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Pre Diabetes Advice

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

In pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range. Whilst this raised glucose level is not so high that you have diabetes, you are at increased risk of developing diabetes when you have pre-diabetes. You are also at increased risk of developing conditions such as heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke (cardiovascular diseases). If pre-diabetes is treated, it can help to prevent the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The most effective treatment is lifestyle changes, including eating a healthy balanced diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and doing regular physical activity. What is pre-diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If you have pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range but it is not so high that you have diabetes. However, if y Continue reading >>

Prediabetes And Lifestyle Modification: Time To Prevent A Preventable Disease

Prediabetes And Lifestyle Modification: Time To Prevent A Preventable Disease

Go to: Abstract More than 100 million Americans have prediabetes or diabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which individuals have blood glucose levels higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. People with prediabetes have an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes. An estimated 34% of adults have prediabetes. Prediabetes is now recognized as a reversible condition that increases an individual’s risk for development of diabetes. Lifestyle risk factors for prediabetes include overweight and physical inactivity. Increasing awareness and risk stratification of individuals with prediabetes may help physicians understand potential interventions that may help decrease the percentage of patients in their panels in whom diabetes develops. If untreated, 37% of the individuals with prediabetes may have diabetes in 4 years. Lifestyle intervention may decrease the percentage of prediabetic patients in whom diabetes develops to 20%. Long-term data also suggest that lifestyle intervention may decrease the risk of prediabetes progressing to diabetes for as long as 10 years. To prevent 1 case of diabetes during a 3-year period, 6.9 persons would have to participate in the lifestyle intervention program. In addition, recent data suggest that the difference in direct and indirect costs to care for a patient with prediabetes vs a patient with diabetes may be as much as $7000 per year. Investment in a diabetes prevention program now may have a substantial return on investment in the future and help prevent a preventable disease. Distribution of members with prediabetes by body mass index for Kaiser Permanente Southern California Antelope Valley and Kern Service Areas Body mass index, kg/m2 Antelope Valley, no. (%) Kern, no. (%) ≥ 30 4403 (54) 3534 (51) 25–29 2192 Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Diet Plan

Pre Diabetes Diet Plan

It’s estimated that almost 50% of the American population has diabetes or prediabetes – a condition where blood sugar is higher than normal levels. It is accompanied by insulin resistance, a risk factor for full-blown diabetes, and other health complications. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data estimates the recent prevalence of total diabetes, diagnosed diabetes and undiagnosed diabetes’ US trends to be 12-14% among US adults. So, neither should you shrug off your doctor’s advice, nor should you be taking your elevated blood sugar levels lightly. Generally, the power of a pre-diabetes diet plan, for getting those numbers back on track, is underestimated. Prediabetes is diagnosed when fasting blood sugar levels range from 100 to 125 mg/dl, or hemoglobin A1C levels range from 5.7 to 6.4%. One needs to undergo regular prediabetes tests to be sure. But, with the right pre-diabetes diet plan, one starts to feel the difference in their energy levels soon enough. MORE: Take the Prediabetes Risk Test This is a chance to take control. Simple and daily lifestyle changes, like a balanced diet and regular exercise, that help you lose weight go a long way towards warding off the risk of progressing to full-blown type 2 diabetes. Pre-Diabetes Diet Plan: Changes You Need To Make Today If you already have pre-diabetes, you are likely to develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) within the next 10 years unless you make some changes, starting from today. It’s time to adopt a new pre-diabetes diet plan built on some basic principles: Don’t Skip Breakfast You may barely make it to office on time, but that doesn’t mean you skip breakfast. That means you wake up earlier! A healthy breakfast starts your day on the right note. It gives your metabolism the kick-sta Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For Prediabetes

