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Pre Diabetes In A Thin Person

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I'm Thin, I'm Active And I Might Have Diabetes

When I tell people that I have to miss spaghetti dinner or pass on the free bagels at the breakfast meeting because I’m managing my blood sugar, they look at me like I must be confused. Why? they wonder. Because I have a lot of the symptoms of pre-diabetes and my healthcare providers have encouraged me to avoid carbs and control the sugars in my diet. Diabetes? How could you have diabetes?! Sounds crazy for an active, 29 year old, who is 5’6” and 125 lbs to be worried about diabetes. That’s what I always thought too—until my fit, active, 3-squares-a-day mother was tested and diagnosed with prediabetes. Her blood sugar was too high and she was given a few months to get it under control with diet before pharmaceutical options would be strongly recommended. We both knew that diabetes ran in the family, but we always considered it a disease of the overweight so it didn’t apply to us. But according to the National Institutes of Health even though most people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are overweight, it can turn up in thin, otherwise healthy individuals—particularly if there’s a family history of the disease. NIH also reports that 35 percent of U.S. adults ages 20 ye Continue reading >>

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  1. Newt0this Friend

    Female, fit, thin, no family diabetes history, but elevated A1c

    I just met with my doctor and she told me some info that I think is worth sharing. She has at least 10 patients like me. We are thin. We exercise. We don't have a family history of diabetes. But we have all tested in the pre-diabetes or diabetes range on the A1C. She thinks there may be a subset of people like us who haven't yet been studied, but might be worth studying. Because my community is one of the healthiest in the country, she thinks there are more of us here than in other communities, so the pattern is starting to show here before it has been picked up elsewhere.
    Those of us who fit this pattern have been slashing our carbs to next to nothing, but that hasn't lowered our A1cs as much as it would for others. She has run antibodies tests on others (and did so with me today), but as a group, the issue doesn't seem to be late onset Type 1. She also said that metformin doesn't appear to help much.
    She recommended that I relax my diet a bit (right now I am eating only cheese, yogurt, eggs, and salad greens) and go back to a low carb, but more normal diet and see if my A1C stays the same. If it doesn't change, then I might as well have the less rigid diet. She says the A1C appears to stabilize at some point. Not necessarily keep coming down, but not rising, either.

  2. Newt0this Friend

    My doctor thinks we may discover that a subgroup of us are healthy, and may just have a higher A1C, which seems too high if we use the standard comparisons, but which may be normal for us.

  3. jwags

    I am 110 pounds and exercise like crazy. I did almost 10 years of LC to keep my HbA1 c in the mid to upper 6's. My GAD was negative, but my c-peptide is 1.1 which is in the low normal range. I now eat higher carb because I developed GI problems with the highe fat, meat diet. So now I eat basically vegan. But my bgs have gone up, unfortunately. My current HbA1 c was done in March and was 6.4. That was before my GI problems. I am due for my next one in July and I am expecting it to be over 7. I already have several microvascular diabetic complications. So don't let your doctor tell you hogher bgs don't matter.

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What is GLUCOSE PARADOX? What does GLUCOSE PARADOX mean? GLUCOSE PARADOX meaning - GLUCOSE PARADOX definition - GLUCOSE PARADOX explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Glucose paradox is a theory formulated by biochemist J. D. McGarry and his research associates. It is a theory that demonstrates the importance of lactic acid in carbohydrate metabolism. The paradox is that the large amount of glycogen (10%) in the liver cannot be explained by its relatively minimal glucose absorption. After the digestion of carbohydrates and their entering the circulatory system in the form of glucose (blood sugar), some glucose will be absorbed directly into the muscle tissue and will be converted into lactic acid in the anaerobic energy system rather than going directly to the liver and being converted into glycogen. This is true especially in situations of energy depletion and exercise. The lactate is then taken to and converted by the liver into the building blocks for liver glycogen. Much of the body's liver glycogen is produced indirectly from lactate rather than directly from glucose in the blood. Under normal physiological conditions, glucose is a poor precursor for glycogen and fatty acid and utilization by the liver is limited.

‘obesity Paradox’: Why Being Thin With Diabetes Is A Dangerous Combo

Being overweight or obese is a risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes, but it turns out that these heavier patients may have an advantage: people who are overweight when they are diagnosed with diabetes live longer than their thinner peers. The so-called obesity paradox, in which being overweight appears to be protective against early death, has been seen before in heart failure and chronic kidney disease. But, says study author Mercedes Carnethon, associate professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University, that doesn’t necessarily mean that gaining excess weight is a healthy strategy; rather, it may be that people who are thin when they develop diabetes are already be vulnerable to worse health. “We hypothesized that their diabetes may be different,” she says. “They may have developed diabetes for reasons unrelated to obesity. Overall, about 85% of people with diabetes are heavy. Gaining too much weight is a major contributor to Type 2 diabetes, since excess fat cells can affect the way the body breaks down glucose and produces insulin, but some normal weight individuals can develop the disease as well. The elderly and people of Asian descent are more likely Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Newt0this Friend

    Female, fit, thin, no family diabetes history, but elevated A1c

    I just met with my doctor and she told me some info that I think is worth sharing. She has at least 10 patients like me. We are thin. We exercise. We don't have a family history of diabetes. But we have all tested in the pre-diabetes or diabetes range on the A1C. She thinks there may be a subset of people like us who haven't yet been studied, but might be worth studying. Because my community is one of the healthiest in the country, she thinks there are more of us here than in other communities, so the pattern is starting to show here before it has been picked up elsewhere.
    Those of us who fit this pattern have been slashing our carbs to next to nothing, but that hasn't lowered our A1cs as much as it would for others. She has run antibodies tests on others (and did so with me today), but as a group, the issue doesn't seem to be late onset Type 1. She also said that metformin doesn't appear to help much.
    She recommended that I relax my diet a bit (right now I am eating only cheese, yogurt, eggs, and salad greens) and go back to a low carb, but more normal diet and see if my A1C stays the same. If it doesn't change, then I might as well have the less rigid diet. She says the A1C appears to stabilize at some point. Not necessarily keep coming down, but not rising, either.

