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Muscle Blood Sugar

[the Role Of Skeletal Muscle In The Regulation Of Glucose Homeostasis].

[the Role Of Skeletal Muscle In The Regulation Of Glucose Homeostasis].

1. Endokrynol Diabetol Chor Przemiany Materii Wieku Rozw. 2003;9(2):93-7. [The role of skeletal muscle in the regulation of glucose homeostasis]. (1)Grnolaskie Centrum Zdrowia Dziecka i Matki, Poradnia Diabetologiczna w Katowicach, Katowice, Poland. [email protected] Muscle tissue has been considered to be a major regulator of systemic glucosehomeostasis. Glucose normally provides energy sources for tissues of the body.Its uptake by muscle requires a secretion of insulin. The initial step of glucoseutilization requires the transport of glucose into the cells. Theinsulin-receptor complex stimulates the cellular uptake of glucose. In thewell-fed state muscle contains about 1% of its weight as glycogen. Because of itsmass, muscle contains almost four times as much glycogen as the liver. Muscleglycogen is not directly available as a source of blood glucose because musclelacks glucose-6-phosphatase. During muscular activity, glycogen is converted tolactate and then into blood glucose in the liver. Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose (sugar) Levels | Joslin Diabetes Center

Blood Glucose (sugar) Levels | Joslin Diabetes Center

Why Do Blood Glucose Levels Sometimes Go Up after Physical Activity? When you exercise your muscles need moreglucose to supply energy. In response, your liver increases the amount of glucose it releases into your bloodstream. Remember, however, that the glucose needs insulin in order to be used by your muscles. So if you do not have enough insulin available, your bloodglucose levels can actually increase right after exercise. Basically, stimulated by the demand from your exercising muscles, your body is pouringglucose into your bloodstream. If you do not have enough insulin available to "unlock the door" to your muscles, the glucose cannot get into your muscles to provide needed energy. The end result is thatglucose backs-up in your bloodstream, causing higher blood glucose readings. Consult your doctor before starting an exercise program. If you are over the age of 35 you may need a stress test. Check your blood sugar before and after exercise. Do not exercise if your blood sugar is over 250 mg/dl and you have ketones. If your blood sugar is over 250 but no ketones are present, follow these guidelines: Type 1: If blood sugars are 300 or more, test within 5-10 minutes of begining exercise. If your blood sugar is dropping, you may continue. If it is not dropping, stop exercising. Type 2: Do Not exercise if blood sugars are 400 or more Plan exercise to prevent low blood sugar reactions. Always carry a carbohydrate snack (juice, glucose tablets, etc.) with you. Find more information about physical activity and diabetes in Staying Healthy with Diabetes Physical Activity & Fitness available from the Joslin Online Store . Attention visitors from outside the US: You can easily convert US to non-US blood glucose levels by clicking here . Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of Cardiovascular Exercise For Blood Sugar Health

The Benefits Of Cardiovascular Exercise For Blood Sugar Health

The Benefits of Cardiovascular Exercise for Blood Sugar Health Exercise is important for all people who want to maintain a heathy body, but its particularly important for those with type 2 diabetes. Daily exercise, as well as following a healthy, low carb meal plan, should be part of your treatment plan so that you may maintain your blood glucose levels. Controlling your blood sugar levels so they consistently stay in the proper range is essential to prevent long-term complications such as kidney disease and nerve damage. How Exercise Benefits Blood Glucose Levels People with type 2 diabetes typically have too much glucose in their blood, because their body doesnt use insulin properly due to insulin resistance. Exercise has the ability to lower the amount of glucose in the blood. This is because our muscles can use that glucose without insulin when we exercise. This is incredible news and means that despite being insulin resistant, when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need (benefit 1) and in turn your blood glucose levels go down (benefit 2). In addition, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective, so you become less resistant and your cells use glucose much more effectively. Another amazing benefit of exercise is that it helps those with type 2 diabetes avoid heart problems, a typical long-term complication of the disease. Those with diabetes are more susceptible to developing blocked arteries arteriosclerosis which can lead to a heart attack.Exercise helps you maintain healthy lipid levels and improves the health of your blood vessels. The reason I exercise is for the quality of life I enjoy. Kenneth H. Cooper While exercise is incredibly important for your overall health, the truth is, many people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are overweigh Continue reading >>

