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Oatmeal Recipes For Diabetics

Oatmeal And Diabetes: The Do’s And Don’ts

Oatmeal And Diabetes: The Do’s And Don’ts

Diabetes is a metabolic condition that affects how the body either produces or uses insulin. This makes it difficult to maintain blood sugar, which is crucial for the health of those with diabetes. When managing blood sugar, it’s important to control the amount of carbohydrates eaten in one sitting, since carbs directly affect blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association’s general recommendation for carb intake is to consume 45-60 grams per main meal, and 15-30 grams for snacks. It’s also important to choose nutrient-dense types of carbohydrates over refined and processed carbs with added sugar. This means that what you eat matters a great deal. Eating foods that are high in fiber and nutrients but low in unhealthy fat and sugar can help maintain a healthy blood sugar level, as well as improve your overall health. Oatmeal offers a host of health benefits, and can be a great go-to food for those with diabetes, as long as the portion is controlled. One cup of cooked oatmeal contains approximately 30 grams of carbs, which can fit into a healthy meal plan for people with diabetes. Oatmeal has long been a common breakfast food. Oatmeal is made of oat groats, which are oat kernels with the husks removed. It’s typically made of steel cut (or chopped), rolled, or “instant” oat goats. Oatmeal is cooked with liquid mixed in and is served warm, often with add-ins like nuts, sweeteners, or fruit. It can be made ahead and reheated in the morning for a quick and easy breakfast. Because oatmeal has a low glycemic index, it can help maintain glucose levels. This can be beneficial for people with diabetes, who especially need to manage their blood sugar levels. Oatmeal in its pure form may reduce the amount of insulin a patient needs. Oatmeal can also promote heart health, Continue reading >>

Easy Oat Chocolate Chips Cookies Recipe

Easy Oat Chocolate Chips Cookies Recipe

Ingredients 1/3 cup margarine, softened 1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar 1 egg 3 teaspoons vanilla 3/4 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon salt 3/4 cup quick-cooking rolled oats 1/3 cup semisweet chocolate chips Vegetable cooking spray Directions Preheat oven to 375°F. Beat margarine at medium speed with an electric mixer until light and fluffy; gradually add brown sugar and beat well. Add egg and vanilla, beating well. Combine flour, baking soda, and salt. Gradually add flour mixture to margarine mixture, mixing well. Stir in oats and chocolate chips. Coat cookie sheets with cooking spray. Using two teaspoons, drop dough onto cookie sheets, leaving about 2 inches between each cookie. Portion the dough so that you make about 3 dozen cookies. Bake 10 minutes or until lightly browned. Store in an airtight container. Yield: about 3 dozen. Serving size: 2 cookies. Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories: 101 calories, Carbohydrates: 14 g, Protein: 1 g, Fat: 4 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Sodium: 120 mg, Fiber: 1 g Exchanges per serving: 1 starch, 1 fat. Carbohydrate choices: 1. This recipe was developed by Nancy Cooper, a Contributing Editor of Diabetes Self-Management. Nancy is a Diabetes Nutrition Specialist at the International Diabetes Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

2 Blood Sugar Lowering Breakfasts That Taste Like Apple And Pumpkin Pie

2 Blood Sugar Lowering Breakfasts That Taste Like Apple And Pumpkin Pie

Imagine waking up to the soothing smell of fresh-baked apple or pumpkin pie...only it’s a hot breakfast cereal that helps stabilize your blood sugar and stave off hunger for hours. And all you have to do is scoop some into a bowl, top with some nuts and seeds, a bit of milk and your favorite fruit, and you’re good to go. Imagine no longer. Instead, try these easy scrumptious steel-cut oat recipes that cook overnight in a crockpot. And please tell me if you like them as much as I do. Breakfast Apple Pie Yield: 4 cups 2 cups water 2 cups milk of your choice 1 cup uncooked steel-cut oats ¾ teaspoon cinnamon, or to taste 2 apples, chopped into ½” pieces 2 tablespoons packed brown sugar, or sweetener of your choice 1 tablespoon coconut oil, or oil of your choice ½ teaspoon salt Spray the inside of a crockpot well with cooking spray. Add the water and milk. In a small bowl, stir together the steel-cut oats and cinnamon and add to the crockpot. Add the remaining ingredients and mix all together. Set crockpot on low, cover and cook overnight (about 6-7 hours). Stir before serving. Any leftovers keep in the refrigerator for about a week and are easy to reheat by moistening with a little water or milk. Serving size: 1/2 cup Calories: 150 Total fat (grams): 4 Sodium (mg): 170 Total carbohydrate (grams): 24 Sugars (grams): 7 Fiber (grams): 3 Protein (grams): 4 Breakfast Pumpkin Pie Yield: 4 ½ cups 2 cups water 2 cups milk of your choice 1 cup uncooked steel-cut oats ¾ cup canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie mix) ¼ cup packed brown sugar, or sweetener or your choice 1 ½ teaspoon cinnamon, or to taste 1 ½ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice, or to taste 1 teaspoon vanilla ½ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon coconut oil, or oil of your choice Spray the inside of a crockpot well with cookin Continue reading >>

