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Metformin Diet Pcos

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

September 30, 2015 by Dr. Brooke in Be Better , Eat Better , pcos 3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin Metformin is recommended by doctors for women with PCOS that want to loose weight or otherwise manage their PCOS and insulin resistance. But there are 3 very important things that you need to know about it including the fact that it's not the only option! Let me first say, I dont hate Metformin for women with PCOS . For some women it really does help spur ovulation, control blood sugar and help with some weight management but.its not without its share of issues. And its definitely not the magic bullet for weight loss although its usually presented that way. How Metformin (or its generic form: Glucophage) Works Metformin is typically given with meals throughout the day, or more commonly now the extended release version is given once with dinner or at bedtime. While only having to pop a pill one time per day is always appealing, this once a day dosing (especially at bedtime) is where I see the most problems with my patients. It lowers both fasting and post meal glucose levels by decreasing the glucose absorption in your intestines after a meal; as well as decreasing the amount of glucose your liver makes for later use. It also does help improve insulin sensitivity by increasing glucose movement into a cell. All sounds good so far right? Not so fast, here are the most common issues I see in women using Metformin: Metformin is notorious for causing sometimes severe digestive issues including stomach pain or upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and even a sense of body weakness or metallic taste in the mouth in some. And it is touted as not causing low blood sugar as many older blood sugar lowering drugs did, however I see it every day in my practice that Metformin can m Continue reading >>

Keto Diet, Pcos And Metformin (x-post From /r/keto) : Pcos

Keto Diet, Pcos And Metformin (x-post From /r/keto) : Pcos

Hey /r/PCOS :) someone suggested I might have better luck with this question over here. I've been lurking in /r/Keto for a while now and plan on trying it after new years. One thing that has me a bit confused is if I should stay on Metformin (1500 mg a day) or stop taking it. I have a mild case of PCOS and I'm definitely insulin resistant (I've had insulin dependent gestational diabetes 3 times). I'm a bit scared Ill confuse the Keto flu with hypoglycemia if I stay on the Metformin, also .. I HATE METFORMIN :P It makes me feel nauseous all day every day. Nothing serious would happen if I stop taking it. I've often had to take a break from Metformin (or should I say its side effects) for a few months, but then the vicious blood sugar rollercoaster cycle starts (mad carb cravings, extreme hunger from the blood sugar crash etc etc) so I give up and start taking it again. From what I've read here that should stop so perhaps I won't need the evil Metformin? I'd ask a doctor but every doctor I've met over here (I live in a small country) regarding the PCOS/diet/insulin resistance is totally useless, plus it would take at least a couple of months just to get an appointment. I know there are a few ladies here dealing with PCOS, I've also done a search but I couldn't find any answers to my question. Continue reading >>

Effect Of Long-term Treatment With Metformin Added To Hypocaloric Diet On Body Composition, Fat Distribution, And Androgen And Insulin Levels In Abdominally Obese Women With And Without The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Effect Of Long-term Treatment With Metformin Added To Hypocaloric Diet On Body Composition, Fat Distribution, And Androgen And Insulin Levels In Abdominally Obese Women With And Without The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Effect of Long-Term Treatment with Metformin Added to Hypocaloric Diet on Body Composition, Fat Distribution, and Androgen and Insulin Levels in Abdominally Obese Women with and without the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Endocrine Unit (R.P., A.G., D.B., V.V., L.G., D.C., S.F., A.M.M.-L.), Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Endocrine Unit (R.P., A.G., D.B., V.V., L.G., D.C., S.F., A.M.M.-L.), Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Endocrine Unit (R.P., A.G., D.B., V.V., L.G., D.C., S.F., A.M.M.-L.), Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Endocrine Unit (R.P., A.G., D.B., V.V., L.G., D.C., S.F., A.M.M.-L.), Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Endocrine Unit (R.P., A.G., D.B., V.V., L.G., D.C., S.F., A.M.M.-L.), Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Endocrine Unit (R.P., A.G., D.B., V.V., L.G., D.C., S.F., A.M.M.-L.), Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Endocrine Unit (R.P., A.G., D.B., V.V., L.G., D.C., S.F., A.M.M.-L.), Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Reproductive Endocrinology Center (G.E.C., M.F.), University of Bologna, 40138 Bologna, Italy Search for other works by this author on: Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Reproduct Continue reading >>

