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Outline Why A Carbohydrate Controlled Diet Is Important In Preventing Raised Blood Glucose Levels

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Meal plan You need to eat and drink at least 12 carbohydrate choices each day. Most women need 14 carbohydrate choices each day to maintain the desired weight gain of one-half pound each week. If you follow a vegetarian diet, you need 15 to 16 carbohydrate choices each day to get enough nutrients. At breakfast, include: 2 to 3 carbohydrate choices (30 to 45 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At lunch, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At dinner, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For a morning snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an afternoon snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an evening snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely Breakfast tips Blood glucose is hard to control in the morning when the hormones that boost your blood glucose levels are released. To help, follow these breakfast tips: Eat a small breakfast. Eat whole-grain bread products. Eat a food that has protein. Do not eat cereal or fruit. Do not drink fruit juice at breakfast or any other time of the day. Fruit juice raises your blood glucose very quickly. Completing a meal plan Vegetables Most vegetables do not raise blood glucose. Vegetables supply many nutrients for both you and your baby. Try to eat at least four servi Continue reading >>

Working With Diabetic Clients

Working With Diabetic Clients

A look at the exercise implications and contraindications when working with clients who suffer from type 1 and type 2 diabetes, hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Look around your exercise floor. Although there are no outward or telltale signs, it is likely that several of your members or clients have some form of diabetes. It is also likely that many of these people either are unaware of their condition or have difficulty managing and regulating the disorder. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 20.8 million people who live in the United States currently have diabetes, accounting for 7% of Americans (CDC 2005). In fact, it is estimated that 6.2 million of these people have not been diagnosed with diabetes (CDC 2005). Diabetes has an enormous medical and financial impact on our nation. Estimated diabetes costs in the U.S. in 2002 were $132 billion, of which $40 billion resulted from disability, work loss and premature death (CDC 2005). People with diabetes are at high risk for heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney and nervous-system diseases, which is why the medical costs of this condition are so high. While it is outside of your scope of practice as a fitness professional to dispense medical advice to diabetic clients about specific issues such as blood glucose levels or medications, you are in a unique position to help. As the number of people with diabetes (or related conditions like hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia) continues to grow, it is imperative that fitness professionals have a practical understanding of how exercise benefits and affects these clients. This article outlines the mechanisms of diabetes; risk factors; signs and symptoms; complications of the condition; exercise considerations and contraindications; and recommendat Continue reading >>

Meal Planning For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Meal Planning For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

When you have a child with type 1 diabetes, it's easy to get carried away with the notion of a diabetic diet. But in reality, your child's dietary needs are no different from a child who doesn't have diabetes. Of course, there are certain considerations you need to be aware of, and understanding the carbohydrate content in food is arguably the most important. In this article, you will learn about the importance of carb counting, with a special emphasis on how fiber and sugar alcohols may also affect your child's blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. Nutrition Basics There's really no such thing as a diabetic diet. That's why you should focus instead on providing your child with balanced nutrition. A good nutritional resource to consult is the Food Pyramid. In recent years, the United States Department of Agriculture has made some updates to the standard Food Pyramid that most of us grew up knowing. Instead of being a set-in-stone guideline, now you can create personalized eating plans that are flexible and balanced. To refresh your memory on healthy eating, visit ChooseMyPlate.gov. There are 3 main nutrients in foods—fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. These essential nutrients affect blood glucose in different ways. Fats: Fat typically doesn't break down into sugar in your blood, and in small amounts, it doesn't affect your blood glucose levels. But fat does slow down digestion, and this can cause your blood glucose to rise slower than it normally would. After a high-fat meal, your child's blood glucose may be elevated up to 12 hours after the meal. Proteins: Protein doesn't affect blood glucose unless you eat more than your body needs. In most cases, you need only about 6 ounces or less (which is about the size of 2 decks of cards) at each meal. Carbohydrates: Carbohyd Continue reading >>

