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Minority Diabetes Prevention Program

Through Reach, Cdc Addresses Health Gaps In Minority Populations

Through Reach, Cdc Addresses Health Gaps In Minority Populations

Through REACH, CDC Addresses Health Gaps in Minority Populations The future of overall health for Americans will be determined in large part by how effectively health organizations and communities address the complex issues that contribute to a persistent gap among minority ethnic and racial populations. Often driven by cultural, social, environmental, community and individual factors, these disparities account for a disproportionate burden of disease, disability and death for a sizeable portion of the U.S. population. Reconciling health disparities that fall along racial or ethnic lines requires a dedicated effort to unite, educate and empower members of communities that are most heavily impacted. Administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) , Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) is a national program aimed at achieving health equity. Driven by the philosophy that every individual deserves the chance to attain his or her full health potential, REACH partners with various organizations that implement community-based programs and culturally tailored intervention s serving African Americans, American Indians, Hispanics/Latinos, Asian Americans, Alaska Natives and Pacific Islanders. Through initiatives at the community level, REACH partners work to identify, develop and share evidence- or practice-based strategies to address a range of high-priority health issues, including heart disease, diabetes, infant mortality, asthma, immunization, obesity and breast and cervical cancers. Through these partnerships, communities served by REACH have demonstrated health and behavior-related improvements connected to these issues. For example, efforts to engage and educate Latino communities across New England have helped eliminate health dis Continue reading >>

Winston-salem State University Gets Grant For Diabetes-prevention Program

Winston-salem State University Gets Grant For Diabetes-prevention Program

Winston-Salem State University gets grant for diabetes-prevention program Winston-Salem State University has received a $385,000 grant for a program at its School of Health Sciences. The money will be used to carry out a two-year diabetes-prevention program for high-risk, low-income communities, the university said. The money comes from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities and is designed to create a network of health-care intervention programs through historically black colleges and universities. HBCUs are typically located within communities that are at high risk for chronic disease, said Melicia Whitt-Glover, who will be the co-project investigator. Through this grant, we will research how HBCU faculty and students can become partners to provide interventions to prevent and treat chronic diseases, such as diabetes, in the communities they serve, Whitt-Glover said. The grant is designed to focus on assessing and identifying the barriers to diabetes-prevention intervention in low-income, high-risk communities; to develop a curriculum for training HBCU students to facilitate methods for intervention of chronic diseases in these communities; and to explore the possibility of expanding to other HBCUs, according to Winston-Salem State University. According to Whitt-Glover, who is the director of the WSSU Center for Excellence for the Elimination of Health Disparities, the neighborhoods surrounding the university have more than 50 percent of the racial and ethnic minority and low-income residents within Forsyth County. Chronic disease, including diabetes and related poor health behaviors, are among the highest in the county. Initial research will be through WSSU and Wake Forest University Health Sciences. Through the grant, students will also ge Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention In Michigan

Diabetes Prevention In Michigan

At the Michigan Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, we work with partners across the state to educate and inform the public and health care providers about the facts on diabetes prevention and provide links to resources. The Michigan Diabetes Prevention Action Plan, 2016-2018 represents best thinking of public health professionals and interested citizens concerned about the burden of diabetes and prediabetes within our state. The plan includes three strategic areas of focus and targeted goals and objectives to reduce the burden of prediabetes in Michigan. For more information, contact Tamah Gustafson at [email protected] What is prediabetes? Who is at high risk? Prediabetes is a condition where people have a blood glucose level slightly higher than normal, but not yet considered diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes can be prevented! Research shows that people with prediabetes and those at high risk could significantly reduce their risk of diabetes by making modest lifestyle changes–lose 5-7% body weight and be physically active at least 150 minutes a week (at least 5 days, 30 minutes of moderate physical activity). Just making these changes for life, goes a long way to lower risk of diabetes. Some other risk factors for diabetes are: being over overweight or obese, not physically active, older than 45 years, having family history or a history of gestational diabetes. Learn your risk by taking this simple test or Take the Quiz at cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/ (on right side of page) What is the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)? The good news is that people with prediabetes may delay the onset of type 2 diabetes and possibly return their blood glucose levels to normal by participating in a national program called the National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP). This e Continue reading >>

Culturally Targeted Strategies For Diabetes Prevention In Minority Populations: A Systematic Review And Framework

Culturally Targeted Strategies For Diabetes Prevention In Minority Populations: A Systematic Review And Framework