Pcos Diet Vs. Normal Diet

Pcos Diet Vs. Normal Diet

I recently came across a piece of research that made me SO excited and I just have to share it with you as it could completely transform how you manage your PCOS. Now this research is a gem, a treasure to be looked after and worn close to your heart. It confirms that you don’t have to be a victim of PCOS but that you do have some power and control over what happens with your body. Are you ready for this? The Gem Diet and lifestyle changes are more effective than Clomid and Metformin in managing PCOS (1). I have always firmly believed this but to see it in black and white, evidenced in medical and scientific journals, validates my own approach to managing my PCOS. Researchers compared the effectiveness of Clomid, Metformin, Clomid combined with Metformin, and Lifestyle changes. They measured pregnancy rates and found that Clomid had a 12.5% pregnancy rate with Metformin being 14.4% and the Clomid and Metformin rate was 14.8%. Here is the amazing thing: Diet and lifestyle changes resulted in a 20% pregnancy rate! This is HUGE and so exciting. Well, you might say that you aren't trying to conceive. Why is this relevant for you? Pregnancy rates confirm that a woman has ovulated and if ovulation has occurred, hormones are probably balanced, testosterone levels have dropped and insulin is probably more under control. If that were to carry on over the long term, you can bet that weight loss, decrease in excess hair and improvements in acne are just around the corner. Sounds good, doesn't it?! Right, we have established that diet changes are key to managing PCOS. But just how should we be eating and what should our diet look like? Is it enough to eat a healthy diet or even follow a weight loss program? Will that help us manage our PCOS symptoms? Let's try and answer these que Continue reading >>

Role Of Metformin In The Management Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Role Of Metformin In The Management Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Go to: Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinological disorder affecting 4–12% of women [Diamanti-Kandarakis et al. 1999; Farah et al. 1999; Knochenhauer et al. 1998]. It has also been the most controversial medical condition and every aspect has received a lot of attention from the nomenclature to the management. Several descriptions of similar conditions took place in the 20th century and it was named Stein—Leventhal Syndrome in 1935 after the authors who described polycystic ovarian morphology in patients suffering from hirsutism, amenorrhoea and infertility [Leventhal, 1958; Stein and Leventhal, 1935]. PCOS was also called polycystic ‘ovarian’ syndrome implying that the primary pathology lies in or triggered by the ovary. Others have called it polycystic ovary disease (PCOD), which is the least used term for obvious reasons. Currently, PCOS refers to a disorder with a combination of reproductive and metabolic characteristics. This has evolved over time with controversy over the definition culminating in the latest consensus [ESHRE/ASRM, 2004] which instead of solving the issue created more controversy [Azziz et al. 2006]. In the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology/American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ESHRE/ASRM) consensus, at least two of the following features are needed to make the diagnosis; oligo/anovulation, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic features on ultrasound scan [ESHRE/ASRM, 2004]. The Androgen Excess Society, however, recommended that androgen excess should remain a constant feature of PCOS irrespective of the ovulatory status and morphological features of the ovaries [Azziz et al. 2006]. For almost three decades, PCOS has been regarded as a life course disease which besides its reproductiv Continue reading >>

