diabetestalk.net

Metformin Diet Restrictions

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Metformin is often one of the first medications prescribed to people with diabetes, according to the Canadian Diabetes Association (see reference 2 under Highlights of Revisions). It helps lower your blood sugar levels by decreasing the amount of glucose, or sugar, produced by your liver. It also helps your insulin, the hormone that gets the sugar out of your blood and into your cell, work better. (see reference 1 pg 1 under Clinical Pharmacology under Mechanism of Action para 1). While you do not need to avoid any foods when taking metformin, you may need to limit or avoid alcohol (see reference 1 pg 8 under alcohol intake.). Metformin and Alcohol If your doctor has prescribed metformin to help you get better control over your blood sugar, you should not drink an excessive amount of alcohol, including beer, wine or hard liquor (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). Too much alcohol causes metformin to breakdown too much lactate, which is a by-product of glucose and amino acids, and may lead to lactic acidosis (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). If you drink alcohol, it's OK to have moderate amounts while on metformin, which means up to 1 drink a day for women and 2 drinks a day for men (see reference 3 pg x). But everyone is different, so be sure to talk to your doctor first to a safe amount of alcohol for you. Lactic acidosis is actually not very common when taking metformin, but it can be dangerous, and even deadly, according to the Food and Drug Administration (see reference 1 pg 15). Symptoms that warrant an immediate call to your doctor include difficulty breathing, stomach pain, diarrhea, muscle cramps, unusual sleepiness or weakness or an all-around achiness. Continue reading >>

Should Restrictions Be Relaxed For Metformin Use In Chronic Kidney Disease? No, We Should Never Again Compromise Safety!

Should Restrictions Be Relaxed For Metformin Use In Chronic Kidney Disease? No, We Should Never Again Compromise Safety!

Metformin is and has been considered as first-line therapy for type 2 diabetes for over a quarter of a century. Like other biguanides, metformin can cause a lactic acidosis that is exceptionally rare but fatal. The likelihood of metformin-associated lactic acidosis is substantially higher in patients with kidney impairment and also among those with seemingly normal kidney function who are at risk of acute kidney injury (AKI). Hence, regulatory agencies in many industrialized nations have maintained strict renal restrictions surrounding metformin. However, there have been millions of people exposed to metformin for many years, many of them with serum creatinine values at or close to 1.5 mg/dL with estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) much below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 who have not developed lactic acidosis. Thus, there clearly remains controversy in this area, and there has been heightened pressure to remove the renal restrictions of metformin. To provide a discussion on the pros and cons of relaxing the renal restrictions for metformin use, we provide a Point-Counterpoint. In the point narrative below, Drs. Kalantar-Zadeh and Kovesdy provide their argument that although there is little evidence of the potential benefits of metformin in kidney disease, just considering the sheer numbers of metformin users and the high fatality rate of its associated lactic acidosis, the most appropriate practice is to avoid metformin use in people with eGFR <45 mL/min/1.73 m2 or in those who are at high risk of AKI irrespective of underlying eGFR. In the following counterpoint narrative, Drs. Bakris and Molitch argue that the data from a very large analysis demonstrate clearly that serum creatinine should be supplanted with eGFR as the criteria for metformin use and that the incidence Continue reading >>

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

A prediabetes diagnosis can be alarming. This condition is marked by abnormally high blood sugar (glucose) most often due to insulin resistance. This is a condition in which the body doesn’t use insulin properly. It’s often a precursor to type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, people with prediabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. With prediabetes, you may also be at risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, a prediabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you will definitely get type 2 diabetes. The key is early intervention; to get your blood sugar out of the prediabetes range. Your diet is important, and you need to know the right kind of foods to eat. How diet relates to prediabetes There are many factors that increase your risk for prediabetes. Genetics can play a role, especially if diabetes runs in your family. Excess body fat and a sedentary lifestyle are other potential risk factors. In prediabetes, sugar from food begins to build up in your bloodstream because insulin can’t easily move it into your cells. Eating carbohydrates doesn’t cause prediabetes. But a diet filled with carbohydrates that digest quickly can lead to blood sugar spikes. For most people with prediabetes, your body has a difficult time lowering blood sugar levels after meals. Avoiding blood sugar spikes can help. When you eat more calories than your body needs, they get stored as fat. This can cause you to gain weight. Body fat, especially around the belly, is linked to insulin resistance. This explains why many people with prediabetes are also overweight. You can’t control all risk factors for prediabetes, but some can be mitigated. Lifestyle changes can help you maintain balanced blood sugar levels as well as a healthy weight. Watch carbs with Continue reading >>

