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Low Carb Low Sugar Diet

Should You Start A Low Carb Diet?

Should You Start A Low Carb Diet?

The decision to start a low carb diet is huge. Some people choose a low carb diet to lose weight. Others go low carb for the health benefits alone. Learn where to find the right resources and advice. Prepare yourself, your friends and family, and your kitchen. Grab a free carb counter and a 7 day low carb meal planner. Build a solid grocery store shopping strategy. Take the plunge with confidence and support. The general concept behind the low carb diet is to replace bad carbs with good ones, and ultimately- in restricted amounts. Basically, the focus is on making healthier carb choices and limiting sugar in order to maintain a healthy and stable blood sugar level. The Basic Science The essence of a low carb diet is weeding out all the refined starches and sugars from your diet. That’s all. You don’t need to buy extra stuff, special-made products etc. Just cut out the starches and sugars, and limit your carbs to 60 grams/day or lower. The remaining fat, protein and non-starchy vegetables you eat will satisfy your hunger sooner and for a longer amount of time. Ketosis Changes Your Body As you cut the carbs, you enter a state of ketosis. In ketosis, your body’s metabolism changes. You will no longer be a “sugar burner.” Instead, you are a healthier, more efficient fat burner. You’ll eat high fat foods but continue to lose weight. When there is an absence of sugar in the body, it uses stored body fat for energy. This is the magic of the low carb diet at work. You are eating “very fattening” foods, yet dropping weight like crazy. (We love this.) Keto Symptoms During keto, low carbers experience bursts of energy and heightened mood – just two of the big benefits of ketosis. Some dieters notice a temporary, sweet taste in the mouth or a mild, sweet breath od Continue reading >>

The Atkins 40 Low Carb Diet Plan

The Atkins 40 Low Carb Diet Plan

Atkins 40 is a simple diet plan based on portion control and eating 40g net carbs per day. If you have less than 40 pounds to lose, are pregnant or breastfeeding, or want a wider variety of food choices from the first day of your diet, Atkins 40 could be a great fit for you. With Atkins 40 you can enjoy a range of food that you choose from. From protein and veggies to pasta and potatoes, there is an extensive list of food to plan your meals around while still losing weight and feeling satisfied. How Does Atkins 40 Work? Start the Atkins 40 program by eating 40 grams of net carbs, 4 to 6-ounce servings of protein and 2 to 4 servings of fat per day. As you approach your weight loss goals, start to increase your carbohydrate portion size. From day one, Atkins 40 offers a flexible variety of food choices. Your daily carbs can come from all food groups and you can choose to eat anything from the Acceptable Foods list below. With Atkins, you have the opportunity to customize your diet plan to achieve your weight loss goals in no time. Net carbs represent the total carbohydrate content of the food minus the fiber content and sugar alcohols, if any. The net carbs calculation reflects the grams of carbohydrate that significantly impact your blood sugar level and therefore are the only carbs you need spread out between three meals and two snacks in a day. Full of fiber and nutrients, veggies are one of the best sources of carbohydrates. About 1/3 of your net carbs will come from these foundational vegetables. Choose 6 to 8 servings per day from the list below. Continue reading >>

