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National Institute Of Diabetes And Digestive And Kidney Diseases Overweight And Obesity Statistics

Nutristrategy - Economic Costs Of Obesity And Rates Of Obesity And Overweight

Nutristrategy - Economic Costs Of Obesity And Rates Of Obesity And Overweight

Adult obesity rates rose in 28 states, according to a 2013 study. More than two-thirds of states (38) have adult obesity rates above 25%. The most obese states, with rates above 30%, are Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, West Virginia, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Kentucky and Arkansas. In 1991, no state had an obesity rate above 20 percent. The economic impact of obesity and overweight population in terms of illness, diseases and lost productivity is significant. Overweight and obesity costs total $147 billion in the United States. Direct costs include the cost of physicians and other professionals, hospital and nursing home services, the cost of medications, home health care and other medical durables. Indirect costs include lost productivity that results from illness and death. Over two-thirds of adults in the United States are overweight or obese (Body Mass Index > 25): Over one-third of adults age 20 and older are obese (BMI >30): Less than one-third of adults age 20 and older are at a healthy weight (BMI > 18.5 and < 25): Economic Costs of Obesity: As rates of overweight and obesity increase, there is a corresponding increase in health care costs. Based on 2008 data, average health care costs for obese people are 42% higher than normal weight people. Cost of obesity by insurance status for each obese beneficiary: Medicare pays $1,723 more than it pays for normal weight beneficiaries. Medicaid pays $1,021 more than it pays for normal weight beneficiaries. Private insurers pay $1,140 more than they pay for normal weight beneficiaries. Cost of obesity by the type of service provided: Medicare pays $95 more for an inpatient service, $693 more for a non-inpatient service, and $608 more for prescription drugs in comparison with normal weight patients. Medicaid pays $213 more fo Continue reading >>

Clinical Guidelines On The Identification, Evaluation, And Treatment Of Overweight And Obesity In Adults: The Evidence Report

Clinical Guidelines On The Identification, Evaluation, And Treatment Of Overweight And Obesity In Adults: The Evidence Report

Clinical Guidelines on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults: The Evidence Report Clinical practice guidelines are systematically developed statements to assist practitioner and patient decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances (Institute of Medicine, 1990). They define the role of specific diagnostic and treatment modalities in the diagnosis and management of patients. The statements contain recommendations that are based on evidence from a rigorous systematic review and synthesis of the published medical literature. National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in cooperation with the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Clinical Guidelines on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults: The Evidence Report [Internet]. 1998 Sep [cited 2013 Jan 17]. NIH Publication no. 98-4083. Available from: Effect Behavioral Change , Reduce Morbidity , Reduce Risk or Incidence of Disease or Condition , Public Health , Health Care , Clinical Practice , Informational & Educational , Secondary Prevention , Health Care Providers , Patients The Healthy People 2020 evidence-based resources identified have been selected by subject matter experts at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Each of the selected evidence-based resources has been rated and classified according to a set of specific criteria based, in part, on publication status, publication type, and number of studies. This classification scheme does no necessarily consider all dimensions of quality, such as statistical significance, effect size (e.g., magnitude of effect), meaningfulness of effect, additional effect over control, and study design ( Continue reading >>

Your Weight And Diabetes

Your Weight And Diabetes

Diabetes is a group of disorders characterized by chronic high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to the body's failure to produce any or enough insulin to regulate high glucose levels. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, which often occurs in children or adolescents, is caused by the body's inability to make insulin or type 2 diabetes, which occurs as a result of the body's inability to react properly to insulin (insulin resistance). Type 2 diabetes is more prevalent than type 1 diabetes and is therefore seen in roughly 90% of all diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes is predominantly diagnosed after the age of forty, however, it is now being found in all age ranges, including children and adolescents. The impact of diabetes goes beyond chronic hyperglycemia. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness (diabetic retinopathy), end stage kidney diseases (diabetic nephropathy) and non-traumatic lower extremity amputations (diabetic neuropathy) in working-age adults. People with diabetes are also two to four times more likely to experience cardiovascular complications and strokes. Diabetes and its related complications result in an estimated 200,000+ deaths each year, making diabetes one of the major causes of mortality in the U.S. In 2012, the NIH reported an estimated 29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the population) living with diabetes. Of these, an estimated 8.1 million persons were unaware that they had the disease. How does my weight relate to type 2 diabetes? There are many risk factors for type 2 diabetes such as age, race, pregnancy, stress, certain medications, genetics or family history, high cholesterol and obesity. However, the single best predictor of type 2 diabetes is overweight or obesity. Almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes a Continue reading >>

