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Managing Diabetes At School: Tools For The School Nurse

School Nurse Resources

School Nurse Resources

Please CONTACT US to suggest further additions to this resource list. Thank you. These may be third party resources and therefore you may be directed to a site that is not part of CSNO. Research shows that school nurse case-management of chronically ill students increases attendance. (Engelke, M.K., Guttu, M., Warren, W.B, & Swanson, M. (2008); Levy, M., Heffner, B., Stewart, T., Beeman, G. (2006). The California Attorney Generals Office, the Ad Council, California Endowment and community partners including CSNO, sent communications experts to interview nearly 1,000 parents of chronically absent elementary school students. They learned some very interesting things, including: Parents have big dreams for their children, but those dreams are tied to high school and beyond (graduation, college admission, etc.). Only 3741% of interviewed parents thought that K3 absences are a serious issue. Simple changes to messaging can have a big positive impact. For example, parents are better able to understand the reasonable number of absences if you refer to absences per month (an average of 2+ is too many), as opposed to absences per term or year (18+ absences is too many). Parents prefer to communicate via text message. School and community leaders should consider using text messages as part of a comprehensive outreach strategy. All of this information is now available in the form of a positive parent messaging toolkit. The toolkit includes all of the research reports, communication tools based on the research, and recommendations that will help district and community leaders develop their own communications strategies. Attendance Works ( ) is a national and state initiative that promotes better policy and practice around school attendance. We promote tracking chronic absence data Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes At School: Tools For The School Nurse Book And Record Forms

Managing Diabetes At School: Tools For The School Nurse Book And Record Forms

Managing Diabetes at School: Tools for the School Nurse Book and Record Forms Managing Diabetes at School: Tools for the School Nurse Book and Record Forms Managing Diabetes at School: Tools for the School Nurse Book and Record Forms Managing Diabetes at School: Tools for the School Nurse Managing Diabetes at School: Tools for the School Nurse Record Forms 10/Package Managing Diabetes at School: Tools for the School Nurse provides school nurses and other diabetes-trained health care professionals with sample IHPs, as well as tools and resources needed for assessment, planning and implementing the IHP. The diabetes procedures, skills checklists, delegation checklists and forms for documenting students daily diabetes management, compliment the three tiered framework for training school staff outlined in the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) Helping the Student with Diabetes Succeed: A Guide for School Personnel, updated 2010 edition. Tools for the School Nurse is a 220 page spiral manual accompanied by a disc containing forms in PDF and WORD formats, and is adapted from NASNs H.A.N.D.S. (Helping Administer to the Needs of the Student with Diabetes in School) program. School Health Office Diabetes Record (SHODR) is a tri-fold form that allows documentation of medication administration, blood glucose monitoring and interventions for students in the school setting diagnosed with diabetes. This item is prepared for sale in shrink-wrapped packs of 10. In Stock: The item is in stock in our warehouse. Stock statuses can change daily as we process customer orders and receive new inventory. A customer care representative will contact you if there is a problem shipping your in stock item. Available: The item is available but not stored in our warehouse. Available items ma Continue reading >>

Colorado Kids With Diabetes | Nurse Files: Includes Individualized Health Plans

Colorado Kids With Diabetes | Nurse Files: Includes Individualized Health Plans

Nurse Files: includes Individualized Health Plans Contains Instructions, Individualized Health Plans, Standards of Care, Provider Order forms, Documentation records/logs and resources Standards of Care for Diabetes Management in the School Setting 2017 :These standards of care for students with Type 1 Diabetes are to be used in conjunction with the Colorado Provider Orders & Individualized Health Plans. The students health care provider may indicate exceptions to these standards on the students individual orders. These Standards were originally developed in 2013 by theColorado Kids with Diabetes Care and Prevention Collaborative of local health care providers, nurses and stakeholders and are updated annually. Guidelines of Insulin Management :Practicalguidelines on insulin management in Colorado Collaborative Guidelines for Dexcom G5 Non-Adjunctive Dosing :These guidelines are to be used if parents have requested to use the Dexcom G5 (only) for Non-Adjunctive Insulin dosing. Guiding Principles Chronic Health Conditions : Guidance from the Colorado Department of Education and the American Diabetes Association Bus Emergency Medication on Bus 2013 :Provided by the Colorado Department of Education guidelines for medication administration on school buses. ADA CGM Guidance Nov 2016 : Guidance from the American Diabetes Association regarding the use of CGM in the school setting #502 Insulin Carb Calculation worksheet : Documentation tool for daily Insulin Carb dosing #505 School Reporting Form-BDC : Optional form to report Blood Glucose that are out of range #720 Low-High BS Hands A great visual tool that lists the symptoms, causes and how to problem solve both high and low blood sugars on one piece of paper.Great reference for classroom teachers, substitute teachers, aids an Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes At School Playbook

