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List Of Foods That Raise Blood Sugar Levels

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions among adults and children worldwide (1). Uncontrolled diabetes has many serious consequences, including heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and other complications. Prediabetes has also been linked to these conditions (2). Importantly, eating the wrong foods can raise your blood sugar and insulin levels and promote inflammation, which may increase your risk of disease. This article lists 11 foods that people with diabetes or prediabetes should avoid. Carbs, protein and fat are the macronutrients that provide your body with energy. Of thesen three, carbs have the greatest effect on your blood sugar by far. This is because they are broken down into sugar, or glucose, and absorbed into your bloodstream. Carbs include starches, sugar and fiber. However, fiber isn't digested and absorbed by your body in the same way other carbs are, so it doesn't raise your blood sugar. Subtracting fiber from the total carbs in a food will give you its digestible or "net" carb content. For instance, if a cup of mixed vegetables contains 10 grams of carbs and 4 grams of fiber, its net carb count is 6 grams. When people with diabetes consume too many carbs at a time, their blood sugar levels can rise to dangerously high levels. Over time, high levels can damage your body's nerves and blood vessels, which may set the stage for heart disease, kidney disease and other serious health conditions. Maintaining a low carb intake can help prevent blood sugar spikes and greatly reduce the risk of diabetes complications. Therefore, it's important to avoid the foods listed below. Sugary beverages are the worst drink choice for someone with diabetes. To begin with, they are very high in carbs, with a 12-ounce (354-ml) can of soda prov Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Diet: 7 Foods That Control Blood Sugar

Diabetes & Diet: 7 Foods That Control Blood Sugar

When you have type 2 diabetes, what you eat can help you control your blood sugar, stave off hunger, and feel full longer. “Diabetes is when your blood sugar or glucose levels are higher than normal. It’s carbohydrate foods like breads, cereals, rice, pasta, fruits, milk, and desserts that can cause this rise," says Maggie Powers, PhD, president-elect of Health Care & Education at the American Diabetes Association. Your eating plan should focus on the amount and type of carbs you put on your plate throughout the day, Powers says. But it’s also important to have foods you enjoy. You want to eat enough so you feel satisfied and avoid overeating and poor choices. Here are seven foods that Powers says can help keep your blood sugar in check and make you happy and healthy to boot. These add color, flavor, and texture to a meal. Choose tasty, low-carb veggies, like mushrooms, onions, eggplant, tomatoes, Brussels sprouts, and low-carb squashes, like zucchini. Try them with dips such as low-fat dressings, hummus, guacamole, and salsa, or roasted with different seasonings such as rosemary, cayenne pepper, or garlic. Go beyond your regular salad and try kale, spinach, and chard. They’re healthy, delicious, and low-carb, Powers says. Roast kale leaves in the oven with olive oil for quick, crunchy chips. You can also mix greens in with roasted veggies to add texture and a different flavor, or serve them with a little protein, like salmon. Plain water is always good, but water infused with fruits and vegetables is more interesting. Cut up a lemon or cucumber and put it in your water, or make ice cubes with some flavoring in them. If you’re not a hot tea drinker, try cold tea with lemon or a cinnamon stick. “Not only are these beverages low-carb, they can also help fill y Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Now some of the diabetes diet information presented below may be slightly different to what you are used to seeing. That’s because there are quite a few flaws in the common diet prescription for type 2 diabetes. In our work with clients we’ve discovered that a ‘real food’ approach to eating has helped control type 2 diabetes the most. That’s because there is more to managing diabetes than just counting cabrs! So we’ve put together this type 2 diabetes diet food list that will give you a great place to start. FREE DOWNLOAD Like a Take Home Copy Of This List? Includes Snack Ideas and Food Tips! Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List PROTEINS Every meal should contain a source of protein for energy production and to fuel the creation of new cells. Below is a list of good protein sources to choose from. Protein also helps to satisfy the appetite, keeping you fuller longer. Lean Meats Lean beef; veal, flank steak, extra lean mince, sirloin steak, chuck steak, lamb. Pork Lean cuts of pork; pork chops or loin. Poultry Chicken, turkey, duck, quail, goose. Fish Tuna, salmon, cod, trout, bass, flatfish, whitehead, mackerel, herring, eel, haddock, red snapper, trout, drum, walleye, sardines and so forth. Seafood Crab, lobster, prawns, shrimp, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, crayfish. Game Meats Venison, wild boar, kangaroo, deer, pheasant, moose, wild turkey, alligator, emu, ostrich, elk, bison, turtle. Many people don’t eat these types of meats but you can eat them if you like them. Organ Meats Beef, pork, lamb, chicken livers. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken tongues, hearts, brains. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken marrow, kidneys. Many people don’t eat these types of meats either but you can eat them if you like them, and they are very good sources of vitamins and minera Continue reading >>

