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Pre-diabetes Diet Foods To Avoid

Diabetes: More Than Just Sugar Overload?

Diabetes: More Than Just Sugar Overload?

I walk every day, eat a healthful diet, and have no diabetes in my immediate family. I'm not model skinny (truth be told, I've been known to pack on a few extra pounds), but I'm certainly not a couch potato or junk food addict. So, imagine my surprise when a routine blood test showed that my blood sugar was elevated and I was officially prediabetic. Prediabetic, meaning I have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels that put me at risk of developing diabetes, the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States. Yikes! The fact that I'm not alone doesn't make me feel any better -- 57 million Americans have prediabetes and another 24 million have diabetes (90 to 95 percent of all diabetes diagnosed is type 2, which typically appears in adults and is associated with obesity, physical inactivity, family history, and other factors). Being part of what's shaping up to be a diabetes epidemic in America isn't a club I want to join. Health.com: How to lower your risks for developing diabetes Another wake-up call It turns out that prediabetes isn't really "pre" anything, according to Mark Hyman, M.D., author of "UltraMetabolism" and "The UltraMind Solution: Fix Your Broken Brain by Healing Your Body First." "It's a danger in and of itself that sets off a whole cascade of problems," he says. In fact, there's now evidence that a prediabetic patient's risks for eye, kidney, and nerve damage, as well as heart disease, are nearly as great as a diabetic's, says Alan J. Garber, M.D., chairman of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists task force that's currently writing new guidelines for managing prediabetes. What's more, diabetes can be especially dangerous for mothers and their unborn children, potentially leading to miscarriage or birth defects. Women with diabetes a Continue reading >>

Your Doctor Said You Have Pre-diabetes, Now What?

Your Doctor Said You Have Pre-diabetes, Now What?

Feeling stressed because your doctor said you have pre-diabetes? I totally understand. Being given the news of something wrong with your health is always overwhelming, especially because it usually means you need to make changes—changes you weren’t expecting that may seem a little confusing. Today I’m here to help you feel a bit more confident so you know exactly what to do to take good care of yourself moving forward. The Good News: You Have PRE-Diabetes. It is actually good news to be told you have ‘pre’ diabetes rather than a full Type 2 Diabetes diagnosis because it means you can prevent your health from deteriorating further. You can have pre-diabetes for up to 10 years before being diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes. And right now you have the ability to turn everything around and avoid many of the negative health consequences. Many studies have shown that people who eat better, exercise regularly and adopt a healthier lifestyle can avoid diabetes altogether. So, take a deep breath—because having pre-diabetes is actually good news. Exercise. If you have pre-diabetes you have insulin resistance, which means the cells in your liver and muscles have become resistant to the hormone insulin. Since insulin unlocks the cells to allow glucose in, the insulin resistance contributes to glucose intolerance and higher blood sugar. Exercise helps to improve your insulin sensitivity and get the glucose out of the bloodstream and into the cells more efficiently. What you want to do is aim for at least 30 minutes of exercise every day. Even a walk is enough to help. But if you can also include resistance exercises such as some bodyweight training where you might do squats, lunges, bridges and so forth, this will help even more. Diet. Without a doubt, your diet is a critic Continue reading >>

I’m Pre-diabetic. Now What?

I’m Pre-diabetic. Now What?

