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Recipes For Dialysis Patients With Diabetes

Kidney-friendly Diet For Ckd

Kidney-friendly Diet For Ckd

You need to have a kidney-friendly meal plan when you have chronic kidney disease (CKD). Watching what you eat and drink will help you stay healthier. The information in this section is for people who have kidney disease but are not on dialysis. This information should be used as a basic guide. Everybody is different and everybody has different nutrition needs. Talk to a renal dietitian (someone who is an expert in diet and nutrition for people with kidney disease) to find a meal plan that works for you. Ask your doctor to help you find a dietitian. Medicare and many private insurance policies will help pay for appointments with dietitians. Check with your insurance company to see if your policy covers medical nutrition therapy (MNT). Why is an eating plan important? What you eat and drink affects your health. Staying at a healthy weight and eating a balanced diet that is low in salt and fat can help you control your blood pressure. If you have diabetes, you can help control your blood sugar by carefully choosing what you eat and drink. Controlling high blood pressure and diabetes may help prevent kidney disease from getting worse. A kidney-friendly diet may also help protect your kidneys from further damage. A kidney-friendly diet limits certain foods to prevent the minerals in those foods from building up in your body. Healthy diet basics With all meal plans, including the kidney-friendly diet, you need to track how much of certain nutrients you take in, such as: Calories Protein Fat Carbohydrates To make sure you are getting the right amounts of these nutrients, you need to eat and drink the right portion sizes. All of the information you need to keep track of your intake is on the “Nutrition Facts” label. Use the nutrition facts section on food labels to learn m Continue reading >>

Sample Renal Meal Plan

Sample Renal Meal Plan

For people with diabetes who have kidney disease, it is essential to follow a diet that takes your individual health needs into account. Depending on those needs, a meal plan for one day may resemble the following one. Estimated totals: 1600 calories, 60 grams protein, 1500 mg sodium, 2300 mg potassium, 800 mg phosphorus. BREAKFAST 4 ounces unsweetened grape juice 1 cup Rice Krispies cereal 4 ounces liquid nondairy creamer 1/2 English muffin 1 teaspoon low-sodium margarine 1 tablespoon fruit jam LUNCH 2 slices low-calorie white bread 2 ounces sliced fresh roasted turkey Lettuce and onion for sandwich (one slice each) 1 teaspoon light mayonnaise 1 medium apple (three-inch diameter) 1 cup raw baby carrots 4 vanilla wafers 12 ounces Diet Sprite DINNER 3 ounces baked pork tenderloin (seasoned with rosemary, garlic powder, and black pepper) 1/3 cup white rice topped with one sliced scallion 1 cup steamed fresh green beans 12 seedless grapes 1 small white roll 2 teaspoons low-sodium margarine Water BEDTIME SNACK 1 small slice plain sponge cake 1/2 cup unsweetened canned peaches 2 tablespoons light nondairy whipped topping Water Continue reading >>

Snacks For Diabetics & Renal Failure Patients

Snacks For Diabetics & Renal Failure Patients

People with either renal failure or diabetes already have strict nutritional guidelines necessary for optimal health. If you have both diseases, choosing which foods to eat or avoid can be confusing. Not only must you restrict certain nutrients for kidney health, such as sodium, potassium and phosphorus, but you must also consider carbohydrate consistency for blood glucose control. A registered dietitian can help guide you toward developing a diet plan customized to meet your individualized needs. Video of the Day Several foods can be included in a renal, diabetic diet that may satisfy your sweet tooth. Fresh fruit that is low in potassium can make for a healthful option. These fruits include apples, strawberries, pineapple, grapes and plums. Top with a dollop of sugar-free whipped topping to make a dessert out of them. Sugar-free gelatin and ice pops are other sweet snack ideas, although be sure to count them toward your daily fluid intake if that is something you need to monitor. Animal crackers, vanilla wafers and graham crackers are kidney-friendly snacks that you can include in moderation but may contribute high amounts of carbohydrates if you do not control portions. Renal patients must pay particular attention to the sodium content of their foods. Savory snacks lower in sodium include unsalted breadsticks or pretzels, air-popped popcorn seasoned with a sodium-free herb blend and Melba toast with light cream cheese. Other healthy options include cut-up fresh vegetables, such as celery sticks, cucumbers, carrots and cauliflower with a low-fat salad dressing for dipping. If you are on hemodialysis, you may need a portable snack during the time-consuming process. Snacks that transport well and are appropriate on a renal, diabetic diet include a tortilla wrap with tun Continue reading >>