The Ultimate List Of 40 Low-carb Foods

The Ultimate List Of 40 Low-carb Foods

Keto, "if it fits your macros" (IIFYM), and low-carb paleo all agree: Eating low-carb can help you lose fat, increase muscle, and control hunger.[1] Here are some of the best low-carb foods. Even if you don't want to count macros, you can easily eat low carb just by choosing foods from this list. Low-Carb Vegetables Zucchini Carb count: 7 grams per 1 medium squash Juicy zucchini can stand in for pasta or hash browns. Cauliflower Carb count: 5 grams per cup Cauliflower can be used for a lower-carb version of mashed potatoes, rice, or even pizza crust. Swiss Chard Carb count: 1 gram per cup Steam chard or use whole, uncooked leaves instead of tortillas for tacos and wraps. Mushrooms Carb count: 2 grams per cup Mushrooms are low in carbs but rich in flavor. Celery Carb count: 1 gram per stalk Celery has next to no carbs or calories since it's about 95 percent water. Cherry Tomatoes Carb count: 6 grams per cup Cherry tomatoes add nutrients like lycopene to your diet. Spaghetti Squash Carb count: 7 grams per cup This squash is high in vitamin C, which helps you recover from exercise.[2] Other Low-Carb Veggies Radish Asparagus Bok choy Broccoli Spinach Arugula Bell pepper Watercress Low-Carb Fruits Apricots Carb count: 8 grams per 2 fruits Apricots are high in beta-carotene, which is good for your brain. [3] Avocado Avocado has lots of fiber and healthy fat. Strawberries Carb count: 11 grams per cup Strawberries are delicious and a great source of vitamin C.[4] Red Grapefruit Carb count: 9 grams per 1/2 fruit Red grapefruit has less sugar than an orange and is also high in vitamin C. Other Low-Carb Fruits Rhubarb Watermelon Peaches Star fruit Cantaloupe Blackberries Low-carb Meats And Fish Catfish Carb count: 0 grams per 3 ounces Farmed catfish is a cheap, sustainable way to Continue reading >>

13 Low-carb Fruits And Vegetables

13 Low-carb Fruits And Vegetables

Getting enough fruits and vegetables each day can be a challenge for some, but research indicates that these foods can help to reduce the risk of cancer and other chronic diseases. Fresh fruits and vegetables are generally low in fat and calories, but they contain various levels of carbohydrates and sugars. And for some people trying to manage their intake, carb content is helpful to know. Fruit Fruit tends to have a higher carbohydrate content than most vegetables, because of the naturally occurring sugars - they're sweeter, after all. But that doesn't mean you should avoid them. If you're watching your carbohydrate intake, some fruit has a higher water content and therefore fewer carbs per standard serving. 1. Watermelon This fruit of summer scores lowest in carbohydrate content, packing only 7.55 grams per 100 grams of fruit. It's also high in vitamin A and has a high water content, making it a great high-volume food because it will fill you up while providing fewer calories. Even the rind has health benefits! 2. Strawberries Berries are a popular choice for people watching their carb intake, and strawberries have the least. For each 100 grams of strawberries, you'll get just 7.68 grams of carbohydrate. They're also an excellent source of potassium and vitamin C. 3. Cantaloupe This popular orange melon is great on a hot summer day, and contains only 8.16 grams of carbohydrate per 100 grams of fruit. Some people like to eat melons like this and honeydew with tuna salad. Try blending it with lime, mint, and water to make a refreshing agua fresca. 4. Avocados Yes, avocados are a fruit, and they have relatively low carbohydrate content to boot. For each 100 grams of avocado, you'll get an estimated 8.64 grams of carbohydrate. In addition, you'll get healthy monounsaturat Continue reading >>

Low Carb

Low Carb

Tweet Many people with diabetes are following a low-carb diet because of its benefits in terms of improving diabetes control, weight loss and being a diet that is satisfying and easy to stick to. Low-carb diets are flexible and can be followed by people with different types of diabetes. The diet has allowed many people with type 2 diabetes to resolve their diabetes, that is to get their blood sugar levels into a non-diabetic range without the help of medication. People with type 1 diabetes have also reported much more stable blood sugar levels, making the condition easier to predict and manage. The diet is a healthy way of eating as vegetables and natural, real foods are integral to the diet. Low-carb guidance and support The low-carb diet forum has been cited as a leading resource in providing support and encouragement for people that are looking to achieve lower HbA1c levels and sustain effective weight loss. [127] In 2015, Diabetes.co.uk launched the Low Carb Program which has helped thousands of people with type 2 diabetes to improve their diabetes control and reduce their dependency on diabetes medication. Why follow a low-carb diet? Carbohydrate is the nutrient which has the greatest effect in terms of raising blood sugar levels and requires the most insulin to be taken or be produced by the body. Lowering sugar levels is clearly a benefit for people with diabetes. Lower need for insulin is also particularly useful as lowering insulin in the body can reduce insulin resistance which can help towards reversing type 2 diabetes. Insulin is also the fat storage hormone in the body, so reducing insulin in the body with a low-carb diet can help with losing weight. Benefits of low-carb diets The benefits of a low-carb diet typically include: Lower HbA1c Improved weight lo Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know Before Starting A Low-carb Diet