So you just got back from the doctor, and your blood work didn’t look good. Your fasting glucose was 110: not diabetic, but not normal either. Your triglycerides were 195, your HDL cholesterol was 35, and your blood pressure has crept up to 130/90. Despite repeated warnings from your doctor, your waistline has continued to expand, maybe partly because you can’t find time to exercise, and you find it nearly impossible to go much more than a day without sweets or snacks of some kind. If you look back at my first post on prediabetes, you’ll see that elevated blood glucose, high triglycerides, low HDL, moderately high blood pressure, and a growing waistline are all potential indicators of a steady march towards diabetes. However, steady does not mean inevitable. It is well within your power to reverse this process, especially now, before actual diabetes kicks in. Your first step should be to get moving. You don’t need to join a gym or become a triathlete to get the benefits of exercise. In fact, the first thing you need to do is stop sitting still. If you ordinarily sit at a desk for hours at a time, working or just surfing the web, get up and move around every hour or so. The more vigorously you move around, the better: Climb the stairs a couple of times, or just get your blood moving. Same thing if you’re a couch potato: Hit the pause button, or use commercial time to move around. If people ask what you’re up to, tell them you’re trying to be more active to get in better health. There’s every chance they’ll (secretly) admire you, and they may even be brave enough to admit they would like to do the same thing. Of course, it also helps to get regular exercise, and it’s hard to beat walking for convenience. Walking daily, or even most days of the week, is Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes: Can You Prevent It From Becoming Type 2 Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes: Can You Prevent It From Becoming Type 2 Diabetes?

The line between “pre-diabetes” and “type 2 diabetes” is a very thin line. According to the American Diabetes Association, an A1C between 5.7 to 6.4 percent will earn you a diagnosis of “pre-diabetes.” Anything above 6.5 percent will be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. In terms of blood sugar readings, a fasting blood sugar between 100 to 125 mg/dL qualifies as pre-diabetic. Anything above is considered type 2 diabetes. The unfortunate part of that very thin line between “pre-diabetic” and “type 2 diabetic” is that your blood sugars just need to run a smidge higher in order to qualify you for an overwhelming and life-changing diagnosis. The benefit to that very thin line is that it shows just how little change needs to occur in your A1C in order to prevent your status from escalating to “full-blown” type 2 diabetes. Certainly, there are many mysteries that still persist when it comes to understanding type 2 diabetes, such as why changes in diet and exercise are enough for some people to manage healthy blood sugar levels while they’re not enough for others. Research continues to dig into why people who are thin and active can develop type 2 diabetes, and on the contrary, why obesity alone does not indicate diabetes since not all people who are obese present with high blood sugars or insulin resistance. It’s actually far more complicated than simply what you eat, how much you exercise, and what you weigh. But for many, there are things you can do to reduce your risk of developing pre-diabetes, and, if given that diagnosis, there are things you can do to reduce the likelihood of it progressing to a status of type 2. What Causes Pre-Diabetes? “It’s the job of the body’s pancreas to make insulin to be used to bring glucose that results from our Continue reading >>

Eating For Pre-diabetes Is Easier Than You Think!

Eating For Pre-diabetes Is Easier Than You Think!

Many people who learn they have pre-diabetes believe that they will need to make drastic changes in the way that they eat. Actually, the components of a healthful pre-diabetes meal plan works much in the same way that any healthy eating plan would work. By following a few simple principles, the person with pre-diabetes can benefit considerably. A well thought out eating plan should focus on portion control and a variety of nutrient dense foods. Weight loss, blood sugar control and improved nutrition are the most obvious benefits when you begin to eat in this way. Having pre-diabetes does not mean that you need to make separate meals or foods. Everyone has similar nutritional requirements, regardless of whether or not they have this condition. A pre-diabetic meal plan includes the same foods that everyone else can eat. Buying specialty or diet food is unnecessary. To begin with, you do not have to give up all carbohydrates when you have pre-diabetes. Although carbohydrate foods have an effect on blood sugar, they are a necessary component of a healthy diet. It is the quantity as well as the type of carbohydrate that you include in your eating plan that will make the biggest difference. Carbohydrates are the body’s primary energy source. Simple carbohydrates include foods with added sugars, juices and fruits. Complex carbohydrates include grain products and starchy vegetables. When you have pre-diabetes it is recommended that most of the carbohydrate in your diet come from the complex carbohydrates. Use grain products or other carbohydrate foods that are high in fiber. In other words, look for whole grains, and use plenty of vegetables to get fiber. Refined or processed grains have much less fiber, and often have less nutritional value. Fruit contains natural, simple su Continue reading >>