Avoiding Blood Sugar Spikes

Avoiding Blood Sugar Spikes

Do you ever get that “2 o’clock feeling when all you really want is a candy bar? What about a mid-morning headache along with fatigue, confusion, and brain fog? You might be riding the blood sugar roller coaster, which is when your blood sugar goes from low to high frequently throughout the day. Most of us opt for a quick fix and that usually involves eating sugar. But brushing these symptoms off can cause insulin resistance over time and lead to health problems in the future including diabetes and heart disease. So what causes blood sugar fluctuation? While there are a few reasons why it could occur (stress, lack of sleep, etc.), the simple answer is carbohydrate (carb) consumption. Carbohydrates are the only macronutrient that can raise blood sugar significantly, whereas protein and fat act as carbohydrate buffers, helping to keep blood sugar stable throughout the day. Because carbohydrates make up a major portion of the standard American diet, many may be unaware that their blood sugar could be troublesome. There are a few different things you can do to control it, but it’s important to get your diet in check first. Start with the simple tips listed below. 1. Balance your meals with fat and protein. These two macronutrients have a minimal effect on your blood sugar levels. Not only will they help you feel full and stay full, they slow the digestion of carbs, keeping your blood sugar from spiking rapidly. Here is an example of a meal that includes a good balance of protein, fat, and carbs: a serving of chicken (protein) sautéed in coconut oil (fat) with broccoli and carrots (carbs) on the side, along with a small serving of berries (carbs) for dessert. 2. Eat 3 meals a day, and a few snacks if you need them. Another option is eating smaller meals more frequentl Continue reading >>

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Hi, I just found this site and would like to participate. I will give my numbers, etc. First, my last A1c was 6.1, the doc said it was Pre-diabetes in January of 2014, OK, I get it that part, but what confuses me is that at home, on my glucometer, all my fastings were “Normal” however, back then, I had not checked after meals, so maybe they were the culprits. Now, I am checking all the time and driving myself crazy. In the morning sometimes fasting is 95 and other times 85, it varies day to day. Usually, after a low carb meal, it drops to the 80’s the first hour and lower the second. On some days, when I am naughty and eat wrong, my b/s sugar is still low, and on other days, I can eat the same thing, and it goes sky high, again, not consistent. Normally, however, since February, my fbs is 90, 1 hour after, 120, 2nd hour, back to 90, but, that changes as well. In February, of 2014, on the 5th, it was horrible. I think I had eaten Lasagne, well, before, my sugars did not change much, but that night, WHAM-O I started at 80 before the meal, I forgot to take it at the one and two hour mark, but did at the 3 hour mark, it was 175, then at four hours, down to 160, then at 5 hours, back to 175. I went to bed, because by that time, it was 2 AM, but when I woke up at 8:00 and took it, it was back to 89!!!! This horrible ordeal has only happened once, but, I have gone up to 178 since, but come down to normal in 2 hours. I don’t know if I was extra stressed that day or what, I am under tons of it, my marriage is not good, my dear dad died 2 years ago and my very best friend died 7 months ago, I live in a strange country, I am from America, but moved to New Zealand last year, and I am soooo unhappy. Anyway, what does confuse me is why the daily differences, even though I may Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

What is diabetes? When a food containing carbohydrate is eaten, your body digests the carbohydrate into sugar (called glucose), which can then be used as energy by the cells in your body. Diabetes is a condition where your body can’t properly control the amount of glucose in your blood. A hormone called insulin is needed for transferring glucose from the bloodstream to enter the body cells and be converted to energy. In people with diabetes, blood glucose levels are often higher than normal because either the body does not produce insulin (type 1 diabetes) or cannot use insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). High levels of glucose in the bloodstream can lead to short term complications such as: passing large amounts of urine being extremely thirsty and drinking lots of fluids being tired having blurred vision having frequent skin infections and being slow to heal Blood glucose levels are normally between about 4.0 and 8.0 mmol/L. People with diabetes should aim for blood glucose levels as near to normal as possible, but individual targets should always be discussed with your diabetes health care professional. Controlling diabetes is important to prevent serious long term complications such as: heart and circulation problems infections kidney disease eye problems, which can lead to blindness nerve damage to the lower limbs and other parts of the body Types of diabetes There are three types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes affects less than 1% of all Australians. It can appear at any age, but most commonly in childhood and early adult life. People with type 1 diabetes cannot produce enough insulin, and therefore they must inject themselves with insulin several times a day. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 7.1 % of a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet Or Insulin? How To Best Control Blood Sugar

