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Metformin Uses For Weight Loss

Have Pcos Or Diabetes? Is Metformin (glucophage) Your Best Choice?

Have Pcos Or Diabetes? Is Metformin (glucophage) Your Best Choice?

Should you take metformin -- nor not? Is there a better alternative? This page will answer your questions. It's an anti-diabetic drug sometimes used to treat PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome), although it is used chiefly to help control Type 2 diabetes. This drug offers both benefits and significant risks. Free PCOS Newsletter The FDA has approved it only for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Because of this limitation, some physicians don't have much clinical experience using Glucophage to treat PCOS and don't always feel comfortable using it unless you have diabetes. 13 Side Effects of Metformin Your Doctor Didn't Tell You About Did you know that metformin has at least 13 under-recognized side effects? Some of them can be serious. Read more about the side effects. Can't Tolerate It? Try This! Medical research is now showing that there are natural alternatives to this and other drugs for treating PCOS, diabetes or metabolic syndrome. So if you're uncomfortable with the idea of taking Glucophage for years to come, or you've tried it but can't tolerate its side effects, take a look at the natural alternatives that are just as effective as metformin. Does It Reduce PCOS Symptoms? Some medical guidelines say it is not the first thing you should try for controlling PCOS. However, it may be helpful IF you have insulin resistance. Read more... Take Supplemental Vitamin B12! Recent research is showing that you will develop a vitamin B12 deficiency if you take this drug for over a year or so. A deficiency in vitamin B12 could have undesirable consequences if for fetal development if you're pregnancy or trying to become pregnant. Read more... Is It Appropriate for Girls? As girls and teenagers start to have trouble with their weight, irregular periods, early appearance of public Continue reading >>

Baby Obesity Research: No Need To Panic

Baby Obesity Research: No Need To Panic

Babies are to be “treated in the womb for obesity”, according to the Daily Mail. The newspaper said that overweight mothers-to-be will be given a diabetes pill “to cut the risk of having a fat child”. The news is based on an ongoing study to find out if giving the diabetes drug metformin to obese pregnant women can reduce the risk of their babies being born overweight. This is of interest as obese women tend to have poorer control of their blood sugar, a problem that metformin can help regulate in people with diabetes. If exposed to excess blood sugar in the womb, growing babies may be born with excess birth weight, which has been linked to difficulties during birth and illness in later life. While the Mail’s front-page presentation of this research might make this research seem frightening or frivolous, it should be noted that metformin is already used to help some pregnant women control their blood sugar and prevent complications. The study has also gone through various safety checks to ensure it does not pose any significant risks to either mother or baby and that it could be of potential medical benefit. This research is neither new nor finished yet, and it is unclear why the Daily Mail has chosen to cover it. This study began in 2010 and will run until 2014, when its results will be revealed. Only then will we be able to see if the research is truly newsworthy. What is metformin? Metformin is currently used by patients with type 2 diabetes to control their blood sugar levels. It is commonly the first choice of medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, particularly in overweight and obese patients. In type 2 diabetes, patients build up too much glucose (sugar) in their blood, which can make them very ill. This happens either because they do not make Continue reading >>

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

Metformin is recommended by doctors for women with PCOS that want to loose weight or otherwise manage their PCOS and insulin resistance. But there are 3 very important things that you need to know about it including the fact that it's not the only option! Let me first say, I don’t hate Metformin for women with PCOS. For some women it really does help spur ovulation, control blood sugar and help with some weight management but….it’s not without its share of issues. And it’s definitely not the magic bullet for weight loss – although it’s usually presented that way. How Metformin (or it’s generic form: Glucophage) Works Metformin is typically given with meals throughout the day, or more commonly now the extended release version is given once with dinner or at bedtime. While only having to pop a pill one time per day is always appealing, this once a day dosing (especially at bedtime) is where I see the most problems with my patients. How Metformin works is this: It lowers both fasting and post meal glucose levels by decreasing the glucose absorption in your intestines after a meal; as well as decreasing the amount of glucose your liver makes for later use. It also does help improve insulin sensitivity by increasing glucose movement into a cell. All sounds good so far right? Not so fast, here are the most common issues I see in women using Metformin: Low Blood Sugar Metformin is notorious for causing sometimes severe digestive issues including stomach pain or upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and even a sense of body weakness or metallic taste in the mouth in some. And it is touted as not causing low blood sugar as many older blood sugar lowering drugs did, however I see it every day in my practice that Metformin can make the low carb life a living hell. When a Continue reading >>