Your Muscles Can 'taste' Sugar

Your Muscles Can 'taste' Sugar

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! It's obvious that the taste buds on the tongue can detect sugar. And after a meal, beta cells in the pancreas sense rising blood glucose and release the hormone insulinwhich helps the sugar enter cells, where it can be used by the body for energy. Now researchers have uncovered an unexpected mechanism of glucose sensing in skeletal muscles that contributes to the body's overall regulation of blood sugar levels. It's obvious that the taste buds on the tongue can detect sugar. And after a meal, beta cells in the pancreas sense rising blood glucose and release the hormone insulin -- which helps the sugar enter cells, where it can be used by the body for energy. Now researchers at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute have uncovered an unexpected mechanism of glucose sensing in skeletal muscles that contributes to the body's overall regulation of blood sugar levels. "We found that skeletal muscle cells have machinery to directly sense glucose -- in a certain sense it's like the muscles can taste sugar, too," said senior study author Jiandie Lin, a faculty member at the LSI, where his lab is located. This ability of muscles to sense blood glucose is a separate and parallel process that augments the insulin-driven response. Together they work as a rheostat to maintain steady glucose levels in the body, particularly after a meal, according to findings scheduled to be published May 4 in Molecular Cell. Continuing to develop this in-depth understanding of how the body self-regulates blood sugar at the molecular level could shed new light on obesity and diabetes, as well as point toward new therapeutic targets, said Zhuoxian Meng, the study's lead author and a research investigator in Lin' Continue reading >>

What Is Glucose?

What Is Glucose?

Glucose comes from the Greek word for "sweet." It's a type of sugar you get from foods you eat, and your body uses it for energy. As it travels through your bloodstream to your cells, it's called blood glucose or blood sugar. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose from your blood into the cells for energy and storage. People with diabetes have higher-than-normal levels in their blood. Either they don't have enough insulin to move it through or their cells don't respond to insulin as well as they should. High blood glucose for a long period of time can damage your kidneys, eyes, and other organs. How Your Body Makes Glucose It mainly comes from foods rich in carbohydrates, like bread, potatoes, and fruit. As you eat, food travels down your esophagus to your stomach. There, acids and enzymes break it down into tiny pieces. During that process, glucose is released. It goes into your intestines where it's absorbed. From there, it passes into your bloodstream. Once in the blood, insulin helps glucose get to your cells. Energy and Storage Your body is designed to keep the level of glucose in your blood constant. Beta cells in your pancreas monitor your blood sugar level every few seconds. When your blood glucose rises after you eat, the beta cells release insulin into your bloodstream. Insulin acts like a key, unlocking muscle, fat, and liver cells so glucose can get inside them. Most of the cells in your body use glucose along with amino acids (the building blocks of protein) and fats for energy. But it's the main source of fuel for your brain. Nerve cells and chemical messengers there need it to help them process information. Without it, your brain wouldn't be able to work well. After your body has used the energy it needs, the leftover glucose is stored in little bundles Continue reading >>

Muscle Mass

Muscle Mass

The amount of skeletal muscle in the body. The ratio of a person’s muscle mass to the total body weight is called the skeletal muscle index. In response to insulin, skeletal muscle uses glucose in the bloodstream for energy, and research has shown that for every 10% increase in the skeletal muscle index, there is an 11% reduction in insulin resistance (a condition in which more insulin is needed to control blood glucose levels) and a 12% reduction in the risk of prediabetes (a borderline condition in which a person’s blood glucose level is higher than normal but not high enough to be considered diabetic). People tend to lose muscle mass as they age, and those with diabetes tend to lose muscle mass faster than nondiabetic individuals of the same age. Fortunately, strength exercises can increase muscle mass and improve blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. In addition to regular aerobic exercise, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends regular strength training at least two times a week for people with diabetes. According to ADA, strength training activities include using free weights or weight machines at a fitness facility, using resistance bands, lifting light objects in the home such as canned goods and water bottles and engaging in exercises that use your own body weight, such as push-ups, sit-ups and squats. Want to learn more about using exercise to help manage diabetes? Read “Increasing Insulin Sensitivity,” “Making Exercise More Fun,” and “Picking the Right Activity to Meet Your Fitness Goals.” Continue reading >>