Personal Sized Baked Oatmeal With Individual Toppings: Gluten Free & Diabetic Friendly

Personal Sized Baked Oatmeal With Individual Toppings: Gluten Free & Diabetic Friendly

Personal Sized Baked Oatmeal with Individual Toppings: Gluten Free & Diabetic Friendly Do you have picky family members? Do you make a meal and almost always one child is not as thrilled as the others because of one little ingredient you might have put into the recipe? Well that’s my family. If I make a large baked oatmeal in a 9 by 13 baking dish and add one type of fruit, like blueberries for instance, I have one child who will not eat it. If I make it with raisins which I love, none of my kids will eat it! And then there’s the hubby who wants nuts and the boys are allergic. So you see this recipe came out of a DEEP desire to please everyone in my family! So everyone will eat what I am putting in front of them for breakfast and I won’t have to make 3 different breakfasts (which I really hate to admit I have certainly done, shame on me I know! My original recipe began in a large baking dish as I mentioned, delicious for overnight guests, can be made ahead, wonderfully yummy! But freezing it was hard because I didn’t like the size of it in my freezer. I then used that same recipe to accommodate it in portion perfect muffin cups because I was often eating to much of this yummy breakfast. I guest posted that freezer friendly baked oatmeal and you can find it at Money Saving Mom. This is the third and final version I am super happy with because the toppings are what wins everyone over! I made 4 plain, 4 topped with walnuts and added some frozen blueberries in the batter for the hubby, 4 topped with chocolate chips for kiddies and 4 topped with raisins for me!! This recipe is completely free of added sugar and lower in calories as well! I think this finally fits our family to a tee so I think it will be perfect for you and yours as well! Enjoy! Additional Notes: Use Continue reading >>

Making Your Oats More Diabetic Friendly

Making Your Oats More Diabetic Friendly

Oats are a good old favourite and as the weather gets colder, we start moving away from our fruit and yoghurt or cereal, to warmer alternatives. Fond memories are waking up on those chilly mornings to the smell of oats and cinnamon. Oats are extremely versatile and can be eaten as a porridge, added to smoothies, muffins, bread, muesli or granola. WHY WE LOVE OATS Oats are high in vitamins, minerals and fibre. They contain mainly soluble fibre but also small amounts of insoluble fibre. Both of these types of fibre are needed for optimum gut health.1 Beta-Glucan is the soluble fibre found in oats and has been shown to: Lower cholesterol Control appetite Aid in weight management, as it keeps you fuller for longer.1,2 Whole oats contain antioxidants called Avenanthramides, they are believed to have protective effects against heart disease.1 As oats are a low GI (Glycaemic Index) food, they get broken down and absorbed into your blood more slowly, providing you with a source of long-term energy. Due to this fact, oats can help to control your blood sugar levels, and are therefore great for people with diabetes.1,2 Steel cut oats have the lowest GI, so choose steel cut oats where possible but note they take longer to cook so make sure you allocate enough time for cooking. Oats can be made ahead of time and reheated in the morning for a quick and healthy breakfast. Oats come in different forms due to the level of processing, which varies the cooking times. Whole grain oats are called oat groats. These oat groats are commonly rolled or crushed into flat flakes and lightly toasted to produce oat porridge. The quick or instant variety consists of oats that are more thinly rolled or cut, they absorb water more easily and therefore cook faster. Oat bran, which is the fibre-rich out Continue reading >>