New Weight Loss Formula: Popular Diabetes Drug Melts Pounds, Studies Show

New Weight Loss Formula: Popular Diabetes Drug Melts Pounds, Studies Show

If the FDA says yes, a major new weight loss drug may hit the market this year. A high-dose formulation of liraglutide, the popular diabetes drug from Novo Nordisk melts up to 10 percent of body mass, studies show. Liraglutide, available in 1.2 mg and 1.8 mg doses as Victoza, is already a huge success for Novo Nordisk. The company has now filed with the FDA seeking approval for a 3.0 mg dose after studies found major weight loss benefits (in conjunction with diet and exercise.) In clinical trials, liraglutide helped those taking it lose 5 to 10 percent of their body mass, according to research published in the International Journal of Obesity. And while this study looked at people with diabetes, a previous study published in the Lancet tested the drug in non-diabetics and found similarly impressive weight loss. In late December, Novo Nordisk filed two submissions for liraglutide, a new drug application (NDA) with the FDA, and a Marketing Authorization Application (MAA) with the European Medicines Agency, according to Drug Discovery & Development. But some folks may not have to wait even that long. In February, Novo Nordisk made the unusual move of targeting Mexico for an initial approval of high-dose liraglutide. And others may not wait at all; while the studies warn against using liraglutide "off-label" for weight loss, it seems certain that patients will seek to use Victoza for that purpose. Liraglutide works by mimicking a hormone known as GLP-1, which slows digestion and stimulates the body's natural production of insulin. Victoza has been very successful for Novo Nordisk, with sales jumping 58 percent in 2012, and climbing an additional 14 percent in the third quarter of 2013. Experts are projecting that liraglutide would have blockbuster potential as a weight loss Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) And Weight Loss

Metformin (glucophage) And Weight Loss

Tweet Metformin, a generic diabetes treatment usually sold under the brand name Glucophage, may help people with diabetes to lose weight by lowering their appetites. Insulin makes people overweight by acting on the brain to cause hunger, making the liver manufacture fat and fill fat cells in the stomach. Avoiding obesity is a matter of avoiding foods high in blood sugar, and taking medication that prevents blood sugar levels from climbing too high. Glucophage function The function of diabetes drug Glucophage is to reduce the release levels of sugar from your liver. This stops blood glucose levels from rising too high, and means that the body does not have to produce as much insulin. Therefore, the patient is not as hungry. Type 2 diabetes drug Metformin (Glucophage) may be used successfully as a medication for type 2 diabetes. Lowers insulin levels It lowers insulin levels, helps to prevent diabetes complications, and helps people with diabetes to lose weight. Losing weight whilst taking Metformin (Glucophage) means also eating a healthy diet. Eating lots of foods that boost blood sugar levels will counteract the effects of Metformin. Most doctors prescribe 500mg of Metformin (Glucophage) before eating. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a s Continue reading >>

What’s Invokana? 10 Things You Need To Know

What’s Invokana? 10 Things You Need To Know

Invokana (canagliflozin) is one of the new oral medications for adult onset diabetes. It’s expensive but has many upsides. Taken usually in combination with metformin it is a rising star in the treatment of diabetes. Here is what you need to know to help you decide: worth it or not? Invokana is taken as a 100 mg tablet once daily before breakfast, increasing to a 300 mg tablet once a day if you have normal kidney function. Invokana can be taken with or without food. Invokana is not yet recommended for use alone in the treatment of diabetes; it should be given as a second agent in addition to metformin or as a third-line treatment. Invokana works on the kidneys and tells the proximal tubule to resorb approximately 90 percent of the filtered glucose load. So, Invokana promotes dumping of glucose from the kidneys to the urine. Invokana used alone doesn’t lower blood sugars (measured by the A1C blood test) enough to make it effective as a single agent for diabetes. In studies it lowers A1C by 0.5 to 0.7 percentage points, making it a relatively weak glucose lowering agent. When should Invokana be added? It has been shown to be effective in lowering A1C when metformin alone is not achieving the goal A1C of < 7.0. Invokana 300 mg compared to Januvia 100 mg mixed with metformin was better at lowering blood sugar and helped with weight loss. Will I lose weight on Invokana? Yes, in most studies Invokana (used with metformin) resulted in a 6.5 pound weight loss at 12 weeks and an almost 10 pound weight loss at the end of a year. That’s quite a plus. The huge downside of Invokana is the frequency of genital fungal infections, which are almost sixfold higher. This means there is an increased risk of genital yeast infections: vulvovaginal candidiasis (vaginal yeast infections) Continue reading >>