Following A Diet For Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Following A Diet For Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Both of these illnesses can be difficult to manage alone, but can create even more stress when you have to manage both. Many Americans suffer from both conditions though and according to the End-Stage Renal Disease Incident and Prevalent Quarterly Update, approximately 37% of patients with ESRD have diabetes. (1) Diet becomes even more important for patients with both conditions. You will need to pay more attention to the amount of carbohydrates (sugars) that you eat. Carbohydrates can be found in many foods such as fruits, milk, breads, deserts and many drinks. Sodium remains important for both CKD and diabetic patients. Keeping your diet lower in sodium helps to lower blood pressure and reduce fluid retention. Protein is another nutrient that has enhanced importance and too much protein can be harmful for diabetic patients. It is important to talk to your dietician and nephrologist to determine the levels appropriate for your care. Another major change from only a kidney friendly diet is emphasis on eating on a routine and balancing out your meals and snacks. Peritoneal dialysis patients that also are diabetic need to be extra careful with their sugar levels, because dialysate solutions used to clean the body are normally sugar based solutions. Your care team will help determine what solution is best for you and help you adjust your diet to account for the extra sugar in the dialysate. Your care team should be aware of your status as a diabetes patient, however be proactive and make sure your dialysis care team is aware of your condition. The Following are examples of foods and drinks that are can be exchanged and are good for both diets: Fruits Good alternatives: Berries, grapes, cherries, apples, plums Avoid: Cantaloupe, mangos, kiwi, oranges, pomegranate Vegetables Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet is one of the most important treatments in managing diabetes and kidney disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with kidney disease as a result of diabetes, you’ll need to work with a dietitian to create an eating plan that’s right for you. This plan will help manage your blood glucose levels and reduce the amount of waste and fluid your kidneys process. Which nutrients do I need to regulate? Your dietitian will give you nutritional guidelines that tell you how much protein, fat and carbohydrate you can eat, as well as how much potassium, phosphorus and sodium you can have each day. Because your diet needs to be lower in these minerals, you’ll limit or avoid certain foods, while planning your meals. Portion control is also important. Talk to your dietitian regarding tips for accurately measuring a serving size. What may be measured as one serving on a regular diet may count as three servings on the kidney diet. Your doctor and dietitian will also recommend you eat meals and snacks of the same size and calorie/carbohydrate content at certain times of the day to keep your blood glucose at an even level. .It’s important to check blood glucose levels often and share the results with your doctor. What can I eat? Below is an example of food choices that are usually recommended on a typical renal diabetic diet. This list is based on sodium, potassium, phosphorus and high sugar content of foods included. Ask your dietitian if you can have any of these listed foods and make sure you know what the recommended serving size should be. Carbohydrate Foods Milk and nondairy Recommended Avoid Skim or fat-free milk, non-dairy creamer, plain yogurt, sugar-free yogurt, sugar-free pudding, sugar-free ice cream, sugar-free nondairy frozen desserts* *Portions of dairy products are o Continue reading >>

Spice It Up!

Spice It Up!