Glycemic Index Diet: What's Behind The Claims

Glycemic Index Diet: What's Behind The Claims

A glycemic index diet is an eating plan based on how foods affect your blood sugar level. The glycemic index is a system of assigning a number to carbohydrate-containing foods according to how much each food increases blood sugar. The glycemic index itself is not a diet plan but one of various tools — such as calorie counting or carbohydrate counting — for guiding food choices. The term "glycemic index diet" usually refers to a specific diet plan that uses the index as the primary or only guide for meal planning. Unlike some other plans, a glycemic index diet doesn't necessarily specify portion sizes or the optimal number of calories, carbohydrates, or fats for weight loss or weight maintenance. Many popular commercial diets, diet books and diet websites are based on the glycemic index, including the Zone Diet, Sugar Busters and the Slow-Carb Diet. Purpose The purpose of a glycemic index (GI) diet is to eat carbohydrate-containing foods that are less likely to cause large increases in blood sugar levels. The diet could be a means to lose weight and prevent chronic diseases related to obesity such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Why you might follow the GI diet You might choose to follow the GI diet because you: Want to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight Need help planning and eating healthier meals Need help maintaining blood sugar levels as part of a diabetes treatment plan Studies suggest that a GI diet can help achieve these goals. However, you might be able to achieve the same health benefits by eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and getting enough exercise. Check with your doctor or health care provider before starting any weight-loss diet, especially if you have any health conditions, including diabetes. The glycemic index The GI Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Control: Does Cutting Out White Foods Really Help?

Blood Sugar Control: Does Cutting Out White Foods Really Help?

Q: I have cut out all “white” foods from my diet, but my blood sugar levels are still running high after meals. What else can I do at mealtimes to improve my readings? A: Although “white” foods can contain excess sugar and refined carbohydrates that spike blood sugar levels, these are not the only foods that impact blood sugar. In addition, not all “white foods” are going to significantly raise your levels either. First, let's take a look at what actually impacts blood sugar. Any carbohydrate-based food will break down into glucose, or sugar, and enter your bloodstream. Depending on the type of carbohydrate contained in the food, this will either happen rapidly or slowly over time. Although “white foods” like table sugar will elevate blood sugar levels quickly, there are plenty of non-white foods that will do this as well. The key to managing healthy blood sugar levels: Eat mostly complex carbohydrates instead of simple carbohydrates — but make sure not to consume excess amounts of any kind of carbohydrate at any one time. A simple carbohydrate is one that converts into sugar rapidly. In addition to table sugar, these include white flour pasta, white bread, and white rice. Then there are non-white simple refined carbohydrates such as wheat bread (that is not 100% whole grain), honey, fruit drinks, sugary desserts and snacks, such as milk chocolate and pie, condiments such as jelly, ketchup, barbeque sauce, and even many granola bars. Consuming any refined carbohydrate, regardless of its color, will result in a rise in blood sugar levels. To prevent this, you want to choose complex, or whole grain carbohydrates, instead. These are carbohydrate-rich foods that are still in their whole, unprocessed form. Think whole fruits, 100% whole grain bread, brown r Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

