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Low Carbohydrate Diets For Diabetes Control

Very Low-carbohydrate Diets In The Management Of Diabetes Revisited

Very Low-carbohydrate Diets In The Management Of Diabetes Revisited

Grant Schofield, George Henderson, Simon Thornley, Catherine Crofts Data from the 2008/2009 New Zealand Nutrition Survey placed the prevalence of diabetes among adults at 7%. The incidence of pre-diabetes, defined as HbA1c, 41 to 49 mmol/mol (5.8% to <6.7%), was 25.5%, predicting a further increase in the incidence of diabetes in coming decades.1 The systematic review and meta-analysis of different dietary approaches to the management of type 2 diabetes by Ajala et al (2013) found that the low-carbohydrate diet “appeared to provide superior weight loss, glycemic control, and lipid profile compared with low-fat diets and, in one of 2 studies, was superior to the low-GI diet for all 3 variables”.2 Yet there is still resistance to the acceptance of low-carbohydrate diets in New Zealand. The Ministry of Health’s document Eating and Activity Guidelines for New Zealand Adults (2015) advises a low-fat diet supplying most energy from starch, and counsels the use of lean meat and low-fat dairy products to meet saturated fat recommendations.3 Although weight control is important for diabetes prevention, the ‘Topical Questions and Answers’ supplement to the guidelines is briefly dismissive of low-carbohydrate diets for weight control, and does not refer to any other benefits such as improved glycaemic control. A similarly low-fat diet plan can be found on the Diabetes New Zealand website, which states that, Most people need 3–4 serves of carbohydrate food at each of the three main meals [ie, 135–180g/day]. Very active people may need larger serves of carbohydrate foods or between meals snacks to maintain blood glucose levels.4 However, it is our view that the current evidence is sufficiently in favour of the modern, nutritionally adequate, very low-carbohydrate diet Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet

Low-carb Diet

It was known well before the discovery of insulin[1] that a low-carb diet would help diabetic humans survive much longer. It's not surprising, then, that low-carb diets are studied in cats and dogs with diabetes. Both dogs and cats are able to convert protein into energy as well as into muscle. The average of most commercial dry pet foods is between 30-70% carbohydrates. Neither species in the wild would have a diet similar to this; both would consume far less than the 30% low-end estimate[2]. It is certainly possible to produce canned pet foods without carbohydrates, but today's dry pet foods would be non-existent without them. It's worth noting that high-protein diets in less active and younger dogs may have health risks. Young dogs who are fed too much protein can develop joint issues in later life.[3] Most commercial dry foods are not suitable for diabetic cats[4][5]: they contain between 30% and 70% carbohydrates[6]. Use the link below to calculate yours based on as-fed values requested from the manufacturer[7] Carbohydrates are essential to the formation of dry pet food, adding structure, texture and form. Dry food could not exist in its current form without carbohydrates, mostly corn and other grains. Even though there is a dry food for cats called Innova Evo Cat & Kitten[8] that claims a 7 per cent carbohydrate level, some caregivers have found that it did not produce reduced blood glucose levels as effectively as wet food with a similar carbohydrate rating. In fact a vet had EVO dry food tested and found its carbohydrate level was nearly double what it was claimed.[9] One of our case studies shows a 150 mg/dL point drop in blood glucose levels by removing EVO from a mixed wet/dry diet. However, dry EVO can serve as a transitional food for dry food addicts--chan Continue reading >>

Low Carb-high Fat Diet And Diabetes: A Detailed Guide For Beginners

Low Carb-high Fat Diet And Diabetes: A Detailed Guide For Beginners

If you are a regular reader of our site, you would already know that we highly endorse the Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) diet for reversing diabetes, losing weight and improving your overall health and well-being. The reason why a low carb diet for diabetes comes highly recommended by doctors and nutritionists alike is the fact that carbohydrates are the main culprit behind elevated blood sugar levels. Once you eat fewer carbs, it automatically becomes much easier for the body to attain stable blood sugar levels. Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) Diet for Diabetes: Why It Works? Carbohydrates are broken down into simple sugars during digestion. These sugars enter the blood stream and elevate blood sugar levels. As a diabetic, your body either doesn’t produce insulin at all, or doesn’t produce enough insulin to minimize this blood sugar spike before it causes irreplaceable damage to internal organs. This is the reason why your body’s dependence on insulin goes down when you eat lesser carbs. A UK study tried to understand the short-term effects of severe dietary carbohydrate-restriction advice in type 2 diabetes. It found that restricting carbohydrate intake is an effective method to lose weight as well as improve HDL ratios. This was a randomized controlled trial studying 102 patients over a course of 3 months, and the results were published in the Diabetic Medicine in September 2005. Another research group from Duke University Medical Center studying the effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients, found that 95.2% patients had managed to reduce or eliminate their glucose-lowering medication within 6 months of being on a LCHF diet. A low carb diet works very well in lowering blood sugar and insul Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diets Help Reduce High Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetics

Low Carb Diets Help Reduce High Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetics

"Read all about it! Low Carb Diets Help Reduce High Blood Sugar Levels in Diabetics!"That is what newspaper boys should be shouting. So, when your doctors says, "You have type 2 diabetes" he will also say you need to control your high blood sugar and weight. This means you will need to adopt healthy food choices and exercise that will include a low carb diet. There are other diets to choose from like low fat diets. Not choosing one means developing diabetes complications such as heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, obesity, loss of vision, etc. Suddenly, you realize that diabetes is a whole body disease and you will need to follow your doctor's recommendations to live a healthy life. Problems That Face Type 2 Diabetes Sufferers Three of the biggest problems facing type 2 diabetes patients are high blood sugar levels, obesity, and high blood pressure. These problems are not curable only treatable and the best way to treat both is to lose weight. You can start doing this by understanding how carbohydrates and protein affect your body and the value of low carb diets. What Is A Carb? The majority of people today don't understand what a carbohydrate is, only that many of these foods are bad for them. So what is a carb? Carbs are compounds that are broken down by the body to produce different amounts of glucose (sugar). Glucose is used as fuel by all cells of the body. There are three types of carbs including fibers, starches and sugars. When the carbs turn into glucose, it is taken into the cells to be used immediately or stored for later use should there be too much in the body. Fiber has the least available glucose. Starch has more available glucose than fiber. Sugar, as in sugar added during manufacturing or cooking has the most because sugar is sugar. Sugar is a c Continue reading >>

The Low-carb Diabetes Plan That Works

The Low-carb Diabetes Plan That Works

After hearing for years that a high-carb, low-fat diet is the only real road to weight loss, you might be wondering how a low-carb diabetes diet can help you finally drop the pounds and help you get control of your blood sugar. Let us explain. The high-carb, low-fat idea basically oversimplified how food works once it enters your body. It ignored the fact that not all carbs are good, and glossed over that not all fats are bad. Therefore, we loaded up on all the breads, pastas, and low-fat goodies, never realizing that it was making us fatter. Here's how it really works. All carbs are converted to glucose and raise your blood sugar, but they aren't all converted at the same rate. How fast they are absorbed--and how much--is what affects your weight. There are two general classes of carbs--refined and unrefined. Refined carbs (white breads, white flour, pastas) are essentially refined sugars, meaning once you eat them they are quickly turned into glucose in your system. Unrefined carbs are the kinds found in whole grains, beans, fruits, and many vegetables. The fiber in these foods helps to slow down your body's absorption of carbs, therefore slowing the process of turning carbs into glucose. The problem comes in when you eat too many carbs--especially too many refined carbs. If you eat excessive amounts of quickly absorbed carbs, you create a situation where more glucose becomes available than your body needs. That excess glucose gets turned into fat. What's the problem with eating lots of carbs if you have diabetes? If you eat excessive amounts of quickly absorbed carbs, you upset your body's precise balance of blood sugar. Simply put, eating too many carbohydrate grams may cause a situation where more glucose becomes available to the cells than the body needs. Obviousl Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet Helps To Control Diabetes

Low-carb Diet Helps To Control Diabetes

The biggest pilot study of a low-carbohydrate diet to treat type 2 diabetes has shown that it may successfully control the condition. A review of more than 80,000 people who ditched their low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet found that their blood-glucose levels dropped after ten weeks. The results have led doctors to call for an overhaul of official dietary guidelines. The study came about as a consequence of an online revolt by patients in which 120,000 people signed up to the “low-carb” diet plan launched by the forum diabetes.co.uk in a backlash against official advice. By rejecting guidelines and eating a diet low in starchy foods but high in protein and “good” saturated fats, such as olive oil and nuts, more than 80 per cent of the… Continue reading >>