10 Reasons Why Your Blood Glucose Is Going High During Exercise

10 Reasons Why Your Blood Glucose Is Going High During Exercise

High blood sugar is one of the biggest hurdles to improving health, getting in shape and performing well. In this article, I discuss 10 of the biggest reasons why blood glucose levels tend to go high in people living with diabetes during exercise. Please bear in mind that Type 1 and 2 diabetes are different and need to be managed differently. Key factors include; the type of medication, physical activity levels, training volume, muscle mass, other illnesses and susceptibility to life stress. You simply don’t have enough insulin in your bloodstream to facilitate the transport of glucose into target tissues. As a result, your blood glucose levels remain high, increasing the risk of ketoacidosis which exacerbates hyperglycemia. This may be due to missing a dose, eating too many carbs or uncontrolled glucose production from your liver during times of stress. Fix. Administer appropriate amounts of insulin or other diabetic medication specific to your abnormal blood glucose level. Only do this under the close guidance and monitoring of a professional health care team. 2. Prolonged Pump disconnect. Similar to above. Lack of insulin in the blood stream means only one thing for the individual deficient in insulin. High blood glucose. Fix. Ensure you pump is well connected at all time, especially if you’ve spent the day doing manual labor. Be mindful that wearing an exercise belt, for powerlifting and bodybuilding purposes can lead to pump discomfort and disconnect during training, consequently leading to high blood glucose. 3. Malfunctioning needles. If your needle fails to work, you won’t be able to administer insulin accurately, or even at all. Fix. Test needle function by squirting out a few units of insulin. If it’s jammed. Replace it immediately. Always carry spares Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Symptoms: How High Blood Sugar Affects The Body - Health

High Blood Sugar Symptoms: How High Blood Sugar Affects The Body - Health

Glucose, or sugar, is the fuel that powers cells throughout the body. Blood levels of this energy source ebb and flow naturally, depending what you eat (and how much), as well as when you eat it. But when something goes wrongand cells aren't absorbing the glucosethe resulting high blood sugar damages nerves, blood vessels, and organs, setting the stage for dangerous complications. Normal blood-sugar readings typically fall between 60 mg/dl and 140 mg/dl. A blood test called a hemoglobin A1c measures average blood sugar levels over the previous three months. A normal reading is below 5.7% for people without diabetes . An excess of glucose in the bloodstream, or hyperglycemia, is a sign of diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes dont make insulin, the hormone needed to ferry sugar from the bloodstream into cells. Type 2 diabetes means your body doesnt use insulin properly and you can end up with too much or too little insulin. Either way, without proper treatment, toxic amounts of sugar can build up in the bloodstream, wreaking havoc head to toe. Thats why its so important to get your blood sugar levels in check. If you keep glucose levels near normal, you reduce the risk of diabetes complications, says Robert Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association. Heres a rundown of the major complications and symptoms of high blood sugar. Often, high blood sugar causes no (obvious) symptoms at all, at least at first. About 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, but one in four has no idea. Another 86 million have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes . That's why its a good idea to get your blood sugar tested if you are at risk for diabetes. That includes people who are overwei Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Exercise Tip: Add Weight Training To Your Routine

A Diabetes Exercise Tip: Add Weight Training To Your Routine

A Diabetes Exercise Tip: Add Weight Training to Your Routine Weight training with diabetes can lead to better blood sugar control and a reduced risk of complications, among other health benefits. Here's how to incorporate this type of exercise into your routine. Medically Reviewed by Bhargavi Patham, MD Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Weight training helps guard against many potential complications of diabetes. Research has established the benefits of regular aerobic exercise: Running, swimming, and biking all can reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer, and yes diabetes, according to the National Institutes of Health. But now scientists believe that people with diabetes can benefit from a regular weight, or strength, training routine as well. In fact, the American Diabetes Association recommends that all people, even those without chronic illness, strength train at least twice a week. Not only can lifting weights help improve type 2 diabetes symptoms, but when part of a workout plan that includes aerobics, it can put you on the path to long-term good health. Diabetes is marked by the body's inability to process glucose and use insulin efficiently, but strength training can help with those issues. Here's how: You can experience an increase in lean muscle mass, which boosts your base metabolic rate and causes you to burn calories at a faster rate. "Burning these calories helps keep your blood glucose levels in check," notes Sherin Joseph, MPH, health education manager at Montefiore Health System'sWilliamsbridge Family Practice Center in the Bronx, New York. The ability of your muscles to store glucose increases with your strength, mak Continue reading >>