7 Natural Treatments Of Prediabetes Symptoms

7 Natural Treatments Of Prediabetes Symptoms

We know that diabetes is a major problem in the U.S., and prediabetes is not less of an issue — but it’s also a wakeup call that can jolt someone into action. Prediabetes symptoms may go unnoticed, but the first sign is that you no longer have normal blood sugar levels. A prediabetes diagnosis is a warning sign to people who will develop diabetes if they don’t make serious lifestyle changes. The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention National Diabetes Statistics Report says that 37 percent of United States adults older than 20 years and 51 percent of those older than 65 exhibit prediabetes symptoms. When applied to the entire population in 2012, these estimates suggest that there are nearly 86 million adults with prediabetes in the United States alone. Furthermore, the International Diabetes Federation projects an increase in prevalence of prediabetes to 471 million globally by 2035. (1) Luckily, research shows that lifestyle intervention may decrease the percentage of prediabetic patients who develop diabetes from 37 percent to 20 percent. (2) What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a condition defined as having blood glucose levels above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. It’s considered to be an at-risk state, with high chances of developing diabetes. Without intervention, people with prediabetes are likely to become type 2 diabetics within 10 years. For people with prediabetes, the long-term damage to the heart and circulatory system that is associated with diabetes may have started already. (3) There are several ways to diagnose prediabetes. The A1C test measures your average blood glucose for the past two to three months. Diabetes is diagnosed at an A1C of greater than or equal to 6.5 percent; for prediabetes, the A1C is between 5.7 percent Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes definition and facts Prediabetes means your blood sugar is higher than normal, but not high enough to diagnose type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes typically has no symptoms or signs; however, it has been associated with being overweight. Usually, blood sugar is high because of insulin resistance, meaning glucose can't get into the cells to be used for energy. Prediabetes is diagnosed with blood tests. Prediabetes levels of blood sugar fall in the range of 100-125 when blood glucose is measured fasting. Prediabetes is reversible by getting healthier. Treatment for prediabetes begins with getting more physically active. All exercise helps reverse prediabetes, especially exercise that helps build muscle. Following a low glycemic index, low carb diet, and following a healthier lifestyle helps reverse prediabetes. Medications and dietary supplements also can be used in reverse prediabetes management. Without making lifestyle changes (or taking medication), the "side effect" of prediabetes is that it is likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is the term used to describe elevated blood sugar (glucose) that has not yet reached the threshold of a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Consider pre-diabetes a warning sign that it is time to take your health more seriously. What is the difference between prediabetes and type 2 diabetes? Prediabetes occurs when there is too much sugar (glucose) in the blood. It is an early warning sign that the body has more sugar in the blood then it can use. Type 2 diabetes is a condition that occurs slowly over time. The pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to keep up with the increased need to move sugar into the cells for energy. Medication and lifestyle changes are necessary to manage blood sugar levels and avoid diabetes complications Continue reading >>

