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Pre Diabetes In A Thin Person

Are You At Risk For Prediabetes?

Are You At Risk For Prediabetes?

Working as a physical therapist in Talent, Oregon, Jade Wilcoxson treated diabetic patients every day, but she never imagined she could become one of them. At 28, she had an athletic build, loved to mountain bike and play soccer on weekends, and ate what she considered a pretty healthy diet. So in 2006, she was shocked when she got a call from her doctor's office after having blood work done during a routine checkup. "My blood sugar was elevated," recalls Jade, now 36. Her doctor retested her a few times, but the results were conclusive: Jade had prediabetes, a condition that put her at higher risk for type 2 diabetes, a disease in which the body doesn't properly make or use insulin, the hormone that helps convert glucose into fuel for our cells. As a result, blood sugar builds up in the bloodstream and can damage nerves and organs. A prediabetes diagnosis means that has already begun to happen. Exactly why isn't known, but genetics, excess body fat and inactivity play a role. Jade was devastated. She knew that if she got diabetes, she would be at an increased risk for high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke and kidney disease. The good news: Prediabetes is reversible. She could clean up her diet, as her doctor suggested, cutting back on simple carbs and alcohol, and step up her exercise routine and/or take drugs to manage her glucose levels. "I worried that if I started taking medication I would become dependent on it," Jade says. "I wasn't ready to go down that route." She called her brother, Ryan, who suggested they train for a 100-mile bicycle race together as a way to exercise more consistently. "It took us about eight or nine hours to cross the finish line, but we made it," Jade says. Inspired, she kept training. "Once I started riding, I felt like eating bette Continue reading >>

Thin Type 2s?

Thin Type 2s?

We’ve all read about people with Type 1 climbing mountains, dancing ballet, or playing professional football. But people with Type 2 are thought by many to be overweight and sedentary. Last week I learned different. It’s an interesting story. You occasionally hear from diabetes educators about “thin Type 2s,” but for a long time, I thought they didn’t really exist. I thought they were misdiagnosed Type 1s or 1.5s. I figured they had either LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adults) or MODY (Maturity Onset of Diabetes of the Young). My reasoning went like this: Type 2 diabetes is driven by insulin resistance. Insulin resistance has many causes, but the main ones are physical inactivity and stress. So how could a very active person develop Type 2? Well, now I know. If you have the right genes, stress can drive even a very active person to Type 2 all by itself. Last week, I spoke at a support group for people with Type 2. Two of the group members, one man and one woman, were not only thin, but very active. The man kept tapping his foot and rocking his legs back and forth. The woman kept moving around in her chair. Both the man and the woman talked of exercising a great deal. In my experience, people with Type 2 don’t move as much as these two do. They don’t fidget. They conserve energy. (Readers — has that been your experience?) Saving energy is vital to survival where life is physically demanding and food is scarce. In a culture like ours, where food is plentiful and physical activity is discouraged, being an energy-saver can contribute to health problems, including Type 2 diabetes. Solving the puzzle At first, I thought, “You guys aren’t really Type 2.” In the past, I had actually helped a number of fit 1.5s by diagnosing them (over the phone!) aft Continue reading >>

Even A Thin Person Can Get Diabetes

Even A Thin Person Can Get Diabetes

Print Font: One of my most enduring childhood images is from a newspaper clipping. The grainy photograph freezes a lanky teen named Tom O'Connell launching a hook shot from his right thigh. Tucker, as he was known, led a team from tiny Merchantville High School in scoring and rebounding during an improbable run to the South Jersey Championship. New Jersey had its own version of Hoosiers in 1952, and for that one season, my father was his team's Jimmy Chitwood. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. In February 2008, I arrive at a nursing home in the San Fernando Valley to visit the man in that photograph, a man I've neither seen nor spoken to in 20 years. Entering his room, I barely recognize the gaunt face. Where his right thigh should be sits a corduroy pant leg, gathered up and bobby-pinned. The spindly arm he extends to greet me is splotched with blood bursts. Once 6'3'' and 215 pounds, he's now a cadaverous-looking 145. The only cheerful note in the room is a balloon tied to the metal bed frame. His 73rd birthday was last week, apparently. It's a detail I had long since forgotten. Like a man looking into a foggy mirror, my father strains to recognize me. But if he is staring into his past, I might be peering into my future. I'm 6'6'' and weigh 220, with 12 percent body fat and the outline of abs above a 32-inch waist. Yet diabetes has me in its crosshairs as well. If you think being thin gives you a fr Continue reading >>