Metformin For Clozapine Associated Obesity: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Metformin For Clozapine Associated Obesity: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Abstract Although clozapine is the gold-standard for treatment refractory schizophrenia, it has the worst metabolic profile of all antipsychotics. This is partly mediated by clozapine’s impact on glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1). There is an absence of robust evidence for effective treatments for clozapine associated weight gain and metabolic syndrome. Metformin, with its role in increasing GLP-1 may aid weight loss among people on clozapine. We conducted a systematic-review and meta-analysis of metformin versus placebo for change in weight and metabolic syndrome for people on clozapine without diabetes mellitus. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group’s trial register, Pubmed and Embase, as well as the following Chinese databases: the Chinese Biomedical Literature Service System and China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database. This was supplemented by hand searches of key papers. Eight studies, of which three were from Chinese databases, with 478 participants were included. We found that metformin was superior to placebo in terms of weight loss (-3.12kg, 95%CI -4.88kg to -1.37kg) and BMI (-1.18kg/m2, 95%CI -1.76kg/m2 to -0.61kg/m2). Metformin significantly improved three of the five components of metabolic syndrome; waist circumference, fasting glucose and triglycerides. Sensitivity analysis on study quality and duration did not greatly impact results. Metformin led to clinically meaningful weight loss among people on clozapine, and may reduce the rates of metabolic syndrome. Inclusion of metformin into the treatment protocols of people on clozapine, as tolerated, should be considered. Figures Citation: Siskind DJ, Leung J, Russell AW, Wysoczanski D, Kisely S (2016) Metformin for Clozapine Associated Obesity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. PLoS ONE 11(6) Continue reading >>

What Does Metformin Do For Weight Loss?

What Does Metformin Do For Weight Loss?

What is Metformin? It is an oral diabetes drug that is used to treat people with diabetes. This medication is normally taken together with an exercise program and diet plan to control blood sugar in those with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition where the body cannot produce enough insulin, or use it properly. Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone which works by absorbing and processing glucose so it can be stored or used for energy by the cells of the body. Without insulin, glucose cannot be absorbed or used by the muscle cells for energy, hence they stay in the bloodstream. Hyperglycemia, which refers to dangerously high levels of sugar in the bloodstream, can develop leading to serious health complications such as kidney problems and nerve damage. People with type 2 diabetes can take Metformin to reduce high blood sugar levels. This medication should not be used to treat type 1 diabetes, a condition where the body makes little or no insulin as a result of the immune system destroying insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. This is because Metformin works by helping your body respond properly to insulin that is already being produced by the pancreas. In addition, the drug works by reducing the amount of glucose that is produced by the liver. This helps prevent blood sugar levels from rising too high. Hence, the body will not need to produce as much insulin to control blood sugar levels. This medicine can be used alone or in combination with insulin or other diabetes drugs. How does Metformin cause weight loss? So is this medication used for weight loss? Metformin, which is a brand name for glucophage, is prescribed only to treat people with diabetes to reduce their blood sugar levels, but many also experience weight loss as a side effect. Continue reading >>