What You Need To Know Before Starting A Low-carb Diet

Carbohydrates play an important role in our diets. They’re our bodies’ main source of energy. But cutting down on them has led many people to find weight-loss success over the years, making the low-carb diet popular for people trying to lose weight. That doesn't mean, however, that going low-carb is always effective, easy, or simple. Or always a good idea. Our world is filled with endless options, and diet plans are no exception. (There’s even a taco diet.) There are lots of low-carb diet ideas out there, and while they can produce weight-loss results upfront, experts are skeptical about certain aspects of them. The key, if you want to try cutting carbs to lose weight, is following a plan that allows you to still get the right nutrients, is healthy and sustainable, and doesn’t leave you feeling deprived. Everyone has their own dietary needs, and if you have certain medical concerns, cutting significantly down on a whole food group might not be the best plan for you. It's also important to note that weight loss as a goal isn't necessarily for everyone. For anyone who has a history of disordered eating, even if you're in recovery, you should speak with a doctor before you change your eating habits or pursue any weight-loss goal. Even if you don't have a history of disordered eating, it's really important to have realistic expectations and make sure you're approaching weight loss in a healthy way. Results can be incredibly difficult to come by, may take a very long time to achieve, and are also really hard to maintain. Many factors play into weight loss—like exercise, getting good sleep, managing stress levels, and genetics—so simply eating fewer calories may not bring the results you want. With so many factors at play, it's no wonder weight loss varies so much Continue reading >>

30 Healthy Low-carb Foods To Eat

30 Healthy Low-carb Foods To Eat

On a low-carb diet? Here's how and what to eat for balanced meals and snacks. You've decided you're going on a low-carb diet. So what do you actually eat? The key to not feeling deprived is to consume a variety of foods from all the food groups—even grains can fit nicely into low-carb eating. At EatingWell, we recommend that on a low-carb diet you get about 40 percent of your calories from carbs, or at least 120 grams of carbs total per day. That amount helps you maintain a balanced diet and get all your nutrients in. It's also more doable and less restrictive than following super-low-carb diets. Featured Recipe: Chicken Enchilada-Stuffed Spaghetti Squash Must Read: The Healthy Way to Start a Low-Carb Diet Here are 30 wholesome foods to incorporate into your low-carb diet LOW-CARB PROTEINS One large egg packs 6 grams of protein, 5 grams of fat and less than 1/2 gram carbs all in a nice 72-calorie package. Eat the yolk: new research in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that while eggs do contain cholesterol, they don't increase your risk of heart disease—even if you have a gene that makes you more sensitive to dietary cholesterol. They also pack important nutrients, including vitamin D, lutein and choline. Meat is fair game because it's all protein and no carbs. (Keep in mind, while it has a good amount of vitamins and minerals, meat also contains no fiber. Translation: You shouldn't overdo it on the meat and crowd out the whole grains, fruits and vegetables that add fiber in your diet.) You know chicken is a lean source of protein, but 20 cuts of beef are also considered "lean" or "extra lean" by the USDA. Smart choices include eye of round roast, sirloin tip side steak, bottom round roast and top sirloin steak. Try our healthy steak recipes. The best Continue reading >>

Sugar Free Versus Low Carb: What’s The Difference?

Sugar Free Versus Low Carb: What’s The Difference?