Diabetes Diet Or Insulin? How To Best Control Blood Sugar

Finding out you have type 2 diabetes can be overwhelming to say the least. Your diet suddenly becomes even more important, as you closely track and learn to what to eat to control your blood sugar. Darlene Turner, ARNP, CDE, UnityPoint Health, offers diabetes diet tips and also discusses when it might be necessary to use insulin. Diabetes Diet or Medication? Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes more resistant to the insulin naturally produced and released by the pancreas. The pancreas becomes overworked when large amounts of carbohydrates are consumed, and the body can’t keep up with the amount of insulin needed. Turner says type 2 diabetes management depends on whether the diagnosis is made early or late in the disease process. “Sometimes, we find type 2 diabetes early, and we can treat it with diet changes and possibly oral medication,” Turner says. “However, sometimes we diagnose it when the person has already had it a long time, and the pancreas is hardly making any insulin. In that case, we need to have insulin from the beginning in order to gain control of their blood sugars.” Turner says that many people with type 2 diabetes who manage the condition for years will still need insulin at some point, due to the natural progression of the disease. Diabetes Diet Tips to Start Today There are three parts to type 2 diabetes management: dietary changes, an activity plan and medication. Turner recommends learning all you can about diabetes to get it controlled quickly, before more insulin resistance is created from high blood sugar levels. “Our bodies respond better to lifestyle changes early in the disease process, rather than allowing uncontrolled diabetes to go on for a few years before getting serious about taking care of the condition. Lifestyle c Continue reading >>

Understanding Gestational Diabetes

Understanding Gestational Diabetes

Introduction Approximately 3 to 5 percent of all pregnant women in the United States are diagnosed as having gestational diabetes. These women and their families have many questions about this disorder. Some of the most frequently asked questions are: What is gestational diabetes and how did I get it? How does it differ from other kinds of diabetes? Will it hurt my baby? Will my baby have diabetes? What can I do to control gestational diabetes? Will I need a special diet? Will gestational diabetes change the way or the time my baby is delivered? Will I have diabetes in the future? This brochure will address these and many other questions about diet, exercise, measurement of blood sugar levels, and general medical and obstetric care of women with gestational diabetes. It must be emphasized that these are general guidelines and only your health care professional(s) can tailor a program specific to your needs. You should feel free to discuss any concerns you have with your doctor or other health care provider, as no one knows more about you and the condition of your pregnancy. What is gestational diabetes and what causes it? Diabetes (actual name is diabetes mellitus) of any kind is a disorder that prevents the body from using food properly. Normally, the body gets its major source of energy from glucose, a simple sugar that comes from foods high in simple carbohydrates (e.g., table sugar or other sweeteners such as honey, molasses, jams, and jellies, soft drinks, and cookies), or from the breakdown of complex carbohydrates such as starches (e.g., bread, potatoes, and pasta). After sugars and starches are digested in the stomach, they enter the blood stream in the form of glucose. The glucose in the blood stream becomes a potential source of energy for the entire body, sim Continue reading >>

A Low-carb Diet For Beginners

A Low-carb Diet For Beginners

A low-carb diet is low in carbohydrates, like sugary foods, pasta and bread. Instead, you eat real foods including protein, natural fats and vegetables. Studies show that low-carb diets result in weight loss and improved health markers, and just about everyone knows someone who has successfully tried it. 1 There’s not even any need to count calories or use special products. So why is it still controversial? Learn more about low carb and how to use it for your personal goals here. Choose a section or keep reading below. 2. What to eat on a low-carb diet In this section you can learn exactly what to eat on low carb, whether you prefer visual guides, detailed food lists, delicious recipes or a simple get started guide. Let’s start with a quick visual guide to low carb. Here are the basic food groups you can eat all you like of, until you’re satisfied: The numbers above are grams of digestible carbs per 100 grams (3.5 ounces). Fiber is not counted, you can eat all the fiber you want. All foods above are below 5% carbs. Sticking to these foods will make it relatively easy to stay on a strict low-carb diet, with less than 20 grams of carbs per day. Try to avoid Here’s what you should not eat on low carb – foods full of sugar and starch. As you can see, these foods are much higher in carbs. The numbers are grams of digestible carbs per 100 grams (3.5 ounces), unless otherwise noted. What to drink So what do you drink on low carb? Water is perfect, and so is coffee or tea. Ideally, use no sweeteners. A modest amount of milk or cream is OK (but beware of caffe latte!). The occasional glass of wine is fine too. Check out our full guides to low-carb drinks and low-carb alcohol. Visual low-carb guides Here are more detailed visual guides to the amount of carbs in common f Continue reading >>