Nhs Diet Advice For Diabetes

Nhs Diet Advice For Diabetes

Tweet In the UK, current 2016 NHS diabetes diet advice is that there is no special diet for people with diabetes. Many people with diabetes focus on the carbohydrate content of their meals and prefer a low-carb diet for tight blood glucose level control. The NHS (and Diabetes UK) recommend a healthy, balanced diet that is low in fat, sugar and salt and contain a high level of fresh fruit and vegetables. This guide reviews the diet advice the NHS gives to people with diabetes and discusses to what degree the advice is sensible. What does the NHS advise? The NHS provides the following diet advice for people with diabetes: [147] [148] Eat plenty of starchy carbohydrates with a low glycemic index (low GI) Increase the amount of fibre in your diet Eat plenty of fruit and vegetables - at least 5 portions per day Cut down on fat and saturated fat in particular Choose foods with unsaturated fat instead - such as vegetable oils, reduced fat spreads, oily fish and avocados Choose low-fat dairy products Choose lean meat - such as skinless chicken Avoid fatty or processed meat Eat fish at least twice a week and ensure you have oily fish at least once a week Eggs and beans are other good sources of protein Cook food by grilling, baking, poaching or steaming instead of frying or roasting Avoid fatty or sugary snacks - such as crisps, cakes, biscuits and pastries Eat snacks such as fruit, unsalted nuts and low-fat yoghurts Cut down on sugar Eat less salt - have less than 6g of salt (2.4g of sodium) per day Cut down on alcohol Don’t skip breakfast Keep hydrated - aim to drink between 1.6 and 2 litres of fluid each day Is the NHS advice sensible? Whilst a number of these points are undoubtedly sensible, some of the recommendations have been criticised by patients and some leading UK h Continue reading >>

A Low-carbohydrate, Whole-foods Approach To Managing Diabetes And Prediabetes

A Low-carbohydrate, Whole-foods Approach To Managing Diabetes And Prediabetes

Diabetes is a systemic disease that has reached epidemic proportions worldwide during the past 30 years,1 and this trend shows no sign of slowing down. In the United States alone, it is estimated that almost 26 million people have diabetes, including 7 million not yet diagnosed.2 The statistics are even worse for prediabetes (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance), which is believed to affect 79 million Americans > 20 years of age.2 Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include, but are not limited to, family history, ethnicity, and obesity, whereas people with certain autoimmune conditions, pancreatic disease, and genetic predisposition are at increased risk for type 1 diabetes.3 Regardless of the type, individuals with diabetes experience abnormal carbohydrate metabolism because of a variety of factors, including impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance. After carbohydrates were recognized as the macronutrient primarily responsible for increasing blood glucose, severe restriction was used to manage hyperglycemia before the discovery of insulin in 1922.4 Until the early 1970s, a lower-carbohydrate, higher-fat diet was considered appropriate for nutritional management of diabetes.5 In 1980, the first set of Dietary Guidelines for Americans included recommendations to adopt an eating pattern lower in fat to prevent chronic health conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and hypertension.6 Although these guidelines state that they “do not apply to people who need special diets because of diseases or conditions,” many clinicians began recommending lower-fat eating patterns, and people with diabetes began adopting them. Although the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended for more than 15 years that macronutrient compos Continue reading >>

Paleo, Do We Have A Problem?

Paleo, Do We Have A Problem?

Lots of meat, healthy fats, veggies, and no dairy, grains, or processed sugar of any kind—those are the main principles of the highly popular Paleo diet, which loyal followers credit for everything from losing weight to curing adult acne. With celebs like Jessica Biel and Kobe Bryant embracing the dietary lifestyle, you would think it's a foolproof way to slim down and stay healthy. But not necessarily, says a new study out of the University of Melbourne; it's far from being one of the best 50 zero belly tips ever… A study published in the nature journal Nutrition and Diabetes reveals that researchers found Paleo-esque diets to be a problem for the pre-diabetes mice they tested. Here's how it went down: One group of rodents went from a diet of 3% fat to a diet with 60% more fat and only 20% carbs. The other group ate their normal diet. Although the researchers were testing to see if a high-fat, low-carb diet would be beneficial for those with pre-diabetes (translation: checking to see if a Paleo-like diet could help), they actually found the opposite. The high-fat, low-carb group actually gained more weight than the constant group after eight weeks, doubling their fat mass from 2% to 4%. Their insulin levels rose, and they also had worse glucose intolerance. "This level of weight gain will increase blood pressure and increase your risk of anxiety and depression and may cause bone issues and arthritis," said Professor Sof Andrikopoulos, lead author of the study. "For someone who is already overweight, this diet would only further increase blood sugar and insulin levels—and could actually predispose them to diabetes." The mice examined in the study were, however, sedentary. Any healthy weight-loss program should incorporate at least 30 minutes of exercise several ti Continue reading >>

How Do I Prevent Prediabeties Turning Into Diabetes?

