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Managing Diabetes With Diet And Exercise

Diabetes And Nutrition

Diabetes And Nutrition

People who have diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. Managing diabetes means managing your blood sugar level. What you eat is closely connected to the amount of sugar in your blood. The right food choices will help you control your blood sugar level. Path to improved health Eating well is one of the primary things you can do to help control diabetes. Do I have to follow a special diet? There isn’t one specific “diabetes diet.” Your doctor can work with you to design a meal plan. A meal plan is a guide that tells you what kinds of food to eat at meals and for snacks. The plan also tells you how much food to have. For most people who have diabetes (and those without, too), a healthy diet consists of: 40% to 60% of calories from carbohydrates. 20% calories from protein. 30% or fewer calories from fat. Your diet should also be low in cholesterol, low in salt, and low in added sugar. Can I eat any sugar? Yes. In recent years, doctors have learned that eating some sugar doesn’t usually cause problems for most people who have diabetes — as long as it is part of a balanced diet. Just be careful about how much sugar you eat and try not to add sugar to foods. What kinds of foods can I eat? In general, at each meal you may have: 2 to 5 choices (or up to 60 grams) of carbohydrates. 1 choice of protein. A certain amount of fat. Talk to your doctor or dietitian for specific advice. Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are found in fruits, vegetables, beans, dairy foods, and starchy foods such as breads. Try to have fresh fruits rather than canned fruits, fruit juices, or dried fruit. You may eat fresh vegetables and frozen or canned vegetables. Condiments such as nonfat mayonnaise, ketchup, and mustard are also carbohydrates. Protein. Protein is found in meat, poultry, fish Continue reading >>

4 Diet And Exercise Tips To Control Diabetes

4 Diet And Exercise Tips To Control Diabetes

India leads the diabetes epidemic in the world with an estimated 66.5 million people living with diabetes. Studies have shown that not only is a significant proportion of our population IS predisposed to diabetes, on an average diabetes in Indians sets in at least 10-15 years prior compared to individuals of most other countries. The treatment for diabetes is lifelong, so it is best to adopt preventive measures earlier and save yourself the hassle of taking medication later. Through simple lifestyle changes, you can reduce the risk of developing diabetes and can even reverse it in the early stages. With the rising income levels among urban Indians, there is a corresponding decline in health. Factors such as urbanization, increment in wealth, higher anxiety levels, inactive lifestyles, no or little exercise, excessive consumption of calorie-rich foods and inadequate nourishment, are the main reasons for high incidence of diabetes cases in India. Together, these variables lead to obesity and excessive weight gain. While majority of the diabetes patients in India are middle-aged, the onset of the disease begins at a much younger age. What puts us at risk? Being overweight causes insulin resistance and makes it difficult for the body to maintain appropriate blood glucose levels. As obesity and diabetes are interlinked, health experts have created the term "Diabesity". Several studies indicate that obese individuals are up to 80 times more prone to get Type 2 diabetes than those whose body mass index (BMI) is under 22. Other than obesity, genetic pre-disposition is another major factor that increases the risk of developing diabetes. There is a 15 per cent possibility of getting diabetes if either of the parents is diabetic and this probability increases to an alarming 75 per Continue reading >>

New Trial Muddies The Water About Diet, Exercise, And Diabetes

New Trial Muddies The Water About Diet, Exercise, And Diabetes

Long-awaited results from a nearly 10-year trial exploring the effect of changes in diet and exercise among people with diabetes weren’t what most people expected. The Look AHEAD trial found that intensive efforts to lose weight by eating less and exercising more didn’t provide any more protection against heart disease—a common co-traveler with diabetes—than standard diabetes support and education. The spin from some media reports is that weight loss doesn’t reduce heart disease risk among people with type 2 diabetes, but I think that’s the wrong interpretation. In the Look AHEAD trial, researchers recruited more than 5,000 men and women with type 2 diabetes. All were overweight. Half were assigned to a program aimed at losing weight by exercising and cutting calories. People in this group were asked to eat between 1,200 and 1,800 calories a day and to exercise for at least 175 minutes a week. Their goal was to lose at least 7% of their starting weight, and maintain that weight loss. The other half of the volunteers met three times a year for group counseling sessions that focused on the importance of lifestyle changes like more exercise, a better diet, and greater social support to control their diabetes. Both groups lost weight and did a pretty good job keeping it off. Those in the intensive-change group lost a little more weight (about 18 pounds) than those in the comparison group (about 14 pounds). After almost 10 years, the rates of heart attacks, strokes, heart-related deaths, and hospitalizations for chest pain were the same in both groups. The headline only tells part of the story There are several ways to explain why the intensive intervention didn’t seem to do any better than standard care, at least for heart disease. Here’s the “obvious” o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs - Disease Management