Metformin Diet Restrictions

Metformin Diet Restrictions

Dietary fiber consists of the parts of plant foods that the body cannot digest.A good diet of fruits vegetables dairy wholemeal and nuts is ideal for a diabetes mellitus.REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT. Metformin (Glucophage) decreases insulin resistance. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced it is requiring the removal of certain restrictions on prescribing and use of the diabetes drug.Learn about metformin and weight loss, and what the side effects are.Untreated Gestational Diabetes Maintaining appropriate diabetes 2 diet inside. (Avandia) from sale in Europe and severe restrictions. This eMedTV Web page offers details on specific foods that not only nourish, but also help prevent.A good PCOS diet is crucial to managing your PCOS and combined with exercise, is more effective than medication.Metformin: learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus.Diabetes Management With Metformin Alterations in diet plan tend to weight reduction should be reproduced gradually.This portion of the eMedTV archives explores potential metformin drug interactions with other medications, such as thyroid medicines, oral contraceptives, and niacin.Metformin official prescribing information for healthcare professionals.Cull CA, Frighi V, Holman RR: Glycemic control with diet, sulfonylurea, metformin,. Metformin And Weight Loss | Lifescript.com Google Answers: Why Metformin's mode of action causes diarrhea Metformin and Weight Loss: What You Should Know Meticulous patient preparation including restrictions of diet and activity and management of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients,.WebMD explains why weight gain is a common side effect of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).Metformin-containing Drugs: Drug Safety Communication - Revised Warnings for Ce Continue reading >>

Activation Of Ampk By The Putative Dietary Restriction Mimetic Metformin Is Insufficient To Extend Lifespan In Drosophila

Activation Of Ampk By The Putative Dietary Restriction Mimetic Metformin Is Insufficient To Extend Lifespan In Drosophila

Activation of AMPK by the Putative Dietary Restriction Mimetic Metformin Is Insufficient to Extend Lifespan in Drosophila Affiliation: Institute of Healthy Ageing, Department of Genetics Evolution and Environment, University College London, London, United Kingdom Affiliation: Institute of Healthy Ageing, Department of Genetics Evolution and Environment, University College London, London, United Kingdom Affiliations: Institute of Healthy Ageing, Department of Genetics Evolution and Environment, University College London, London, United Kingdom, Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, ZMMK Forshungsgebaude, Koln, Germany The biguanide drug, metformin, commonly used to treat type-2 diabetes, has been shown to extend lifespan and reduce fecundity in C. elegans through a dietary restriction-like mechanism via the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the AMPK-activating kinase, LKB1. We have investigated whether the longevity-promoting effects of metformin are evolutionarily conserved using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. We show here that while feeding metformin to adult Drosophila resulted in a robust activation of AMPK and reduced lipid stores, it did not increase lifespan in either male or female flies. In fact, we found that when administered at high concentrations, metformin is toxic to flies. Furthermore, no decreases in female fecundity were observed except at the most toxic dose. Analysis of intestinal physiology after metformin treatment suggests that these deleterious effects may result from disruptions to intestinal fluid homeostasis. Thus, metformin appears to have evolutionarily conserved effects on metabolism but not on fecundity or lifespan. Citation: Slack C, Foley A, Partridge L (2012) Activation of AMPK by the Putative Dietary Restriction Mi Continue reading >>

Critical Review Dietary Carbohydrate Restriction As The First Approach In Diabetes Management: Critical Review And Evidence Base

Critical Review Dietary Carbohydrate Restriction As The First Approach In Diabetes Management: Critical Review And Evidence Base

