating Plan

Heres a sample day of a kidney-friendly eating plan. 1/2 cup low-calorie cranberry-apple juice 1/4 cup egg substitute scrambled with 1Tbsp. each chopped onions and green peppers, cooked with 2tsp. soft tub margarine in a nonstick pan 1 1- to 2.5-inch plain mini bagel with 2tsp. soft tub margarine and 1tsp. sugar-free strawberry spread 1/2 cup brewed decaf coffee with 1Tbsp. nondairy creamer and sugar substitute 3 oz. grilled chicken breast on a kaiser roll with a large lettuce leaf and 2tsp. mayonnaise 1 cup fresh-brewed iced tea with fresh lemon and sugar substitute 4 oz. baked or broiled fish such as flounder with fresh lemon and dill 1/2 cup sliced carrots cooked in 2 tsp. soft tub margarine 1 salad with 1/4cup Bibb lettuce, 3small radishes, and 2Tbsp. chopped cucumber with 2tsp. extra-virgin olive oil and 1/2tsp. balsamic vinegar 1 small slice angel food cake with 1/4cup sliced fresh strawberries and 2Tbsp. nondairy whipped topping 3 graham cracker squares with 2tsp. cream cheese Nutrition Facts for the Days Menu: Fat exchanges 11, Starch exchanges 6, Lean meat exchanges 8, Fruit exchanges 3.5, Carbohydrate exchanges 3, Vegetable exchanges 3, Calories 1,820, Calories from Fat 640, Total Fat 71g (Saturated Fat 14.7g, Trans Fat 1.8g), Cholesterol 185mg, Sodium 1,650mg, Potassium 2,180mg, Total Carbohydrate 218g (Dietary Fiber 15g, Sugars 72g), Protein 82g, Phosphorus 1,030mg, Calcium 400mg Created by Sharon Schatz, MS, RD, CSR, CDE, a certified diabetes educator and expert in renal nutrition who works at a dialysis center in Lumberton, N.J. Continue reading >>

Keep Your Kidneys Healthy: 5 Foods To Avoid

Keep Your Kidneys Healthy: 5 Foods To Avoid

The first step in healthy eating is having the right foods stocked in your kitchen. Because many foods are hidden sources of sugar and sodium, it is important to know what's really in your refrigerator. The two leading causes of kidney disease are diabetes and high blood pressure, but when these conditions are controlled, kidney disease can often be prevented or slowed down. Making healthy food choices and controlling sugar, fat, sodium and salt intake can make a big difference in managing the risk factors for kidney disease and protecting the kidneys. Keep these 5 foods out of your daily diet to keep your kidneys healthy: 1) Soda: Steer clear! Soda provides no nutritional benefit and is packed with sugars -- either natural or chemically manufactured. This equates to extra calories in your diet and can ultimately result in unwanted weight gain. A typical 12 oz. cola has 152 calories, and in some places, this is considered a small serving of soda! There are stores in the United States that sell soda in 50 oz. servings! Studies have linked sodas to conditions like osteoporosis, kidney disease, metabolic syndrome and dental problems. Diet sodas may be lower in calories, but still provide no nutritional value and often contain additives, including artificial sweeteners. Skip the soda and reach for water instead. If you don't like the taste of plain water, add a slice or two of fresh fruit to add flavor. 2) Processed deli meats: Scrap cold cuts like bologna and ham from your diet! Processed meats can be significant sources of sodium and also nitrates, which have been linked to cancer. Choose leaner meats like fresh roasted turkey or chicken and always opt for the low sodium, low nitrate meats. 3) Butter: Skimp on the spread! Butter is made from animal fat and contains choles Continue reading >>