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs - Disease Management

With exercise, the correct diet and insulin therapy you can successfully manage the health of your diabetic dog. Can diabetes be cured? The underlying cause of diabetes cannot be cured. Diabetic dogs usually require lifelong treatment with an insulin preparation. Aim of Treatment Restoring your diabetic dog’s quality of life is the aim of treatment. This means minimizing diabetic complications without causing hypoglycaemia and stopping the signs of diabetes mellitus: drinking lots of water urinating frequently increased hunger and weight loss. Poorly managed or untreated diabetes mellitus may result in diabetic ketoacidosis, a serious condition. This must be treated as an emergency requiring prompt treatment. Read more under Emergencies. How are diabetic dogs treated? Successful diabetes management is dependent upon a regular routine. Correct feeding – See the section on Nutrition for advice on establishing the correct feeding regime for your dog. Intact bitches with diabetes should be spayed. The ovaries produce progesterone for a period known as diestrus after the bitch has been on "heat". Read more... Helping your dog regain its quality of life through the effective treatment of diabetes is very rewarding. Continue reading >>

Aging & Health A To Z

Aging & Health A To Z

Diabetes Lifestyle & Management Managing Diabetes with Diet and Exercise Healthy eating and exercise is very beneficial for people with diabetes. They can improve your overall health, help manage your blood glucose level, and decrease your risk of the complications of diabetes. Your healthcare providers will help you design a diet and exercise program that is right for you. They will help you increase your level of physical activity safely and gradually, so you can keep it up over time. Your diet and exercise plan will also take into account any other illnesses or physical limitations you may have. Your healthcare provider may also have you work with a dietician to help you develop a healthy food plan that you will enjoy. Choose Healthy, Low-calorie Foods—and Watch the Calories To help manage your blood glucose levels, you need to control the number of calories you eat each day. But you don’t have to give up taste and satisfaction! Here’s how to eat well and healthfully when you have diabetes: Eat smaller portions at each meal. If you eat out, share what you order with a friend or bring home part of your meal to eat the next day. Eat cereals, breads, and pasta made with whole grains instead of white flour. Substitute brown rice for white rice and sweet potatoes for white potatoes. Read labels on foods such as cereal, bread, and pasta. Choose those containing at least 3 grams or more of fiber per serving. Eat a variety of brightly-colored, low calorie fruits and vegetables. Aim for 6 to 9 servings a day. Especially good choices include leafy greens (such as spinach, chard, kale, collards, mustard greens, and dark green or red lettuces), broccoli, broccoli rabe, red peppers, carrots, berries, cherries, apples, pears, and citrus fruits. Drink water or unsweetened tea Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes Risk With Diet And Exercise

Managing Diabetes Risk With Diet And Exercise

Daily activity may be the best medicine for people who have or are at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. According to a 2014 study released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 12.3% of U.S. adults have diabetes. The majority of them have Type 2 diabetes, a condition where your blood sugar, or blood glucose, levels are too high as a result of poor diet, lack of exercise and obesity. “With Type 2 diabetes, your body can no longer make or use insulin, the hormone which helps the body regulate glucose levels,” says Dr. Sheri Colberg, a professor of human movement sciences at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va., who specializes in diabetes and exercise research. “Normally insulin helps the body use glucose for energy. When this doesn’t happen, glucose ends up being stored in places like the abdomen, liver, pancreas.” Dr. Colberg says a combination of diet and increased physical activity can help prevent Type 2 diabetes, and even reverse the disease. Cardio and strength workouts are both important, she says; if there’s only time for one, choose resistance training. “We lose muscle mass as we age,” she says. “It’s important to keep muscle fibers strong and active. Most of us are on our feet or walk around at least some part of the day, but how often do we jump, hop, sprint or really engage our muscles?” Dr. Colbeg suggests 30 minutes of strength training a few days a week. “Body weight exercises like plank or lunges work just as well as weights,” she says. For those unsure if they are at risk for diabetes, Dr. Colberg says ask your doctor for an A1C blood test, which is used to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes, the condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated but that isn’t yet full-blown disease. Write to Continue reading >>