Thin And Type 2: Non-obese Risk Factors For Developing Diabetes

Thin And Type 2: Non-obese Risk Factors For Developing Diabetes

Emily got quite a surprise when she went for her annual physical exam. The lab tests taken showed that her blood glucose readings were in the range of someone with type 2 diabetes. Since Emily did not fit the usual appearance of someone with type 2 diabetes, her doctor ran the test again and checked for antibodies to insulin and her c-peptide levels, in case Emily was in the early stages of LADA (a slow moving version of type 1 diabetes). The test results were the same, however. Even though Emily, at 5 feet 2 inches and 115 pounds, had never been overweight in her life, she had type 2 diabetes. Emily was one of the 15 percent of individuals in the United States who develop type 2 diabetes even though their BMIs are squarely in the normal range (between 18.5 and 24.9). There can be a number of factors that come into play when a thin person develops type 2 diabetes. Genetics play a significant role in determining disease onset. A strong family history coupled with a sedentary lifestyle and poor eating habits can tip the scales in the wrong direction. So too can a previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes or the birth of a baby greater than nine pounds. Unfortunately for these individuals, their outside appearance is hiding a metabolic profile similar to overweight people who have type 2 diabetes. They are insulin resistant not from excess pounds per say, but from the places where some of their fat cells are stored, and often from a lack of exercise. Many normal weight people with type 2 diabetes have excess visceral fat. Visceral fat is the type of fat surrounding the body’s abdominal organs and is highly metabolically active, producing a variety of hormones that influence glucose and fat metabolism. Fat cells release fatty acids into the blood stream that can damage t Continue reading >>

Slim But Sedentary: Prediabetes Risk May Rise

Slim But Sedentary: Prediabetes Risk May Rise

HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Here's yet another reason to get off the couch: Inactivity is associated with greater risk of prediabetes, even for healthy-weight adults, a new study finds. University of Florida researchers said the finding may help explain why up to one-third of slim American adults have prediabetes -- elevated blood sugar but not full-blown diabetes. "We have found that a lot of people who we would consider to be at healthy weight -- they're not overweight or obese -- are not metabolically healthy," said lead investigator Arch Mainous III. He's chair of health services research, management and policy in the university's College of Public Health and Health Professions. Mainous and his colleagues analyzed data from more than 1,000 people, aged 20 and older, in England. All had a healthy weight and no diagnosis of diabetes. Those with an inactive lifestyle were more likely than active people to have a blood sugar level of 5.7 or above, which the American Diabetes Association considers prediabetes. About one-quarter of all inactive people and more than 40 percent of inactive people 45 and older met the criteria for prediabetes or diabetes, according to the study. The study doesn't establish a direct cause-and-effect relationship. Still, these inactive people may have unhealthy "normal-weight obesity or 'skinny fat,' " -- a high proportion of fat to lean muscle, the researchers said. "Our findings suggest that sedentary lifestyle is overlooked when we think in terms of healthy weight. We shouldn't focus only on calorie intake, weight or [body mass index] at the expense of activity," Mainous said in a university news release. Because prediabetes increases the risk of diabetes and other health problems, the study adds to growing Continue reading >>

Thin Fit Prediabetic - Is There Hope?