How Do I Prevent Prediabeties Turning Into Diabetes?

Pre diabetic is a state when your blood glucose level is consistently increased but not enough criteria for a established diabetic state! Diabetes depends upon polygenic facors(family history, genetics, personal susceptibility, work, stress etc..) Goals for controling a proper blood glucose level are For achieving normal healthy lifestyle Prevent any long term complications of diabetes or hyperglycemia You should follow: Diet: Dietary modifications are essential for preventing the diabetic state. It is known as Medical nutrition therapy(MNT). Coordinate it along with caloric intake. Avoid excess sugar in meal. Use artificial sweeteners instead. Salt restricted diet Reduce fat consumption Foods rich in fibers Ample fruits and vegetables These factors are proven for delaying the onset of type II Diabetes and also helpful in blood pressure and hyperlipidemic states. Weight reduction: helps in glycemic control. Excercise: It is the mainstay of all factors. Excercise daily at least for 30 minutes. Benefits are many. It helps in better cardiovascular circulations, prevention of DVT/Thrombosis. But avoid sternous workouts or excercise Comprehensive care for Prediabetic/Diabetes: Self monitoring of glycemic levels (Glucometer is a affordable waybto monitor glucose level) Keep a diary of glycemic levels and maintain it properly for optimal glycemic control Proper education about Diabetes. Warning signs (for like hypoglycemia) Annual eye, foot, kidney examinations for prevention of hyperglycemic related complications! Self care, prevention of any trauma, infection etc.. as healing in diabetic patient takes a longer period. Lastly do not too much worry about having prediabetes/diabetes. Treat it like a close friend rather than being frightened. Live normally like as if it's nothin Continue reading >>

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Table of Contents Simple Steps to Lower Your Risk Introduction If type 2 diabetes was an infectious disease, passed from one person to another, public health officials would say we’re in the midst of an epidemic. This difficult disease, once called adult-onset diabetes, is striking an ever-growing number of adults. Even more alarming, it’s now beginning to show up in teenagers and children. More than 24 million Americans have diabetes; of those, about 6 million don’t know they have the disease. (1) In 2007, diabetes cost the U.S. an estimated $116 billion in excess medical spending, and an additional $58 billion in reduced productivity. (1) If the spread of type 2 diabetes continues at its present rate, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the United States will increase from about 16 million in 2005 to 48 million in 2050. (2) Worldwide, the number of adults with diabetes will rise from 285 million in 2010 to 439 million in the year 2030. (3) The problems behind the numbers are even more alarming. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness and kidney failure among adults. It causes mild to severe nerve damage that, coupled with diabetes-related circulation problems, often leads to the loss of a leg or foot. Diabetes significantly increases the risk of heart disease. And it’s the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., directly causing almost 70,000 deaths each year and contributing to thousands more. (4) The good news is that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. About 9 cases in 10 could be avoided by taking several simple steps: keeping weight under control, exercising more, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Our cells depend on a single simple sugar, glucose, for most of their energy needs. That’s why the body Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid When Pre-diabetic

