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Managing Diabetes With Diet And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes: The Fitness You Need

Type 2 Diabetes: The Fitness You Need

Type 2 diabetes is not inevitable. Preventing and even reversing the onset of diabetes is entirely possible, but it takes commitment. Taking charge of your health involves a two-pronged approach: diet and exercise. Both are crucial for long-term success and optimal health. Diet and exercise Diet and exercise are both key components of a successful strategy to beat or manage diabetes. Studies show that diet and exercise can sharply lower the likelihood of diabetes, even in people who are at high risk of developing it. Learn about the risk factors for type 2 diabetes » Other studies also show that lifestyle interventions can improve insulin sensitivity and blood lipid profiles and help lower high blood sugar levels. Diet and exercise help lower body weight — and excess body weight is closely linked to the onset of diabetes. A major clinical study called the Diabetes Prevention Program studied people at risk for diabetes. It showed that lifestyle changes involving 150 minutes of exercise per week decreased the risk of progressing to type 2 diabetes by 58 percent. Keep in mind that diet and exercise should go hand in hand. For instance, even if you regularly exercise, a diet with lots of sugar and fat and very little fiber or phytonutrients (beneficial plant compounds) could more than counteract those efforts. On the other hand, you can eat a healthful diet, but if you never get up and move, your cardiovascular health will almost certainly suffer. Cardiovascular health and diabetes are also intricately linked. Committing to a better diet and daily exercise promotes better blood sugar levels, blood lipid control, and mood. It also leads to higher energy levels, which makes it easier to exercise. Daily exercise helps keep blood vessels healthy, makes you feel better about Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Diabetes Medicines

Common Questions About Diabetes Medicines

How do I know if my diabetes pill is working? The best way to find out how well your diabetes pill is working is to test your blood sugar. Ask a member of your health care team what time of day is best for testing. You'll want to test when your diabetes medicine is expected to be most active in your body. Keep a record of your blood sugar levels (PDF) during that time to see if they're at or near your goal. If your levels are at or near your goal and you're not having any problems with the medicine, then it's probably working well. If you're still not sure, talk to your doctor or other member of your care team. Can I stop taking my diabetes medicine after my blood sugar is under control? It's reasonable to think that after a person gets good blood sugar control, it means the end of managing diabetes. But that's not the case. People with type 1 diabetes aren't able to make their own insulin, so they will always need to take insulin shots every day. For people with type 2 diabetes who are on medicine, the answer isn't as clear. Sometimes when people are first diagnosed, they start on pills or insulin right away. If the person also works hard to control diabetes with diet and exercise, he or she can lower the need for medicine and might be able to stop taking it altogether. As long as the person is able to keep blood sugar levels normal with diet and exercise, there isn't a need for medicine. However, type 2 diabetes changes over time. The change can be fast or slow, but it does change. This means that even if a person was able to stop taking medicine for a while, he or she might need to start taking it again in the future. If a person is taking medicine to keep blood sugar normal, then it's important to keep taking it to lower the chances for heart disease and other healt Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes management requires awareness. Know what makes your blood sugar level rise and fall — And how to control these day-to-day factors. Keeping your blood sugar levels within the range recommended by your doctor can be challenging. That's because many things make your blood sugar levels change, sometimes unexpectedly. Following are some factors that can affect your blood sugar levels. Food Healthy eating is a cornerstone of healthy living — with or without diabetes. But if you have diabetes, you need to know how foods affect your blood sugar levels. It's not only the type of food you eat but also how much you eat and the combinations of food types you eat. What to do: Learn about carbohydrate counting and portion sizes. A key to many diabetes management plans is learning how to count carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the foods that often have the biggest impact on your blood sugar levels. And for people taking mealtime insulin, it's crucial to know the amount of carbohydrates in your food, so you get the proper insulin dose. Learn what portion size is appropriate for each type of food. Simplify your meal planning by writing down portions for the foods you eat often. Use measuring cups or a scale to ensure proper portion size and an accurate carbohydrate count. Make every meal well-balanced. As much as possible, plan for every meal to have a good mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins and fats. It's especially important to pay attention to the types of carbohydrates you choose. Some carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, are better for you than are others. These foods are low in carbohydrates and contain fiber that helps keep your blood sugar levels more stable. Talk to your doctor, nurse or dietitian about the best food choices and Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Diet And Exercise Lifestyle Programme Could Revolutionise Type 2 Treatment