Thin Fit Prediabetic - Is There Hope?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Discussion in ' Prediabetes ' started by dendify , Jun 14, 2013 . I am thin (BMI 21), exercise regularly and eat a healthy diet. Recently tested with fasting BG 6.4, 2 hour GTT 10.1 despite this. I'd like to hear from any other people who are in a similar situation on whether watching following the standard advice here ( viewtopic.php?f=39&t=26870 ) has had any long term impact. Most of the information I can find is about people who can benefit from weight loss and starting to exercise. If my impaired glucose tolerance is just due to my unlucky genetics, should I just resign myself to an inevitable progression to full type 2? I have impaired glucose tolerance, slim build (BMI 20.4) with no dietary sins. I ate whole grains, fruit, veg, pulses. I didn't have a sugar habit, rarely touched alcohol, no family history. Unlike you, I'm not fit (housebound due to ME/CFS) and that's probably why I have developed this problem and why it's so difficult for me to address because I can't exercise. I've cut the carbs and I'm eating to the meter. I am working on increasing my physical activity but exercise for someone with ME is not the same as exercise for the general population, so it's not enough to make an impact on my blood sugar levels. I don't have a lot of weight to spare and I'm not specifically trying to lose weight either. Would a few pounds make any impact considering that some people lose stones? Again, it's not as if there's all that excess weight demanding more insulin than what's available. It's a tough call. I am officially Type 2. Diet and exercise controlled. Like you I am slim, I teach yoga and I had a good diet on diagnosis. So making huge sweep Continue reading >>

‘obesity Paradox’: Why Being Thin With Diabetes Is A Dangerous Combo

‘obesity Paradox’: Why Being Thin With Diabetes Is A Dangerous Combo

Being overweight or obese is a risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes, but it turns out that these heavier patients may have an advantage: people who are overweight when they are diagnosed with diabetes live longer than their thinner peers. The so-called obesity paradox, in which being overweight appears to be protective against early death, has been seen before in heart failure and chronic kidney disease. But, says study author Mercedes Carnethon, associate professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University, that doesn’t necessarily mean that gaining excess weight is a healthy strategy; rather, it may be that people who are thin when they develop diabetes are already be vulnerable to worse health. “We hypothesized that their diabetes may be different,” she says. “They may have developed diabetes for reasons unrelated to obesity. Overall, about 85% of people with diabetes are heavy. Gaining too much weight is a major contributor to Type 2 diabetes, since excess fat cells can affect the way the body breaks down glucose and produces insulin, but some normal weight individuals can develop the disease as well. The elderly and people of Asian descent are more likely to be at normal weight when diagnosed, for example. (MORE: Doctors Should Screen All Adults for Obesity, U.S. Panel Says) For the new study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Carnethon and her team reviewed data on five previous studies that were tracking people for heart disease risk factors. The studies, which were conducted between 1990 and 2011, included 2,625 people who were recently diagnosed with diabetes, about 12% of whom were at normal weight. The lean patients looked metabolically similar to those who were obese, with the exception of their weight Continue reading >>

How A Thin Diabetic Reversed Her Type 2 Diabetes

How A Thin Diabetic Reversed Her Type 2 Diabetes

I received a letter from reader Sarah, who has successfully used low-carbohydrate high-fat diets and intermittent fasting to reverse her type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, she is not particularly overweight as measured by body mass index, yet still suffered from T2D. At her heaviest, she only had a BMI of 24.9, which puts her in the ‘normal’ range. She writes: The letter I immigrated to US from P.R. China in the end of 1998 when I was 31 years old; I weighed about 55 kg (121 lbs). While I was in China, I lived thousands of miles away from my family, so I had sort of an intermittent fasting life style from age 19 to 31 years old. The meals in China were mostly vegetables and very little protein. I had an annual physical check up every year, but was never told of any abnormal blood results. After I immigrated to the U.S., my lifestyle suddenly changed from one meal per day to three meals consisting of mainly grains with little fat and protein. I gained about 25 pounds (11 kg) in a couple of years, my weight did not continue going up. My heaviest was about 145 pounds (66 kg). When I was diagnosed with diabetes in Dec 2004: Weight: 142 pounds (64 kg) Height: 5 feet 4 inches (163 cm) HbA1c: 9.4 FG: 214 I was told to exercise, so I started yoga shortly after my diagnose. I lost about 10 pounds (5 kg) and 2 inches (5 cm) from my waist but still required metformin. In the spring of 2005, I relocated to Galveston from Houston because of my work as an engineer. My endocrinologist sent me to a nutritionist who measured my after meal glucose in her office, it was near 200 mg/dl (11.1 mmol/l) three hours after lunch which was only one low-fat pita bread. I was devastated, my previous family doctor always told me that if I exercise daily, my blood sugar will come down to normal, so Continue reading >>