Highlights • We present major evidence for low-carbohydrate diets as first approach for diabetes. • Such diets reliably reduce high blood glucose, the most salient feature of diabetes. • Benefits do not require weight loss although nothing is better for weight reduction. • Carbohydrate-restricted diets reduce or eliminate need for medication. • There are no side effects comparable with those seen in intensive pharmacologic treatment. The inability of current recommendations to control the epidemic of diabetes, the specific failure of the prevailing low-fat diets to improve obesity, cardiovascular risk, or general health and the persistent reports of some serious side effects of commonly prescribed diabetic medications, in combination with the continued success of low-carbohydrate diets in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome without significant side effects, point to the need for a reappraisal of dietary guidelines. The benefits of carbohydrate restriction in diabetes are immediate and well documented. Concerns about the efficacy and safety are long term and conjectural rather than data driven. Dietary carbohydrate restriction reliably reduces high blood glucose, does not require weight loss (although is still best for weight loss), and leads to the reduction or elimination of medication. It has never shown side effects comparable with those seen in many drugs. Here we present 12 points of evidence supporting the use of low-carbohydrate diets as the first approach to treating type 2 diabetes and as the most effective adjunct to pharmacology in type 1. They represent the best-documented, least controversial results. The insistence on long-term randomized controlled trials as the only kind of data that will be accepted is without precedent in science Continue reading >>

Foods You Can Eat While Taking Metformin

Foods You Can Eat While Taking Metformin

Meformin Diet: Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes or non-insulin dependent diabetes. It is used alone or in combination with other diabetic medications. It works to lower blood glucose levels and allows the glucose to enter your body to produce energy. Type 2 diabetes may lead to blood vessel damage in the eyes, heart, kidney and nerves. Diet, exercise and weight loss may lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is available in many forms such as tablet, liquid version and two long acting forms. Here is a list of foods you can eat while taking metformin. Always consult your health care provider first. Healthy diet plan for metformin: Metformin is used with a proper diet, exercise and also with other medications to control high blood sugar. You must take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. It is important to check the glucose level several times even when you taking this medication. Eat a consistent amount of food every day. Take medications same time every day as directed by your doctor. This might improve blood sugar level and lower the risk of diabetes. Exercise for half an hour. Ask your doctor first. Brand names for metformin include: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet and Fortamet. List of foods you can eat while taking metformin: 1. Carbohydrates: There are two types of carbohydrates which includes simple and complex. Simple carbs are found in refined sugar, flour and fruits. Complex carbohydrates are found in whole grains, beans, nuts and vegetables. It contains good amounts of fiber. It is easily digestible by the body and also provides steady source of energy. For adults, you can have 4 carbs servings at each meal and 1 to 2 carbs servings as snack. Muffins and cereals: You can eat oroweat double fiber Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Pcos Diet?

What Is The Best Pcos Diet?

A PCOS diet is crucial role in the management of PCOS, not only for weight loss and maintenance, but also to regulate insulin levels. Many women with PCOS are resistant to insulin, resulting in the pancreas producing more insulin in order to be effective. Insulin and PCOS Insulin is an important hormone as it transports sugar from the blood into the muscles of the body, allowing the body to effectively make use of the energy from glucose. High insulin levels wreak havoc on the body, leading to a lot of the symptoms of PCOS like, increased hair growth, weight gain, skin tags, fatty liver and high cholesterol, polycystic ovaries and an irregular menstrual cycle, not to mention increased hunger levels and cravings. Sounds familiar, doesn’t it? Most of us have many, if not all, of those symptoms. So, management of blood insulin levels is crucial in the management of PCOS. Refined carbohydrates cause a spike in insulin levels and should therefore be avoided. Also, foods that are high in fat will lead to weight gain and high cholesterol. Many doctors will recommend a low GI diet of wholegrain, unprocessed foods in the management of PCOS. Metformin is also a drug commonly prescribed for women with PCOS, in an attempt to tackle insulin resistance. BUT, insulin is not the only hormone impacted by PCOS. If it were, we’d all have been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes, which we have not. So, our diets need to incorporate low GI foods to manage insulin levels, in addition to tackling other aspects of the Polycystic Ovarian SYNDROME. Finding the right diet to tackle your PCOS is a highly individual and complex process as the underlying cause of PCOS and different hormone levels will vary from woman to woman. Here are some of the general PCOS diet guidelines: THRIVE WITH PCOS - FREE Continue reading >>