Managing Diabetes At School Playbook

Goodbye, summer. Hello, homework. And guess what—the first assignment isn’t for kids. Parents, make a game plan to ensure all the bases are covered for your child’s diabetes care at school. Getting back into the routine of school takes a little more preparation for kids with diabetes, but it pays off over and over as the weeks and months go by. And since kids spend nearly half their waking hours in school, reliable diabetes care during the school day really matters. Some older students will be comfortable testing their blood sugar, injecting insulin, and adjusting levels if they use an insulin pump. Younger students and those who just found out they have diabetes will need help with everyday diabetes care. In a perfect world, all teachers and other school staff would understand how to manage diabetes so they could support your child as needed. But here in the real world, you’ll want to provide information to the school and work with staff to keep your son or daughter safe and healthy, no matter what the school day brings. Put it in Writing No two kids handle their diabetes exactly the same way. Before the year begins, meet with your child’s health care team to develop a personalized Diabetes Medical Management Plan (DMMP). Then visit the school and review the DMMP with the principal, office secretary, school nurse, nutrition service manager, teachers, and other staff who may have responsibility for your son or daughter during the day and after school. The DMMP explains everything about diabetes management and treatment, including: Target blood sugar range and whether your child needs help checking his or her blood sugar Your child’s specific hypoglycemia (low blood sugar, or “low”) symptoms (see the list on this page) and how to treat hypoglycemia Insuli Continue reading >>

School Nurse Controversy Ruffles Our Diabetes Feathers

School Nurse Controversy Ruffles Our Diabetes Feathers

Today is National School Nurse Day and a time when many are recognizing the 74,000 school nurses in the U.S. So, it's a perfect time to take a look at the current landscape of school nurses. Of course, we thank those make it their professional responsibility to take care of kids in school. There are a lo t of great nurses out there who do wonders for our taking care of our D-Kids and make sure they are safe in school. We appreciate all that you do! But there also people involved in this profession who can make diabetes care in school a complicated and contentious issue. To make matters worse, many schools are slashing these nurses in the wake of budget cuts. Kids with diabetes often get caught in the crossfire, and are left dangling between an unsupportive school and rules that don't allow them to turn elsewhere to get the help they need. That's unfortunately led to some serious bad blood and legal battles between educators and parents -- whereas they should be collaborating toward academic success AND health success in school. The Case of Insulin Delivery in California Schools In the past few years, all eyes have been on California, where the role of school nurses in routine D-Management has boiled over into the state's highest courts. Almost three years ago now, a state appeals court ruled that state law is written to allow only school nurses to give diabetic students insulin, and that no one else can be trained to do so because it's a nursing function and requires some skill and scientific knowledge. You know, because it's not like anyone without a nursing degree can ever deliver insulin properly... (I'm still waiting to receive my nursing degree). What's most fascinating about this case is that all the courts that have ruled on it think the law is wrong. They recogn Continue reading >>

School Model - Rural Diabetes Prevention Toolkit

School Model - Rural Diabetes Prevention Toolkit

Children have unique diabetic needs and it is important that school staff are aware of how to properly care for diabetic children. Children are more commonly afflicted with type 1 diabetes but the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in children is increasing rapidly. This demonstrates a need for interventions that emphasize healthy lifestyle behaviors. School nurse involvement is crucial in testing and the administration of insulin and/or glucagon when needed. It is also beneficial to have additional staff members (not nurses) within the school environment who are comfortable assisting students with their diabetes. Staff can advocate for and support diabetic students by understanding the importance of water and bathroom breaks as well as blood sugar monitoring. Educating the children's classmates about diabetes will also help to increase understanding and break down barriers between peers. Schools are great places to educate children and families about diabetes and dispel myths about the disease. They can be a source for students, parents, teachers, and administrators to prevent and manage diabetes through improved food choices, exercise opportunities, education, and screening. They may also provide a more appropriate learning environment for children and adolescents than clinical settings. Helping the Student with Diabetes Succeed: A Guide for School Personnel The guide includes recommended actions for school administrator, nurse, trained diabetes personnel, teacher, physical education teacher, food service manager, transportation manager and bus driver, school psychologist, counselor or social worker, parents and guardians, and students Organization(s): National Institute of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases The Centers for Disease Co Continue reading >>