When people eat a food containing carbohydrates, the digestive system breaks down the digestible ones into sugar, which enters the blood. As blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that prompts cells to absorb blood sugar for energy or storage. As cells absorb blood sugar, levels in the bloodstream begin to fall. When this happens, the pancreas start making glucagon, a hormone that signals the liver to start releasing stored sugar. This interplay of insulin and glucagon ensure that cells throughout the body, and especially in the brain, have a steady supply of blood sugar. Carbohydrate metabolism is important in the development of type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it makes. Type 2 diabetes usually develops gradually over a number of years, beginning when muscle and other cells stop responding to insulin. This condition, known as insulin resistance, causes blood sugar and insulin levels to stay high long after eating. Over time, the heavy demands made on the insulin-making cells wears them out, and insulin production eventually stops. Glycemic index In the past, carbohydrates were commonly classified as being either “simple” or “complex,” and described as follows: Simple carbohydrates: These carbohydrates are composed of sugars (such as fructose and glucose) which have simple chemical structures composed of only one sugar (monosaccharides) or two sugars (disaccharides). Simple carbohydrates are easily and quickly utilized for energy by the body because of their simple chemical structure, often leading to a faster rise in blood sugar and insulin secretion from the pancreas – which can have negative health effects. Complex carbohydrates: These carbohydrates have mo Continue reading >>

25 Of The Top Foods To Control Diabetes (you Won’t Even Believe #19!)

25 Of The Top Foods To Control Diabetes (you Won’t Even Believe #19!)

If you or someone you love suffers from diabetes, you know what a struggle it can be trying to decide what to eat every day. There are so many tasty, delicious foods out there, but many of them are not good for you. Diabetics who use professional advice from dieticians and have nutritional supervision have a much better chance of stabilizing their blood sugar levels, and therefore avoiding the complications that can arise from this disease. Diabetics should avoid snacking and eat meals at regular times throughout the day to avoid any sharp increases in blood sugar levels. So what are the best foods that can help you control diabetes? We have made a list of 25 of the best foods that will do exactly that. These are all common, everyday foods, so you don’t have to make a trip to a special store to get them. Keep reading and get ready to make your next grocery list! 1. Collard Greens These dark green, leafy vegetables are a terrific source of lutein, which is an important carotenoid for the eyes. This is vital for diabetics, as they can develop severe eye problems as a complication of their disease. Collard greens are also a great source of fiber, important B vitamins, calcium, vitamin C, and iron. 2. Olive Oil Olive oil contains no carbs, so it cannot raise blood sugar levels. One of the interesting things about olive oil is that it slows the absorption of foods that are eaten with it. This oil is also rich in omega-3 and omega-9 fatty acids, which keep the blood vessels flexible. Because it won’t increase blood sugar, it reduces the resistance of insulin. 3. Sweet Potatoes Sweet potatoes are so good and naturally sweet that for diabetics, they can be dessert! Simply choosing a sweet potato instead of a regular white potato can lower your blood sugar by 30 percent. The Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar Naturally

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar Naturally

Processed foods like cookies, cakes, and candy (and even starchy plant foods like rice, beans, and potatoes) can cause rapid increases in blood sugar levels. After one meal containing these foods, blood sugar can get so high that insulin can’t keep up. Side effects like fatigue, blurred vision, headaches, trouble concentrating, and frequent urination can result. If you consume high-carbohydrate foods every day, you increase your risk of type 2 diabetes — the medical diagnosis for having chronically high blood sugar levels that are caused by diet and lifestyle. (This is different from type 1 diabetes — a condition where the body produces little to no insulin.) Over 422 million people have diabetes worldwide, and their high blood sugar levels are destroying their bodies. To know if your blood sugar levels are chronically high, many doctors will check your A1C levels. A1C stands for glycated hemoglobin, which is formed when blood sugar attaches to hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells). A1C tests measure the percentage of your hemoglobin that has blood sugar attached to it. If blood sugar levels have been high for the past 3 months, then more hemoglobin will be glycated. Thus, A1C testing provides an accurate measurement of how high your blood sugar has been over the past two to three months. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates pre-diabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal. Earlier in this article, we explored how you can raise your blood sugar. Just eat cookies, cakes, rice, potatoes, and other high-carbohydrate foods, and you will be on the fast track toward diabetes. Following this logic, won’t eating fewer carbohydrates lower your blood sug Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar & The Blood Type Diet July 28, 2016uncategorizedoff