Diet Tips For Prediabetes

In a person with prediabetes, blood sugar levels are raised but not yet to within the ranges of diabetes. Although not a lot is known about how many people have prediabetes, one study found that the condition affects 1 in 3 adults in the UK. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the same prediabetes rates affect Americans. Without treatment, an estimated 15-30 percent of those with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes 5 years after diagnosis. Many prediabetes prevention plans revolve around two key lifestyle factors - a healthy diet and regular exercise. The results of the Diabetes Prevention Program, run in the United States since 2001, suggest that losing an average of 15 pounds in the first year of a prediabetes prevention plan reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58 percent over 3 years. Researchers from John Hopkins University also found that a combination of diet and exercise help. When both were used to achieve a total body weight loss of 10 percent or more in the first year of a prevention plan, the risk of type 2 diabetes fell by 85 percent within 3 years. Contents of this article: The prediabetes diet There are a few different ways to plan a prediabetes diet. The Mayo Clinic suggests diets filled with low-fat, low-calorie, high-fiber, foods. That means lots of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and protein-packed legumes. It also means avoiding artificial sugars, added sugars, and fats. To help guide meal plans, the Glycemic Index (GI) is a useful tool. It ranks foods by the rate at which they affect blood sugar levels. Some carbohydrates are digested slowly, gradually releasing sugar into the bloodstream. Others are processed quickly, causing a quick rise in blood sugar levels. Because prediabetes pr Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: 7 Steps To Take Now

Prediabetes: 7 Steps To Take Now

Getting diagnosed with prediabetes is a serious wake-up call, but it doesn't have to mean you will definitely get diabetes. There is still time to turn things around. “It’s an opportunity to initiate lifestyle changes or treatments, and potentially retard progression to diabetes or even prevent diabetes,” says Gregg Gerety, MD, chief of endocrinology at St. Peter’s Hospital in Albany, N.Y. Making these seven changes in your daily habits is a good way to start. Becoming more active is one of the best things you can do to make diabetes less likely. If it's been a while since you exercised, start by building more activity into your routine by taking the stairs or doing some stretching during TV commercials, says Patti Geil, MS, RD, author of What Do I Eat Now? “Physical activity is an essential part of the treatment plan for prediabetes, because it lowers blood glucose levels and decreases body fat,” Geil says. Ideally, you should exercise at least 30 minutes a day, five days a week. Let your doctor know about your exercise plans and ask if you have any limitations. If you're overweight, you might not have to lose as much as you think to make a difference. In one study, people who had prediabetes and lost 5% to 7% of their body weight (just 10-14 pounds in someone who weights 200 pounds) cut their chances of getting diabetes by 58%. See your doctor every three to six months, Gerety says. If you're doing well, you can get positive reinforcement from your doctor. If it's not going so well, your doctor can help you get back on track. "Patients like some tangible evidence of success or failure," Gerety says. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: A Life-saving Wake Up Call

Prediabetes: A Life-saving Wake Up Call

Reviewed by Jill Gora, MD, & Kerry LeBenger, MD Has your doctor ever said that your blood sugar was slightly higher than normal? If you answered yes, you have prediabetes. Prediabetes, which used to be called borderline diabetes, is a warning sign that your body is not controlling your blood sugar as well as it should. More than 1 in 3 adults in the U.S. have blood sugar levels that are higher than normal, but are not bad enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes typically does not have any symptoms. If left unchecked, some 15 to 30 percent of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years. Type 2 diabetes does not develop overnight. It is a continuum of increasing sugars that happens over several years, says Jill Gora, MD , family medicine physician at Summit Medical Group. With todays screening tests, we are given this golden window of opportunity to identify elevated sugar and make changes before diabetes and related complications develop. If you have prediabetes, the good news is that it is not too late to reverse course. With lifestyle changes, such as following a healthy diet and getting regular exercise, you can prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Research shows that losing 5 to 7 percent of your body weight and exercising for at least 150 minutes a week will lower your lifetime risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent. Summit Medical Group has certified diabetes educators , or diabetes coaches, who can help you develop healthy eating and exercise plans. Dr. Gora urges patients to take the news of prediabetes to heart. Many patients come to her for the first time and are surprised to hear the words prediabetes. They thought their sugar was just a little high. I tell them there is no such thing as slightly high sugar. Either your su Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetic Tips | Critical Advice From A Physical Therapist

Pre-diabetic Tips | Critical Advice From A Physical Therapist

Been told that you arepre-diabeticby your physician? Did you know that physical therapy can help get you on the right track to being non pre-diabetic? In order to become non-prediabetic and decrease blood sugar levels, you need to lose weight and reduce body fat percent. This has a significant effect on blood sugars and even a small amount of weight loss can make a big difference. In physical therapy, we will teach you the right exercises to do for both strength and cardiovascular exercise and how often you need to do them. We will monitor your exercises to make sure you are performing them properly with the ultimate goal of weight loss and reduction in body fat percent. According to the American Diabetes Association the recommendation for exercise is for strengthening exercises to be done 2-3 days per week and conditioning exercises (exercises that elevate your heart rate) be done 4-7 times per week for 20-30 min. OSI has a pre-diabetic program that includes the exercise instruction that you need as well as use of our exercise equipment and a free nutrition counseling session from one of our personal trainers to get you on the right track toward the ultimate goal of being non-prediabetic. If you have questions on the pre-diabetic program, please call Shari Walters PT, OCS at 715-247-5735 at our Somerset Wisconsin location. I would be happy to answer any of your questions. Continue reading >>