Newbie; Thin Pre-diabetic With Questions

Newbie; Thin Pre-diabetic With Questions

Newbie; Thin pre-diabetic with questions Friend Pre-diabetic; father was thin Type 2 Newbie; Thin pre-diabetic with questions Hi...New here...... I'm a lean, active prediabetic (female, age 57) who would appreciate some advice. For the last 20 years my lab tests have shown fasting BG values in the 90s, and the occasional A1c tests were 4.6-5.2. That's over a range of activity levels, BMIs of 20-24, high or low carb diets, etc. My father was a lean, active Type 2, who was on insulin in his later years, so I've figured that I have some predisposition to diabetes. In March 2010 my FBG hit 100 mg/dL, and the A1c was 5.8, which prodded me into action. I had been getting lax in the exercise and diet areas, so I improved those. In January 2011 I decided to focus on reducing whatever insulin resistance I might have, so I: increased my exercise (more brisk walking, and added resistance exercise); eliminated sugar and wheat; reduced fructose to a minimum; capped carbs at 100 mg/day, with max of 30 mg/meal; checked with a meter that my post prandial numbers were okay (generally okay, but 30 mg carbs seems to be my max); cut my snacking way back; took chromium supplements; and tried to manage stress. I had some successes: I lost several pounds, putting my BMI just below 20, and some of the weight actually came off of my waist (usually it just comes off of my already flat rear end). My morning readings went mostly (but not always) back into the 90s. Most surprising was a shift in my hunger: previously I usually needed to eat about every two hours or so to prevent the "hungry-can't-think" feeling, but I now seem to be more stable for longer. Last month I went in for lab tests, and the results were: fasting BG = 98 mg/dL; A1c = 5.7; fasting insulin <2 uIU/mL. These numbers are no wor Continue reading >>

8 Strategies To Reverse Skinny-fat Syndrome

8 Strategies To Reverse Skinny-fat Syndrome

“If I’m not overweight, do I need to become concerned about obesity and other health issues?” asks this week’s House Call. “Even though I drink soda and eat whatever I want, I don’t gain weight. Should I be worried?” The short answer is yes, and here’s why. One study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found nearly one in four skinny people have pre-diabetes and are “metabolically obese.” In other words, about 25 percent of the population fit the skinny fat syndrome, also known as thin on the outside, fat on the inside (TOFI). Skinny fat means just what it sounds like: You look thin but inside you’re fat. You’ve got organ fat (the more dangerous type of fat) coating your liver, kidneys, and other organs. You are under-lean but over-fat, meaning not enough muscle and too much fat (especially belly fat). Most people assume if you’re overweight, you’re unhealthy; if you are thin, you are healthy. Unfortunately, the reality isn’t so simple. Yes, America has a big fat problem: almost 70 percent are overweight and many have diabesity, a condition I define as anywhere on the continuum between pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Even though it might sound crazy, being skinny fat might become more dangerous than being overweight. Let’s say you go to your annual doctor visit and you are overweight or obese. He or she will probably run blood tests, become concerned about type 2 diabetes, and ask you to lose some weight. If you arrive thin, your doctor might not conduct those blood tests or otherwise acknowledge underlying issues. He or she might assume things are normal rather than checking under the hood for pre-diabetes and other problems that pave the way for detrimental repercussions. That’s unfortunate, since if you are Continue reading >>