Sugar Free Versus Low Carb. Is there a difference and why should it matter? This has been a controversial topic that continues among those who are healthy food bloggers with a following of mixed readership and those looking for healthy, sugar free and/or low carb recipes. What is the difference and why should you need to know? There is quite a big difference and everyone should be knowledgeable in knowing what works best for your body and how it functions. If you’re a follower of my blog and enjoy my sugar free recipes you may wonder what, if anything will change on my blog. I’m sharing all I know with you today and how it effects my recipes. Top Photo: Low Carb Everything Bagels (Net carbs: 1.7g) Bottom Photo: Gluten Free Banana Bread Muffins (Net carbs: 22g) When I first began my blog 3 1/2 years ago I had been sugar free for 8 years. Or at least what I considered sugar free at the time. I was still using whole wheat flour and natural sugars like fruits and honey in recipes. My sugar addiction was to added sugar, refined sugars, white table sugar. Once I removed those refined sugars in my life my cravings subsided. So sugar free, to me, meant no white refined sugar in any way, shape or form in my recipes. Basically what’s called today the “no white approach” and even what I would consider paleo as well, with the exception I love cheese and dairy!No white sugar, no white flour, no white rice, no white potatoes and just eliminating those was enough for me for many years to live and maintain my weight loss after my 3rd child. I lived happily enjoying life until one day I received a comment of confusion. “This isn’t a sugar free recipe because it contains applesauce and it’s high in carbs.” My happy bubble had been popped. I thought I was doing everythin Continue reading >>

14 Foods To Avoid (or Limit) On A Low-carb Diet

14 Foods To Avoid (or Limit) On A Low-carb Diet

Some of these will surprise you. By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE A low-carb diet can help you lose weight and control diabetes and other conditions. Some high-carb foods obviously need to be avoided, such as sugar-sweetened beverages, cake and candy. However, figuring out which staple foods to limit is more challenging. Some of these foods are even relatively healthy, just not suitable on a low-carb diet because of their high amount of carbs. Your total daily carb target will also determine if you need to limit some of these foods or avoid them altogether. Low-carb diets typically contain 20–100 grams of carbs per day, based on personal tolerance. Here are 14 foods to avoid or limit on a low-carb diet. 1. Bread and Grains Bread is a staple food in many cultures. It comes in many forms, including bread loaves, rolls, bagels and flatbreads, such as tortillas. Unfortunately, all of these are high in carbs. This is true for whole-grain bread as well as bread made from refined flour. Although carb counts vary based on ingredients and portion sizes, here are the average counts for popular breads: White bread (1 slice): 14 grams of carbs, 1 of which is fiber. Whole-wheat bread (1 slice): 17 grams of carbs, 2 of which are fiber. Flour tortilla (10-inch): 36 grams of carbs, 2 of which are fiber. Bagel (3-inch): 29 grams of carbs, 1 of which is fiber. Depending on your personal carb tolerance, eating a sandwich, burrito or bagel could put you near or over your limit for the day. To make your own low-carb bread at home, follow one of the recipes on this page. Most grains are also high in carbs and need to be limited or avoided on a low-carb diet. This includes rice, wheat, oats and others. Bottom Line: Most breads and grains are too high in carbs to include on a low-carb diet. T Continue reading >>

The Low-fat Vs. Low-carb Diet Debate Has A New Answer

The Low-fat Vs. Low-carb Diet Debate Has A New Answer

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. If there’s one message that most people get about their diet, it’s to cut back on fat. Too much fat, especially the saturated fat and cholesterol found in animal meat, dairy products and cheese, can clog up arteries and lead to heart disease, stroke and obesity. But fat may not be only culprit in those unhealthy conditions. In recent years, studies have revealed that cutting back on fat doesn’t always contribute to a lower risk of heart disease or reduced chance of dying early. In fact, some studies show the opposite, that people who eat extremely low amounts of fat tend to die earlier. MORE: Does a Low-Carb Diet Really Beat Low-Fat? That may be because of something else they’re eating instead. In one of the most comprehensive studies to date looking at how diet affects health and mortality, researchers led by a team at McMaster University report that rather than lowering fat, more people might benefit from lowering the amount of carbohydrates they eat. In a study published in the Lancet, they found that people eating high quantities of carbohydrates, which are found in breads and rice, had a nearly 30% higher risk of dying during the study than people eating a low-carb diet. And people eating high-fat diets had a 23% lower chance of dying during the study’s seven years of follow-up compared to people who ate less fat. The results, say the authors, point to the fact that rather than focusing on fat, health experts should be advising people to lower the amount of carbohydrates they eat. In the study, which involved 135,000 people from 18 different countries, the average diet was made up of 61% carbohydrates, 23% fat and 15% protein. In some countries, like China, south Asia and Africa, however, the amount of carbohydrate Continue reading >>