Oats Recipe | Indian Oats Breakfast Recipe For Diabetics

Oats Recipe | Indian Oats Breakfast Recipe For Diabetics

oats recipe for diabetics. I am not a diabetic nor a gestational diabetic, still I eat this, it is delicious, nutritious and more like a chat that tickles the taste buds and make us long for more. This can be served anytime of the day for quick breakfast,brunch,lunch or dinner. It is a balanced food that has good amount of protein from green gram or moth bean, vitamin C from lemon juice and goodness from fresh veggies. You can find here a complete collection of diabetic recipes from this blog. This oats recipe is a generalized one suitable for most diabetics and gestational diabetics. However, there can be people whose blood sugar’s rise in spite of eating right, as their body needs medication, no matter how good and best they eat. So please monitor your blood sugar levels after 1 ½ to 2 hrs. Of consumption of these foods, to know whether it is suitable for you or can it still spike your BS levels. to make this oats recipe, all the ingredients are approximations only for you to get an idea. Adjust the quantity of the ingredients as per your body’s tolerance. A simple example can be Chapathi or Roti, is very well tolerated by some even when they eat 3, while for most even 1 ½ roti can give a spike. The same I have seen for whole milk, while some can easily manage even after drinking 2 servings of whole milk, while for some even a 200 ml can give a sudden spike. It all depends on your body’s hormones and metabolism. iam no expert in human medicine nor in nutrition and diet. I have tried to put my best, please take a dietitians opinion before you try the oats recipe, especially if you have gestational diabetes. I suggest you refer the web to find out the GI levels of the main ingredients and the kind of carbs they contain, to understand what is right for you. Pleas Continue reading >>

Baked Apple And Banana Oatmeal

Baked Apple And Banana Oatmeal

Upgrade your oatmeal with this baked version – made especially heart-healthy with the use of canola oil, which is rich in omega-3 fat and is a good source of vitamin E. You can substitute berries for the apple if you prefer. Ingredients 2 cups rolled oats 500 mL 1/2 Tbsp baking powder 7 mL 1 tsp cinnamon 5 mL 1/4 tsp salt 1 mL 1 apple, diced 1 banana, sliced 1 egg 1 cup skim milk 250 mL 3 Tbsp canola oil 45 mL 1/3 cup maple syrup or brown sugar 75 mL 3/4 tsp vanilla extract 4 mL canola oil cooking spray Instructions Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). In large bowl, mix together oats, baking powder, cinnamon and salt. Stir in apples and banana; set aside. In another bowl, whisk together egg, milk, canola oil, maple syrup or brown sugar and vanilla extract. Pour over dry mixture and gently stir to combine. Spray 8- x 8-inch (20- x 20-cm) baking dish with canola oil spray. Pour mixture into baking dish and bake for 45 minutes or until golden brown. Notes Serving size: 1/2 cup (125 mL) Recipe courtesy of canolainfo.org, featured in the Canadian Diabetes Association’s 2014 Healthy Living Calendar. To download the latest recipes, visit diabetes.ca/calendar. Calories 270 Total Fat 7 g Saturated Fat 0.5 g Cholesterol 25 mg Carbohydrates 33 g Fibre 3 g Sugars 15 g Protein 5 g Sodium 170 mg Potassium 182 mg Continue reading >>

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

Oatmeal For People With Diabetes

Oatmeal For People With Diabetes

The American Diabetes Association recommends whole grains, like oatmeal, as a good way to increase soluble fiber in the diet. Soluble fiber can help improve blood glucose control by slowing the absorption of sugar from the digestive system. Oatmeal can lower low density lipoprotein, or "bad" cholesterol, when it's consumed daily. People with diabetes have at least double the risk for heart disease, according to the American Heart Association, and lowering cholesterol is one way to help reduce the risk for heart disease. Video of the Day Benefits of Oatmeal A December 2013 article in "Forschende Komplementärmedizin/Research in Complementary Medicine" reported that eating oatmeal may help improve sensitivity to the blood-sugar-regulating hormone insulin in obese people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. Another study in the August 2012 issue of "Nutrition Journal" found that people who consumed oatmeal daily for 6 weeks, as part of a low-fat diet based on nutritious whole foods, decreased waist size by 1/2 inch and reduced LDL cholesterol by 15 mg/dL. The control group in this study ate wheat noodles instead of oatmeal and experienced a 1/3-inch gain in waist size. LDL cholesterol dropped by 7 mg/dL in the control group. Steel cut oats are the least processed and cook in about 45 minutes. Rolled oats are slightly processed to reduce cooking time, but they still contain the whole grain and cook in about 10 minutes. Quick-cooking oats cook in even less time. Instant oatmeal contains less fiber and often contains added sugar, although plain instant oatmeal without added sugar is available. One cup of cooked oatmeal contains about 27 g of carbohydrates. Healthy toppings include a sprinkle of chopped nuts, cinnamon, berries or other fruit and low-fat milk. Continue reading >>

3 Healthy, Balanced, And Filling Recipes For People With Diabetes

3 Healthy, Balanced, And Filling Recipes For People With Diabetes

Many people with diabetes reach for oatmeal to start their day. Why oatmeal? Because it is a good source of soluble fiber and also has a small amount of fat. As a component of a diabetes-friendly breakfast, these characteristics will help with both glucose and morning appetite control. Seasonal fruit or frozen fruit can be substituted in all recipes, but watch out for added sugar. These three recipes, as well as other breakfast ideas for diabetics, are well balanced, providing plenty of nutrition while never skimping on taste. Trail Mix Oatmeal 1/4 cup granola 8 pecan halves, chopped 2 tablespoons raisins Dash of cinnamon 1 cup cooked oatmeal Add granola, pecans, raisins, and cinnamon to a bowl of hot cooked oatmeal and stir. (444 calories, 9 grams fiber, 3 grams saturated fat) Berry Almond Crunch Oatmeal 1 cup fresh raspberries 6 almonds, chopped 1 cup cooked oatmeal 1 cup skim milk Add raspberries and almonds to a bowl of hot cooked oatmeal and stir. If raspberries seem tart or are not in season, consider adding a teaspoon of sugar substitute. Serve with a glass of skim milk. (395 calories, 14 grams fiber, 1 gram saturated fat) Banana Nut Oatmeal 1 small banana, diced 4 walnut halves, chopped 1 cup cooked oatmeal 1 cup skim milk Add banana and walnuts to a bowl of hot cooked oatmeal and stir. Serve with a glass of skim milk. (377 calories, 7 grams fiber, 1 gram saturated fat) Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Prevent dangerous blood sugar spikes with the help of these foods. Oatmeal Studies have shown that eating a diet rich in whole grains and high-fiber foods may reduce the risk of diabetes by between 35 and 42 percent. An excellent source of both is heart-healthy oatmeal: It’s packed with soluble fiber, which slows the absorption of glucose from food in the stomach — keeping blood-sugar levels under control. Top oatmeal with 1 to 2 tablespoons of chopped pecans, almonds, or walnuts to add protein and healthy fat, which stabilize blood sugars further. Plus, the nuts add great crunch and flavor to your morning meal. Continue reading >>

Oatmeal-blueberry Muffins: Diabetic Recipe

Oatmeal-blueberry Muffins: Diabetic Recipe

Serves 12 Ingredients 1 cup all purpose flour (1/2 cup whole-wheat, 1/2 cup white flour) 1 cup skim milk 3/4 cup uncooked regular oats 1 egg 1 tbsp baking powder 1/4 cup vegetable oil 2 tbsp sugar sub. (or equivalent of 2 tbsp reg. sugar) 1 cup fresh blueberries 1/2 tsp salt 1 vegetable cooking spray 1 tsp ground cinnamon Preparation Combine flour, oats, baking powder, sugar substitute, and salt in a medium bowl. Make a well in center of mixture. Combine milk, egg, and oil; add to dry ingredients, stirring just until moistened. Gently fold in blueberries. Spoon batter into muffin pans coated with cooking spray, filling two-thirds full. Sprinkle cinnamon over muffins, and bake at 425 F for 20 to 25 minutes or until lightly browned. Nutritional Information per Serving Calories: 127 Carbohydrate: 16 grams Protein: 3 grams Cholesterol: 26 milligrams Fat: 5 grams Sodium: 300 milligrams Food Exchanges 1 Starch 1 Fat Recipe from: All New Cookbook for Diabetics and Their Families by the University of Alabama at Birmingham Recipe reviewed by Dietitian Kimberly A. Tessmer, RD LD In the event that you find that this Oatmeal-Blueberry Muffin recipe is not appropriate for diabetics, please contact us and we will review your suggestions. Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes in many ways. As its alternate name of adult-onset diabetes implies, it is usually only found in adults. However, the rate of children acquiring the disease is going up. Type 2 diabetes is also known as non-insulin dependent diabetes due to the fact that, unlike type 1, insulin injections are not always required for treatment. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas either doesn't produce any insulin, or the insulin that is produced is not properly utilized. This is due to a condition known as insulin resist Continue reading >>

Cinnamon Raisin Oatmeal

Cinnamon Raisin Oatmeal

I have been compensated by Glucerna for this post; however, I am sharing my own thoughts. All opinions are my own. #SteadyIsExciting Diabetic Friendly Cinnamon Raisin Oatmeal – This easy to make breakfast recipe is a great way to start your day off right! Did you know that an estimated 29 million people in the United States suffer from type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million suffer from prediabetes? The good news is that while there can be severe complications associated with diabetes, their development isn’t a foregone conclusion. Keeping your glucose level within range is key to successful management. As a child, I remember being terrified when my Grandmother was diagnosed with diabetes. Being a traditional Southern cook, she had been overweight as long as I remembered. Over the course of the next months, I watched her change the way she ate and lose weight. She lived until I was in my late 20’s, and as far as I know diabetes never gave her any more trouble. The way she took control of her health and successfully managed her diabetes is still an inspiration to me today! Changing your diet is so important if you or someone you love has diabetes. The key is focusing on a diet that is high in fiber and full of fruits, vegetables, lean protein and whole grains. Careful attention is also critical for those with prediabetes. A recent study at the University of Colorado School of Medicine showed that those with pre-diabetes who brought their elevated glucose levels down to normal levels with diet and exercise were 56% less likely to progress to having diabetes. One product that can help you is Glucerna, which you can pick up at Target. It is the #1 Doctor recommended brand of nutritional products formulated for people with diabetes. Their products include Glucerna 6pk Continue reading >>

Oatmeal Orange Cookies (diabetes Friendly)

Oatmeal Orange Cookies (diabetes Friendly)

Introduction These cookies are packed full of whole grains and fiber to fill you up and keep you satisfied. They're great for snacks and suitable for those with diabetes! Ingredients 1/2 cup Smart Balance butter for baking, softened 1/4 cup granulated sugar 1/4 cup dark brown sugar, packed 1 egg white 1/4 cup applesauce, unsweetened 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour 1 cup old fashioned oats 1/3 cup wheat bran 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1 orange, zested and juiced 1 tablespoon orange juice Directions Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Place the butter in a medium mixing bowl. Cream the butter using an electric mixer. Slowly add the sugars and continue to mix for 2-3 minutes. Add the egg white and applesauce, and mix just to combine. Sift the dry ingredients together in a separate mixing bowl. Add to the wet ingredients, along with the juice and zest. Drop the dough one tablespoon at a time onto two cookie sheets lined with a silicone mat or parchment paper. Bake 10 minutes or until the bottom of the cookies are just browned. Cool on a wire rack. Serves 18 (2 cookies per serving). Continue reading >>

Quaker Oats For Breakfast, Diabetes For Lunch?

Quaker Oats For Breakfast, Diabetes For Lunch?

Sitting down to a bowl full of sugar every morning is a pretty surefire way to lead yourself to a whole host of metabolic derangements down the line, whether or not your waistline is showing it. Insulin dis-regulation not only leads to difficulty managing blood sugar, but also has a direct effect on the status of the other hormones in our bodies which are the way most of our body functions are managed. This is where the old saying, “you are what you eat” becomes a bit freaky when we're sitting down to a big bowl of cereal to start our days. I've already ranted about Kashi comparing it's GoLean Crunch Cereal to an egg, because that commercial was and is appalling. If you even took one minute to THINK about how those huge vats of grains and sweeteners arrive on a truck at a factory door before going through miles of machinery to be portioned out into bags and boxes of cereal, you might possibly pause to think about whether or not cereal is even FOOD. Or perhaps not. I know I didn't think much about it before maybe five or six years ago. I ate tons of cereal. With skim milk. Seriously. And I was hungry ALL the time. After seeing the latest commercial from Quaker where The Biggest Loser trainer Bob Harper pimps their Oatmeal Squares cereal as a “superfood,” I couldn't resist another little rant. I don't even have time to get into every last detail here about how sugar and grains (yes, even “whole grains”) negatively impact our blood sugar and our waist lines. If you aren't clear yet on how that all works, a tiny bit of research will turn up TONS of information on how a low-fat/high-carb USDA-recommended diet promotes dis-regulation of insulin secretions in your body leaving you hungry, craving more sugar, likely still fat (despite the caloric deficit you struggl Continue reading >>

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