Blood Sugar & The Blood Type Diet July 28, 2016uncategorizedoff

Everyone can benefit from following the Blood Type Diet. For individuals who are challenged with blood sugar issues, the personalized nutrition and lifestyle guidelines of the Blood Type Diet provide additional support for healthy blood sugar maintenance and regulation. Let’s quickly review some fundamentals of blood sugar maintenance. The hormone insulin produced in the pancreas, moves sugar out of the bloodstream and into cells. If there’s more sugar in the bloodstream than the body needs right away, the extra is stored as fat. Normally, the presence of too much sugar in the blood signals the pancreas to release insulin, and lowered blood sugar levels makes insulin production stop. Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, occurs when there’s too much insulin for the amount of sugar. This can happen from eating a high sugar, low fat, low protein meal that releases a lot of sugar quickly. Then no more energy is released while insulin levels are still high. Eating a diet that’s right for your type can help keep blood sugars in a healthy range. Type 1 Diabetes occurs when the pancreas stops producing insulin. Insulin shots will be needed for life, and following the right diet provides additional support and helps prevent complications. Type 2 Diabetes occurs when the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin isn’t working as well as it should. This can be managed via diet, but sometimes medications are also needed. Gestational diabetes is when blood sugar gets too high during pregnancy. It usually clears up after delivery, but it raises the risk for Type 2 Diabetes later in life. People with diabetes often have high cholesterol and/or high triglycerides. Your body uses cholesterol to build cell walls and to produce certain vitamins and minerals. Triglycerides are u Continue reading >>

10 Blood Sugar–lowering Foods

10 Blood Sugar–lowering Foods

Adapted from The Carb Sensitivity Program It is no exaggeration—balancing your blood sugar could be a matter of life or death. Chronic high blood sugar levels are toxic to your body, destroying organs and blood vessels and paving the way to a heart attack, type 2 diabetes, stroke, dialysis, nerve damage, erectile dysfunction, or even blindness. The good news? Out-of-control sugar levels can be reigned in and regulated with the right foods. Here are most potent blood sugar-lowering foods so you know how to lower blood sugar levels naturally. Blood Sugar Benefit: A groundbreaking study published in the Journal of Nutrition in 2010 found a daily dose of the bioactive ingredients from blueberries increases sensitivity to insulin and may reduce the risk of developing diabetes in at-risk individuals. That's important because too many carbs produces too much insulin, which could lead to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adding blueberries to daily smoothies for six weeks also improves insulin sensitivity, so feel free to eat healthy doses of the superfood fruit, too. Added Perk: Low in naturally occurring sugars, blueberries are also packed with antioxidants that fight damage from free radicals, accelerated aging, and diseases like cancer and Alzheimer's. Blood Sugar Benefit: Don't let the fat content of avocados fool you—they're still good for you! Avocados are full of monounsaturated fat, the kind that helps slow the release of sugars into the bloodstream, prompting less insulin release, and can even help to lower your cholesterol. Added Perk: Avocados contain beta-sitosterol, a compound that could help quell inflammation after an intense workout. Just limit yourself to one-quarter of an avocado at a time to avoid calorie overload. Or, try avocado oil drizzled on a Continue reading >>