Low-carbohydrate Diet

Low-carbohydrate Diet

Not to be confused with slow carb diet. This article is about low carbohydrate diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss. For low-carbohydrate dietary therapy for epilepsy, see Ketogenic diet. Low-carbohydrate diets or low-carb diets are dietary programs that restrict carbohydrate consumption. Foods high in easily digestible carbohydrates (e.g., sugar, bread, pasta) are limited or replaced with foods containing a higher percentage of fats and moderate protein (e.g., meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, eggs, cheese, nuts, and seeds) and other foods low in carbohydrates (e.g., most salad vegetables such as spinach, kale, chard and collards), although other vegetables and fruits (especially berries) are often allowed. The amount of carbohydrate allowed varies with different low-carbohydrate diets.[1] Such diets are sometimes 'ketogenic' (i.e., they restrict carbohydrate intake sufficiently to cause ketosis). The induction phase of the Atkins diet[2][3][4] is ketogenic. The term "low-carbohydrate diet" is generally applied to diets that restrict carbohydrates to less than 20% of caloric intake, but can also refer to diets that simply restrict or limit carbohydrates to less than recommended proportions (generally less than 45% of total energy coming from carbohydrates).[5][6] Definition and classification[edit] Low-carbohydrate diets are not well-defined.[7] The American Academy of Family Physicians defines low-carbohydrate diets as diets that restrict carbohydrate intake to 20 to 60 grams per day, typically less than 20% of caloric intake.[8] A 2016 review of low-carbohydrate diets classified diets with 50g of carbohydrate per day (less than 10% of total calories) as "very low" and diets with 40% of calories from carbohydrates as "mild" low-carbohydrate diets.[9] Used for Continue reading >>

Recent Research On Low (and Low-ish) Carb Diets For Type 2 Diabetes

Recent Research On Low (and Low-ish) Carb Diets For Type 2 Diabetes

Carb reduction as a strategy for managing Type 2 Diabetes is gaining an increasing amount of mainstream attention recently. A few years ago, even the journal of the American Diabetes Association published a meta-analysis suggesting that low-carbohydrate diets may have some benefits. So what’s behind the changing recommendations? Partly, it’s research that’s already been done and just needed to be brought to everyone’s attention. But there are some interesting new studies from the past year or so – here’s a look at what’s been going on since 2014 or so. This is not a comprehensive list of all studies published on carbs and diabetes; it’s not even a comprehensive list of all those studies from the past few years. It’s just a closer look at some that you might find interesting. Benefits of Low-Carb Diets The good news is pretty simple on the surface: several recent studies have found that a low-carb intervention is better than a low-fat intervention for all different aspects of Type 2 Diabetes. Blood Sugar and Lipids The low-carb benefit everyone thinks of first is blood sugar control, often measured by HbA1c (basically a measurement of how good your blood sugar control is in the long term). It was pretty clear from almost all the studies that lower-carb was better for blood-sugar control, and also for blood lipids (cholesterol and triglycerides). To start off with, this study (also in the American Diabetes Association’s journal) found that a low-carb diet was better than a high-carb diet for reducing HbA1c and triglycerides, for getting the participants off medication, and for increasing HDL cholesterol. In another study, a low-carbohydrate diet improved HbA1c (and incidentally also blood lipid levels) more than a calorie-restricted diet – namely, th Continue reading >>

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

I spend a great deal of time in my clinic dealing with the problems of type 2 diabetes. But occasionally, people ask about type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well. The reason why it is so rare for me is that I treat adult patients where T2D outnumbers T1D by at least 9:1. I was looking at a fascinating study that my friend, Ivor Cummins (The Fat Emperor) had alerted me to a few months ago. Dr. Richard Bernstein is a fascinating character. He had developed T1D as a child of twelve and began to have complications by his 30s. He eventually went to medical school in order to learn better how to treat his own disease. Eventually he decided that the proper treatment was a low carb diet. This was in direct contradiction to the prevailing wisdom of the time (1990s), which included treating patients with insulin and a diet high in carbs. Dr. Bernstein opened up a controversial clinic to treat T1D with a low carb diet and also wrote several best selling books discussing the same topic. Over the years, it has proven to be a safe treatment for T1D. While there are few long-term studies, Dr. Bernstein himself is living proof of the low carb T1D paradigm. In many ways, T1D and T2D are exact opposites of each other. T1D typically affects children who are usually quite skinny. T2D typically affects adults who are usually quite obese. This is not absolute, and we are seeing much more T2D in children as their weights have increased. There are also cases of normal or even underweight patients with T2D. But in general, that is the case. T1D is the severe deficiency of insulin where as T2D is the severe excess of insulin. Nevertheless, people often treat both types of diabetes in the same manner. Both are treated with medications or insulin to keep blood glucose in acceptable levels. Wait, you might Continue reading >>