Obesity The New Epidemic

Obesity The New Epidemic

Dr. Carabin is the President and Medical Director of Womens Health Sciences Institute, Inc., a not-for-profit organization, located in Vero Beach, FL. United States is currently plagued by a new epidemic obesity. According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2000, 64 percent of American adults are either overweight or obese. Overweight refers to an excess of body weight compared to agreed upon standards. Obesity refers specifically to having an abnormally high proportion of body fat. [i] Obesity occurs when a person consumes more calories than are burned, resulting in the deposition of fat. There is no single cause of human obesity; several factors can be involved ranging from genetic, to behavioral, and physiological. Most methods in ascertaining the condition of being overweight or obesity are based on the relation between height and weight; others are based on measurements of body fat. The most commonly used method today for measuring overweight or obesity is the body mass index (BMI). BMI is a calculation based on height and weight, and it is not gender-specific. The mathematical formula for calculating the BMI is: Obesity is found worldwide. In the United States, overweight/obesity have become a problem over the last several decades, as demonstrated by their steadily increased prevalence affecting all ages, genders, and socioeconomic status. [ii] For example, the prevalence of obesity (BMI [iii] > 30) more than doubled from 13.3 to 30.9 percent between 1960 and 2000, while the prevalence of extreme (morbid) obesity (BMI > 40) increased from 2.9 to 4.7 percent between 1988 and 2000. [iv] Until recently, health care providers often relied on weight-for-height tables that have a range of acceptable weights for a person of a given hei Continue reading >>

Overweight And Obesity Epidemic In America Part Ii

Overweight And Obesity Epidemic In America Part Ii

Overweight and Obesity Epidemic in America Part II Suggested Citation: Garko, M.G. (2010, November). Overweight and obesity epidemic in America Part II: Obesity prevalence and trends among children and adolescents. Health and Wellbeing Monthly. Retrieved (insert month, day, year), from www.letstalknutrition.com . Overweight and Obesity Epidemic in America Part II: Obesity Prevalence and Trends Among Children and Adolescents The health of Americas youth is dangerously close to being in jeopardy. Many health practitioners, experts and researchers would contend that it is already in peril and representing a serious threat to the health of the nation. This pediatric concern for the nations youth is supported and evidenced by the increased prevalence of obesity and other chronic health conditions among children over recent decades. Specifically, the rate of increase of childhood chronic conditions (e.g., obesity, asthma,other physical conditions and behavior/learning problems) rose from 12.8% in 1994 to 26.6% in 2006 (see Van Cleave et al., 2010). While an increase in the prevalence of any chronic health condition among Americas youth merits attention, obesity among children and adolescents is of special importance because it is linked to other serious health conditions (e.g., insulin resistance/metabolic syndrome, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and early signs of heart disease), which are being diagnosed in children and adolescents. For example, in a recent study, obese children as young as three years of age were found to have elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is an inflammation marker and early warning sign of vascular damage leading to coronary heart disease, a condition from which adults typically suffer (Skinner et al., 2010). As Continue reading >>

Overweight & Obesity Statistics

Overweight & Obesity Statistics

This content describes the prevalence of overweight and obesity in the United States. Defining Overweight and Obesity A person whose weight is higher than what is considered as a normal weight adjusted for height is described as being overweight or having obesity.1 Fast Facts According to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2013–20142,3,4,5 More than 1 in 3 adults were considered to be overweight. More than 2 in 3 adults were considered to be overweight or have obesity. More than 1 in 3 adults were considered to have obesity. About 1 in 13 adults were considered to have extreme obesity. About 1 in 6 children and adolescents ages 2 to 19 were considered to have obesity. Using Body Mass Index (BMI) to Estimate Overweight and Obesity BMI is the tool most commonly used to estimate and screen for overweight and obesity in adults and children. BMI is defined as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared. For most people, BMI is related to the amount of fat in their bodies, which can raise the risk of many health problems. A health care professional can determine if a person’s health may be at risk because of his or her weight. The tables below show BMI ranges for overweight and obesity. Adults An online tool for gauging the BMIs of adults can be found at: Children and Adolescents BMI of Children and Adolescents Ages 2 to 19 BMI Classification At or above the 85th percentile on the CDC growth charts Overweight or obesity At or above the 95th percentile on the CDC growth charts Obesity (including extreme obesity) At or above 120 percent of the 95th percentile on the CDC growth charts Extreme obesity Children grow at different rates at different times, so it is not always easy to tell if a child is overweight. The CDC BMI gro Continue reading >>