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

Just a “little touch of sugar?” iStock/stocksnapper If you’re among the 79 million Americans with prediabetes—higher-than-normal levels of blood sugar, which boost your risk for full-blown diabetes and related health problems—don’t shrug it off. New research published in the journal The Lancet found that prediabetic patients who had at least one normal blood sugar reading, even for a short period of time, were 56 percent more likely to avoid progressing to diabetes during nearly six years of follow-up after the study. In other words, “This is your chance to take control,” says Matt Longjohn, MD, MPH, senior director of chronic disease prevention for the YMCA-USA. “Research proves that some simple, daily lifestyle changes can dramatically cut the risk for developing diabetes over the next couple of years by 58 percent, which is better than what is seen with frequently prescribed medications like metformin.” The key? Avoid these four roadblocks between you and a healthier future. iStock/martinedoucet The landmark Diabetes Prevention Program study, which followed 3,234 people with prediabetes for three years, revealed that everyday changes—switching up their eating habits and adding more physical activity—helped participants lose a little weight. Trimming just 5 percent to 7 percent of their body weight (that’s 12.5 pounds for a 180 pound person) and exercising slashed the odds for developing full-blown diabetes by a whopping 58 percent. This helps trim abdominal fat—the deep belly fat that settles in your torso, wraps itself around your internal organs, and even invades your liver. It messes with your liver’s ability to regulate blood sugar by pumping out inflammation-boosting compounds that make your body stop obeying insulin. Smart Move: St Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a serious health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 84 million American adults—more than 1 out of 3—have prediabetes. Of those with prediabetes, 90% don’t know they have it. Prediabetes puts you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The good news is that if you have prediabetes, the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems. Causes Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy. If you have prediabetes, the cells in your body don’t respond normally to insulin. Your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes—and type 2 diabetes down the road. Symptoms & Risk Factors You can have prediabetes for years but have no clear symptoms, so it often goes undetected until serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes show up. It’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include: Being overweight Being 45 years or older Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Being physically active less than 3 times a week Ever having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Race and ethnicity are also a factor: African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk. Getting Tested You can get a simple blood Continue reading >>

Preventing Pre-diabetes

Preventing Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes is a serious medical condition that puts you at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is also very treatable, and if you have it, there is a good chance you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by making changes in your diet and increasing your level of physical activity. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body does not produce or use enough insulin to be able to turn glucose into energy. Glucose is the sugar and starch that comes from the food you eat, which fuels your body. Insulin is a hormone that carries glucose from your blood into your cells. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in your blood and can cause serious health problems. Pre-Diabetes Pre-diabetes is when your fasting blood glucose (blood sugar) level is above normal. To test for pre-diabetes, your doctor will take a sample of your blood after you have fasted overnight: Normal fasting glucose: 60 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) Pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose): 100 to 125 mg/dl Diabetes: 126 mg/dl or higher on 2 occasions Healthy Tips for Preventing Type 2 Diabetes If you have pre-diabetes, you should talk to your doctor about developing a lifestyle plan to reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends increased physical activity and, if you are overweight, losing 5-10 percent of your body weight. Your doctor may also want you to take medication if you have a family history of diabetes, you are obese, or have other cardiovascular risk factors (high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, or a history of heart disease). Below are tips to help you keep pre-diabetes from progressing to Type 2 diabetes: Exercise Every Day Since muscles use glucose for energy, activities like walking, bicycling, and gardening Continue reading >>