Low Carbohydrate Diets: Understanding The Grim Long-term Effects

Low Carbohydrate Diets: Understanding The Grim Long-term Effects

Diabetes is growing faster now than at any point in human history, yet despite this doctors continue to prescribe low carbohydrate diets, a strategy that is often viewed as the most effective nutrition approach for optimal diabetes health. On the surface, this appears to make sense because low carbohydrate diets often result in rapid weight loss, reduced A1c values, and decreased blood glucose. However, more than 85 years of research has clearly demonstrated that low carbohydrate diets cause insulin resistance, the behind-the-scenes condition that complicates and worsens all forms of diabetes (1–30). A growing body of evidence now shows that diets low in fat and high in unrefined carbohydrates from fruits, vegetables, beans, lentils, and whole grains are remarkably effective at reversing insulin resistance in patients with type 1 diabetes, prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes (20–25,31–42). Insulin resistance results from the accumulation of fat in tissues that are not designed to store fat, mainly in your liver and muscles (2,3,9–14,16–18,27,43,44). When you eat a low carbohydrate diet high in fat and protein, fatty acids are burned for energy, however they also accumulate in tissues like your muscle and liver. When your muscle and liver begin accumulating fat, both tissues begin rejecting insulin in an effort to block more energy from entering. Essentially, the more fat you eat, the weaker insulin becomes. Low carbohydrate diets are the easiest way to develop insulin resistance. In the research setting, scientists induce insulin resistance and diabetes by feeding laboratory animals a low carbohydrate diet high in fat and protein. These animals gain weight, develop severe insulin resistance, and show early signs of diabetes in as little as 8 weeks (1,45,46,46–5 Continue reading >>

Getting Started On Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Diet

Getting Started On Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Diet

Dr. Bernstein's diabetes diet is a low-carb diet designed for better blood sugar control for people with diabetes. Understanding how it works can increase your chances of success. These seven steps will help you get started. If you are taking diabetes medications, work with your health professional while making diet changes. 1. Read Dr. Bernstein's Diet Books It is essential to fully understand the underpinnings of Dr. Bernstein's approach if you have diabetes. Read "Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution: The Complete Guide to Achieving Normal Blood Sugars." It has information specifically for people with diabetes, such as information about injecting insulin. People without diabetes will get enough information from "The Diabetes Diet: Dr. Bernstein's Low-Carbohydrate Solution." It has over 100 recipes. 2. Consider Home Blood Glucose Testing, Even If You Don't Have Diabetes Dr. Bernstein's approach is rooted in promoting normal blood glucose. The only real way to know how you respond to foods is to test your blood glucose. You should work with your health care team if you have diabetes. They can advise you on modifying the diet or your medications based on how the diet affects you. 3. Learn How to Count Carbs Bernstein's plan relies on knowing how much carbohydrate is in everything you eat. Therefore, it's important to learn about carb counting. There are books with carb counts, apps, and software you can use. For example, use the Recipe Nutrition Calculator for a single food or a complete recipe to see the carbohydrate and fiber content as well as other nutrients. 4. Learn What to Eat The rules of carbohydrate eating on Bernstein's plan are summarized as "6-12-12." This means that 6 grams of carbohydrate are eaten at breakfast, 12 grams at lunch, and 12 grams at dinner/supp Continue reading >>