Foods That Don’t Raise Blood Sugar

Foods That Don’t Raise Blood Sugar

When you know about all the right foods that don’t raise your blood sugar—it can actually become very easy to keep your blood sugars in check. Certain foods will make your blood sugar go up quite rapidly. Also known as high-glycemic foods, these foods include sweets like candy, cakes, muffins, cupcakes, doughnuts, crackers, chips, French fries, pizza dough, wraps, white bread, white pasta, croissants, white rice, sugar, fruit juices like orange juice and apple juice, sweets, cookies, syrup, hamburger buns, rolls, bagels, oatmeal, corn, quinoa, couscous, macaroni and cheese, fettuccini, spaghetti, soda, and honey. You'll want to steer clear of those foods, so that your blood sugar levels stay nice and balanced. Once you add in more foods that don't raise your blood sugar, you won't miss those foods. Here is a list of foods that don't raise blood sugar. This is a list of diabetic-safe foods that are both healthy and delicious. Vegetables Artichoke hearts, Asparagus, Bamboo Shoots, Bean sprouts, Beets, Brussel sprouts, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Cucumber, Eggplant, Greens (collard, kale, mustard, turnip), Hearts of palm, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Mushrooms, Okra (not fried), Onions, Peppers (red, orange, yellow, green), Radishes, Rutabaga, Salad greens, Squash (summer, crookneck, spaghetti, zucchini), Sugar snap peas, Swiss chard, Turnips, and Water chestnuts. Proteins Greek yogurt, Cottage cheese, Eggs, Beef (steak, ground), Pork (chops, loin, ham), Chicken (breast, thigh), Turkey (breast, thigh), Fish (Tuna, halibut, Salmon, tilapia), Shrimp, Canadian bacon, Nuts (peanuts, almonds, cashews), Edamame (soybean), Tofu, and Low-carb protein powders. Fats Avocado, Almonds, Chia seeds, Vegetable Oil, Olive Oil, Flax seeds, Peanut butter (no sugar added), Cocon Continue reading >>

A Long Glycemic Index Food List To Keep Your Blood Sugar Levels Balanced

A Long Glycemic Index Food List To Keep Your Blood Sugar Levels Balanced

The glycemic index food list is there for your benefit, and you’ll find that it will help you to learn more about which foods will be good for your blood sugar levels – as well as which ones can have a negative effect. There are many low glycemic foods that you can eat, and these foods will work wonders for your body by keeping your glucose levels low. High glycemic foods are the ones that will raise your blood sugar levels, and it’s these high glycemic index foods that you want to avoid. By following the glycemic index, weight loss is also a very real possibility. Understanding the Glycemic Index Before we can look at the free glycemic index chart below, it’s important that you understand just what the glycemic index really is. The Glycemic Index (or GI) is a chart that lists the foods according to their effect on your blood sugar. Foods that have a greater effect on your blood glucose levels will be ranked with a higher GI, while those with a lower GI ranking will not affect your blood sugar as much. There are many diets that you can try to help you to keep your carb consumption low, and the Glycemic Index Diet and Atkins Diet are two of them. You’ll find that these diets can help you to keep your blood sugar under control, as they’ll ensure that you don’t get too much glucose in your system. How Fast Carbs and Slow Carbs Affect Your Body High Glycemic Foods Pushes Your Insulin Production Through the Roof When you eat high glycemic foods – foods that will affect your blood sugar levels in a noticeable way – you’ll find that your body has to produce a lot more insulin to keep up with the glucose that comes from all the food you eat. This is because too much glucose can cause problems in your body, so your body has to respond by creating insulin to p Continue reading >>