Product Information - S065- Managing Diabetes At School: Tools For The School Nurse

Product Information - S065- Managing Diabetes At School: Tools For The School Nurse

S065- Managing Diabetes at School: Tools for the School Nurse If you are a member, click here to log in. S065- Managing Diabetes at School: Tools for the School Nurse Managing Diabetes at School: Tools for the School Nurse Author:National Association of School Nurses (NASN) This 220-page manual (3-ring binder) is adapted from NASNs H.A.N.D.S.sm (Helping Administer to the Needs of the Student with Diabetes in School) program. It includes 3 diabetes IHPs and the documentation forms and training tools to support implementation of the IHP. You will receive sample procedures for BGM, ketone testing, insulin administration, skills checklists, and training documentation forms, as well as 2 additional daily diabetes management documentation forms (SHODR*). The manual is accompanied by a disc containing all of the forms in PDF and WORD formats.Revised June 2014 School Health Office Documentation Record (SHODR) Forms -packs of 10 ($6 for members - $11 for non-members) This tri-fold form on heavy stock paper is designed to be a comprehensive documentation tool for a students daily diabetes management. When you purchase the Diabetes Management at School: Tools for the School Nurse publication you receive 2 SHODR forms. Purchase packs of 10 for additional students. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Back To School Wisdom, From A Texas School Nurse With Type 1

Diabetes Back To School Wisdom, From A Texas School Nurse With Type 1

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. As it's Back to School season, we thought it would be valuable to hear some wisdom from a school nurse, on the front lines of helping take care of kids and teens with diabetes during school days. It's a tough job. So today we welcome fellow T1D Cassie Moffitt, who is a school nurse in Texas. You may remember her name as one of our 2016 Patient Voices Scholarship winners, who attended our annual DiabetesMine Innovation Summit last year. We're grateful for her work, and also her contributions here at the 'Mine today, sharing some very specific D-advice from the school nurse POV. On Back to School with Diabetes, by Cassie Moffitt Its the most wonderful time of year! Christmas? Um, no.Back to school. For you parents out there, now is the time when you get totake advantage of Back to School sales, the wine aisle at Target that faces theschool supply aisle (at least at mine), and tax-free weekend (in Texas,anyway). Oh, and that time when you get to drop your little darlings off to yourtrusted teachers and school nurses -- like me -- for a daily eight-hour dose ofinstruction for the next 180 days. If youre the parent of a child with type 1 diabetes, it mayalso be the most stressful time of year. You know what Im talkingaboutsitting on edge to find out who your childs teacher might be, praying towhatever deity you subscribe to that they will be understanding and tolerant ofyour childs needs and a trusted ally. You may also be sitting on the edge ofyour seat praying that the school nurse you worked with last year will return,understanding and tolerant of your childs needs or a trusted ally. If theywere none of those, youre proba Continue reading >>

Actions For The School Nurse

Actions For The School Nurse

Please print and distribute to the School Nurse When a school nurse is assigned to the school (or school district), he or she is the key school staff member who leads and coordinates the provision of health care services for a student with diabetes at school and at school-related activities. The school nurse, in collaboration with the principal, takes the lead in identifying, training, and providing ongoing supervision of trained diabetes personnel. Diabetes technology, therapies, and evidence-based practice all are changing rapidly. The school nurse, who provides care to students with diabetes and facilitates diabetes management training for school personnel, has the professional responsibility to acquire and maintain current knowledge and competency related to diabetes management on a regular and ongoing basis. (See Train School Personnel ) The school nurse is responsible for the following actions and should review them when notified that a student with diabetes is enrolled in the school, annually, or more often as necessary. Understand your role in ensuring compliance with Federal and State laws that may apply to students with diabetes, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Understand the procedures for implementing these laws. (See School Responsibilities Under Federal Laws ) Understand State laws regarding delegation/assignment of nursing tasks and other laws relating to the provision of health care in schools. Obtain and review the students current Diabetes Medical Management Plan (DMMP) (PDF, 218 KB) and other pertinent information from the students parents/guardians. Using the medical orders in the DMMP and information obtained from a thorough nursing as Continue reading >>