Culturally Targeted Strategies for Diabetes Prevention in Minority Populations: A Systematic Review and Framework 1Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA 2VA Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI 1Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA 2VA Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI 1Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA 2VA Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI 1Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA 2VA Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI 3University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Corresponding Author: Pooja Lagisetty, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, NCRC 2800 Plymouth Road, Bldg 14-Room G100-36, University of Michigan, [email protected] , Fax; 734-647-3301, Phone 734-647-4844 The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Diabetes Educ The purpose of this study is to (a) assess the effectiveness of culturally tailored diabetes prevention interventions in minority populations and (b) develop a novel framework to characterize four key domains of culturally tailored interventions. Prevention strategies specifically tailored to the culture of ethnic minority patients may help reduce the incidence of diabetes. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and CINAHL for English-language, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-experimental (QE) trials testing culturally tailored interventions to prevent diabetes in minority populations. Two reviewers independ Continue reading >>

An Adaptation Of The Diabetes Prevention Program For Use With High-risk, Minority Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

An Adaptation Of The Diabetes Prevention Program For Use With High-risk, Minority Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

An adaptation of the diabetes prevention program for use with high-risk, minority patients with type 2 diabetes. The Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo (Dr Cramer, Dr Sibley, Dr Bartlett, Dr Kahn) Kaleida Health, Buffalo, New York (Ms Loffredo) The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effectiveness of an edited Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) Lifestyle Resources Core Teaching Plan for managing patients with type 2 diabetes in an urban underserved setting. Modifications were made to attempt to cut to the bare essentials to work within the constrained budgets of safety net providers. The primary aim was to achieve a mean absolute reduction in HbA1c level of 1 percentage point. The authors conducted a randomized controlled trial of 9 months' duration for patients with type 2 diabetes with an HbA1c>or=8.0%. A total of 67 patients randomized into usual-care and case management groups were evaluated with an intention-to-treat analysis. A modified DPP workbook was used during 7 monthly visits with a nurse case manager. As compared with the usual-care group, those in the case management group experienced a greater reduction in HbA1c level (-1.87 vs -0.54; P=.011) and weight (-2.47 kg vs +0.88 kg; P=.011). Use of an edited version of the DPP workbook in an urban, low-income, minority population with type 2 diabetesproduced a significant absolute reduction in HbA1c percentage and weight. Continue reading >>

Community And Clinical Connections For Prevention And Health Branch

Community And Clinical Connections For Prevention And Health Branch

Kamaria Mason serves as the Minority Diabetes Prevention Program Specialist with the Community and Clinical Connections for Prevention and Health Branch. Her background is in public health nutrition, and she is passionate about reducing health disparities among child and minority populations through community and faith-based interventions. She completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Michigan with a concentration on Women's studies and a has a Master of Science degree focused on Biomedical Sciences from Barry University. After graduation, Kamaria worked on several research projects in Downtown Detroit including an asthma management program for adolescents and a high-risk pregnancy intervention. Prior to joining the Division of Public Health, Kamaria worked as a Project Manager for the Children's Health Weight Research group at the UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease prevention. In 2013 she returned to school and completed the UNC Coordinated Masters of Public Health Nutrition and Dietetics program. Kamaria is a Registered Dietitian who advocates for healthy eating and diabetes self-management with experience working with children and adolescents with diabetes. In addition to serving as the Minority Diabetes Prevention Program Specialist, she is a nutrition blogger and enjoys working on several projects that promote healthy eating and increased physical activity in her community. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention And Control For Minorities | Health Power

Diabetes Prevention And Control For Minorities | Health Power

Diabetes Prevention and Control for Minorities Diabetes is a condition in which a persons blood glucose, which is also called blood sugar, is too high. Although the blood normally has some glucose in it to supply energy, when the blood glucose gets too high, its not good for the persons health. The blood glucose gets too high when one of two things happens: Type 1 Diabetes The body doesnt make enough insulinto metabolize glucose, which makes energy (Metabolism is a chemical process). Type 2 Diabetes The body doesnt use insulin properlyalthough the body makes enough insulin. Gestational Diabetes This third major type of diabetes occurs during pregnancy, or gestation, which is how it got its name. Following is a further description of these three types of diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes used to be called juvenile diabetes, and insulin-dependent diabetes for two reasons: It usually starts in childhood, adolescence or young adulthood, and People with Type 1 diabetes have to take insulin every day since their bodies dont make enough.Insulin is a hormone or chemical thats made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The pancreas then releases insulin in the blood as needed in order to help the glucose get into the bodys cells to produce energy. The focus of treatment for Type 1 Diabetes: weight control by eating wisely and staying physically active blood pressure control (Many people with diabetes have hypertension or high blood pressure) blood cholesterol control (Its important not to let the bad cholesterol level get too high) keeping medical appointments (diabetes is a chronic disease that requires ongoing care) Type 2 Diabetes, used to be called non-insulin dependent diabetes, and also adult onset diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common type. It occurs in about 9 out Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Part Of The Wisconsin Chronic Disease Prevention Program