Foods To Eat While Taking Metformin

Foods To Eat While Taking Metformin

Metformin is a prescription medication used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Metformin can be taken alone or in conjunction with other medications, such as insulin. It is important to eat a healthy diet. A dietician can make recommendations for your particular case, but most people with diabetes eat a healthy variety of foods in moderation and follow regular mealtimes. Video of the Day Carbohydrates are broken into two main categories—sugars (simple carbohydrates) and starches (complex carbohydrates). Carbohydrates break down into blood sugar during digestion. Focus on eating complex carbohydrates such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and low-fat dairy products. Many people with diabetes use the Glycemic Index (GI) to choose foods. The higher GI foods tend to cause a greater increase in blood sugar. Low GI foods tend to be higher in fat. Non-starchy vegetables like spinach, carrots, broccoli and great beans are choices. Eat brown rice and whole wheat pasta. Include high-fiber foods. Aim for 25 to 30 grams of fiber daily. Dietary fiber consists of the parts of plant foods that the body cannot digest. Fiber decreases the risk of heart disease and helps control blood sugar levels. Great sources of fiber include vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole-wheat flour, wheat bran and nuts. Include dry beans such as kidney and pinto beans. Heart healthy dieting is extremely important for a person with diabetes due to the increased risk of heart disease and stroke caused by the accelerated development of clogged or hardened arteries. Limit your intake of saturated fats to less than 7 percent of your daily calories. Eat as little trans fat as possible. Choose monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats instead. Sources of monounsaturated fats include olive and canola oil. Continue reading >>

Paleo And Metformin For Pcos Not Unheard Of?

Paleo And Metformin For Pcos Not Unheard Of?

Hi there! On my journey with PCOS that's going on 11 years, I've been on combo birth control and aldactone, lapsed into being untreated for 7 years and went back to being on medicine after going to the ER more than I should've for cysts. I was put on 1000mg of metformin and combo birth control which was increased to 2000mg in August after switching docs for the third time. I had a lapse in taking it again and gained 20 lbs to put me at 190 lbs as of New Year's day. I started eating clean after that, as well as working out... I lost 5 pounds but haven't lost any more. I've more or less maintained, with the edema, fatigue, headaches and acne appearing. I started back on the metformin this past week at my current dosage, but eating gluten and select dairy makes me feel sick and eating more than 30g of fruit sugar does the same. It's high time I go Paleo. 1 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb you will never lose belly fat. healthplus50.com 2 5 Worst Arthritis Foods Limit these foods to decrease arthritis pain and inflammation. naturalhealthreports.net With all that being said, is it not unheard of to be on metformin and be Paleo? Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

The Best Diet For Pcos: Splitting Fact From Fiction

The Best Diet For Pcos: Splitting Fact From Fiction

PCOS is one of the most common hormonal disorders in the developed world. In fact, it’s thought to affect almost 7% of pre-menopausal women in the US (1). But there is surprisingly limited information on how to treat it naturally. This article explores the best diet for PCOS, as based on scientific evidence. If You Prefer Video: What is PCOS (Polycystic Ovary Syndrome)? PCOS (Polycystic ovary syndrome) is a condition characterised by hormonal imbalances in women. Specifically, it’s an imbalance in the amount of male hormones (or androgens) produced by the ovaries. This short Youtube video illustrates the condition well. The term polycystic ovary means, “to have multiple cysts in the ovaries.” However, the development of cysts isn’t actually necessary for the diagnosis of PCOS. Unfortunately there is no known cure yet, and the cause is unknown. However, genetic predisposition coupled with inadequate diet is thought to be a major driver (2). Summary: PCOS is characterised by an imbalance of male hormones in women. It is likely a genetic condition triggered by diet. Excessive androgen secretion appears to be responsible for most PCOS symptoms. Most will experience one or more of the following symptoms: Irregular or absence of menstrual periods Excess body or facial hair, indicative of increased androgen levels Cysts on one or both ovaries Uncontrollable weight gain Infertility Sleep apnoea Insulin resistance and associated metabolic problems. Summary: PCOS has a cluster of symptoms related to increased male hormone levels. PCOS and Diet: Insulin and Weight Loss are Key The most effective eating pattern for PCOS is one that promotes weight loss and reduces levels of the hormone insulin (3, 4). This is because PCOS coupled with weight gain drives insulin resistance Continue reading >>