One-third Of Slim American Adults Have Pre-diabetes

One-third Of Slim American Adults Have Pre-diabetes

Among normal-weight individuals, those who were inactive were more likely to have an A1C level of 5.7 or higher, which is considered to be pre-diabetic Among all the normal-weight inactive participants (aged 20 and over), about one-quarter were either pre-diabetic or diabetic When only those inactive people aged 40 and over were analyzed, the percentage rose to 40 percent Inactivity increases your risk of pre-diabetes even if you’re not overweight or obese By Dr. Mercola It's often assumed that in order to develop type 2 diabetes, you have to be overweight. While it's true that excess weight is clearly associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, it's the insulin resistance — not necessarily the weight gain — that drives the disease. As such, many people with a healthy weight are not metabolically healthy, putting them at risk of diseases like type 2 diabetes — even without being overweight or obese. One of the greatest risk factors, according to University of Florida researchers, is actually inactivity, which drives up your risk of pre-diabetes regardless of your weight. Inactivity Is Associated With Pre-Diabetes, Even if You're a Healthy Weight If you were looking for motivation to get moving, this study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, is as good as it gets.1 In a survey of more than 1,100 healthy-weight individuals, those who were inactive (physically active for less than 30 minutes per week) were more likely to have an A1C level of 5.7 or higher, which is considered to be pre-diabetic. Among all the inactive participants (aged 20 and over), about one-quarter were either pre-diabetic or diabetic. When only those inactive people aged 40 and over were analyzed, the percentage rose to 40 percent. The researchers suggested that peop Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes And Being Very Thin-need Advice!

Pre-diabetes And Being Very Thin-need Advice!

pre-diabetes and being very thin-need advice! I recently had my annual physical and my fasting blood sugar was 107. My Dr. said it was fine and I don't have diabetes but I read online that 107 is considered pre-diabetes That scared me because diabetes runs in my family. I have always been extremely thin. I am5'4' and 98lbs. I'm trying to watch my carbs and have been exercising to hopefully prevent diabetes from developing.The problem isI'm losing weight.. Any suggestions how I can eat alow carb diet but not lose weight at the same time? I just don't know what to do. Thanks! Also, can you tell me if eating a half cup of Fiber one cereal with one cup of milk would raise my blood sugar a lot?I eat that every morning. Thanks so much for your help. Yes, a fasting glucose of 107 mg/dl is considered prediabetes. The fasting glucose ranges are: Since diabetes runs in your family ask your doctor for an A1c [HbA1c] test. See this link for an explanation. An 8oz glass of milk contains on average 8 grams of sugar, every 7 grams equals one heaping Tablespoon of refined sugar. That alone will jack your postprandial [after meal] glucose levels upwards. Oatmeal spiced with cinnamon and fruits is my usual breakfast. A much better choice than synthetic fiber. For weight its best to sit down with a nutritionist to go over your foods and serving sizes - what you should eat and cannot eat. Ask your doctor for a referral. Major teaching hospitals found on or near major university campuses have trained nutritionist's on staff. Continue reading >>

Can Thin People Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Thin People Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Almost 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, according to government statistics, and it's known that carrying excess weight ups your diabetes risk. The reason is that fat interferes with your ability to use insulin — insulin moves sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells, which need the sugar for energy. But don't think you're off the hook if you're thin — you still can be at risk for type 2 diabetes, even if you're not heavy. The risk for developing type 2 diabetes may be smaller if you're thin, but it's still real, especially if you're older, says Christopher Case, MD, who specializes in endocrinology in Jefferson City, Mo. It's not known exactly how many thin or normal-weight people have type 2 diabetes, but part of that may be because there is no standard definition for "thin," Dr. Case says. "They may not look obese," Case says, but any excess weight, especially around the stomach, is a risk factor. One of the reasons people can have high blood sugar and develop diabetes whether they're thin or obese is because weight, though a contributing factor, is not the only factor. Type 2 Diabetes Could Be in Your Genes Genetics plays a role in developing type 2 diabetes. Studies show that people who have a close relative (parent or sibling) with type 2 diabetes have a greater than three times higher risk of developing the disease than those with no family history, Case says. Genetics may explain why some people who are thin develop type 2 diabetes and why an obese person might not, he says. African-Americans, Asians, Hispanics, and Native Americans also are at greater risk for type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle Choices Raise Your Diabetes Risk These other risk factors, often associated with people who are overweight, can plague thin people, too Continue reading >>

Think Skinny People Don’t Get Type 2 Diabetes? Think Again.