Diabetes: Part Of The Wisconsin Chronic Disease Prevention Program

Diabetes in Wisconsin Diabetes is a costly, complex, and devastating chronic illness that poses a major public health problem. Approximately 356,000 adults and 6,500 children and adolescents in Wisconsin have been diagnosed with diabetes.1,2,3 It is estimated that an additional 138,000 have diabetes but are undiagnosed.4 Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in Wisconsin, incurring an estimated $3.9 billion annually in health care and lost productivity costs.5 Each year, more than 1,300 Wisconsin residents die from diabetes and many more suffer disabling complications such as heart disease, kidney disease, blindness, and amputations.6 This burden is higher among minority populations. Much of the health and economic burden of diabetes can be averted through known prevention measures. Nearly 4 out of 10 Wisconsin adults has prediabetes. Modest behavior changes can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in people who have prediabetes. 2 out of 5 Wisconsin adults are expected to develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Diabetes causes high blood glucose (blood sugar) levels that can lead to serious health problems. Diabetes and the Wisconsin Chronic Disease Prevention Program The Wisconsin Chronic Disease Prevention Program (CDPP) works with health systems, health care providers, insurers, and professional organizations across the state to support a healthier Wisconsin by improving the prevention and management of diabetes. With funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the CDPP manages several projects to enhance coordinated systems of care, promote clinical best practices, and support patient self-care and health literacy. Increasing use of diabetes self-management programs and chronic disease self-management programs in communit Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Programs For Hispanics

Diabetes Prevention Programs For Hispanics

Diabetes prevention programs for Hispanics Significant health disparities exist in the Hispanic community compared with their non-Hispanic counterparts in the United States. In terms of diabetes, specifically, recent data from the CDC indicate that Hispanics are 65% more likely to have diabetes, 55% more likely to be diagnosed with end-stage renal disease and 45% more likely to die of diabetes. The health care challenge posed by these statistics becomes even more alarming because Hispanics are one of the fastest growing ethnic groups in the United States and may constitute 30% of the population by 2060. Besides these disparities around diabetes diagnoses and outcomes, the Hispanic population is also at greater risk for prediabetes. Based on fasting glucose or HbA1c levels, it is estimated that nearly 38% of Hispanics aged 20 years or older have prediabetes. It seems as if a Hispanic diabetes time bomb is waiting to explode unless culturally sensitive and targeted interventions are developed and implemented in this community to improve diabetes awareness and emphasize its prevention. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases was working with a budget of nearly $2 billion for fiscal year 2016, and a large portion of this amount generally funds development of community-based diabetes programs targeting diabetes prevention and/or improving diabetes-related outcomes in underserved communities. However, it is disappointing that these funds fail to translate into significant improvements in diabetes-related health outcomes in high-risk communities. Although there is no denying the role of biological and lifestyle factors in the growing numbers of prediabetes cases in this community, we are probably discounting the role of a few other important facto Continue reading >>

Effectiveness Of Diabetes Prevention Program Translations Among African Americans

Effectiveness Of Diabetes Prevention Program Translations Among African Americans

@article{2331d684903f4000969a8da219758494, title = "Effectiveness of diabetes prevention program translations among African Americans", abstract = "The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) demonstrated risk reduction for incident diabetes through weight loss among all participants, including African Americans. Several DPP translations have been conducted in less controlled settings, including primary care practices and communities; however, there is no detailed compilation of how effective these translations have been for African Americans. This systematic literature review evaluated DPP translations from 2003 to 2012. Eligible records were retrieved using a search strategy of relevant databases and gray literature. Retrieved records (n=1,272) were screened using a priori criteria, which resulted in 21 full-text studies for review. Seventeen studies were included in the full-text qualitative synthesis. Seven studies had 100\{%} African American samples and 10 studies had mixed samples with African American subgroups. African American participants\{textquoteleft} average weight loss was roughly half of that achieved in the DPP intervention. However, with few higher-quality studies, small sample sizes and differences in intervention designs and implementation, comparisons across interventions were difficult. The suboptimal effectiveness of DPP translations among African American adults, particularly women, signals the need for enhancements to existing evidence-based interventions and more high-quality research that includes other at-risk African American subgroups such as men and younger adults of lower socioeconomic status.", keywords = "Health promotion, Intervention studies, Minority health, Translational medical research, Weight reduction programmes", author = "Samuel-H Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Prevention Program: Recruitment Methods And Results - Sciencedirect