Low-carb Vs. Low-fat: New Research Says It Doesn’t Really Matter

Low-carb Vs. Low-fat: New Research Says It Doesn’t Really Matter

Correction: An earlier version of this story misstated the amount of carbs and fat eaten by participants in a recent nutrition study. The DIETFITS study had participants aim for 20 grams of carbs or fat, not make their diet 20 percent carbs or fat. This version has been corrected. (iStock) For every patient I have who comes to me believing that a low-carb diet is the way to be healthy or control weight, I have another who has been unable to shrug off the vestiges of the low-fat era, convinced that eating more fat will lead to heart disease or weight gain. I remind them that the evidence strongly suggests that when you reduce something in your diet — such as carbs or fat — it’s important to be mindful of what you replace it with. For example, when the public was advised to lower fat decades ago, most people swapped it for foods high in sugar and white flour, rather than with fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Not ideal. When it comes to weight loss, the past several years of research show that low-carb diets may have a slight short-term edge on average, but that neither can claim true superiority, especially given that about 95 percent of dieters end up regaining. A decade ago, a group headed by nutrition scientist Christopher Gardner, professor of medicine at Stanford University, published a study comparing the Atkins, Zone, Ornish and LEARN diets among a group of 311 women. After a year, average weight loss was only a few pounds, but when you looked beyond that, the difference between losers and gainers on each of the four diets was huge: some lost 55 pounds, others gained 10 to 20 pounds. Why? Gardner’s group decided to try to answer that question, focusing not on which diet was best, but which diet was best for whom. Some preliminary research — including Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Do A Low Carbohydrate Diet The Right Way.

10 Ways To Do A Low Carbohydrate Diet The Right Way.

A few days ago, I posted about the 10 Hidden Dangers of a Low Carbohydrate Diet. If you recall from that article, I did mention that I am certainly a fan of low carbohydrate diets, and referenced how physically active individuals may be able to actually benefit from strategic low carbohydrate intake in my article 4 Reasons To Think Twice About Eating Carbohydrates Before A Workout or (if you’re a Rock Star Triathlete Academy member) the article 5 Ways to Get A Big Carbohydrate Restricting Performance Advantage. I summed it up this way: In a nutshell, pun intended, as you begin to increase carbohydrate consumption above the levels that you need for survival or periods of intense physical activity, you lose your ability to rely on fat burning mechanisms, and you experience the damaging effects of chronically elevated blood sugars, including neuropathy (nerve damage), nephropathy (kidney damage), retinopathy (eye damage), increased cardiovascular disease risk, potential for cancer progression (tumor cells feed on sugar) and bacterial or fungal infection. So if the dangers of a low carb diet that I talked about didn’t deter you, and you’re bent on banning bread, take heart. There is a way to do a low carbohydrate diet the right way. Here are 10 ways to eat a low carbohydrate diet while avoiding common mistakes. 1. Time Carbohydrates Wisely. This one is a biggie, so we’ll start with it. One of the main reasons for eating a low carbohydrate diet is because your blood sugar levels stay far more stabilized. But there is a time that you can consume carbohydrate without causing your blood sugar levels to go on a roller coaster ride – and that time is immediately before, during, or after exercise. So if you are on a low carbohydrate diet, I highly recommend carbohydrate Continue reading >>