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Young women with PCOS often have elevated insulin levels and are more likely to develop diabetes. Metformin is a medication often prescribed for women with PCOS to help prevent diabetes. A lifestyle that includes healthy nutrition and daily exercise is the most important part of a PCOS treatment plan. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The food you eat is broken down into simple sugar (glucose) during digestion. Glucose is absorbed into the blood after you eat. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells of the body to be used as energy. If there’s not enough insulin in the body, or if the body can’t use the insulin, sugar levels in the blood become higher. What is insulin resistance? If your body is resistant to insulin, it means you need high levels of insulin to keep your blood sugar normal. Certain medical conditions such as being overweight or having PCOS can cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance tends to run in families. What can insulin resistance do to me? High insulin levels can cause thickening and darkening of the skin (acanthosis nigricans) on the back of the neck, axilla (under the arms), and groin area. In young women with PCOS, high insulin levels can cause the ovaries to make more androgen hormones such as testosterone. This can cause increased body hair, acne, and irregular or few periods. Having insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing diabetes. How can I lower my insulin levels? You can help lower your insulin levels naturally by eating fewer starches and sugars, and more foods that are high in fiber and low in refined carbohydrates. Low glycemic foods, on the other hand, don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels as much as foods that are high in sugar or refined carbohydr Continue reading >>

6 Reasons Why Metformin Might Not Be Safe For Pcos

6 Reasons Why Metformin Might Not Be Safe For Pcos

Have you been prescribed metformin for PCOS and are wondering what the side affects are? Metformin is often described as a ‘safe’ drug, but read on to find out why this might not be the case. When I was diagnosed with PCOS, the first thing I asked my GP was what I could take to ‘fix’ it. She gently explained that there was no pill or surgery that could cure my condition. However, there was a drug that could help with the elevated insulin levels caused by it. Metformin, she claimed, was a safe drug with no major side effects that would help with insulin resistance and weight loss. Sign me up. At first, I thought metformin was the wonder drug. I lost about 5kg in 4 months, more than I had ever been able to lose previously. I was ecstatic. I had a quick look online to see whether there were any side effects and initially found that diarrhea, loose stools, fatigue, and muscle soreness were commonly experienced. But I thought that it was small price to pay for finally being able to lose some weight. However, when I investigated further I found that that there are some much more sinister side effects of metformin that aren’t so widely publicised. These include: – Depleting our bodies of essential nutrients. – Increasing the risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by up to 9 times. – Reducing energy levels by almost 50%. – Killing beneficial gut bacteria. This article is not intended to be a case against metformin for PCOS. There is no doubt that metformin helps to reduce weight, lowers blood glucose levels, and promotes ovulation. My concern is the lack of studies about the safety of long-term use of metformin for PCOS, especially in utero. Drugs can help with the associated symptoms of a disease, but they cannot fix the root cause of it. Metformin i Continue reading >>

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Did you know that one of the main reasons you can't lose weight with PCOS is because of your hormones? It's true, and that's why many women (and physicians) turn to using Metformin to try and help with weight loss. But just because it works for some people doesn't mean it will necessarily work for YOU. Find out why metformin helps with weight loss, but more important what works better and how to finally lose weight if you have PCOS. ​ Insulin & PCOS: Why It's so Important One of the most common medications prescribed for PCOS is metformin. But, PCOS is a hormonal condition which results in weight gain, hair growth on the face, infertility, acne and estrogen/progesterone imbalances. So why is metformin, a medication used to lower blood sugar and treat insulin resistance, used to treat estrogen/progesterone imbalances in women? The logic is quite simple: Most of the symptoms of PCOS (all those listed above) stem from insulin resistanc e! In fact many physicians recommend that ALL women with PCOS should be treated for insulin resistance regardless of what their fasting insulin and fasting blood sugar levels are. This means that the root cause of PCOS (at least the majority of it) is insulin resistance, and this is why metformin is so commonly used to treat. Insulin resistance causes a block of glucose uptake in your skeletal muscles which results in a lower metabolism (and weight gain), insulin also directly acts on your ovaries and adrenals increasing androgens like testosterone and DHEA. It's also the action of insulin on your pituitary that results in increased LH production which over stimulates your ovaries resulting in the characteristic "cysts" of PCOS. ​ High levels of DHEA and testosterone lead to acne and hair growth (hirsutism). ​ But one simple question r Continue reading >>