The Diabetes Prevention Program: Recruitment Methods And Results - Sciencedirect

Volume 23, Issue 2 , April 2002, Pages 157-171 Author links open overlay panel The DPP Research Group1[5] Get rights and content The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is a multicenter randomized controlled trial designed to test whether diet and exercise or medication can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in persons with impaired glucose tolerance, who are at increased risk of the disease. This paper describes DPP recruitment methods, strategies, performance, and costs. The DPP developed an organizational structure for comprehensive management and continuous monitoring of recruitment efforts. The DPP utilized a variety of recruitment strategies, alone or in combination, and a stepped informed consent procedure leading to randomization. Studywide and clinic-specific recruitment data were monitored, analyzed, and used to modify recruitment approaches. DPP recruitment was completed slightly ahead of schedule, meeting goals for the proportion of women enrolled and nearly meeting goals for the proportion of racial/ethnic minorities. Clinics varied widely in the recruitment strategies they used, and these strategies also varied by participant age, gender, and race/ethnicity. Staff time devoted to recruitment averaged 86.8 hours per week per clinic, with the majority of effort by staff specifically assigned to recruitment. The number of staff hours required to recruit a participant varied by recruitment strategy. Recruitment cost (excluding staff cost) was about US$1075 per randomized participant. The DPP experience offers lessons for those planning similar efforts: (1) a method for ongoing assessment and revision of recruitment strategies is valuable; (2) a range of recruitment strategies may be useful; (3) the most effective methods for recruiting potential subj Continue reading >>

Summit - Speakers - Diabetes Free North Carolina

Summit - Speakers - Diabetes Free North Carolina

Rachel Marquez is the Healthy Communities Program Manager for Cone Health, one of North Carolinas largest and most comprehensive health networks. She is also the Regional Coordinator for the Region 5 Health Departments overseeing the Minority Diabetes Prevention Program in the communities of Alamance, Caswell, Chatham, Durham, Guilford, Orange, Randolph, Rockingham, and Person counties. Rachel leads Cone Healths Diabetes Prevention Program, which earned full recognition from the CDC in March 2017. She has led 8 Diabetes Prevention cohorts through the year long program, each of which has attained the CDC-recommended 5-7% weight loss. She conducts these classes in both English and Spanish. Rachel holds a Bachelors Degree in Biology from Grand Canyon University and a Masters in Public Health from Grand Canyon University. She is a Master Trainer Select for the National Diabetes Prevention Program. Rachel serves on numerous community coalitions, include the Diabetes Advisory Board, the Alamance County Food Collaborative, the Alamance Community Health Assessment Team and Alamance County Wellness Collaborative. In this role, Vodicka manages the strategic direction, communication and advocacy work of the states Alliance in support of the Ys Mission and Cause. Prior to her work with the NC Alliance of YMCAs, Vodicka served as the Director of Advocates for Health in Action, a Wake County-based healthy weight collaborative. Prior to that, Vodicka served eight years managing integrated marketing communications for the N.C. Division of Public Healths Physical Activity and Nutrition Branch around healthy eating, physical activity and healthy weight for all North Carolinians. Vodicka received a Bachelor of Science degree in dietetics with honors from the University of Kentucky, and a Continue reading >>

Culturally Targeted Strategies For Diabetes Prevention In Minority Population: A Systematic Review And Framework

Culturally Targeted Strategies For Diabetes Prevention In Minority Population: A Systematic Review And Framework