Nutrition research seems to be constantly evolvingand changing! And so does our food supply. This canmake life confusing, especially for a kidney patient.Renal diet recommendations and the foods we areeating have changed dramatically in the fifteen yearsthat I have been practicing... Some of the earliest diet recommendations forpatients with kidney failure come from the 1940s,before dialysis was available. These diets meant nosalt, almost no protein, and strictly limited fluids... Salt or sodium reduction is important for all Canadians,but it is especially critical for those who have or areat risk for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). The kidneysplay an important role in the balance between sodiumand fluids, and when the kidneys aren?t working,this balance is disrupted... Beat The Heat: Surviving the summer on a restricted fluid intake Hot summer days are wonderful but can be very hard forpeople who must restrict their fluid intake. This article is especially for people who have to try to manage both their fluid intake and beat the heat at the same time... Malnutrition: Are you getting enough protein and calories ? Protein and the right number of calories are critical to good nutrition. Calories provide energy to keep you going, and the right proteins help you fight infections, build muscles, produce hormones and repair tissues... Sometimes it seems as if kidney patients need to be detectives when it comes to reading labels. A quick glance at a Nutrition Facts table gives you an idea of sodium content but wont give you enough information when it comes to phosphorus (or phosphate). Food manufacturers are not required to list the amount of phosphorus in foods on food labels... Diabetes and Kidney Disease a Challenging Combination! Diabetes is a serious chronic disease that o Continue reading >>

Renal Diabetic Diet For Breakfast

Renal Diabetic Diet For Breakfast

Janet Renee is a clinical dietitian with a special interest in weight management, sports dietetics, medical nutrition therapy and diet trends. She earned her Master of Science in nutrition from the University of Chicago and has contributed to health and wellness magazines, including Prevention, Self, Shape and Cooking Light. A vegetable omelet on a breakfast plate.Photo Credit: margouillatphotos/iStock/Getty Images A renal diabetic has developed kidney disease as a complication of diabetes. Having diabetes and kidney disease means you have to plan your meals carefully so that you follow the guidelines of your kidney diet while controlling your blood sugar. Controlling blood sugar helps slow the progression of kidney disease and prevents further complications of diabetes. Because nutritional needs are highly individual, it's crucial to consult your doctor regarding how to best meet your specific needs. If hemodialysis is part of your treatment, your doctor may recommend limiting electrolytes such as phosphorus, potassium and sodium. When planning your breakfasts, take the electrolyte restriction into consideration, along with guidelines for controlling blood sugar. You can still eat well with diabetes and kidney disease by choosing low potassium and low phosphorous foods, limiting your milk and dairy intake and avoiding simple sugars such as candies, sodas, sweet deserts, jam and honey. Because you have kidney disease, you must limit some foods that are typically allowed on a meal plan for diabetes. Limit milk, cheese and other dairy foods typically eaten for breakfast, such as yogurt, which are rich in phosphorous to one 4-ounce serving. You may need to avoid beans, dried fruit and refrigerated dough, such as biscuits and whole grains, since these are high in phosphoro Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet Meal And Menu Plans With Recipes

Diabetic Diet Meal And Menu Plans With Recipes

Diabetic Diet Meal and Menu Plans With Recipes Get a meal plan and shopping list for a diabetic 1800 cal diet. Order now and download right away. Feeding children in just about any situation can be tricky. Kids are notorious for being picky. If your child has diabetes, that pickiness can start to make meal times even more difficult. Especially in the middle of the day, when your child needs a good meal to fill them up and keep them energized for Subscription based program for people who need a diabetic, cardiac or renal diet. Provides recipes, ingredients, nutritional information, and grocery lists per week for 7 meals. What does this mean a special diet or a diabetic diet or a cardiac diet? As a dietitian, I hear that all of the time in hospitals and A great way to find a gift that anyone can use! nice idea and not very expensive and it gives year round. Pre-dialysis patients do follow a more restrictive diet plan to ready them for dialysis and to not overload their kidneys. This does not mean that theres nothing to eat, however. With these guidelines and secrets, you will have plenty to eat. Product by Pet Ag More about this product ~ Mrs. Mathea Ford (author) More about this product Carbohydrate Controlled Diet: A Balanced Carb Blood Sugar Solution To Diabetes Management (CCD Diet) [Mrs. Mathea Ford] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Is controlling diabetes a real problem for you? You have just located a solution that might just be the one that fits your way of life. A CCD diet! A Carbohydrate Controlled Diet is one of the best diabetes solutions to managing diabetes as it will allow a person using the diet to use basic carb counting skills to apply a set to each meal of the day and snacks to maintain consistent blood sugar levels. Tried all the r Continue reading >>