Diabetes: Diet And Exercise Lifestyle Programme Could Revolutionise Type 2 Treatment

In a three year study, patients who carried out the course, which also encouraged healthy lifestyle changes, successfully reduced the need for diabetic medication or insulin. The team of British researchers found that patients who successfully completed the exercise and diet programme had no increase in their oral diabetes medication. In addition, they were half as likely to progress to insulin as those who did not complete the programme and those who did not lose weight. Type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition, but it was only the patients who did not successfully complete the programme that required increased amounts of oral diabetes medications over the subsequent three years. This is the first real-world study to show that the lifestyle weight management programmes that we deliver in the NHS can have a long lasting meaningful clinical effect on type 2 diabetes. The study further found that patients who successfully completed the programme - which costs less than £140 - also went on to maintain a healthier weight in the future than either those who failed to complete the course. Experts said the findings showed simple lifestyle and dietary choices could help tackle the UK’s growing diabetes epidemic. Dr Jennifer Logue, lead author of the study from the University of Glasgow, said: “This is the first real-world study to show that the lifestyle weight management programmes that we deliver in the NHS can have a long lasting meaningful clinical effect on type 2 diabetes. “This study shows that the common assumption that the weight lost is quickly regained is not true. “Currently weight management programmes in the NHS are under-resourced and there is a lack of belief in their effectiveness by clinicians leading to low levels of referral, despite them being re Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes With Diet And Exercise

Managing Diabetes With Diet And Exercise

As you probably know, there are two types of diabetes: Type I and Type II. Type II can often be managed and treated with the right exercises and diet. Type I is a completely different monster, though. If you or a loved one has Type I diabetes, here are some tips to help you manage it and stay as healthy as possible through diet and exercise choices. Carbs Carbohydrates have gotten a pretty bad rep over the years. It’s not that they’re all bad, though. There are both good carbs and bad carbs. This is especially true if you’re trying to manage diabetes. Including carbohydrates in your diet can give you plenty of health benefits, it’s just you have to be smart about which ones you eat. Some of the carbs that you should generally avoid include: White rice White flour White sugar De-germed cornmeal Fruit juices Instead of eating any of the above, try to replace them with better, ‘nicer’ carbs. Foods that are generally considered to be good carbs are whole grain foods, brown rice, whole natural fruits and whole cornmeal. Using Protein to Process Carbs If you choose your proteins and carbs carefully, you can combine them to keep your blood sugar levels in-check and avoid those nasty spikes that lead to bad situations. While you don’t want to overdo it on carbs, you can usually get away with some of them by eating protein with it. Basically, the protein helps your body process the carbs more effectively and consistent to avoid sugar spikes. Some combinations that you might want to try are: Add some unsweetened, natural nut butter to a piece of whole grain bread or crakcers Top some whole grain crackers with your choice of low fat cheese Cook up some brown rice and add some beans into it Create your own “party mix” – combine some pretzels, peanuts and your fa Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin – Is It Possible?

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin – Is It Possible?

It is widely believed that those with Type 2 diabetes may eventually need insulin if they have diabetes for long enough. However, only about 20-30 percent of people with Type 2 diabetes end up needing insulin injections. In this article, we will explore whether it is possible to manage your diabetes without insulin. If so, how can one do so and when they may eventually need insulin if other treatments do not work out? 1 Type 1 Diabetes disclaimer This article is not for people with Type 1 diabetes because it is imperative that people with Type 1 diabetes require insulin every day without question. A person with Type 1 diabetes produces very little, or no insulin. Without insulin, you cannot convert food into usable energy. Simply put, without insulin, a person with Type 1 diabetes cannot survive. 2 When Robert contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, he was concerned that one day he would have to take insulin shots for his Type 2 diabetes. He had heard a few of his friends with diabetes at church talking about how they had to take insulin injections. Robert was “afraid of needles,” and the thought of giving himself a shot scared him. Is Robert going to need to start taking insulin, or is there any way he can avoid it at this point? If he avoids it, what effects would this have on his health? Will he develop long term complications of diabetes if he doesn’t start giving himself shots of insulin? I suggest also reading these: At TheDiabetesCouncil, we decided to take a look at this particular question in depth, for Robert and for others with diabetes who might benefit from reading this information. Insulin isn’t the “bad guy.” Naturally, the fear of giving oneself an injection or “shot,” can increase anxiety and stress. But what if I told you that once you get past t Continue reading >>