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to (a) assess the effectiveness of culturally tailored diabetes prevention interventions in minority populations and (b) develop a novel framework to characterize 4 key domains of culturally tailored interventions. Prevention strategies specifically tailored to the culture of ethnic minority patients may help reduce the incidence of diabetes. Methods: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and CINAHL for English-language, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-experimental (QE) trials testing culturally tailored interventions to prevent diabetes in minority populations. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Inductive thematic analysis was used to develop a framework with 4 domains (FiLLM: Facilitating [ie, delivering] Interventions Through Language, Location, and Message). The framework was used to assess the overall effectiveness of culturally tailored interventions. Results: Thirty-four trials met eligibility criteria. Twelve studies were RCTs, and 22 were QE trials. Twenty-five out of 34 studies (74%) that used cultural tailoring demonstrated significantly improved A1C, fasting glucose, and/or weight loss. Of the 25 successful interventions, 21 (84%) incorporated at least 3 culturally targeted domains. Seven studies used all 4 domains and were all successful. The least utilized domain was delivery (4/34) of the interventions key educational message. Conclusions: Culturally tailoring interventions across the 4 domains of facilitators, language, location, and messaging can be effective in improving risk factors for progression to diabetes among ethnic minority groups. Future studies should evaluate how specific tailoring approaches work compared to usual care as well as comparative effectiveness of each Continue reading >>

Ship And Healthcare | Partnership 4 Health

Ship And Healthcare | Partnership 4 Health

PartnerSHIP 4 Health, through the Community Wellness Grant (CWG), seeks to impact the local populations at-risk for diabetes and high blood pressure (low-income and/or ethnic minorities). The Community Wellness Grant (CWG) has three components related to healthcare: Mary Bressler shares her experience with the I CAN Prevent Diabetes Program at Lake Region Healthcare. With its inaugural Hispanic Diabetes Prevention Program in 2015, the Pelican Rapids Hispanic community gained a new tool to combat diabetes. Participants are modeling healthy behaviors and getting the word out to the community on how they improved their health. By partnering with community groups and faith communities, PartnerSHIP 4 Health hopes to reach more and more Hispanics each year. Watch this video clip to learn more about the impact of the 2015 Diabetes Prevention Program in Pelican Rapids, MN. This component involves public health partnering with healthcare settings to address prediabetes and hypertension among their patient population by putting scientific-based guidelines into practice. Health care partners are empowered to integrate the steps of Ask, Advise, Assess Readiness, Assist, and Arrange Follow-up related to prediabetes and hypertension into clinic and practice flow. In addition, because a culture of wellness enhances clinician ability to have wellness discussions with their patients, PartnerSHIP 4 Health works with healthcare partners to advance worksite wellness in their respective settings by encouraging participation in the PartnerSHIP 4 Health Worksite Wellness Collaborative. Perham Health: Clinics in Perham (2), Ottertail, and New York Mills Lake Region Healthcare: Clinics in Fergus Falls, Ashby, Barnesville, and Battle Lake Community Health Service Inc.: Clinics in Moorhead, Graf Continue reading >>

Engaging At-risk Minority Women In Health System Diabetes Prevention Programs Brown, Susan Denise Kaiser Foundation Research Institute, Oakland, Ca, United States

Engaging At-risk Minority Women In Health System Diabetes Prevention Programs Brown, Susan Denise Kaiser Foundation Research Institute, Oakland, Ca, United States

Engaging At-Risk Minority Women in Health System Diabetes Prevention Programs Preventing type 2 diabetes is a high priority for health care systems. Particular focus is needed on racial and ethnic minority populations who suffer disproportionately from diabetes and its complications. Success depends not only on patient access to lifestyle programs to reduce risk, but on patient engagement in such programs. Yet evidence-based strategies to increase engagement in clinical settings are lacking. This K01 career development award will provide Susan D. Brown, PhD with the expertise needed to achieve her long- term goal of reducing health disparities in diabetes by engaging diverse at-risk patients, such as overweight and obese women with a history of gestational diabetes, in preventive programs in health care settings. This proposal examines whether two theory-driven outreach strategies, tailored diabetes risk information and self- affirmation, impact three initial and sustained patient engagement outcomes: patient responses to outreach materials, and participation and retention in a lifestyle program. The central hypothesis is that diabetes risk information individually tailored to women's race/ethnicity and diabetes risk factors derived from electronic medical records may increase patient engagement. Yet tailored risk information can be psychologically threatening;thus its effects will be enhanced, and the threat mitigated, when individuals can affirm a sense of self-worth by actively reflecting on values that are important to them. Among overweight/obese women with a history of gestational diabetes, the Specific Aims are as follows. Aim 1 : Develop novel, interactive outreach materials to be used in the clinical setting containing tailored diabetes risk information and se Continue reading >>

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