''free'' Foods For Diabetes

''free'' Foods For Diabetes

A List of Foods That Don't Impact Blood Sugar In diabetes meal planning, blood sugar control is the main goal. Typically, people with diabetes are advised to follow carbohydrate-controlled diets in order to minimize blood sugar spikes and manage their disease. Since many foods contain carbohydrates, this can be a challenge. One must learn not only which foods contain carbohydrates, but how to control those portion sizes and divide the carbohydrate foods appropriately into meals and snacks for the day. During this process of learning and planning, you may also hear about "free foods." In the diabetes world, ''free'' foods are defined as foods (or drinks) that contribute a very small amount of carbohydrates and are also very low in calories. There are two categories of ''free'' foods. Category #1: Even though this group is called "free," people with diabetes cannot eat them with reckless abandon (the name is slightly misleading). Rather, these foods are considered "free" because when eaten in specified portions, they do not need to be added to a person's allotted carbohydrate amount for a meal or snack. That's because these particular foods, although they may contain a small amount of carbohydrates, have a very minimal impact on blood sugar levels. In order for a food or drink to be in this category (and not count as a carbohydrate food in diabetes meal planning), it must contain fewer than 5 grams of carbohydrates and less than 20 calories per serving. These foods should be limited to no more than 3 servings per day, spread throughout the day. If all three servings were eaten at the same meal or snack, the food would in fact impact (raise) your blood glucose levels. Refer to the serving sizes listed in the charts below--not the food label--to measure proper serving sizes Continue reading >>

What Foods Raise Blood Sugar Levels?

What Foods Raise Blood Sugar Levels?

How many carbs, fats, and proteins can I eat on a healthy diabetic meal plan? The number of carbohydrates (carbs), fats, and proteins in your plan will depend upon the ideal number of calories you should consume each day. Your age, gender, the amount of exercise you get, and your activity level affect the number of calories you need to eat in order to gain, lose, or maintain a healthy weight. A high-fiber diet has been shown to improve blood sugar and cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Fiber can be found in many foods, especially whole grains, beans, vegetables, nuts, and fruits. Can I have sugar on a diabetic meal plan? Most doctors and other medical or health care professional believe that people on a diabetic diet can have small amounts of sugar, so long as they are part of a healthy and balanced nutrition strategy. Table sugar does not raise blood glucose more than starches. Can I have alcohol on a diabetic diet? It may be OK for some people with diabetes to drink alcohol in moderation. It is best to drink alcohol when your blood sugar levels are under good control, and it is important to remember that wine and mixed drinks contain sugar, and alcohol has a lot of calories. Your doctor or health care professional can tell you if alcohol can be a safe part of your meal plan. What foods raise blood sugar levels? The extent to which carbohydrates raise blood sugar levels is known as their glycemic index. High glycemic index foods raise glucose levels faster and to a greater degree than low glycemic index foods. High glycemic index foods include: White bread, bagels Short-grain white rice Corn flakes or puffed rice cereal Russet potatoes Saltine crackers, pretzels, rice cakes Pumpkin Melons Pineapple Popcorn What foods help maintain good blood sugar level Continue reading >>

The Top 20 Foods For Beating Diabetes

The Top 20 Foods For Beating Diabetes

Every time you roll your shopping cart into the supermarket, you’re making a decision that goes far beyond whether you’re going to have pork or pierogies for dinner. You’re actually choosing between being a victim and a victor. What you put in your cart goes a long way toward determining whether you’ll be compromised by diabetes or start controlling and eventually even beating it. That’s why we’ve assembled the following list of the 20 best foods for fighting diabetes. Every time you go to the store from now on, take this list with you and check off each item. In fact, if your favourite store has a delivery service, sign up for it so your supplies are automatically replenished every few weeks. Research proves that making a few key changes to your diet such as eating more produce, fewer refined carbohydrates, plenty of lean protein, and more ‘good’ fat’helps improve blood-sugar control and cuts the risk of diabetes-related complications. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that one or two or even five foods on this list will transform you. You need most of them, yes, even the flaxseed, because together they represent a new approach to eating, a lifestyle rather than just a diet. 1. Apples Because they offer so many health advantages, put these at the core of your diet. Apples are naturally low in calories, yet their high fibre content (4 grams) fills you up, battles bad cholesterol, and blunts blood-sugar swings. Red Delicious and Granny Smith are also among the top 10 fruits with the most disease-fighting antioxidants. Eat them whole and unpeeled for the greatest benefit, or make a quick ‘baked’ apple. After washing and chopping one apple, put it in a bowl with a dusting of cinnamon and microwave until soft (about 4 minutes). Enjoy with yogourt an Continue reading >>

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