Foods To Avoid When Pre-diabetic

If you have prediabetes, your blood sugar levels are higher than they should be but not quite high enough for you to be classified as diabetic. Fasting blood sugar levels between 100 and 125 milligrams per deciliter, oral glucose tolerance test results between 140 and 199 or A1C test results between 5.7 percent and 6.4 percent indicate you have prediabetes. Losing about 5 percent to 7 percent of your weight and exercising at least 150 minutes each week may help delay or prevent type-2 diabetes, but certain dietary changes may also be beneficial. Speak with your doctor to determine the best way for you to go about making diet and lifestyle changes to help treat your prediabetes. High-Calorie Foods Limiting foods high in calories, such as foods high in fat or sugar, can help you lose the weight needed to reverse your prediabetes. Limit the amount of fats you add during cooking as well as those you add at the table. These include butter, oils, salad dressings, cream cheese and sour cream. Eat fewer foods that contain added sugars, especially desserts, baked goods and sweets. Steaming, baking, poaching and microwaving are good cooking methods for reducing fat during cooking. Herbs and spices can help you add flavor without adding fat and sugar. Low-Nutrient Foods You don't necessarily have to drastically cut out carbohydrates when you have prediabetes, but you should limit the overly processed and highly refined carbohydrates because these are often low in nutrients and high in calories. Choose whole grains instead of refined grains, and fill the rest of your plate with nutritious foods such as beans, fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy foods and lean protein sources. Consider trying the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or DASH, eating plan. This diet emphasizes the h Continue reading >>

Foods To Eat To Help Prevent Diabetes

Foods To Eat To Help Prevent Diabetes

Why is meat consumption a risk factor for diabetes? Why does there appear to be a stepwise reduction in diabetes rates as meat consumption drops? Instead of avoiding something in meat, it may be that people are getting something protective from plants. Free radicals may be an important trigger for insulin resistance, and antioxidants in plant foods may help. Put people on a plant-based diet, and their antioxidant enzymes shoot up. So, not only do plants provide antioxidants, but they may boost our own anti-endogenous antioxidant defenses, whereas, on the conventional diabetic diet, they get worse. In my video, How May Plants Protect Against Diabetes, I discuss how there are phytonutrients in plant foods that may help lower chronic disease prevalence by acting as antioxidants and anti-cancer agents, and by lowering cholesterol and blood sugar. Some, we’re now theorizing, may even be lipotropes, which have the capacity to hasten the removal of fat from our liver and other organs, counteracting the inflammatory cascade believed to be directly initiated by saturated-fat-containing foods. Fat in the bloodstream—from the fat in our bodies or the fat we eat—not only causes insulin resistance, but also produces a low-grade inflammation that can contribute to heart disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Fiber may also decrease insulin resistance. One of the ways it may do so is by helping to rid the body of excess estrogen. There is strong evidence for a direct role of estrogens in the cause of diabetes, and it’s been demonstrated that certain gut bacteria can produce estrogens in our colon. High-fat, low-fiber diets appear to stimulate the metabolic activity of these estrogen-producing intestinal bacteria. This is a problem for men, too. Obesity is associated wi Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For Prediabetes

Diet Tips For Prediabetes

In a person with prediabetes, blood sugar levels are raised but not yet to within the ranges of diabetes. Although not a lot is known about how many people have prediabetes, one study found that the condition affects 1 in 3 adults in the UK. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the same prediabetes rates affect Americans. Without treatment, an estimated 15-30 percent of those with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes 5 years after diagnosis. Many prediabetes prevention plans revolve around two key lifestyle factors - a healthy diet and regular exercise. The results of the Diabetes Prevention Program, run in the United States since 2001, suggest that losing an average of 15 pounds in the first year of a prediabetes prevention plan reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58 percent over 3 years. Researchers from John Hopkins University also found that a combination of diet and exercise help. When both were used to achieve a total body weight loss of 10 percent or more in the first year of a prevention plan, the risk of type 2 diabetes fell by 85 percent within 3 years. Contents of this article: The prediabetes diet There are a few different ways to plan a prediabetes diet. The Mayo Clinic suggests diets filled with low-fat, low-calorie, high-fiber, foods. That means lots of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and protein-packed legumes. It also means avoiding artificial sugars, added sugars, and fats. To help guide meal plans, the Glycemic Index (GI) is a useful tool. It ranks foods by the rate at which they affect blood sugar levels. Some carbohydrates are digested slowly, gradually releasing sugar into the bloodstream. Others are processed quickly, causing a quick rise in blood sugar levels. Because prediabetes pr Continue reading >>

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