American Association Of Kidney Patients

American Association Of Kidney Patients

The Independent Voice of Kidney Patients Since 1969 Your healthcare team may recommend that you follow a meal plan to help you manage your dietary needs. When youre on dialysis, you may occasionally need to eat more or less of certain nutrients. When you have diabetes, you must balance food choices to keep blood sugar under control. There are two methods designed to help you manage your diet: The exchange system for meal planning uses a personal meal plan developed with the help of your renal dietitian. An exchange is a serving choice from a list of foods in measured amounts that have about the same nutritional value. Your renal dietitian or a certified diabetes educator can give you a copy of this plan that is tailored to meet your needs. Carbohydrate counting involves planning meals based on the total number of grams of carbohydrates that you will eat for that meal. To follow this plan, you must be willing to keep track of the foods you eat and the carbohydrates allowed for each meal. Reading and understanding food labels are very important. No matter which plan you choose, youll need to monitor your blood sugar levels to ensure your diabetes is well-controlled. Putting together a meal plan that meets the needs of both dialysis and diabetes may seem difficult. Your renal dietitian and healthcare team are available to make this easier for you. Your renal dietitian will review your special diet prescription with you when you begin dialysis and regularly thereafter. Work together with your team to develop the best overall plan to manage your meals, medications, exercise and blood sugar monitoring for your lifestyle and medical needs. Remember to be flexible; your plan may need to change over time! Always remember that if you are on dialysis and have diabetes, you can be Continue reading >>

Chronic Kidney Disease Diet: Food List, Recommendations, And Recipes

Chronic Kidney Disease Diet: Food List, Recommendations, And Recipes

Home Kidney Health Chronic kidney disease diet: Food list, recommendations, and recipes Chronic kidney disease diet: Food list, recommendations, and recipes Chronic kidney disease is a condition affecting close to 20 million Americans. Kidney specialists (nephrologists) suggest that changing your diet can help protect your kidneys. Diet can also help control other health conditions, such as diabetes and high blood pressure, which in fact can lead to kidney problems. If you suffer from kidney disease, paying close attention to what you eat and drink could help you stay healthier. Renal dieticians can help design a specific chronic kidney disease diet plan, but there are some basic guidelines that people with the disease should know about. Its important for those with chronic kidney disease to maintain a healthy weight and eat a well-balanced diet that is low in salt and fat. A chronic kidney disease diet menu limits certain foods to prevent minerals that could cause further damage from building up in your body. No matter what is on your chronic kidney disease diet food list, you need to keep track of your nutrient intake. For example, monitor the calories, protein, fat, and carbohydrates. Nutrition Facts labels are the quickest and easiest guideline to follow. Making good food choices will allow you to have energy to perform daily tasks, prevent infection, build muscle, maintain a healthy weight, and keep your kidney disease from worsening. Recommendationsforchronickidneydiseasediet Some people with kidney disease have trouble processing proteinand may need substitutes. When a low-protein diet is suggested by a healthcare professional, you will need to replace those calories from protein with fruits, bread, grains, and vegetables. There are even cases where you can cons Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet is one of the most important treatments in managing diabetes and kidney disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with kidney disease as a result of diabetes, you’ll need to work with a dietitian to create an eating plan that’s right for you. This plan will help manage your blood glucose levels and reduce the amount of waste and fluid your kidneys process. Which nutrients do I need to regulate? Your dietitian will give you nutritional guidelines that tell you how much protein, fat and carbohydrate you can eat, as well as how much potassium, phosphorus and sodium you can have each day. Because your diet needs to be lower in these minerals, you’ll limit or avoid certain foods, while planning your meals. Portion control is also important. Talk to your dietitian regarding tips for accurately measuring a serving size. What may be measured as one serving on a regular diet may count as three servings on the kidney diet. Your doctor and dietitian will also recommend you eat meals and snacks of the same size and calorie/carbohydrate content at certain times of the day to keep your blood glucose at an even level. .It’s important to check blood glucose levels often and share the results with your doctor. What can I eat? Below is an example of food choices that are usually recommended on a typical renal diabetic diet. This list is based on sodium, potassium, phosphorus and high sugar content of foods included. Ask your dietitian if you can have any of these listed foods and make sure you know what the recommended serving size should be. Carbohydrate Foods Milk and nondairy Recommended Avoid Skim or fat-free milk, non-dairy creamer, plain yogurt, sugar-free yogurt, sugar-free pudding, sugar-free ice cream, sugar-free nondairy frozen desserts* *Portions of dairy products are o Continue reading >>