Grapefruit & Metformin

Grapefruit & Metformin

Metformin is a drug used to treat Type 2 diabetes, a condition in which the body does not properly process insulin, leading to high blood sugar levels or hyperglycemia. This drug works by decreasing the amount of glucose your body makes and absorbs from food. Additionally, metformin bolsters your body's reaction to insulin, which helps to lower blood sugar. When you take a medication like metformin, it interacts with enzymes and chemicals in your body through a process called metabolism. Other medications or foods such as grapefruit may influence the way your body metabolizes drugs. Metformin Metformin comes in liquid and tablet form and is taken with meals throughout the day. Typically, diabetics begin on a low dose of metformin and monitor their blood sugar to determine how well the medication is working. Your physician will increase your dose as needed. In some rare cases, metformin may cause a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. You should call emergency medical services immediately if you experience extreme lethargy, weakness, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, irregular heartbeat, shortness of breath, flushed skin, rapid or labored breathing, muscle pain, chills or dizziness. Grapefruit and Drug Metabolism Grapefruit and other citrus fruits and juices contain chemicals that impair your body's ability to metabolize some drugs. With metabolism slowed, medications build up in your body and have the potential to reach lethal levels. Unfortunately, it doesn't matter if you eat grapefruit with your medication or consume it at a different time of day. If a drug interacts with grapefruit or other citrus products, you'll need to eliminate them from your diet. Potentially Harmful Interaction Grapefruit juice is rich naringin, an antioxidant compound with blood s Continue reading >>

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

September 30, 2015 by Dr. Brooke in Be Better , Eat Better , pcos 3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin Metformin is recommended by doctors for women with PCOS that want to loose weight or otherwise manage their PCOS and insulin resistance. But there are 3 very important things that you need to know about it including the fact that it's not the only option! Let me first say, I dont hate Metformin for women with PCOS . For some women it really does help spur ovulation, control blood sugar and help with some weight management but.its not without its share of issues. And its definitely not the magic bullet for weight loss although its usually presented that way. How Metformin (or its generic form: Glucophage) Works Metformin is typically given with meals throughout the day, or more commonly now the extended release version is given once with dinner or at bedtime. While only having to pop a pill one time per day is always appealing, this once a day dosing (especially at bedtime) is where I see the most problems with my patients. It lowers both fasting and post meal glucose levels by decreasing the glucose absorption in your intestines after a meal; as well as decreasing the amount of glucose your liver makes for later use. It also does help improve insulin sensitivity by increasing glucose movement into a cell. All sounds good so far right? Not so fast, here are the most common issues I see in women using Metformin: Metformin is notorious for causing sometimes severe digestive issues including stomach pain or upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and even a sense of body weakness or metallic taste in the mouth in some. And it is touted as not causing low blood sugar as many older blood sugar lowering drugs did, however I see it every day in my practice that Metformin can m Continue reading >>

Diet And Diabetes

Diet And Diabetes

Gary Deed John Barlow Dev Kawol Gary Kilov Anita Sharma Liew Yu Hwa Background Guidelines for the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) reinforce lifestyle management, yet advice to guide general practitioners on principles around dietary choices is needed. Objective/s This article provides current evidence regarding the differing diets in diabetes prevention and management once T2DM arises, including the role in management of complications such as hypoglycaemia. Discussion Diets should incorporate weight maintenance or loss, while complementing changes in physical activity to optimise the meta-bolic effects of dietary advice. Using a structured, team-care approach supports pragmatic and sustainable individualised plans, while incorporating current evidence-based dietary approaches. Diabetes mellitus is expected to be the leading cause of chronic disease in Australia by 2023. Being overweight or obese carries significant risks for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Lifestyle modification remains the bedrock of management of T2DM and its related comorbidities in Australian and international treatment guidelines.1,2 Once T2DM develops, the combination of diet, lifestyle changes and physical activity has a major impact on glycaemic control, weight management and complication prevention. The role of diet in diabetes prevention It is estimated that 16.4% of Australians have prediabetes.3 This is defined as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance, or an HbA1c of 6.0–6.4% (42– 46 mmol/mol).4 Prediabetes carries an independent risk for cardiovascular disease, separate from the risks of developing T2DM.3 Thus, prediabetes risk prevention must address the prevention of cardiovascular risks as much as managing progressive d Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Restricted Diet In Conjunction With Metformin And Liraglutide Is An Effective Treatment In Patients With Deteriorated Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Proof-of-concept Study