School Nurse / Diabetes Managament

School Nurse / Diabetes Managament

Managing diabetes at school is most effective when there is a partnership among students, parents, school nurse, health care providers, teachers, counselors, coaches, transportation, food service employees, and administrators. The school nurse provides the health expertise and coordination needed to ensure cooperation from all partners in assisting the student toward self-management of diabetes. Each student with diabetes is unique in his or her disease process, developmental and intellectual abilities and levels of assistance required for disease management. The goals of the Diabetes Medical Management Plan are to promote normal or near normal blood glucose with minimal episodes of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, normal growth and development, positive mental health, and academic success (Kaufman, 2009). Throughout childhood and adolescence, the student with diabetes is continuously moving through transitions toward more independence and self-management (Silverstein et al., 2005). They will require various levels of supervision or assistance to perform diabetes care tasks in school. Students who lack diabetes management experience or cognitive and developmental skills must have assistance with their diabetes management during the school day as determined by the nursing assessment and as outlined in the Diabetes Medical Management Plan. American Diabetes Association (ADA). (2011). Diabetes care in the school and day care setting. Diabetes Care, 34(Supp 1), S70-S74. Kauffman, F. (Ed.). (2009). Medical management of type 1 diabetes (5th ed.). Alexandria, VA: American Diabetes Association. National Association of School Nurses (NASN). (2012). Diabetes Management in the School Setting. Silverstein, J., Klingensmith, G., Copeland, K., Plotnick, L., Kaufman, F., & Clark, N. ( Continue reading >>

Tips For School Nurses

Tips For School Nurses

Tips for School Nurses provide ideas to help the school nurse coordinate diabetes care in the school setting. Tips include planning for the care newly diagnosed or returning student, where to seek training resources, preparation for field trips, what information to provide to transportation, and other information. Meet with parent/guardian before the school year begins or after diagnosis to review the student's Diabetes Medical Management Plan/physician's orders (DMMP) and secure needed diabetes supplies, equipment, medication, and snacks. Determine if parents/ guardian is authorized to make adjustments to insulin as indicated in the student's DMMP. Make sure the parent/guardian provides notification of any changes to the student's diabetes regimen and obtains an updated DMMP to document changes. Seek out training as needed to update your skills and gain knowledge about new technologies such as the insulin pump or continuous glucose monitor. Put an Emergency Action Plan in place for prompt recognition and treatment of hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) and make sure the student has immediate access to a quick-acting form of glucose (regular soda, fruit juice, glucose tabs). Put an Emergency Action Plan in place for prompt recognition and treatment of hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) and make sure the student has immediate access to a water and insulin as prescribed in the DMMP. Inform school employees that a student with diabetes should never be sent anywhere alone if feeling hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic. Inform parent/guardian that their child has rights under relevant federal laws such as Section 504 and be a member of the team that determines eligibility for services under federal law and develops the 504 plan or other written accommodations plan. Identify and recr Continue reading >>

A School Nurse Shares What Matters In T1d Care

A School Nurse Shares What Matters In T1d Care

A School Nurse Shares What Matters in T1D Care I stepped into meaningful life-changing work when I became a nurse. I started my nursing career in the Neonatal ICU. It was beautifully rewarding, but intensely demanding. When I made the change to school nursing, I wrestled with doubts about this role and if this work would be enough. Had I traded quality time with my family for career suicide? My first year as a school nurse, I found myself deep in Type 1 diabetes with two boys. Did I know what I was doing? Absolutely not. Learning to juggle the needs of two T1D boys with all the other parts of this job was really hard. I cried a lot. But, this is how I approached it: If my child needed nursing care at her school what would I want that care to look like? I wanted it to look like love, determination, knowledge, persistence, and to be as damn good as possible. This work is anything but insignificant. It is vital. It is necessary. It is deserved. My boys are amazing, and caring for them is more than just ajob. That is what T1D does. It binds ustogether in the struggle to manage it.Here is some of what I know for sure: One of the reasons I left the hospital was to build relationships. It is hard to say goodbye to a patient and never know the rest of his/her story. Here, I know the story. I am privileged to be a part of it. These families have been dealing with the effects of T1D for longer than I have been a nurse. You can study all you want about diabetes, but if you do not know your families, you will fail. I really try to care for my two boys as their families would. I am their advocate and their number one cheerleader throughout the school day. I have learned how to truly carb count; meaning I know that bagel really has 60 grams of carbs, but for this guy it is counts as Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Schools - Information For Teachers & Staff