Dangerous Liaisons: Obesity And Diabetes

Dangerous Liaisons: Obesity And Diabetes

Approximately 80% to 90% of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus are also obese. One can hardly discuss obesity without mentioning type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The association is so strong, it has given rise to a new termdiabesity. Approximately 80% to 90% of patients diagnosed with T2DM are also obese.1 While not fully accurate, the body mass index (BMI) is used to assess obesity. BMI is weight (kg)/height (m2) (Table 1). The statistics on obesity and diabetes are staggering (Table 2). According to the World Health Organization, obesity and T2DM are the biggest public health challenges in the 21st century,10 and obesitys prevalence continues to increase. In 2000, no single state had an obesity prevalence rate above 20%. By 2012, every state had a rate exceeding 20%, with Mississippi having the highest rate (34.6%) and Colorado having the lowest (21.5%).5 Both obesity and T2DM reduce life expectancy and quality of life.11 The causes of obesity and T2DM are similar: the convenience of fast food; a sedentary lifestyle and high calorie intake; and easy access to high-sugar drinks. Additionally, a genetic link for obesity has been established. Evidence from adoption studies indicates a high correlation between adoptees BMI and biological parents, but not with the adoptive parents. Genetics, however, account for a small variance in BMI, suggesting that environmental and lifestyle variables remain key contributors.8 The relationship between T2DM and obesity appears to be bidirectional. Obesity precedes T2DM, and T2DM may precede obesity. Weight gain is common among patients diagnosed with T2DM, but studies indicate obesity is more likely to precede T2DM.8,9 Metabolic syndrome is composed of a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, altered gluco Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Obesity: Twin Epidemics

Type 2 Diabetes And Obesity: Twin Epidemics

Overview Type 2 diabetes accounts for 95% of the 25.8 million diabetes cases in the U.S1 Obesity is a major independent risk factor for developing the disease, and more than 90% of type 2 diabetics are overweight or obese2 Modest weight loss, as little as 5% of total body weight, can help to improve type 2 diabetes in patients who are overweight or obese3 Metabolic and bariatric surgery may result in resolution or improvement of type 2 diabetes independent of weight loss4 Prevalence Diabetes affects 8.3% of the total U.S. population (25.8 million people)5 18.8 million people have been diagnosed 7 million people are unaware they suffer from the disease About 95% of the diabetes population has type 2 diabetes6 Increases in type 2 diabetes cases across the country associated with higher obesity rates and rising age of population7 More than one-third (35.7%) of adults are obese; rate nearly tripled between 1960-20109 While children and adolescents are increasingly being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, the CDC notes is it difficult to estimate the disease’s prevalence in this population because it can go undiagnosed for long periods of time10, 11 The rise in diabetes diagnoses is attributed to increasing childhood obesity rates, which have tripled since the 1980s, with approximately 17% (or 12.5 million) of children aged 2-19 suffering from obesity12 African-Americans and the elderly are disproportionately affected by diabetes13 18.7% of all African-Americans over twenty years old have diabetes, compared to 10.2% of whites 26.9% of Americans age 65 and older have diabetes, compared to 11.3% of adults over 20 Pre-Diabetes About 79 million Americans, or 35% of people 20 or older have pre-diabetes,14 while half of adults over 65 are affected by the disease15 Up to 70% of pati Continue reading >>

Why The Passive Approach To Obesity Cannot Continue

Why The Passive Approach To Obesity Cannot Continue

Why the Passive Approach to Obesity Cannot Continue Why the Passive Approach to Obesity Cannot Continue Why the Passive Approach to Obesity Cannot Continue The obesity epidemic is becoming more prevalent amongst our culture than ever before in history. Currently, almost 33% of the world population is overweight or obese. [1] Obesity is often a precursor to other health conditions like diabetes and cardiovascular disease and is also the second greatest risk factor for cancer after smoking. The rise in global obesity rates has been substantial and widespread, presenting a major public health epidemic all across the world. Many times, people who are suffering from obesity revert to trendy diet fads to try and lose weight quickly and these diets often leave them feeling frustrated and discouraged once they stop because the root cause of their issues with food have not been addressed and the weight quickly returns. Most of these short-term diets recommend portion control and calorie counting, and these are not substantial to maintaining weight-loss. Developing skills that prevent the person from using food as a coping mechanism, engaging in daily physical activity, and developing a consistent eating pattern with a low-fat and low-calorie diet are essential for those who are hoping to lose weight and maintain the weight loss. Establishing a vegan, plant-based diet has been shown to promote greater weight loss than typical low-fat diets and a study of a vegetarian diet in heart patients, used in combination with exercise and stress management, showed that these patients sustained weight loss over a 5-year period. [2] Here at Hippocrates Health Institute, we understand the importance of addressing the entire person throughout their healing journey; mind, body and spirit. We pr Continue reading >>