Tips For Managing Type 1 And 2 Diabetes At Home

Tips For Managing Type 1 And 2 Diabetes At Home

Diabetes home care management facts Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. The main types of diabetes mellitus are type 1 (insulin deficiency; formerly called juvenile diabetes) and type 2 (insulin resistance). Type 1 diabetes requires insulin therapy as well as controlled nutrition and exercise. Type 2 diabetes is best treated with weight reduction, the proper diabetic diet, and exercise. When these measures do not control the blood sugar, oral medications and/or injectable therapies (including insulin) are prescribed. The main goal of diabetes care is to control blood glucose levels in order to prevent the serious complications of diabetes. Glucose levels should be lowered into the normal range, while avoiding low blood sugar whenever possible. It is essential to monitor the effects of treatment on blood glucose levels to avoid overtreatment or undertreatment. Two kinds of home blood glucose monitoring exist. The first type uses a reagent strip. The second type uses a reagent strip and glucose meter. Use of the glucose meter has become more common due to higher reliability than strips alone. Glucose can also be measured in the urine but no longer has a significant role in home testing. Ketoacidosis is a serious but preventable complication from inadequate treatment of diabetes. This dangerous condition is identified by testing for the urine for ketones. People with diabetes should discuss monitoring in detail with their health-care professional, and have clearly defined goals for blood sugar control. Choices for blood glucose meters should be discussed with your physician and any caregivers. The optimal meter accounts for characteristics of the patient which impact usability, such as visual impa Continue reading >>

8 Easy Health Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

8 Easy Health Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body can no longer control the amount of sugar in your blood. It can lead to a number of complications, if it's not managed properly, including heart disease, sight loss and nerve damage. The number of people diagnosed with the condition has risen by 54% in last decade. And experts are warning that type 2 diabetes is fast becoming one of the biggest health crises of our time – with 12 million people at risk of developing the condition. If you've been recently diagnosed, it's easy to feel daunted. But help is at hand. We asked pharmacist Anshu Bhimbat LloydsPharmacy about the best ways to work with your doctor to manage your type 2 diabetes (and even 'reverse' the condition in some cases). He says: "There are a few things that you can do to help manage diabetes and make it a part of your day to day life. Small lifestyle changes can make living with type 2 diabetes easier, delay the progression and support a healthier lifestyle. In some cases, dietary changes and weight loss can even help reverse the insulin sensitivity that people with type 2 diabetes experience." Here are the tips he gives to patients: 1. Cut down on carbohydrates Carbs aren't the enemy – we all need them to survive. But the type and amount you consume can make a difference to your condition. Diabetes UK suggests these ways of including good carbohydrates in your diet, for instance: Choose wholegrain breads and cereals. Have fruit whole, rather than as a juice. Eating an apple with the skin on, for example, will provide more fibre than drinking a glass of apple juice. Try quinoa and couscous as an alternative to pasta. Bhimbat says: "A low carbohydrate diet is highly recommended for people living with type 2 diabetes as it will lower the amount of insulin that the bo Continue reading >>

Diet And Exercise Are Key To Diabetes Management.

Diet And Exercise Are Key To Diabetes Management.