Eating & Nutrition For Hemodialysis

Eating & Nutrition For Hemodialysis

How does what I eat and drink affect my hemodialysis? Your choices about what to eat and drink while on hemodialysis can make a difference in how you feel and can make your treatments work better. Between dialysis treatment sessions, wastes can build up in your blood and make you sick. You can reduce waste buildup by controlling what you eat and drink. You can match what you eat and drink with what your kidney treatments remove. Some foods cause wastes to build up quickly between your dialysis sessions. If your blood contains too much waste, your kidney treatment session may not remove them all. Your dialysis center has a renal dietitian to help you plan your meals. A renal dietitian has special training in caring for the food and nutrition needs of people with kidney disease. Use this information to help you learn how to eat right to feel right on hemodialysis. Read one section at a time. Then, review with your renal dietitian the sections marked Talk with Your Renal Dietitian. Keep a copy of this information handy to remind yourself of foods you can eat and foods to avoid. Meet with a renal dietitian to create an eating plan that will work well for you. Yes. You will need to carefully plan your meals and keep track of the amount of liquids you eat and drink. It helps to limit or avoid foods and beverages that have lots of sodium for example, vegetable juice and sports drinks Why is it important to keep track of how much liquid I eat or drink? You may feel better if you keep track of and limit how much liquid you eat and drink. Excess fluid can build up in your body and may cause swelling and weight gain between dialysis sessions your heart to work harder, which can lead to serious heart trouble a buildup of fluid in your lungs, making it hard for you to breathe Hemod Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Dialysis Diet

The Diabetic Dialysis Diet

What is a diabetic dialysis diet? The diabetic dialysis diet is specifically for patients who have stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD), also called end stage renal disease (ESRD), in addition to diabetes. The diet’s goal is to manage blood glucose levels and help you feel your best. What can I eat? Like the other dialysis diets, the diabetic dialysis diet is filled with nutritious foods. You will work closely with your dietitian to create a balanced eating plan that will feature high-quality proteins and the proper balance of carbohydrates and fats to meet your individual needs. What can’t I eat? Your diet will have restrictions regarding foods that contain high amounts of phosphorus, sodium and potassium. But because of your diabetes, your carbohydrate intake will be tightly controlled in order to manage your blood glucose levels. High-sugar foods increase blood glucose. All carbohydrate-containing foods ( e.g., bread, cereal, pasta, rice, starchy vegetables, fruits, juices, many sugar-free desserts) increase blood glucose levels. Therefore, the total amount of carbohydrates you eat will be balanced with your medicines and activity level. Your dietitian may teach you a system called carbohydrate counting to keep your carbohydrate intake balanced. Why do I have to eat this way? Your dietitian and doctor will advise you to eat this way to reduce the risk of other health problems associated with diabetes and kidney disease. How does it help? Diabetes affects your entire body. It can cause nerve damage, problems in blood circulation and blindness as well as kidney disease. By following this eating plan, you can control your blood glucose levels and lessen the likelihood of developing other diabetes-related problems. Phosphorus isn’t cleared well through dialysis. It Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Ckd And Dialysis Patients To Eat What They Want For Christmas And New Years