New Type Of Diabetes Drug Drops Weight With Blood Sugar

New Type Of Diabetes Drug Drops Weight With Blood Sugar

June 25, 2010 – A new class of diabetes drug lowers blood sugar -- and weight -- by increasing the amount of sugar released in the urine. Now the first of these so-called SGLT2 inhibitors has been tested in a phase III clinical trial. It's dapagliflozin, being jointly developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb and AstraZeneca. Study leader Clifford J. Bailey, PhD, is professor of clinical science at Aston University in Birmingham, England. "It works through an entirely different mechanism than any other diabetes drugs currently available," Bailey tells WebMD. "And you can add it on to other treatments and get an additional benefit. Plus as far as we can see, it can be used at any stage in the disease process." And that's not all. Because dapagliflozin makes the body excrete excess sugar, it makes diabetes patients lose weight. Metformin helps patients lose weight, too, but those adding dapagliflozin to metformin lost about 4 and 1/2 more pounds than those taking metformin alone in the 24-week study. The lost weight was not just water. Patients taking dapagliflozin had smaller waistlines, so the lost weight appears to have been fat. Might this new diabetes drug work as a weight loss pill? No, says Bailey. "The weight loss effect of the drug becomes less and less as the blood-sugar level comes to near normal," he notes. "Therefore the weight loss potential of this drug is very small at normal blood-sugar levels." Weight loss isn't dapagliflozin's only extra benefit. It lowers blood pressure, too. Another plus is that the oral medication is taken only once a day. And the drug does not lower blood sugar to dangerously low levels -- yet another plus. On the down side, patients taking dapagliflozin had an increased risk of genital infections. People with diabetes already are at high Continue reading >>

Ratio-metformin

Ratio-metformin

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Metformin belongs to the class of medications called oral hypoglycemics, which are medications that lower blood sugar. It is used to control blood glucose (blood sugar) for people with type 2 diabetes. It is used when diet, exercise, and weight reduction have not been found to lower blood glucose well enough on their own. Metformin works by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by making it easier for glucose to enter into the tissues of the body. Metformin has been found to be especially useful in delaying problems associated with diabetes for overweight people with diabetes. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? 500 mg Each white, round, biconvex, film-coated tablet with a partial scored-line on one side and "rph M12" on the other side, contains metformin HCl 500 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: hypromellose, magnesium stearate, maltodextrin, polyethylene glycol, and povidone. 850 mg Each Continue reading >>

Metformin In Prevention And Treatment Of Antipsychotic Induced Weight Gain: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Metformin In Prevention And Treatment Of Antipsychotic Induced Weight Gain: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Abstract Most antipsychotics are associated with weight gain and other metabolic complications. Several randomized trials have shown metformin to be effective, but this still hasn’t been included in clinical guidelines on managing antipsychotic induced weight gain. All double blind placebo controlled trials assessing the efficacy of metformin in the treatment of antipsychotic induced weight gain were included. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and MEDLINE were searched for the period January 2000-December 2015. Meta-analysis was carried out using the random effects model. Meta analysis of 12 published studies with a total of 743 patients found that in patients treated with antipsychotics, metformin treatment resulted in significantly better anthropometric and metabolic parameters than placebo. The mean change in weight was −3.27 kg (95 % CI −4.66 to −1.89) (Z = 4.64, p < 0.001). Metformin compared to placebo resulted in significant reduction in BMI [−1.13 kg/m2 (95 % CI −1.61 to −0.66)] and insulin resistance index [−1.49 (95 % CI −2.40 to −0.59)] but not fasting blood sugar [−2.48 mg/dl (95 % CI −5.54 to 0.57]. This meta-analysis confirms that metformin is effective in treating antipsychotic induced weight gain in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Background Most antipsychotics are associated with weight gain and other metabolic complications [1]. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome is higher in patients treated with antipsychotics than in drug naive patients with schizophrenia. Metabolic syndrome is more likely with second generation antipsychotics than first generation antipsychotics [2]. Rate of weight gain is highest in the first six months after commencing treatment however patients continue to gai Continue reading >>