Effects Of Low Blood Sugar On The Body

Effects Of Low Blood Sugar On The Body

The Effects of low blood sugar on the Body Every cell in your body needs sugar (glucose) to function. When your blood sugar levels drop too low, your cells become starved for energy. Initially, that can cause minor symptoms, but if you don’t get your blood sugar levels up soon, you’re at risk of serious complications. When your blood sugar (glucose) levels fall below the normal range, it’s called hypoglycemia, or insulin shock. Low blood sugar can happen when you skip a meal. It can also happen if your pancreas releases more insulin than it should after you’ve eaten. The most common reason for low blood sugar is diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas can no longer produce insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough, or your body can’t use it properly. To keep blood sugar levels from rising too much (hyperglycemia), you need the right amount of insulin. With insufficient insulin, your blood sugar levels rise. Too much, and your blood sugar levels can plummet. Another possible cause of low blood sugar is drinking too much alcohol, especially on an empty stomach. This can interfere with the liver’s ability to release stored glucose into your bloodstream. Hepatitis and other problems with your liver can also lead to low blood sugar. Other causes include kidney disorders, anorexia nervosa, a pancreatic tumor, or adrenal gland disorders. There are a variety of symptoms of low blood sugar, but the only way to be sure what your blood glucose levels are is by taking a blood glucose test. Generally, blood sugar levels below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) are considered too low, according to the American Diabetes Association. If you have diabetes, it’s important to monitor your blood sugar levels often. Low blood sugar can come on quickly Continue reading >>

Lift Weights To Lower Blood Sugar? White Muscle Helps Keep Blood Glucose Levels Under Control

Lift Weights To Lower Blood Sugar? White Muscle Helps Keep Blood Glucose Levels Under Control

Lift weights to lower blood sugar? White muscle helps keep blood glucose levels under control Share on: Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn ANN ARBORResearchers in the Life Sciences Institute at the University of Michigan have challenged a long-held belief that whitening of skeletal muscle in diabetes is harmful. In fact, the white muscle that increases with resistance training, age and diabetes helps keep blood sugar in check, the researchers showed. In addition, the insights from the molecular pathways involved in this phenomenon and identified in the study may point the way to potential drug targets for obesity and metabolic disease. We wanted to figure out the relationship between muscle types and body metabolism, how the muscles were made, and also what kind of influence they have on diseases like type 2 diabetes, said Jiandie Lin, Life Sciences Institute faculty member and associate professor at the U-M Medical School. Lins findings are scheduled to be published online April 7 in Nature Medicine. Much like poultry has light and dark meat, mammals have a range of muscles: red, white and those in between. Red muscle, which gets its color in part from mitochondria, prevails in people who engage in endurance training, such as marathon runners. White muscle dominates in the bodies of weightlifters and sprinterspeople who require short, intense bursts of energy. Most people are in the middle and have a mix of red and white, Lin said. When you exercise, nerves signal your muscles to contract, and the muscle needs energy. In response to a signal to lift a heavy weight, white muscles use glycogen to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP)energy the cells can use to complete the task. While this process, called glycolysis, can produce a lot of power for a sh Continue reading >>

How Resistance Training Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Resistance Training Affects Your Blood Sugar

If you regularly do cardio (like running, swimming, dancing etc.), you have probably noticed that your blood sugar reacts differently depending on the type of cardio. While steady-state cardio will usually make your blood sugar drop, interval training can make it increase (you can read why in this post). The same goes for resistance training. Some types of resistance training will make your blood sugars increase! In this post, I’ll talk about how different types of resistance training affects your blood sugar and the strategies you can try to proactively manage your blood sugar during and after resistance training. I absolutely love resistance training for three simple reasons: Resistance training makes me feel strong and empowered. Resistance training has helped me shape my body to my liking. Resistance training ultimately makes my diabetes easier to manage, as it improves my body’s ability to utilize insulin. Resistance training generally falls into two categories Low-rep (heavy) training with pauses between each set. High-rep training or supersets with little rest between sets. Your heart rate is elevated throughout the workout. Each type of resistance training will affect my blood sugar a little differently during my workouts but they both have the same long-term benefit of a significantly improved insulin sensitivity. How high-rep workouts affect my blood sugar In general, I need to be a little more careful and watch my sugars more closely if I do high rep workouts, supersets, or a lot of compound leg exercises (like squats, deadlifts, or lunges). These kinds of workouts will have a cardio-like (aerobic) impact on my blood sugar since my heart rate will be elevated for most of the session and I can expect my blood sugars to drop. I treat sessions like these alm Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar After Exercise | Joslin Diabetes Center