5 Tips For Ckd And Dialysis Patients To Eat What They Want For Christmas And New Years

Whether it is Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Christmas or New Years Day, the holidays come with festivities and traditions that revolve around tempting foods. It is easy for Chronic Kidney Disease and Dialysis patients to eat foods outside of their Renal and/or Diabetic restrictions and overindulge to feel like they are a part of the festive season. This directly relates to a spike in emergency room visits and poor health outcomes among patients. That is no way to end the holidays or begin the New Year. Try the following tailored tips to enjoy the holidays with family, eat many of the foods that you want, and help limit negative health outcomes: 1.) Watch The Salt: Most patients do not even realize that they are eating foods that have higher levels of salt (popcorn, pretzels, etc.). When the thirst center goes on alert because things are too salty and the body needs water to dilute the salt, that's when you start to feel thirsty which can lead to extra drinking and fluid overload. Hence, try enjoying a few salt-free or hydrating snacks such as watermelon, peaches, or cucumber slices. 2.) Try To Make It From Scratch: Many patients think that some of their favorite dishes are off limits and they are NOT! Try to make some of your favorites from scratch with appropriate substitutes to meet your dietary restrictions. For instance, according to Davita Inc. if patients make stuffing from scratch then they can "reduce or eliminate the high sodium ingredients such as salt and broth." Find your favorite Renal and Diabetic tailored recipes at the KidneyBuzz.com Impact Meal Section . 3.) Hidden Sources Of Fluid: Remember that Jello and other gelatins count as fluid. Also, remember that gravy counts as fluid. You do not have to avoid these foods entirely, just go light and count Continue reading >>

How One Doctor Helps Diabetes Patients Avoid Kidney Dialysis

How One Doctor Helps Diabetes Patients Avoid Kidney Dialysis

One man's biking regimen and weight loss helped improve his blood pressure and blood glucose.IstockphotoAlthough people with type 2 diabetes are at greater risk of kidney problems, kidney failure is not inevitable. Controlling diabetes by lowering blood sugar, dieting, exercising, or taking medicationparticularly blood-pressure-lowering medication, if you need itcan help prevent kidney problems. Seeing a kidney specialist (known as a nephrologist) sooner rather than later is helpful for some people with type 2 diabetes, according to Ian H. de Boer, MD, an assistant professor of medicine in the division of nephrology at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. There are specific interventions, such as limiting salt in the diet, that can help prevent the progression of kidney disease in people who have the early signs. Prevented or delaying kidney problems Dr. de Boer often sees type 2 diabetes patients after signs of kidney trouble have surfaced. They may have very large amounts of protein in their urine (a marker of kidney disease), which is evidence of moderately impaired kidney function or difficult-to-control hypertension. One particular patient, a man in his mid-50s, had all of the above. At 30 ml/min, his glomerular filtration rate, or GFRa measure of kidney functionsuggested he already had moderate to severe damage. He had a large amount of protein in his urine, poorly controlled hypertension, and poorly controlled blood sugar. "His disease was clearly progressive by his recent history," Dr. de Boer explains. "When he learned that he was heading toward dialysis in the next year or less, that was a bit of a shock to him, and it actually motivated him to make a lot of changes." Next Page: Three ways to prevent kidney failure [ pagebreak ] Ian de B Continue reading >>

Renal Diets With Flavor

Renal Diets With Flavor

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 13 No. 8 P. 38 The Food Network’s Aaron McCargo, Jr spices up meals for patients with serious kidney problems. Several conditions can cause the loss of kidney function. The most common is type 2 diabetes, but cardiovascular disease can also be a cause. Sometimes old age is the culprit. Other times, genetic factors, such as polycystic kidney disease, are to blame. Whatever the underlying reason may be, once kidney function deteriorates to the point where the kidneys can no longer remove enough toxins from a person’s blood to keep him or her healthy—a condition known as end-stage renal disease (ESRD)—the person must start dialysis. The United States Renal Data System estimates that 382,000 patients with ESRD are currently receiving some form of dialysis. Dialysis does the work that the kidneys can no longer perform. Unless a patient receives a kidney transplant, he or she will stay on dialysis indefinitely. Because patients who are on dialysis need to restrict certain dietary nutrients to maintain their health, renal diets can be incredibly challenging for patients and dietitians alike. To complicate matters, many dialysis patients have food restrictions related to other health problems. Trying to sort through multiple diets can quickly become a daunting task. Barbara L. Zebrowski, MS, RD, CSR, LDN, corporate dietitian for Fresenius Medical Care North America (FMCNA), which operates more than 1,800 dialysis centers in the United States, says patients are often overwhelmed by all the diet strictures. “You might have somebody who has diabetes who has been told they need to follow a diabetes diet, but they also have had cardiac issues resulting from their diabetes so they’re put on a heart-healthy diet—a low-cholesterol, low-saturated f Continue reading >>