New Trial Muddies The Water About Diet, Exercise, And Diabetes

New Trial Muddies The Water About Diet, Exercise, And Diabetes

Long-awaited results from a nearly 10-year trial exploring the effect of changes in diet and exercise among people with diabetes weren’t what most people expected. The Look AHEAD trial found that intensive efforts to lose weight by eating less and exercising more didn’t provide any more protection against heart disease—a common co-traveler with diabetes—than standard diabetes support and education. The spin from some media reports is that weight loss doesn’t reduce heart disease risk among people with type 2 diabetes, but I think that’s the wrong interpretation. In the Look AHEAD trial, researchers recruited more than 5,000 men and women with type 2 diabetes. All were overweight. Half were assigned to a program aimed at losing weight by exercising and cutting calories. People in this group were asked to eat between 1,200 and 1,800 calories a day and to exercise for at least 175 minutes a week. Their goal was to lose at least 7% of their starting weight, and maintain that weight loss. The other half of the volunteers met three times a year for group counseling sessions that focused on the importance of lifestyle changes like more exercise, a better diet, and greater social support to control their diabetes. Both groups lost weight and did a pretty good job keeping it off. Those in the intensive-change group lost a little more weight (about 18 pounds) than those in the comparison group (about 14 pounds). After almost 10 years, the rates of heart attacks, strokes, heart-related deaths, and hospitalizations for chest pain were the same in both groups. The headline only tells part of the story There are several ways to explain why the intensive intervention didn’t seem to do any better than standard care, at least for heart disease. Here’s the “obvious” o Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Exercise In Treating Diabetes

The Importance Of Exercise In Treating Diabetes

The Importance of Exercise in Treating Diabetes Exercise benefits people with diabetes and those at risk for diabetes by helping manage weight, by improving blood sugar levels, and by improving heart health. For a person with diabetes, exercise is just as important as diet and medication. In fact, the American Diabetes Association recommends at least 30 minutes of physical activity that increases the heart rate five days per week. Healthy diet and exercise are likely as strong as any medication I will ever prescribe for diabetes, and should be continued forever, says Michael Heile, MD , a family medicine doctor at TriHealths Family Medical Group . It is important to design a lifelong exercise routine that is both attainable and enjoyable. Walking is one of the easiest and most convenient options, but you may want to explore new options, too! You should exercise at a comfortable pace and do not overexert yourself. If you adhere to a steady, regular program, you can expect these outcomes: Increased insulin sensitivity (insulin works better) Improved cholesterol, heart rate, and blood pressure levels Lower stress, anxiety, boredom, frustration and depression The American Diabetes Association recommends two different types of exercise for managing diabetes: aerobic and strength training. This exercise is done by using your arms and/or legs in a continuous, rhythmic movement in order to increase your heart rate. Examples include running, dancing, biking, swimming and walking. Be sure to pick an aerobic exercise that you enjoy and set realistic goals. Strength training (also called resistance training) makes your body more sensitive to insulin and can lower blood sugar. In addition to aerobic activity, the American Diabetes Association recommends doing strength training exer Continue reading >>

How To Manage Diabetes Risk With Diet And Exercise

How To Manage Diabetes Risk With Diet And Exercise

Expert Reviewed Three Parts:Eating a Nutritious Diet to Reduce Diabetes RiskIncorporating Exercise to Decrease Diabetes RiskManaging Other Diabetes Risk FactorsCommunity Q&A Diabetes is a chronic disease affecting millions of Americans.[1] Fortunately, there are a variety of risk factors you can monitor and track so you're aware of how at risk you may be. If you do not manage these risk factors, you may put yourself at increased risk for developing this lifelong chronic disease. Health professionals recommend making changes to your diet and exercise routine to help manage risk. The combination of these can significantly improve your overall health and help you better manage your risk of developing diabetes. Try to maintain a healthy weight, modify your diet and incorporate more exercise, so you can manage and hopefully lower your risk of developing diabetes. Continue reading >>