Diabetes statistics are staggering. A recent global assessment of diabetes found that there are 422 million adults living with diabetes in 2014. That's a fourfold increase since 1980. What’s more is that by 2025, the number is expected to surpass 700 million. With those statistics, diabetes is a serious public health issue. But one that can be managed and in some cases, prevented. Most people who develop diabetes are overweight or obese. With changes in lifestyle and nutrition, people with diabetes can live well and decrease serious risks of the condition. Manage Diabetes with Small Changes When people are first diagnosed with diabetes, they can often feel like their days of eating normally are over. But Rachel Johnson, RD, a research scientist with Abbott, says diabetes can be managed. “People with diabetes can live normal, active lives,” she says. In addition to glucose monitoring and taking medication as needed, people can manage their diabetes through exercise and diet changes. And small changes can have big payoffs. For instance, weight loss can have a huge impact. For someone living with diabetes, losing 5 percent or more of his or her body weight can lead to: To manage diabetes and lose weight, strive for healthy food choices, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, non-fat dairy, beans and lean meats. Be Choosy About Carbs In addition to monitoring the amount of carbohydrates you eat, Johnson says people should focus on eating and drinking the right types of carbohydrates—foods and drinks that minimize blood sugar response, while providing a good source of fiber. Timing of meals is also important, Johnson says. “Skipping meals can make it more difficult to manage blood sugar,” she says. “Regular meals eaten close to the same time every day can he Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes With Diet & Food Planning

Managing Diabetes With Diet & Food Planning

Alongside exercise, a healthy diet is an important element of the lifestyle management of diabetes, as well as being preventive against the onset of type 2 diabetes. Maintaining a good diet is also a vital part of keeping tight control of blood sugar levels, itself important for minimizing the risk of diabetes complications.1 The good news for people living with diabetes is that the condition does not preclude any particular type of food or require an unusual diet - the goal is much the same as it would be for anyone wishing to eat a healthy, balanced diet.2 What diet is best for diabetes? Having diabetes does not involve any particularly difficult dietary demands, and while sugary foods obviously affect blood glucose levels, the diet does not have to be completely sugar-free.2 Dietary concerns vary slightly for people with different types of diabetes. For people with type 1 diabetes, diet is about managing fluctuations in blood glucose levels while for people with type 2 diabetes, it is about losing weight and restricting calorie intake.3 For people with type 1 diabetes, the timing of meals is particularly important in terms of glycemic control and in relation to the effects of insulin injection.3 In general, however, a healthy, balanced diet is all that is needed, and the benefits are not confined to good diabetes management - they also mean good heart health.2,4 A healthy diet typically includes a variety of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, skinless poultry and fish, nuts and legumes and non-tropical vegetable oils.4 The following are some general dietary tips for a healthy lifestyle:2-5 Eat regularly - avoid the effects on glucose levels of skipping meals or having delayed meals because of work or long journeys (take healthy snacks with y Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

Reversing Diabetes Is Possible

Reversing Diabetes Is Possible

Bethesda, Maryland (CNN) -- When Jonathan Legg of Bethesda, Maryland, got a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes at 39, he was shocked. "I had always been pretty active," said Legg. "But it was a big wake-up call, that what I was doing and my current weight were not OK." That was two years ago. Since that time, the Morgan Stanley executive decided to make some changes and reverse his diabetes. Although his doctor recommended he go on medication to control his illness, Legg took a different approach. Instead of meds, he began to exercise every day and changed his diet, cutting out alcohol, fatty foods and watching his carbs. Do you have diabetes? How well are you managing it? "I wanted to be able to know the changes I was making were making a difference, and it wasn't the drug," said Legg. According to new statistics just out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 25.8 million people, or 8.3% of the U.S. population, are affected by either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Most, like Legg, have type 2 diabetes, which in many people develops later in life. Caused primarily by genetic makeup, a sedentary lifestyle and poor eating habits, type 2 diabetes can be reversed in some cases. By making changes to their lives such as adding exercise and improving their diets, many type 2 diabetics can drop their glucose or sugar numbers back to the normal range, reversing their condition. "We have seen numerous people reverse their condition," says Dr. Michelle Magee, director of the MedStar Diabetes Institute in Washington. "But it takes a real dedication for the rest of their lives," she notes. So why do exercise and diet help reverse diabetes? To answer that question, we first need to know why people get diabetes in the first place. Diabetes is caused when there is too much glucose Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes: Six Healthy Steps With The Most Benefit