Low-carb Vs High-carb For Type 2 Diabetes

Low-carb Vs High-carb For Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a common condition characterized by high levels of blood sugar, usually due to insulin resistance. The treatment of type 2 diabetes involves medication, but lifestyle strategies to lower blood sugar levels are very important as well. These include increased exercise, weight loss and diet management (1). Although low-carb diets have become popular for managing type 2 diabetes, few high-quality studies have investigated their long-term effects on blood sugar control and risk factors for heart disease (2). Article Reviewed A team of Australian researchers set out to compare the long-term health effects of a low-carb diet and a high-carb diet, focusing on differences in blood sugar control and risk factors for heart disease. Tay et al. Comparison of Low- and High-Carbohydrate Diets for Type 2 Diabetes Management: A Randomized Trial. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2015. Study Design This was a randomized trial that spanned one year, or 52 weeks total. A total of 115 obese and overweight adults with type 2 diabetes participated. Their age ranged from 35 to 68 years. The participants were randomly assigned to one of two diets that contained an equal amount of calories: Low-carb diet (LC): Carbs, protein and fat comprised 14%, 28% and 58% of calories, respectively. The total carb content was under 50 grams per day. High-carb diet (HC): Carbs, protein and fat comprised 53%, 17% and 30% of calories, respectively. Both diets restricted calories in order to produce weight loss. Calories were restricted by 30%, which amounted to 500–1000 calories, depending on the individual. Tip: Probiotics can help weight loss although the exact mechanism is unclear. Adding fiber can also help. Glucomannan is a favorite. The fat content of the diets was mainly unsatura Continue reading >>

Why A Low-carb Diet Should Be The First Approach In Diabetes Treatment

Why A Low-carb Diet Should Be The First Approach In Diabetes Treatment

A panel of medical experts, including our own Advisory Board member Dr. Richard K. Bernstein, presents the evidence for low-carbohydrate diets as initial therapy… Please note: the following summary was excerpted by Jennifer Piggot, LECOM PharmD candidate, from the original article which can be found here. We encourage all interested readers to look over the full article and supporting research. The current state of diabetes care in the United States health system shows the inability of existing recommendations to control the epidemic of diabetes, the failure of low-fat diets to improve obesity rates, cardiovascular risk or general health, and the continual reports of serious side effects of commonly prescribed diabetic medications. The success of low carbohydrate diets in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome without significant side effects point to the need for a reappraisal of dietary guidelines. The immediate benefits of carbohydrate restriction in diabetes patients include reduction of high blood glucose, less requirement for weight loss, fewer side effects than medication therapy and the reduction or elimination of medications. This article outlines the current evidence supporting the use of low-carbohydrate diets as the first approach to treating type 2 diabetes, and an effective adjunct to pharmacology in type 1. These results represent the best documented and least controversial studies. It is known that diabetics are defective in response to carbohydrates, which can lead to hyperglycemia. Hussain et al. compared a very low carbohydrate ketogenic diet (VLCKD) with a low calorie diet over a 24-week period in diabetics and non-diabetics. Blood glucose dropped more dramatically in the VLCKD group than in those given the low-calorie diet. Patients with Continue reading >>

How Just One Slice Of Wholemeal Toast A Day Could Control Diabetes Symptoms

How Just One Slice Of Wholemeal Toast A Day Could Control Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes symptoms could be controlled on a low-carb diet, a dietician claimed Eating just 20g of carb a day could improve symptoms Amount of carbs needed varies between every patient Symptoms of condition include feeling very thirsty, and unexplained weight loss Diabetes patients can’t process carbohydrates effectively, a dietician has said. Carbs are broken down into small units of glucose when digested, which raises blood sugar. The pancreas should produce insulin to help the blood sugar enter cells, providing the body with energy. But, in diabetics, the pancreas fails to produce the correct amount of insulin, which can cause severe harm. Prior to the discovery of insulin in 1921, very-low-carb diets were considered standard treatment for people with diabetes “Many studies support low-carb diets for the treatment of diabetes,” said Registered Dietitian, and Certified Diabetes Educator, Franziska Spritzler. “In fact, prior to the discovery of insulin in 1921, very-low-carb diets were considered standard treatment for people with diabetes. “What's more, low-carb diets seem to work well in the long term, as long as patients adhere to the diet. “The optimal amount of carbs may also vary by individual, since everyone has a unique response to carbs. To figure out your ideal amount, you may want to measure your blood glucose with a meter before a meal, and again one to two hours after eating,” Spritzler wrote on medical website Healthline. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Eating just 20 grams of carbs a day could provide “dramatic improvements in blood sugar levels”, some studies have cla Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

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