4 Diet And Exercise Tips To Control Diabetes

4 Diet And Exercise Tips To Control Diabetes

India leads the diabetes epidemic in the world with an estimated 66.5 million people living with diabetes. Studies have shown that not only is a significant proportion of our population IS predisposed to diabetes, on an average diabetes in Indians sets in at least 10-15 years prior compared to individuals of most other countries. The treatment for diabetes is lifelong, so it is best to adopt preventive measures earlier and save yourself the hassle of taking medication later. Through simple lifestyle changes, you can reduce the risk of developing diabetes and can even reverse it in the early stages. With the rising income levels among urban Indians, there is a corresponding decline in health. Factors such as urbanization, increment in wealth, higher anxiety levels, inactive lifestyles, no or little exercise, excessive consumption of calorie-rich foods and inadequate nourishment, are the main reasons for high incidence of diabetes cases in India. Together, these variables lead to obesity and excessive weight gain. While majority of the diabetes patients in India are middle-aged, the onset of the disease begins at a much younger age. What puts us at risk? Being overweight causes insulin resistance and makes it difficult for the body to maintain appropriate blood glucose levels. As obesity and diabetes are interlinked, health experts have created the term "Diabesity". Several studies indicate that obese individuals are up to 80 times more prone to get Type 2 diabetes than those whose body mass index (BMI) is under 22. Other than obesity, genetic pre-disposition is another major factor that increases the risk of developing diabetes. There is a 15 per cent possibility of getting diabetes if either of the parents is diabetic and this probability increases to an alarming 75 per Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment, Part 1: Diet And Exercise

Diabetes Treatment, Part 1: Diet And Exercise

Acornerstone of diabetes treatment is attention to lifestyle. Unhealthy lifestyles, such as lack of physical activity and excessive eating, initiate and propagate the majority of type 2 diabetes. As discussed in previous articles in this series,1,2 the incidence and prevalence of obesity is rising quickly, both in the United States and in the rest of the world. The frequency of diabetes has risen in tandem with overweight and obesity in essentially all age-groups and ethnicities in the United States, and not by coincidence. Studies have thoroughly demonstrated strong relationships between excess weight and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Physicians are frequently challenged with the task of motivating patients to lose weight and exercise to improve patients' diabetes control and slow or even reverse the natural course of the disease. Lifestyle modification, although different, is an equally integral part of type 1 diabetes management. Patients with type 1 diabetes, because of their universal need for insulin, must learn to count or at least closely estimate the amount of carbohydrate they consume to help regulate their blood glucose levels and adjust their insulin doses. Failure to do so can lead to dangerous hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. Primary Prevention of Diabetes It is difficult to overstate the importance of the relationship between lifestyle and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A recent study demonstrated that both women and men who have a BMI > 35 kg/m2 had a 20-fold increase in their risk of developing diabetes compared to people with a BMI of 18.5-24.9 kg/m2.3 Furthermore, prospective studies have demonstrated that lifestyle modification in the form of diet and regular moderate exercise sharply decreases the l Continue reading >>

Diabetes Remission Possible With Diet, Exercise

Diabetes Remission Possible With Diet, Exercise

In a four-year-long study, overweight and obese diabetics placed on a calorie-restrictive diet along with nearly three hours of exercise per week fared much better than controls After one year, 11.5 percent of the program participants no longer needed medication to keep their blood sugar levels below the diabetes threshold. Only two percent of the non-intervention group experienced any significant improvement in their condition Obesity has now become a greater global health crisis than hunger. It is also the leading cause of disabilities around the world According to a national study there’s been a modest decline in obesity rates among 2- to 4-year-olds from poor families. While the cause for the drop is unclear, some of the potential contributors include a massive increase in breastfeeding over the past three decades, and reduced advertising of junk food to young children By Dr. Mercola It has taken decades, but medical professionals are finally starting to give diet and exercise for the prevention and reversal of type 2 diabetes some well-deserved attention. "... the new study can give people with the disease hope that through lifestyle changes, they could end up getting off medication and likely lowering their risk of diabetes-related complications," Reuters Health reports.1 The research,2 also featured by MedPage Today,3 demonstrates that diet and physical activity are the answer diabetics have been searching for, which is exactly what I've been teaching since I started this web site, 16 years ago. It's worth noting that I do not at all agree with some of the dietary recommendations given to the participants in this study. For example, I believe including healthy saturated fats and avoiding processed liquid meal replacements would be a wise move. I also believe fo Continue reading >>