Diabetes In Schools - Information For Teachers & Staff

Diabetes in schools - information for teachers & staff Diabetes in schools - information for teachers & staff This page is an overview of what teachers and staff should know about diabetes with links to further support and resources If you have a child with Type 1 diabetes in your care at school, youll know that theres a lot to think about. Or if a child with Type 1 diabetes is joining your school, there will be lots of things to put in place to ensure the child is cared for correctly. Over the past two years weve been busy supporting schools to put the right care in place for children with diabetes through our Type 1 diabetes: Make the grade campaign . Weve developed lots of easy to follow, free resources to help schools know what to do and how to do it. On this page you will find information on: Watch this video from the Safe in School campaign to hear from children, staff and parents about what good care involves. Students with Type 1 diabetes moving class in the same school Talk about if their childs classes are changing, or the staff responsible for caring for them at school. Let them know about any planned trips. And consider if there are any other changes that might affect them, such as changes to the school curriculum, timing of lunch and breaks or storage of medication and equipment. Ask parents if any aspects of the students care might change, or if there is any particular area they would like the schools help on, e.g. taking responsibility for certain aspects of care as the student grows up Arrange training for new carers, involve the diabetes nurse and parents in this. Allow time for new carers to work with current carers so that they build up their confidence and the student feels comfortable with them. Update the students individual healthcare plan if nec Continue reading >>

School Nurses Reveal: What Our Favorite D-parents Do

School Nurses Reveal: What Our Favorite D-parents Do

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney School Nurses Reveal: What Our Favorite D-Parents Do You rely on school staff to care for your child for most of his or her waking hours during the academic year, and type 1 diabetes can make that a tall order. In honor of National School Nurse Day (observed on the Wednesday between May 6 and May 12 each year), make their job a little easier: Consider adopting one of these habits or solutions that members of the National Association of School Nurses say has made a real difference to them. Its very helpful when a parent schedules a conference and meetswith me before a child with diabetes starts theschool year.The first few weeks of school are hectic, and I want to be ready to receive your child the minute he or she walks in the school.As we know, children are individuals, and what works for one child may not be the best for another. Yes, we need to know the medical information like ratios and correction factors, but its also important to hear what challenges the child is struggling with, and what is going well. I want to bea very important part of your childs healthcare team and provide the support that your child needs to be successful. Susan Hoffmann, M.S.N., R.N., N.C.S.N., member of theDelaware School Nurse Association, and school nurse at WB Simpson Elementary School in Wyoming, Del. I have multiple students with type 1 diabetes, and keeping parents updated can become quite difficult.Fortunately, the parents I work with agreed to use a web-based program which has allowed me to communicate throughout the day with them. Parents receive text messages and/or emails informing them of blood sugar checks, insulin given, carbohydrate counts, [and other care management information]. This helps simplify my communication, and parents Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes At School: Tools For The School Nurse

Managing Diabetes At School: Tools For The School Nurse

Managing Diabetes at School: Tools for the School Nurse Submitted by support_vendor on August 9, 2013 - 10:03am Managing Diabetes at School: Tools for the School Nurse Publisher - National Association of School Nurses The Northwest Educational Service District 189 is committed to providing access to all individuals, with or without disabilities, seeking information on our website. Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act requires that all individuals with disabilities have access to and use of information and data, comparable to that provided to individuals without disabilities unless an undue burden would be imposed on us. Throughout this website, we make use of different third-party websites, PDFs, and applications to provide information about our agency and to connect our staff and visitors to various educational resources and services. Some of these PDFs, applications, and sites are not controlled by the NWESD. Please contact us at 360-299-4000 or [email protected] if because of a disability you are unable to access content on the NWESDs website, have questions about the accessibility of content or technology used by the NWESD, and/or would like to report barriers to accessing any information on this website. Or if you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader, eye tracking device, voice recognition software, etc.) and have difficulty accessing information on our website, please contact us and provide the URL of the material you tried to access, the problem you experienced, and your contact information. We will contact you and attempt to provide the information you are seeking. Copyright 2018. Northwest Educational Service District | 1601 R Avenue Anacortes, WA 98221 | ph: 360-299-4000 fx: 360-299-4070 Back to Top Continue reading >>

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