Renal Diabetic Diet Grocery List

Renal Diabetic Diet Grocery List

When you're dealing with diabetes and kidney disease, what you eat matters. The foods you include in your diet not only affect your blood sugar but also the amount of waste products and fluid your kidneys need to process and eliminate. If you're armed when you go to the grocery store with a ready list of foods you can eat, you're already well on your way to better managing your renal diabetic diet. Consult your doctor or dietitian to help you determine your individual nutritional needs and diet plan. Video of the Day Fruits and veggies are a source of potassium. When you have kidney disease, your body has a tough time getting rid of potassium, which can cause levels to build up in your blood, leading to an abnormal heart rate or even death. Loading your cart with mostly low-potassium fruits and veggies is a good start, but you also need to limit the amount you eat each day to keep potassium levels under control. Low-potassium fruits and veggies to add to your grocery list include apples, blueberries, peaches, pears, green beans, carrots, cabbage, eggplant, peppers and zucchini. When buying canned or frozen fruits and veggies, look for varieties without added salt or sugar. Better Off With Refined Grains and Starches While whole grains are most often recommended to people with diabetes to help with blood sugar control, whole grains are a source of potassium and phosphorus and may not be a healthy choice when you have kidney disease too. You need to be careful about getting too much phosphorus in your diet. High levels of phosphorus in your blood can lead to weak bones. To keep a lid on potassium and phosphorus intake, add foods such as white bread products, unsweetened refined cereals, flour tortillas, unsalted crackers, pasta or white rice to your grocery list. Meat, po Continue reading >>

Diabetic Renal Diet And Recipes - 1 Photo - Food & Beverage Company -

Diabetic Renal Diet And Recipes - 1 Photo - Food & Beverage Company -

How To Improve Kidney Disease With Exercise | Exercise And Chronic Kidney Disease This video talks about exercise and what it can do improve your kidney disease. Learn how and why and how it will help your ... Discover a world of flavour in our simple but delicious kidney-friendly recipes, which are low in sodium, potassium and phosphorus and can be enjoyed by everyone! The cookbook series Spice it up! was originally created for dialysis patients. All recipes have been analyzed by our team of licensed ren What Fruit Has More Potassium Than Bananas? Potassium is an essential mineral that helps balance your sodium levels to keep your blood pressure from getting too high. It also plays a role in heart, muscle and digestive function. However, many ... Kidneys help control the amount of fluid that leaves your body. If your kidney disease progresses, your kidneys may be unable to regulate the removal of fluid from your body and as a result your doctor may ask you to limit your fluid intake. Too much fluid may cause swelling, shortness of breath, or... Questions about kidney disease? Risk factors? Signs and symptoms? Are you concerned about yourself, a friend or family member? Ask Dr. Spry. Light Moong Dal ( yellow lentils soup) recipe Dhuli Moong Dal ( available in Indian grocery stores) : 1 cup You may even add fresh herbs like basil, coriander, chives, oregano etc. Presoak both Dals for 30 mins. Then add 3 cups of water, turmeric , tomato and salt and pressure cook for 10-15 minutes. When you open the cooker, the dal looks soupy with no visible grains. Take a 1/2 tsp oil in a pan, heat, add cumin seeds and curry leaves. wait untill seeds splatter, add red chilli powder and immediately put the boiled dal in this. Stir until all spices are mixed well with the dal. add fresh Continue reading >>

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