Top 10 Renal Diabetic Diet Foods List

Top 10 Renal Diabetic Diet Foods List

Diabetics almost always are recommended to make dietary changes that can help them reduce their weight, better respond to insulin and manage blood sugar levels. People with various kidney disorders are also often saddled with dietary restrictions due to the negative impact some edibles might have on their condition. A renal diabetic diet combines the dos and donts of both types of diets and avoids conflicts between the two. For instance, high phosphorus foods like whole grain breads are ideal for diabetics, but not good for people with kidney problems. And, white rice is superb for people with kidney problems, but a bad carb loaded option for diabetics. This may seem like a combination diet that essentially eliminates a tremendous amount of foods, but it really is not that complex. Evaluating just what is a diabetic diet and just what is a renal diet and how they can coexist together is the best place to start. Interestingly enough, the actual recommended best diabetic diet is not much if at all different from the regular recommended healthy diet for all humans. It includes whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables, along with low fat meats and dairy. The best diabetic diet eliminates over processed sugary foods as well as beverages, and replaced them with whole, healthy foods that are rich in nutrients and vitamins and minerals. Eating fresh and whole foods in general is an ideal part of both a standalone diet for people with diabetes as well as those who are planning a renal diabetic diet, with some restrictions of course. In terms of produce, bananas, melons, tomatoes, bran, beans and kale are all foods that are perfect for someone with diabetes, but only occasional indulgences at best for a person with kidney problems. The reason why diet is important to diabetics Continue reading >>

Kidney-friendly Diet For Ckd

Kidney-friendly Diet For Ckd

You need to have a kidney-friendly meal plan when you have chronic kidney disease (CKD). Watching what you eat and drink will help you stay healthier. The information in this section is for people who have kidney disease but are not on dialysis. This information should be used as a basic guide. Everybody is different and everybody has different nutrition needs. Talk to a renal dietitian (someone who is an expert in diet and nutrition for people with kidney disease) to find a meal plan that works for you. Ask your doctor to help you find a dietitian. Medicare and many private insurance policies will help pay for appointments with dietitians. Check with your insurance company to see if your policy covers medical nutrition therapy (MNT). Why is an eating plan important? What you eat and drink affects your health. Staying at a healthy weight and eating a balanced diet that is low in salt and fat can help you control your blood pressure. If you have diabetes, you can help control your blood sugar by carefully choosing what you eat and drink. Controlling high blood pressure and diabetes may help prevent kidney disease from getting worse. A kidney-friendly diet may also help protect your kidneys from further damage. A kidney-friendly diet limits certain foods to prevent the minerals in those foods from building up in your body. Healthy diet basics With all meal plans, including the kidney-friendly diet, you need to track how much of certain nutrients you take in, such as: Calories Protein Fat Carbohydrates To make sure you are getting the right amounts of these nutrients, you need to eat and drink the right portion sizes. All of the information you need to keep track of your intake is on the “Nutrition Facts” label. Use the nutrition facts section on food labels to learn m Continue reading >>