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow

Skip the sugary sodas and processed food, and opt for whole foods like fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats like olive oil and avocado, Experts believe the number of people living with diabetes will rise dramatically over the next 40 years. If current trends continue, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as many as one in three adults could have the disease by 2050. And about 79 million American adults now have prediabetes, a condition marked by above-normal blood sugar levels that aren't high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. If there's a silver lining to these alarming statistics, it's that there's plenty you can do to prevent the disease or slow the progression, including eating a balanced diet. Everyone can benefit from a healthy eating plan aimed at containing prediabetes, regardless of whether you're at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, says Barbara Borcik, RD, a certified diabetes eductor at the Diabetes & Nutrition Center at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown, Md. 7 Golden Rules of Healthy Eating Here are seven sound diet principles that can keep your blood sugars from creeping upward, among other health benefits. Skip the sugary drinks. No sweet tea. No juice. No soda. No sweetened lemonade. No mocha latte coffee creations. "My number one recommendation to people is: Don't drink your sugar," Borcik says. Sugary drinks provide nothing more than empty calories, and they won't help you feel full. "All the sugary drinks out there are a real risk factor for obesity," she stresses. Pull back on portions. You still can eat many of the foods you like, just have smaller amounts of them, Borcik says, adding that this is especially true for starchy foods like white rice, white potat Continue reading >>

20 Ways To Halt Pre-diabetes In Its Tracks

20 Ways To Halt Pre-diabetes In Its Tracks

Learn how small changes in your daily routine may help ward off type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease, and one that can be a challenge to manage. It can lead to heart and kidney disease, blindness and many other health conditions. Until a cure is found, people with the disease have to watch what they eat, measure their blood sugar and take medication each day. Am I at-risk? 86 million people in the U.S. have pre-diabetes, and even more are at-risk. Pre-diabetes is when blood glucose levels are above normal, but not high enough to be in the diabetic range. But, people with pre-diabetes are already at a higher risk for heart disease and other complications. You are at an increased risk for type 2 diabetes if you: Are overweight Exercise fewer than three times each week Have a family history of diabetes Are African-American, Hispanic, American-Indian or Pacific Islander Are older than 45 Had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) Have high blood pressure or cholesterol Have a history of heart disease Small changes, big rewards Pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes can often be prevented. And it does not require a complete overhaul of your lifestyle. Research shows that reducing your body weight by 5 percent to 10 percent – 10 to 20 pounds for someone who weighs 200 pounds – can cut your diabetes risk in half. Weight loss can also delay the onset of diabetes. Reduce your risk The key to stopping type 2 diabetes is to reach a healthy weight. And the trick to long-lasting weight loss is a healthy diet and regular exercise. Exercise Work up to 30 to 60 minutes of exercise most days of the week. Always check with your doctor before you start an exercise program. Consider these exercise tips to get started: Exercise does not have to happen all at once. Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Prevent Prediabetes From Becoming Diabetes

5 Ways To Prevent Prediabetes From Becoming Diabetes

Prediabetes, or elevated blood sugar, puts you at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, especially if you are overweight, but you can take steps to prevent it. Type 2 diabetes is not inevitable. More than 86 million American adults—approximately one-third of those over age 18 and half of those over 65—have prediabetes, and most of them don’t even know it. If you have prediabetes, it means your blood sugar levels are consistently higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes puts you at higher-than-normal risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. According to U.S. Centers for Disease Control, up to 30% of overweight men and women with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years of diagnosis. You don’t have to be one of them! Here are five steps you can take to reduce your diabetes risk. Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

8 Actions To Take If You Have Prediabetes

8 Actions To Take If You Have Prediabetes

Changing the Path to Type 2 A whopping 86 million Americans have prediabetes. That’s according to the latest statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) -- that's 37 percent of American adults over age 20 and 51 percent of adults over age 65. Research shows about 70 percent of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes over time. Despite these scary stats, only 11 percent of people who have prediabtes know it. The good news is you can prevent or slow the progression of prediabetes to type 2. Numerous research studies conducted over the last 30 years show that early and aggressive management with continued vigilance over time is what prevents or delays type 2 diabetes. And the earlier you detect it and put your plan into action, the better. Here are eight ways to manage prediabetes. 1. Get Tested to Know for Sure. Do you have family -- parents or siblings -- with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes? Are you carrying extra weight around your middle? Don't get enough exercise? These are a few of the risk factors for prediabetes. A good first step to see if you are at high risk is to use the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test. You can take the test by visiting diabetes.org/risk. If you’re at high risk, schedule an appointment with your health care provider to get a check of your blood glucose level -- or, better yet, your A1C (an average of your blood glucose over two to three months). See the blood test results to diagnose prediabetes on the next page. 2. Max Out Your Insulin-Making Reserves. It's well known that at the center of the storm of the slow and steady onset of prediabetes is insulin resistance -- the body's inability, due to excess weight and genetic risk factors, to effectively use the insulin th Continue reading >>

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