Managing Diabetes: Six Healthy Steps With The Most Benefit

Want to boost your overall health with diabetes? A Johns Hopkins expert offers healthy strategies to help you control your blood sugar, protect your heart, and more. Want more information, support, and advice about practical, everyday ways to stay healthy with diabetes? Ask your doctor about a diabetes self-management class near you. In a 2011 study from The Johns Hopkins University, people who took diabetes-education classes saw their A1C reduced by a significant 0.72 percent. About 17.7 million Americans with diabetes take medications—pills, injections, or both—to help keep their blood sugar within a healthy range, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s important, and it’s important to take medication as prescribed, but don’t stop there. People with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease or a stroke than those without this chronic condition, according to the American Heart Association. “It’s very important to take care of your heart health too,” says Johns Hopkins diabetes expert Rita Rastogi Kalyani, M.D., M.H.S. “Making smart choices every day can help.” Kalyani recommends starting with these six critical steps today. Extra pounds? Lose a little. You don’t have to be a “biggest loser” or get an “extreme makeover” to enjoy big weight-loss benefits if you have diabetes. In a nationwide study of 5,145 people with type 2 diabetes, those who shed just 5 to 10 percent of their weight (for someone weighing 175 pounds, that’s a loss of 9 to 17.5 pounds) were three times more likely to lower their A1C (a test of long-term blood sugar control) by 0.5 percent, a significant drop. They were also 50 percent more likely to lower their blood pressure by 5 points and twice as likely to lower thei Continue reading >>

10 Diet And Exercise Tricks To Control Diabetes

10 Diet And Exercise Tricks To Control Diabetes

Small goals make a big difference When it comes to type 2 diabetes, you need diet and exercise goals that encourage you to succeed—not ones that set you up to fail, says Ann Goebel-Fabbri, PhD, a psychologist and investigator at the Joslin Diabetes Center, in Boston. "I think goals have to be small and well spelled out for people. Everyone has the experience of going to a health practitioner and being told something vague: 'You know, you really ought to lose weight.' What does that mean? Goals need to be broken down into small nuts and bolts," she says. First step: See where you stand now Margaret Savoca, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, suggests that you stop and look at your eating and exercise habits, and figure out what will be the easiest changes to make, rather than making huge changes that are tough to sustain. "Diabetes is a marathon, not a sprint," says Elizabeth Hardy, 47, a Dallas resident who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2005. For Hardy it was easiest to make changes in her life one step at a time. Here are 10 ways to start. Bring your own lunch Avoid eating lunch at restaurants or fast-food joints. Restaurant meals "can go out of control easily," Savoca says. They tend to have large portions, lots of calories, and high amounts of fat. Research has found an association between eating out more and having a higher body weight. When you make your own lunch, you control the ingredients and your portion sizes. If making your own lunch every day is too much, you might want to try twice a week to start. Use a pedometer These handy devices—available for less than $20 at sporting goods stores—clip on to your waistband and record the number of steps you take. Use one to estimat Continue reading >>

Diet Or Exercise: Which Is More Effective For Managing Diabetes?

Diet Or Exercise: Which Is More Effective For Managing Diabetes?

You hear about the importance of diet and nutrition all the time when you have diabetes. It’s true that what you eat and how you eat is essential to controlling diabetes. But regular physical activity is just as beneficial as diet. In fact, regular exercise is one of the most effective tools in diabetes management. What is the difference between physical activity and exercise? Physical activity includes all movement that increases energy use. It doesn’t need to have a structured or formal plan: you can make it part of your everyday routine—walking to the bus stop, dancing at a party on the weekend, cutting the grass or chasing your grandchildren. On the other hand, exercise is planned, structured physical activity. There are three categories of exercise: aerobic exercise, strength training and stretching. Aerobic exercise is an exercise that increases your heart rate and your rate of breathing. When you exercise aerobically, your body uses oxygen as it breaks down fat and glucose for energy. This type of exercise requires you to move the large muscles, which boost the heart rate. Aerobic exercise includes aerobic videotapes, riding a stationary bike, running or walking on a treadmill, taking an aerobics or water aerobics class or using a stair climber. Strength training sometimes known as resistance training, helps you build strong bones and muscles. It includes exercises with free weights, weight machines, body weight, or elastic resistance bands. Stretching increases muscle and joint flexibility and range of motion so you can move your joints and limbs fully. Exercises that focus on flexibility include yoga, tai chi and Pilates. What are the benefits of exercise? Regular exercise can lower your blood glucose—also called blood sugar, blood pressure, and bad cho Continue reading >>

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