Why Carbohydrates Are So Important In Diabetes

Why Carbohydrates Are So Important In Diabetes

Carbohydrates are sugar-based molecules found in fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and dairy products. The make up about 45% to 65% of calories in a healthy diet (the exact percentage is hotly debated); the rest come from fat and protein. You'll find carbohydrates in the healthiest foods you eat, and in the least healthy. Check the food label to find out exactly how much is in your favorite foods. How you eat can affect blood sugar Choosing the right kind of carbohydrates and spacing them out evenly throughout the day can keep blood sugar from rising too high, too fast (90% of the carbohydrate calories you digest end up as glucose, so they have a much bigger impact on blood sugar than fat or protein). "The goal ... is to take in enough carbohydrates to nourish ourselves, but never so much that it causes high blood sugars," says Linda Sartor, a diabetes nutrition specialist at the Penn Rodebaugh Diabetes Center at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Up until about the mid-1990s experts believed that people with diabetes should never eat foods that contain so-called "simple" sugarsthose found in cakes and candyand instead eat "complex" carbohydrates, or those with longer chains of sugar molecules such as potatoes, fruit, vegetables, and grains. We now know that all carbohydrates can cause a rise in blood sugar. Pasta and potatoes, for example, may cause a rapid rise in blood sugar, as can pastries (although other beneficial ingredients in food, such as fiber, cause blood sugar to rise more slowly). Some carbs are better than others The goal is now to maximize intake of the good stuffvitamins, minerals, and fiberand minimize carbohydrates that boost blood sugar too much, offer few nutritional benefits, or are packed with fat and calories. A dieti Continue reading >>

Principles Of Biochemistry/glucose, Glycogen And Diabetes

Principles Of Biochemistry/glucose, Glycogen And Diabetes

Glucose (C6H12O6, also known as D-glucose, dextrose, or grape sugar) is a simple sugar (monosaccharide) and an important carbohydrate in biology. Cells use it as a source of energy and a metabolic intermediate. Glucose is one of the main products of photosynthesis and starts cellular respiration. Glucose exists in several different structures, but all of these structures can be divided into two families of mirror-images (stereoisomers). Only one set of these isomers exists in nature, those derived from the "right-handed form" of glucose, denoted D-glucose. D-glucose is often referred to as dextrose. The term dextrose is derived from dextrorotatory glucose. Solutions of dextrose rotate polarized light to the right (in Latin: dexter = "right"). Starch and cellulose are polymers derived from the dehydration of D-glucose. The other stereoisomer, called L-glucose, is hardly found in nature. The name "glucose" comes from the Greek word glukus (γλυκύς), meaning "sweet". The suffix "-ose" denotes a sugar. The name "dextrose" and the 'D-' prefix come from Latin dexter ("right"), referring to the handedness of the molecules. Glucose is a monosaccharide with formula C6H12O6 or H-(C=O)-(CHOH)5-H, whose five hydroxyl (OH) groups are arranged in a specific way along its six-carbon backbone.[1] In its fleeting open-chain form, the glucose molecule has an open (as opposed to cyclic) and unbranched backbone of six carbon atoms, C-1 through C-6; where C-1 is part of an aldehyde group H(C=O)-, and each of the other five carbons bears one hydroxyl group -OH. The remaining bonds of the backbone carbons are satisfied by hydrogen atoms -H. Therefore glucose is an hexose and an aldose, or an aldohexose. Each of the four carbons C-2 through C-5 is chiral, meaning that its four bonds conne Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Food Choices

Type 2 Diabetes And Food Choices

You make food choices every day. Whole wheat or white bread? A side of french fries or fresh fruit? Eat now or later? Choices about what, when, and how much you eat affect your blood glucose. Understanding how food affects blood glucose is the first step in managing diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, following a diabetes meal plan can help you keep your blood glucose levels on track. Prevent problems Having type 2 diabetes means that your body doesn’t control blood glucose well. When blood glucose stays too high for too long, serious health problems can develop. By controlling your blood glucose through diet, exercise, and medicine, you can delay or prevent kidney, eye, and heart disease, and other complications of diabetes. Control carbohydrates Carbohydrates are foods that have the biggest effect on your blood glucose levels. After you eat carbohydrates, your blood glucose rises. Fruit, sweet foods and drinks, starchy foods (such as bread, potatoes and rice), and milk and milk products contain carbohydrates. Although carbohydrates are important for health, when you eat too many at once, your blood glucose can go too high, especially if you do not have or take adequate insulin for that food. Some carbohydrates—potatoes, sweets and white bread, for instance—may raise blood glucose more than others. Better choices are less processed foods with more fiber and nutrients, such as 100% whole wheat bread, oatmeal, brown rice, and nonstarchy vegetables. Learn to use food labels that indicate added sugar and try to find healthier alternatives, particularly if you are overweight. Food and medicine Insulin helps glucose move from the blood into your muscle cells, where it can be used for energy. Some oral diabetes medicines help you make more insulin Continue reading >>