Metformin For Pcos & Weight Loss

Metformin For Pcos & Weight Loss

Metformin is used for diabetes prevention in women with PCOS.Photo Credit: milosducati/iStock/Getty Images April Khan is a medical journalist who began writing in 2005. She has contributed to publications such as "BBC Focus." In 2012, Khan received her Doctor of Public Health from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. She also holds an Associate of Arts from the Art Institute of Dallas and a Master of Science in international health from University College London. Polycystic ovary syndrome, or PCOS, is a condition caused by an over-production of the luteinizing hormone from the pituitary gland. This over-production causes a hormonal imbalance in estrogen, progesterone and insulin. This results in symptoms such as facial hair growth, weight gain, infertility, ovarian cysts and type 2 diabetes. Although some women dont show these symptoms initially, their physicians may prescribe metformin as a way to prevent diabetes and some may prescribe this medication to treat symptoms of PCOS and aid in weight loss. Metformin is a medication that is usually used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin works by controlling the level of glucose in the blood, by minimizing the amount of glucose your blood absorbs from food and the amount your liver produces. Women with PCOS have an increased level of insulin, which puts these women at risk for developing type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance. This risk is increased if a woman with this condition becomes overweight or obese. Women with PCOS may gain weight easily due to the increased insulin level and may also find it very difficult to lose this weight. For this reason, women are usually told to go on a low-glycemic index diet, which shuns foods that cause spikes in blood insulin after consuming them. In addition to dieta Continue reading >>

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos) And Weight Gain

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos) And Weight Gain

Most women at some point have to contend with weight gain. But for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), losing weight can become a constant struggle. PCOS is the most common hormonal disorder in women of childbearing age and can lead to issues with fertility. Women who have PCOS have higher levels of male hormones and are also less sensitive to insulin or are "insulin-resistant." Many are overweight or obese. As a result, these women can be at a higher risk of diabetes, heart disease, sleep apnea, and uterine cancer. If you have PCOS, certain lifestyle changes can help you shed pounds and reduce the disease's severity. Why does polycystic ovary syndrome cause weight gain? PCOS makes it more difficult for the body to use the hormone insulin, which normally helps convert sugars and starches from foods into energy. This condition -- called insulin resistance -- can cause insulin and sugar -- glucose -- to build up in the bloodstream. High insulin levels increase the production of male hormones called androgens. High androgen levels lead to symptoms such as body hair growth, acne, irregular periods -- and weight gain. Because the weight gain is triggered by male hormones, it is typically in the abdomen. That is where men tend to carry weight. So, instead of having a pear shape, women with PCOS have more of an apple shape. Abdominal fat is the most dangerous kind of fat. That’s because it is associated with an increased risk of heart disease and other health conditions. What are the risks associated with PCOS-related weight gain? No matter what the cause, weight gain can be detrimental to your health. Women with PCOS are more likely to develop many of the problems associated with weight gain and insulin resistance, including: Endometrial cancer Many of these condit Continue reading >>

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin is a type of medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes. Because there is a strong link between diabetes and PCOS, metformin is now commonly proscribed to treat PCOS. But should it be? What is the real relationship between metformin and PCOS? Can Metformin used for PCOS help lessen PCOS symptoms? Metformin used for PCOS: The Science PCOS is an infertility condition that often causes acne, facial hair growth, balding, low sex drive, weight gain, difficulty with weight loss, and mental health disturbances such as depression and anxiety in approximately 15% of women. It is also associated with a myriad of health conditions, spanning from diabetes to hypothyroidism and to heart disease. PCOS is, in short, not a condition to sneeze at. PCOS is a condition of hormone imbalance. With PCOS, male sex hormones such as testosterone and DHEA-S rise relative to the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone. (…Roughly speaking – it’s complicated. For a full-blown account of the science of PCOS and how it affects you, see here.) Elevated testosterone is very often the primary culprit in causing PCOS. (But not always! For one of my most thorough accounts of other things that can cause PCOS, see here.) Insulin causes testosterone levels to rise because insulin tells the ovaries to produce testosterone. Basically, elevated insulin causes elevated testosterone, which causes PCOS. This is where metformin comes into play. Metformin lowers blood sugar levels below what they would otherwise be after a meal. This is because it intervenes with the liver’s interaction with and production of glucose. Insulin is the body’s way of dealing with blood sugar. If blood sugar is lower, then insulin will be lower, and thus testosterone will be lower. Metformin decreases blood sugar, Continue reading >>

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