High Bmi Risk Factors And How To Help Prevent Obesity | Everyday Health

High Bmi Risk Factors And How To Help Prevent Obesity | Everyday Health

Obesity is a multifactorial disease, meaning that while some factors, like genetics, play a role in its development, there isn't a single cause. Peek at your doctors chart, and one of the first things you may see is your BMI,front and center. BMI or body mass index is a measure of your relative height and weight. The calculation, which uses both your weight and height, places people into an underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese category, and may be used as a measure to assess your risk for certain diseases. Heres How to Calculate Your BMI if Youre an Adult If youre an adult, you can calculate your BMI by taking your weight in pounds divided by your height in inches squared, multiplied by 703. ( 1 ) Or, you can check out the National Institutes of Healths BMI calculator or the Centers for Disease Controls (CDC) version . According to the CDC, here are the BMI ranges: ( 2 ) RELATED: Whats a Healthy BMI in Adults? Heres Everything You Need to Know Why You Should Care About Your BMI Calculation Why is BMI important, and how is it used? Doctors often apply BMI on an individual level, but where it is really useful is in population-based research, says Charlie Seltzer, MD , a weight loss specialist in Philadelphia. Dr. Seltzer does not use BMIin assessing his individual patients, because its not always useful information. For example, you can have a normal BMI but have low muscle and a lot of fat, which is an unhealthy state to be in. Or, you can be highly muscular, and thus inaccurately categorized as overweight according toBMI. ( 3 ) But its through BMI that we know how grave the statistics on obesity really are. About 70 percent of adults are overweight or obese, according to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. ( 4 ) Likewise, one in Continue reading >>

The Uks Current Obesity Rate & Future Predicted Rate

The Uks Current Obesity Rate & Future Predicted Rate

The UKs Current Obesity Rate & Future Predicted Rate The UKs Current Obesity Rate & Future Predicted Rate By Chris Jarratt of Bariquins (June 2016) Once again America has recorded an increase in their obesity rate. The US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released some data this week from its 2015 National Health Interview Survey. This shows that the obesity rate in America has risen 0.5% from the 2014 rate to 30.4% in 2015. Albeit a small increase, it is still heading in the wrong direction. Furthermore, the results are the self-estimated weight of those being interviewed. The rates could be even higher if the respondents have underestimated their weight, innocently or otherwise. Whether or not it is higher, Uncle Sam has a population nudging towards one obese person in every three people. And thats without any mention of people who are overweight but not obese. Referring to the stats produced by the US National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese. So, what about this side of the Atlantic? Things dont look quite as bad here -yet. Although in 2014, in England, 58% of women and 65% of men were classed as overweight or obese. Obesity prevalence had also increased from 15% in 1993 to 26% in 2014. So only a mere 1 in 4 people are obese in England. In Scotland, things are worse than England. In 2013, when statistics were gathered in the Scottish Health Survey, just under two-thirds (65%) of adults (aged 16 and over) were either overweight or obese while over a quarter (28%) were obese. Men were more likely than women to be overweight or obese; 69.2% versus 59.6%. In 2014, the Welsh Health Survey reported that Wales had 58% of the adult population were classified as overweight or obese, includ Continue reading >>

Overweight, Obesity, And Health Risk

Overweight, Obesity, And Health Risk

National Task Force on the Prevention and Treatment of Obesity Copyright 2000 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.2000 Arch Intern Med. 2000;160(7):898-904. doi:10.1001/archinte.160.7.898 More than half of adult Americans are overweight or obese, and public health recommendations call for weight loss in those who are overweight with associated medical conditions or who are obese. However, some controversy exists in the lay press and in the medical literature about the health risks of obesity. We review briefly the large body of evidence indicating that higher levels of body weight and body fat are associated with an increased risk for the development of numerous adverse health consequences. Efforts to prevent further weight gain in adults at risk for overweight and obesity are essential. For those whose present or future health is at risk because of their obesity and who are motivated to make lifestyle changes, a recommendation for weight loss is appropriate. Continue reading >>

Health Risks Of Being Overweight

Health Risks Of Being Overweight

Overweight and obesity may increase the risk of many health problems, including diabetes, heart disease, and certain cancers. If you are pregnant, excess weight may lead to short- and long-term health problems for you and your child. This fact sheet tells you more about the links between excess weight and many health conditions. It also explains how reaching and maintaining a normal weight may help you and your loved ones stay healthier as you grow older. What kinds of health problems are linked to overweight and obesity? Excess weight may increase the risk for many health problems, including type 2 diabetes high blood pressure heart disease and strokes certain types of cancer sleep apnea osteoarthritis fatty liver disease kidney disease pregnancy problems, such as high blood sugar during pregnancy, high blood pressure, and increased risk for cesarean delivery (C-section) How can I tell if I weigh too much? Gaining a few pounds during the year may not seem like a big deal. But these pounds can add up over time. How can you tell if your weight could increase your chances of developing health problems? Knowing two numbers may help you understand your risk: your body mass index (BMI) score and your waist size in inches. Body Mass Index The BMI is one way to tell whether you are at a normal weight, are overweight, or have obesity. It measures your weight in relation to your height and provides a score to help place you in a category: normal weight: BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 overweight: BMI of 25 to 29.9 obesity: BMI of 30 or higher For an online tool that will calculate your BMI score, see the Additional Links section. Waist Size Another important number to know is your waist size in inches. Having too much fat around your waist may increase health risks even more than having fat Continue reading >>

Eating Disorders | Chicago, Il | Lakeview Pediatrics

Eating Disorders | Chicago, Il | Lakeview Pediatrics

After hours fees may apply to visits scheduled after 5pm on the weekdays and to appointments scheduled on the weekends. The information contained in these topics is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, it is provided for educational purposes only. You assume full responsibility for how you choose to use this information. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider before starting any new treatment or discontinuing an existing treatment. Talk with your healthcare provider about any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Nothing contained in these topics is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment. Not a Substitute - The information and materials on this website and RemedyConnect's content (Including but not exclusive of: Illness/Symptoms, Is Your Child Sick? Medicine Dosages, Medical Conditions) should not be used as a substitute for the care and knowledge that your physician can provide to you. Supplement - The information and materials presented here in HouseCalls Online are meant to supplement the information that you obtain from your physician. If there is a disagreement between the information presented herein and what your physician has told you -- it is more likely that your physician is correct. He or she has the benefit of knowing your medical problems. Limitations - You should recognize that the information and materials presented here in HouseCalls Online have the following limitations, in comparison to being examined by your own physician: You can have a conversation with your doctor. Your doctor can perform a physical examination and any necessary tests. You could have an underlying medical problem that requires a physician to detect. If you're taking me Continue reading >>

Obesity

Obesity

Panel calls for improvements in research on natural experiments to combat the obesity epidemic - 01-MAY-2018 Details An independent panel convened by the National Institutes of Health outlined several recommendations to improve research to end the obesity epidemic, emphasizing the need for an expanded approach to obesity research. They note that additional methods are needed to assess obesity prevention interventions occurring at the community level.(National Institutes of Health (NIH), HHS) Prescribing Parks for Improved Health Outcomes: National ParkRx Day 2018 - 26-APR-2018 Details On National ParkRx Day this Sunday, April 29th, communities across the country will celebrate in local and national parks with events such as Walk with a Doc, Zumba in the Park, and Tai Chi to recognize the impact parks have on our health, particularly in combating preventable disease.(National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO)) Prevalence and Predictors of Overweight and Obesity Among Kenyan Women - 19-APR-2018 Details Overweight and obesity are associated with increased rates of chronic disease and death globally. In Kenya, the prevalence of overweight and obesity among women is high and may be growing. This study aimed to determine the national prevalence and predictors of overweight and obesity among women in Kenya.(Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), HHS) NIH is a key contributor to solving the obesity problem through scientific research on obesity prevention and treatment.(National Institutes of Health (NIH), HHS) Center for Health and Health Care in Schools (CHHCS) Details A nonpartisan policy, resource and technical assistance center with a history of developing school-connected strategies for better health and education outcomes for children. Continue reading >>

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