Eating Right For Chronic Kidney Disease

Eating Right For Chronic Kidney Disease

You may need to change what you eat to manage your chronic kidney disease (CKD). Work with a registered dietitian to develop a meal plan that includes foods that you enjoy eating while maintaining your kidney health. The steps below will help you eat right as you manage your kidney disease. The first three steps (1-3) are important for all people with kidney disease. The last two steps (4-5) may become important as your kidney function goes down. The first steps to eating right Step 1: Choose and prepare foods with less salt and sodium Why? To help control your blood pressure. Your diet should contain less than 2,300 milligrams of sodium each day. Buy fresh food often. Sodium (a part of salt) is added to many prepared or packaged foods you buy at the supermarket or at restaurants. Cook foods from scratch instead of eating prepared foods, “fast” foods, frozen dinners, and canned foods that are higher in sodium. When you prepare your own food, you control what goes into it. Use spices, herbs, and sodium-free seasonings in place of salt. Check for sodium on the Nutrition Facts label of food packages. A Daily Value of 20 percent or more means the food is high in sodium. Try lower-sodium versions of frozen dinners and other convenience foods. Rinse canned vegetables, beans, meats, and fish with water before eating. Look for food labels with words like sodium free or salt free; or low, reduced, or no salt or sodium; or unsalted or lightly salted. Step 2: Eat the right amount and the right types of protein Why? To help protect your kidneys. When your body uses protein, it produces waste. Your kidneys remove this waste. Eating more protein than you need may make your kidneys work harder. Eat small portions of protein foods. Protein is found in foods from plants and animals. Continue reading >>

Renal Diabetic Diet Grocery List

Renal Diabetic Diet Grocery List

When you're dealing with diabetes and kidney disease, what you eat matters. The foods you include in your diet not only affect your blood sugar but also the amount of waste products and fluid your kidneys need to process and eliminate. If you're armed when you go to the grocery store with a ready list of foods you can eat, you're already well on your way to better managing your renal diabetic diet. Consult your doctor or dietitian to help you determine your individual nutritional needs and diet plan. Video of the Day Fruits and veggies are a source of potassium. When you have kidney disease, your body has a tough time getting rid of potassium, which can cause levels to build up in your blood, leading to an abnormal heart rate or even death. Loading your cart with mostly low-potassium fruits and veggies is a good start, but you also need to limit the amount you eat each day to keep potassium levels under control. Low-potassium fruits and veggies to add to your grocery list include apples, blueberries, peaches, pears, green beans, carrots, cabbage, eggplant, peppers and zucchini. When buying canned or frozen fruits and veggies, look for varieties without added salt or sugar. Better Off With Refined Grains and Starches While whole grains are most often recommended to people with diabetes to help with blood sugar control, whole grains are a source of potassium and phosphorus and may not be a healthy choice when you have kidney disease too. You need to be careful about getting too much phosphorus in your diet. High levels of phosphorus in your blood can lead to weak bones. To keep a lid on potassium and phosphorus intake, add foods such as white bread products, unsweetened refined cereals, flour tortillas, unsalted crackers, pasta or white rice to your grocery list. Meat, po Continue reading >>

Emergency Meal Planning For Diabetics

Emergency Meal Planning For Diabetics

Why do I need an emergency meal plan? This meal plan is for you to use in case of an emergency or a natural disaster when you may not be able to attend dialysis. It is important to follow a limited diet if dialysis has to be missed. A grocery list and a three-day meal plan for an emergency are included in this fact sheet. This diet is much more strict than your usual diet. This very strict plan is needed to control the buildup of toxins such as potassium, phosphorus, urea and fluids that can be life threatening to you if several dialysis treatments are missed due to the emergency . Many things we depend on daily may not be working during an emergency. You may be without a telephone. Water and electricity may be cut off, keeping you from cooking your meals in the usual way. You may need to use cold or shelf-stable foods until the crisis is over. Food in your refrigerator will keep safely for up to 12 hours and in the freezer for one to two days, if these appliances are opened only when meals are prepared. It is best to eat the foods from your refrigerator and freezer first before using your shelf-stable foods. Distilled water, disposable plates and utensils also should be kept on hand. How do I prepare myself for an emergency? As natural disasters may happen without warning, it is good to keep foods with a long shelf-life on hand at all times. If you do stock foods, remember to check dates for freshness and replace regularly. The following items are important and useful to have on hand in case of an emergency: this diet sheet always have a two-week supply of all medicines and vitamins all of the groceries listed in this guide diabetics need to have enough insulin and supplies on hand, including extra batteries for the glucometer emergency phone list with names and phone Continue reading >>

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