Think Skinny People Don’t Get Type 2 Diabetes? Think Again.

In the last article we discussed the complex relationship between body weight and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We learned that although obesity is strongly associated with T2DM, a subset of “metabolically healthy obese” (MHO) people have normal blood sugar and insulin sensitivity and don’t ever develop diabetes. In this article we’re going to talk about the mirror reflection of the MHO: the “metabolically unhealthy nonobese” (MUN). These are lean people with either full-fledged type 2 diabetes or some metabolic dysfunction, such as insulin resistance. You might even be surprised to learn that skinny people can and do get T2DM. They are rarely mentioned in the media, and there isn’t much written about them in the scientific literature. Perhaps these folks have been overlooked because type 2 diabetes has been historically viewed as a disease of gluttony and sloth, a self-inflicted outcome of eating too much and not and not exercising enough. But the very existence of the MUN phenotype proves that there’s more to T2DM than overeating and a sedentary lifestyle. Remember that one in three type 2 diabetics are undiagnosed. It’s possible that a significant number of these people that are lean. They don’t suspect they might have T2DM because they’re under the impression that it’s not a condition that affects thin people. This is one of the biggest dangers of the myth that “only fat people get diabetes”. It’s well-known that high blood sugar can precede the development of T2DM for as long as ten years. It is during this time that many of the complications associated with diabetes – nerve damage, retinal changes, and early signs of kidney deterioration – begin to develop. This is why it’s just as important for lean people to maintain healthy blood s Continue reading >>

Skinny People Get Type 2 Diabetes Too: 10st 7lb Man Who Exercised Regularly Is Stunned To Learn He Has The Condition - Which He Then Reversed In 11 Days With New Diet

Skinny People Get Type 2 Diabetes Too: 10st 7lb Man Who Exercised Regularly Is Stunned To Learn He Has The Condition - Which He Then Reversed In 11 Days With New Diet

When I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes four years ago I was stunned. I’d gone for a check-up, and a routine blood test said it all: diabetes. But it made no sense. As a healthy 59-year-old, who went running, played regular cricket, drank moderately (2 units a week) and only weighed 10st 7lb, I was hardly overweight. In fact, at 5ft 7in, my Body Mass Index (BMI) was a healthy 21. Yes, I did overeat sometimes – I was thin and thought I could eat what I liked within reason – but it was mainly healthy food, few ready meals, semi-skimmed milk, grilled rather than fried food, chicken rather than red meat and lots of fresh veg. But over the past two years I had been under a lot of stress: my dad had recently died from prostate cancer, my job had changed radically, and I’d been on high blood pressure pills for a year. Stress can raise your blood sugar levels. But I still thought my diabetes diagnosis was ridiculous – how could someone with my weight and healthy lifestyle be facing the prospect of all the serious complications of type 2 diabetes in ten years’ time, including sight loss and a much greater risk of early death? My GP told me I could control my condition with diet, and gave me a long list of healthy foods and their glycaemic load (the effect each food has on your blood sugar level). After six months on this, my blood sugar level had dropped from 9mmol to 7, although this was still well above 6, the level at which type 2 diabetes is diagnosed. I wanted to be free of diabetes, not just control it. So I researched online and discovered the work of Professor Roy Taylor at Newcastle University. Type 2 is linked to fat clogging up the liver and pancreas, and Professor Taylor had shown that a very low calorie diet could reverse this. I had to try it. I chose Continue reading >>

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