After Diabetes Diagnosis

After Diabetes Diagnosis

Diabetes is a disease where blood sugar levels are too high because the body can no longer make or use insulin properly. The condition could lead to serious complications and even death. An estimated 29.1 million Americans have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes in the U.S. There are several types of diabetes, including Type 1, Type 2 and gestational — a type that occurs in pregnant women. Type 2 is the most common, and about 95 percent of all people with diabetes in the U.S. have this type. An additional 86 million adults in the United States have prediabetes, a condition where your blood sugar is high but not elevated enough for a diabetes diagnosis. Cases of diabetes increase each year, and every 19 seconds doctors diagnose someone in the U.S. with the disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 1 in 3 adults may be diagnosed with diabetes by 2050. It’s important to keep blood sugar levels controlled because it can cause serious health problems — including kidney disease, heart problems, skin problems and limb amputations. Even if Type 2 diabetes has no cure, it can be prevented and managed. People with the disease can control blood sugar with lifestyle changes and medication. What is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which your body loses its ability to produce and use insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas that the body uses to convert glucose into energy. Without the right amount of insulin, excess sugar builds up in the body and causes a number of health problems. Where Type 1 typically occurs in younger people and is an immune disorder, Type 2 most often occurs later in life. In fact, the medical community used to call Type 2 diabetes “adult-onset” diabetes. M Continue reading >>

Managing Type 2 Diabetes

Managing Type 2 Diabetes

If insulin sensitivity is increased through weight loss and an increase in activity level then less insulin is needed to keep blood glucose levels controlled. If less insulin is needed, then less strain is put on the beta cells. Food, blood glucose and insulin Carbohydrate foods have the greatest direct effect on blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates are broken down into glucose by digestive enzymes. The glucose is then absorbed from the intestine into the bloodstream (usually 1 – 2 hours after eating) and this causes the blood glucose level to rise after a meal. Insulin is needed so that the body’s cells can take this glucose from the bloodstream and either use it for energy or store it for later. People who do not have diabetes will produce just the right amount of insulin to cope with the rise in blood glucose that occurs after a meal. Insulin on demand allows the person without diabetes to keep blood glucose levels within the normal range, even after a meal rich in carbohydrates. If you have Type 2 diabetes then your body no longer produces enough insulin on demand to keep blood glucose levels within the normal range. Many people with Type 2 diabetes do not produce enough insulin to cope with the sharp rise in blood glucose that happens after a meal. Choosing food types that are more slowly digested can reduce the ‘post-meal spike’ in blood glucose, which in turn reduces the demand on the beta cells for insulin. So, a three-pronged attack on the situation can help you to control your blood glucose levels: Increase your daily level of activity – this helps to reduce insulin resistance Reduce you daily calorie intake and try to lose some weight – this helps to reduce insulin resistance Choose carbohydrate foods that are digested more slowly – this takes th Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

If you have gestational diabetes, the chances of having problems with the pregnancy can be reduced by controlling your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You'll also need to be more closely monitored during pregnancy and labour to check if treatment is working and to check for any problems. Checking your blood sugar level You'll be given a testing kit that you can use to check your blood sugar level. This involves using a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. You'll be advised: how to test your blood sugar level correctly when and how often to test your blood sugar – most women with gestational diabetes are advised to test before breakfast and one hour after each meal what level you should be aiming for – this will be a measurement given in millimoles of glucose per litre of blood (mmol/l) Diabetes UK has more information about monitoring your glucose levels. Diet Making changes to your diet can help control your blood sugar level. You should be offered a referral to a dietitian, who can give you advice about your diet, and you may be given a leaflet to help you plan your meals. You may be advised to: eat regularly – usually three meals a day – and avoid skipping meals eat starchy and low glycaemic index (GI) foods that release sugar slowly – such as wholewheat pasta, brown rice, granary bread, all-bran cereals, pulses, beans, lentils, muesli and porridge eat plenty of fruit and vegetables – aim for at least five portions a day avoid sugary foods – you don't need a completely sugar-free diet, but try to swap snacks such as cakes and biscuits for healthier alternatives such as fruit, nuts and seeds avoid sugary drinks – sugar-free or diet drinks are better than sugary versions; be aware that fruit juices and smoothies contain s Continue reading >>

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