What To Eat For Dinner On A Low-sugar Low-carb Diet

What To Eat For Dinner On A Low-sugar Low-carb Diet

Italian Food When we think of Italian food, we may think of pizza and pasta but there are many other dishes to enjoy from this cuisine. When dining at home, marinate your protein foods in oil and balsamic vinegar with Italian spices such as parsley, oregano and garlic instead of breading them. Instead of pasta, julienne zucchini and yellow squash and saute with marinara sauce, include plenty of flavorful vegetables like roasted broccoli and eggplant with fresh garlic or a simple salad of arugula, fresh mozzarella and tomatoes with drizzled balsamic. Thai Food Thai dishes can be low in carbohydrates but you need to avoid noodles, such as pad Thai. Order fresh summer rolls as an appetizer with peanut dipping sauce -- ask about the sugar content -- instead of a fried spring roll. Include a large salad of shredded papaya, carrots, cucumber and mint with a light lemon dressing. Get a curry of chicken or fish with vegetables as your main dish. When preparing foods at home, marinate your protein foods in fresh ingredients such as low sodium soy sauce, lemongrass, ginger and orange instead of sugar or prepared marinades with added sugar. Mexican Food Steer clear of high-carbohydrate foods when dining with Mexican cuisine by sticking to fajitas. Get a chicken or steak fajita with vegetables, guacamole, sour cream and pico de gallo, but use the accompanying tortillas sparingly. Order a side of roasted vegetables rather than rice and beans. Dip carrots and cucumbers in your guacamole and skip the chips. Chinese Food Chinese food can be deceiving as even a simple beef and broccoli dish can contain carbs. When you choose thinner broth based sauces, you take out the likelihood that the sauce has added cornstarch or flour. Choose from low-carb options such as chicken or beef and brocc Continue reading >>

Ask The Diet Doctor: Fueled By Fats Alone

Ask The Diet Doctor: Fueled By Fats Alone

Q: Can I really cut out carbs completely and still exercise at a high level, as some proponents of low-carb and paleo diets suggest? A: Yes, you could cut out carbs and rely on fats alone for fuel—and it is completely safe. Certain nutrients in your diet are absolutely essential, including a couple different fats, a handful of amino acids, and lots of vitamins and minerals. No sugars or carbohydrates make the “must-eat” list. In order to function without carbs, your body does a very good job either making the sugars it needs or finding alternate energy sources. For example, when you drastically reduce or eliminate carbs from your diet, your body is able to make sugar to store as glycogen. Your brain is notorious for being a sugar glutton, as it requires a lot of energy and sugar is its preferred source. But despite your brain’s love affair with carbohydrates, it is more in love with survival. As a result it adapts and thrives, fueling itself with ketones (a byproduct of excessive fat breakdown) when carbs are not around. In fact, your brain may have switched to this alternate fuel source without you even knowing it if you have ever eaten a very low-carb or ketogenic diet, where you consume 60 to 70 percent of your calories from fat and only 20 to 30 grams (g) of carbs per day (eventually upwards of 50g a day). These diets are very effective for fat loss, reducing certain risk factors for heart disease, and treating diabetes and epilepsy. So yes, if you wanted to, you could completely cut out carbs, power your body with fats, improve your health, and exercise at a high level. But the question becomes: Do you really need to? From an application standpoint, a very low-carb diet is restrictive when it comes to food choices—20, 30, or even 50g of carbohydrates is n Continue reading >>

Are Low-carb Diets Effective For Weight Loss?

Are Low-carb Diets Effective For Weight Loss?

Do you want to lose weight, build muscle, or feel more fit? Join Beachbody On Demand, and get unlimited access to Beachbody’s world-famous programs, including 21 Day FIX®, CORE DE FORCE®, and P90X®. Don’t miss out on your chance for amazing results. Sign up today! You’ve probably heard about the benefits of a low-carb diet. Namely, that you’ll experience rapid weight loss by ditching the bread basket and doubling down on a cut of steak. But a low-carb diet isn’t that straightforward in actual practice. Though the principle behind it sounds simple enough — less pasta! more protein! — the diet can be easy to misinterpret. Thanks in part to the perpetuation of popular low-carb diets like the Atkins Diet, which recommended replacing carbs with virtually any high-fat, high-protein foods when it came onto the scene in the early ’70s (it’s now a phased approach that includes gradual increases in carbs), many people end up taking low-carb diets to extreme measures. People nixed hash browns and toast, and piled their plates with bacon, eggs, and sausages with impunity. Some people lost weight, and often quickly, following this model. But, why exactly can people lose weight following a low-carb diet? What Is a Low-Carb Diet, and How Do You Lose Weight on It? According to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, carbohydrates should make up 45 to 65 percent of a person’s total daily calorie intake. Any amount less than this could be considered low carb. For someone consuming 2,000 calories a day, this is about 225 to 325 grams of carbohydrates per day. Most low-carb diets limit carbohydrate intake to between 50 to 150 grams per day, depending on the diet, so there’s some variation. If you want to follow a low-carb diet in a way that optimizes overal Continue reading >>

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