Low Blood Sugar After Exercise | Joslin Diabetes Center

Why Is My Blood Glucose Sometimes Low after Physical Activity? Low blood glucose is defined as a blood glucose level below 70 mg/dl if your meter measures whole blood, or 80 mg/dl or below if it measures plasma glucose (a plasma blood glucose of 90 mg/dl or below with symptoms is also a sign of hypoglycemia). One of the most common causes of low blood glucose is too much physical activity. In fact, moderate to intense exercise may cause your blood glucose to drop for the next 24 hours following exercise. This post-exercise hypoglycemia is often referred to as the "lag effect" of exercise. Basically, when you exercise, the body uses two sources of fuel, sugar and free fatty acids (that is, fat) to generate energy. The sugar comes from the blood, the liver and the muscles. The sugar is stored in the liver and muscle in a form called glycogen. During the first 15 minutes of exercise, most of the sugar for fuel comes from either the blood stream or the muscle glycogen, which is converted back to sugar. After 15 minutes of exercise, however, the fuel starts to come more from the glycogen stored in the liver. After 30 minutes of exercise, the body begins to get more of its energy from the free fatty acids. As a result, exercise can deplete sugar levels and glycogen stores. The body will replace these glycogen stores but this process may take 4 to 6 hours, even 12 to 24 hours with more intense activity. During this rebuilding of glycogen stores, a person with diabetes can be at higher risk for hypoglycemia. Here are tips for safe exercising. Guidelines for preventing exercise related hypoglycemia Check your blood glucose before exercising to make sure your blood glucose is sufficient and/or consume an appropriate snack. Avoid exercise at the peak of your insulin action. Avoid Continue reading >>

How Does Building Muscle Help Lower Blood Sugar? | Healthy Bones, Joints & Muscles - Sharecare

How Does Building Muscle Help Lower Blood Sugar? | Healthy Bones, Joints & Muscles - Sharecare

How does building muscle help lower blood sugar? Muscle isn't just for football players, bouncers, and souped-up cars. Everyone benefits from adding some muscle to their body; in fact, adding some muscle will help lower your levels of blood sugar. The more muscle you have, the more you increase insulin receptivitythat is, the process by which insulin transports glucose (sugar) into your cells. (Insulin is a hormone that regulates the amount of glucose in the blood.) Furthermore, if you gain more muscle and lose weight, you change the chemistry of your cell membranes so that you can absorb glucose throughout your body, rather than having it stay in your blood. You add muscle by doing strength exercises. Good nutrition -- especially calcium and vitamin D -- is very important to healthy bones and muscles, as is regular exercise and keeping weight under control. This lifestyle is especially important in childhood and teen years, whe... n bone strength is developing most rapidly -- and can help prevent osteoporosis (brittle bones), fractures, and painful osteoarthritis (degenerative joints) later in life. Parts of the Musculoskeletal System Exercise & Muscles Diet - Bones & Joints Exercise & Bone Strength Functions of Muscles Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. Good nutrition -- especially calcium and vitamin D -- is very important to healthy bones and muscles, as is regular exercise and keeping weight under control. This lifestyle is especially important in childhood and teen years, when bone strength is develop Continue reading >>

Some Of Our Muscles Can Taste Sugar

Some Of Our Muscles Can Taste Sugar

A new study uncovers an unexpected mechanism of glucose sensing in skeletal muscles that contributes to the bodys overall regulation of blood sugar levels. Its well known that our taste buds can detect sugar. And after a meal, beta cells in the pancreas sense rising blood glucose and release the hormone insulinwhich helps the sugar enter cells, where the body can use it for energy. We found that skeletal muscle cells have machinery to directly sense glucosein a certain sense its like the muscles can taste sugar, too, says senior study author Jiandie Lin, a faculty member at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute. This ability of muscles to sense blood glucose is a separate and parallel process that augments the insulin-driven response. Together they work as a rheostat to maintain steady glucose levels in the body, particularly after a meal, according to findings published in the journal Molecular Cell . Continuing to develop an understanding of how the body self-regulates blood sugar at the molecular level could shed new light on obesity and diabetes, as well as point toward new therapeutic targets, says lead author Zhuoxian Meng, a research investigator in Lins lab. The researchers were able to examine the contributions of the glucose-sensing pathway in skeletal muscle by silencing a key geneBAF60Cin cell cultures and in laboratory mice. When we did that, the mice lacking BAF60C looked absolutely normal, but after we gave them a high-fat diet to induce obesity, they developed trouble disposing of the additional glucose after a meal, Lin said. The well-known insulin mechanism was not sufficient to process the glucose on its own. Elevated blood sugar following a meal is a key symptom of type 2 diabetes. And chronic high blood sugar, also known hyperglycemia, Continue reading >>

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