Metformin For Weight Loss

Metformin For Weight Loss

Dr Nagi Safa health, obesity and overweight, weight loss Health What is Metformin? Is Metformin for weight loss? Metformin refers to an oral prescription drug, which is predominantly used to treat Type 2 diabetes. Doctors also sometimes prescribe it to treat symptoms of PCOS and other ailments. This drug works by controlling the blood sugar in the body and can be used on its own or combined with other drugs or medications. Because of this, metformin has become associated with weight reduction and has become very popular with people struggling to lose weight. Metformin is also widely available in many pharmacies and is sold under different brand names such as Glucophage, Siofor, Riomet and Fortamet among others in Lebanon. Like with any drug that is used for weight reduction , metformin for weight loss has its advantages and drawbacks. Pros and Cons of Using Metformin for Weight Loss Pros of metformin for weight loss Lowers Absorption of Dietary Carbohydrates Although weight gain can be caused by other factors, diet and lifestyle significantly contributes or can compound the problem. Carbohydrates are usually absorbed through the intestines and this is why most obese or overweight people store fat around the abdomen. Metformin decreases the rate at which these carbohydrates are absorbed through the intestines. Although insulin helps regulate the blood sugar in the body, too much of it may be responsible for weight gain and obesity because it sends hunger signals to the brain, which makes you want to eat. Weight gain is highly associated with eating too much. After you eat, your body converts the food into sugar which is absorbed from the intestines to the blood stream after which it goes directly to the liver. The liver instantly releases this sugar back to the blood str Continue reading >>

Effectiveness Of Metformin On Weight Loss In Non-diabetic Individuals With Obesity.

Effectiveness Of Metformin On Weight Loss In Non-diabetic Individuals With Obesity.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of metformin for the treatment of obesity has been evaluated in few clinical trials with inconclusive results. Moreover, the effectiveness in a real-life outpatient setting has not been tested until today. In this study we aimed to examine the effectiveness of metformin as a weight reducing drug in obese and overweight patients with regard to their degree of insulin resistance. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: We treated 154 consecutive patients with a body mass index ≥27 kg/m(2) in an outpatient setting over 6 months with metformin up to a dosage of 2,500 mg per day. Additionally, we included 45 untreated patients as controls. Patients were monitored for weight changes over 6 months. Before metformin treatment was started insulin sensitivity was determined in all patients by calculating HOMA index and Matsuda index after a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. RESULTS: The mean weight loss in the metformin treated group was 5.8±7.0 kg (5.6±6.5%). Untreated controls gained 0.8±3.5 kg (0.8±3.7%) on average. Patients with severe insulin resistance lost significantly more weight as compared to insulin sensitive patients. The percentage of weight loss was independent of age, sex or BMI. CONCLUSION: Metformin is an effective drug to reduce weight in a naturalistic outpatient setting in insulin sensitive and insulin resistant overweight and obese patients. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York. Continue reading >>

Metformin For Prediabetes

Metformin For Prediabetes

This Issue The oral biguanide metformin (Glucophage, and others) is generally the drug of choice for initial treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has also been used to prevent or at least delay the onset of diabetes in patients considered to be at high risk for the disease. Recent guidelines recommend considering use of metformin in patients with prediabetes (fasting plasma glucose 100-125 mg/dL, 2-hr post-load glucose 140-199 mg/dL, or A1C 5.7-6.4%), especially in those who are <60 years old, have a BMI >35 kg/m2, or have a history of gestational diabetes.1 Metformin has not been approved for such use by the FDA. Continue reading >>

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Did you know that one of the main reasons you can't lose weight with PCOS is because of your hormones? It's true, and that's why many women (and physicians) turn to using Metformin to try and help with weight loss. But just because it works for some people doesn't mean it will necessarily work for YOU. Find out why metformin helps with weight loss, but more important what works better and how to finally lose weight if you have PCOS. ​ Insulin & PCOS: Why It's so Important One of the most common medications prescribed for PCOS is metformin. But, PCOS is a hormonal condition which results in weight gain, hair growth on the face, infertility, acne and estrogen/progesterone imbalances. So why is metformin, a medication used to lower blood sugar and treat insulin resistance, used to treat estrogen/progesterone imbalances in women? The logic is quite simple: Most of the symptoms of PCOS (all those listed above) stem from insulin resistanc e! In fact many physicians recommend that ALL women with PCOS should be treated for insulin resistance regardless of what their fasting insulin and fasting blood sugar levels are. This means that the root cause of PCOS (at least the majority of it) is insulin resistance, and this is why metformin is so commonly used to treat. Insulin resistance causes a block of glucose uptake in your skeletal muscles which results in a lower metabolism (and weight gain), insulin also directly acts on your ovaries and adrenals increasing androgens like testosterone and DHEA. It's also the action of insulin on your pituitary that results in increased LH production which over stimulates your ovaries resulting in the characteristic "cysts" of PCOS. ​ High levels of DHEA and testosterone lead to acne and hair growth (hirsutism). ​ But one simple question r Continue reading >>

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