  2. Newt0this Friend

    My doctor thinks we may discover that a subgroup of us are healthy, and may just have a higher A1C, which seems too high if we use the standard comparisons, but which may be normal for us.

  3. jwags

    I am 110 pounds and exercise like crazy. I did almost 10 years of LC to keep my HbA1 c in the mid to upper 6's. My GAD was negative, but my c-peptide is 1.1 which is in the low normal range. I now eat higher carb because I developed GI problems with the highe fat, meat diet. So now I eat basically vegan. But my bgs have gone up, unfortunately. My current HbA1 c was done in March and was 6.4. That was before my GI problems. I am due for my next one in July and I am expecting it to be over 7. I already have several microvascular diabetic complications. So don't let your doctor tell you hogher bgs don't matter.

  4. -> Continue reading
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http://tinyurl.com/np2i3o2w1i2p If you're Diabetic, don't eat way too much for the reason that your sweets is lower. Just one load of sweet sweets or a glucose tab is a much more secure plus more managed method of taking your glucose stage back. In the event you overeat in reaction to a minimal, you're prone to surge your sugars as opposed to getting it back to normal. Raising your intake of the mineral magnesium is not only beneficial to your center, it may help your diabetes as well! You can find plenty of magnesium in sea food, leafy green veggies, and peanuts, so incorporate those things in your diet as often as you possibly can. Walnuts are an outstanding option to pick up like a treat whenever. If you're looking for a health and fitness type to assist you slim down to manage your Diabetes mellitus, try out a healthcare facility! They often times provide aerobic exercises sessions for those who have various problems, like elderly people or perhaps the morbidly chronically overweight, or normal exercise lessons by means of outreach applications. Ask your medical professional to discover if these are offered to you or use directly. Pre Diabetic But Thin To improve maintain your bloodstream sugar, ingest only h2o. Other beverages are rich in glucose, and diet plan soft drinks can cause dehydration, which could also lead to your blood sugar to spike. Transporting all around water in bottles and consuming it frequently can help you keep the blood sugar exactly where they're said to be. how long does it take to reverse prediabetes, how much sugar should a pre diabetic have daily.

Newbie; Thin Pre-diabetic With Questions

Newbie; Thin pre-diabetic with questions Friend Pre-diabetic; father was thin Type 2 Newbie; Thin pre-diabetic with questions Hi...New here...... I'm a lean, active prediabetic (female, age 57) who would appreciate some advice. For the last 20 years my lab tests have shown fasting BG values in the 90s, and the occasional A1c tests were 4.6-5.2. That's over a range of activity levels, BMIs of 20-24, high or low carb diets, etc. My father was a lean, active Type 2, who was on insulin in his later years, so I've figured that I have some predisposition to diabetes. In March 2010 my FBG hit 100 mg/dL, and the A1c was 5.8, which prodded me into action. I had been getting lax in the exercise and diet areas, so I improved those. In January 2011 I decided to focus on reducing whatever insulin resistance I might have, so I: increased my exercise (more brisk walking, and added resistance exercise); eliminated sugar and wheat; reduced fructose to a minimum; capped carbs at 100 mg/day, with max of 30 mg/meal; checked with a meter that my post prandial numbers were okay (generally okay, but 30 mg carbs seems to be my max); cut my snacking way back; took chromium supplements; and tried to manage Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Newt0this Friend

    Female, fit, thin, no family diabetes history, but elevated A1c

    I just met with my doctor and she told me some info that I think is worth sharing. She has at least 10 patients like me. We are thin. We exercise. We don't have a family history of diabetes. But we have all tested in the pre-diabetes or diabetes range on the A1C. She thinks there may be a subset of people like us who haven't yet been studied, but might be worth studying. Because my community is one of the healthiest in the country, she thinks there are more of us here than in other communities, so the pattern is starting to show here before it has been picked up elsewhere.
    Those of us who fit this pattern have been slashing our carbs to next to nothing, but that hasn't lowered our A1cs as much as it would for others. She has run antibodies tests on others (and did so with me today), but as a group, the issue doesn't seem to be late onset Type 1. She also said that metformin doesn't appear to help much.
    She recommended that I relax my diet a bit (right now I am eating only cheese, yogurt, eggs, and salad greens) and go back to a low carb, but more normal diet and see if my A1C stays the same. If it doesn't change, then I might as well have the less rigid diet. She says the A1C appears to stabilize at some point. Not necessarily keep coming down, but not rising, either.

  2. Newt0this Friend

    My doctor thinks we may discover that a subgroup of us are healthy, and may just have a higher A1C, which seems too high if we use the standard comparisons, but which may be normal for us.

  3. jwags

    I am 110 pounds and exercise like crazy. I did almost 10 years of LC to keep my HbA1 c in the mid to upper 6's. My GAD was negative, but my c-peptide is 1.1 which is in the low normal range. I now eat higher carb because I developed GI problems with the highe fat, meat diet. So now I eat basically vegan. But my bgs have gone up, unfortunately. My current HbA1 c was done in March and was 6.4. That was before my GI problems. I am due for my next one in July and I am expecting it to be over 7. I already have several microvascular diabetic complications. So don't let your doctor tell you hogher bgs don't matter.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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