> Carbohydrates And Diabetes

> Carbohydrates And Diabetes

Keeping your blood sugar levels on track means watching what you eat, plus taking medicines like insulin if you need to. Your doctor may also have mentioned that you should keep track of how many carbohydrates (carbs) you eat. But what exactly are carbohydrates and how do they affect your blood sugar? The foods we eat contain nutrients that provide energy and other things the body needs, and one of these is carbohydrates. The two main forms of carbohydrates are: sugars such as fructose, glucose, and lactose starches, which are found in foods such as starchy vegetables (like potatoes or corn), grains, rice, breads, and cereals The body breaks down or converts most carbohydrates into the sugar glucose. Glucose is absorbed into the bloodstream, and with the help of a hormone called insulin it travels into the cells of the body where it can be used for energy. People with diabetes have problems with insulin that can cause blood sugar levels to rise. For people with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas loses the ability to make insulin. For people with type 2 diabetes, the body can't respond normally to the insulin that is made. Because the body turns carbohydrates into glucose, eating carbohydrates makes blood sugar levels rise. But that doesn't mean you should avoid carbohydrates if you have diabetes. Carbohydrates are a healthy and important part of a nutritious diet. Some carbohydrates have more health benefits than others, though. For example, whole-grain foods and fruits are healthier choices than candy and soda because they provide fiber, vitamins, and other nutrients. Fiber is important because it helps you feel full and keeps your digestive system working properly. In fact, eating lots of fiber can even help to slow the body's absorption of sugar when eaten together with s Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Carbohydrate counting is an effective medical nutrition therapy option for adults with type 2 diabetes. This meal planning tool has increased in popularity as a result of research demonstrating the benefits of intensive therapy in individuals with type 1 diabetes.1 It can also lead to improved diabetes control and weight loss in adults with type 2 diabetes. This article describes our experience in teaching carbohydrate counting in a diabetes specialty practice using "carbohydrate homework." In my full-time practice with an endocrinologist and diabetologist, I see a large population of patients with type 2 diabetes. Nutrition services are provided in one-to-one consultations, and 8–12 patients are seen per day. Our type 2 diabetes population spans the spectrum in terms of educational and socioeconomic level. Whether working or retired, many eat the majority of their meals out or on the run, because their spouse has died, their children are grown, or busy lifestyles don't allow for meals at home. Most have a misconception of the role nutrition plays in their diabetes control. When patients enter our practice, they often express frustration with their lack of glycemic control, lack of success with weight loss, and continuing problems with weight gain. Patients report frustration that, although they are following a meal plan and their premeal blood glucose levels are close to target, their HbAlc levels are still elevated. It is often at this frustration point that a patient first meets with the dietitian, and the concept of carbohydrate counting is introduced. Carbohydrate counting with fat- gram counting is an effective way to work on weight loss and to improve the control of diabetes. Carbohydrate is converted to blood glucose almost 100% within approximately 90 minutes Continue reading >>

Eat To Beat Diabetes In Just Eight Weeks: It's The Life-changing Diet That Can Help You Avoid Or Even Reverse Type 2 Diabetes. And The Best Part? It's The Tasty Way To Get Back To Health

Eat To Beat Diabetes In Just Eight Weeks: It's The Life-changing Diet That Can Help You Avoid Or Even Reverse Type 2 Diabetes. And The Best Part? It's The Tasty Way To Get Back To Health

The food we eat today, along with our sedentary lifestyle, is not only making us fat but putting us at risk of Type 2 diabetes — and it’s one of the greatest epidemics of our time. More than 4 million Britons now have this disease, while one in three adults has raised blood sugar levels that can lead to diabetes, yet most don’t know it. Now, help is at hand. Based on research carried out at the University of Newcastle, I have put together a simple diet plan and lifestyle programme that should not only reduce your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes, but can reverse it in those already suffering — all in only eight weeks. What’s more, it’s not just for those at highest risk but for anyone who wants to lose weight fast and regain control of their health. Sounds good? Well, here’s a little story to inspire you. Hanging in the wardrobe at 56-year-old Alan Tutty’s home in Sunderland is an old shirt that he won’t be throwing out any time soon. According to Alan, a father of four, it once used to fit him ‘like cling-film’. These days, it’s much looser — which is all down to the diet he went on three years ago. In just eight weeks, Alan lost two stone. And he has since kept most of that weight off, even though he admits to being ‘no angel’. ‘Occasionally I’ll have takeaways, and wine, cheese and beer,’ he says. ‘But I put the shirt on every so often to see if it’s still loose, and as long as it is, I’m doing fine.’ Far more significant than the fit of his shirt, though, is the fact that Alan, who was diagnosed with diabetes shortly before he began the diet, has had normal blood sugar levels ever since. Yet he might still have had Type 2 diabetes today had he not been lucky enough to be one of 11 people recruited for a research trial at Ne Continue reading >>

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