Carbohydrate Restricted Diet In Conjunction With Metformin And Liraglutide Is An Effective Treatment In Patients With Deteriorated Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Proof-of-concept Study

Go to: Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic progressive disease. During the course of the disease intensive treatment is often necessary resulting in multiple interventions including administration of insulin. Although dietary intervention is highly recommended, the clinical results of the widely prescribed diets with low fat content and high carbohydrates are disappointing. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested the effect of dietary carbohydrate-restriction in conjunction with metformin and liraglutide on metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Forty patients with type 2 diabetes already being treated with two oral anti-diabetic drugs or insulin treatment and who showed deterioration of their glucose metabolism (i.e. HbA1c >7.5), were treated. A carbohydrate-restricted diet and a combination of metformin and liraglutide were instituted, after stopping either insulin or oral anti-diabetic drugs (excluding metformin). After enrollment, the study patients were scheduled for follow-up visits at one, two, three and six months. Primary outcome was glycemic control, measured by HbA1c at six months. Secondary outcomes were body weight, lipid-profile and treatment satisfaction. Thirty-five (88%) participants completed the study. Nearly all participating patients experienced a drop in HbA1c and body weight during the first three months, an effect which was maintained until the end of the study at six months. Seventy-one percent of the patients reached HbA1c values below 7.0%. The range of body weight at enrollment was extreme, reaching 165 kg as the highest initial value. The average weight loss after 6 months was 10%. Most patients were satisfied with this treatment. During the intervention no significant change of lipids was observed. Most patients wh Continue reading >>

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

As a type 2 diabetic, you've probably heard of Metformin, or you might even be taking it yourself. Metformin (brand name “Glucophage” aka “glucose-eater”) is the most commonly prescribed medication for type 2 diabetes worldwide…and for good reason. It is one of the safest, most effective, least costly medication available with minimal, if any, side effects. There are always lots of questions around Metformin – how does metformin lower blood sugar, does metformin promote weight loss or weight gain, will it give me side effects – and lots more. Today we'll hopefully answer some of those questions. How Metformin Works Metformin belongs to a class of medications known as “Biguanides,” which lower blood glucose by decreasing the amount of sugar put out by the liver. The liver normally produces glucose throughout the day in conjunction with the pancreas’ production of insulin to maintain stable blood sugar. In many people with diabetes, both mechanisms are altered in that the pancreas puts out less insulin while the liver is unable to shut down production of excess glucose. This means your body is putting out as much as 3 times as much sugar than that of nondiabetic individuals, resulting in high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. Metformin effectively shuts down this excess production resulting in less insulin required. As a result, less sugar is available for absorption by the muscles and conversion to fat. Additionally, a lower need for insulin slows the progression of insulin resistance and keeps cells sensitive to endogenous insulin (that made by the body). Since metformin doesn’t cause the body to generate more insulin, it does not cause hypoglycemia unless combined with a sulfonylurea or insulin injection. Metformin is one of the few oral diabe Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Diet (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Diet (beyond The Basics)

TYPE 2 DIABETES OVERVIEW Diet and physical activity are critically important in the management of the ABCs (A1C, Blood pressure, and Cholesterol) of type 2 diabetes. To effectively manage glycated hemoglobin (A1C) and blood sugar levels, it is important to understand how to balance food intake, physical activity, and medication. Making healthy food choices every day has both immediate and long-term effects. With education, practice, and assistance from a dietitian and/or a diabetes educator, it is possible to eat well and control diabetes. This article discusses diet in the management of type 2 diabetes. The role of diet and activity in managing blood pressure and cholesterol are reviewed separately. (See "Patient education: High blood pressure, diet, and weight (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: High cholesterol and lipids (hyperlipidemia) (Beyond the Basics)".) Articles that discuss other aspects of type 2 diabetes are also available. (See "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Overview (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Insulin treatment (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Alcohol, exercise, and medical care (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Preventing complications in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)".) WHY IS DIET IMPORTANT? Many factors affect how well diabetes is controlled. Many of these factors are controlled by the person with diabetes, including how much and what is eaten, how frequently the blood sugar is monitored, physical activity levels, and accuracy and consi Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet