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List Of Foods That Do Not Cause Insulin Release

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What is INSULIN RESISTANCE? What does INSULIN RESISTANCE mean? INSULIN RESISTANCE meaning - INSULIN RESISTANCE definition - INSULIN RESISTANCE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Insulin resistance (IR) is a pathological condition in which cells fail to respond normally to the hormone insulin. The body produces insulin when glucose starts to be released into the bloodstream from the digestion of carbohydrates in the diet. Normally this insulin response triggers glucose being taken into body cells, to be used for energy, and inhibits the body from using fat for energy. The concentration of glucose in the blood decreases as a result, staying within the normal range even when a large amount of carbohydrates is consumed. When the body produces insulin under conditions of insulin resistance, the cells are resistant to the insulin and are unable to use it as effectively, leading to high blood sugar. Beta cells in the pancreas subsequently increase their production of insulin, further contributing to a high blood insulin level. This often remains undetected and can contribute to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes of adults. Although this type of chronic insulin resistance is harmful, during acute illness it is actually a well-evolved protective mechanism. Recent investigations have revealed that insulin resistance helps to conserve the brain's glucose supply by preventing muscles from taking up excessive glucose. Insulin resistance should even be strengthened under harsh metabolic conditions such as pregnancy, during which the expanding fetal brain demands more glucose. People who develop type 2 diabetes usually pass through earlier stages of insulin resistance and prediabetes, although those often go undiagnosed. Insulin resistance is a syndrome (a set of signs and symptoms) resulting from reduced insulin action; it is also part of a larger constellation of symptoms called the metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance may also develop in patients who have recently experienced abdominal or bariatric procedures. This acute form of insulin resistance that may result post-operatively tends to increase over the short-term with sensitivity to insulin typically returning to patients after about five days.

Insulin And Insulin Resistance

Go to: Abstract As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the compl Continue reading >>

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  1. bcjmmac

    I had never heard of this, until I did an internet search on a hunch, & therefore doubt many other people on this site have heard of it either. I did the search since I have read of the shortcomings of the glycemic index, glycemic load model – essentially they only look at glucose so the effects of artificial sweeteners, fructose, fats, etc, are not considered.
    To improve on the GI/GL model, the Food Insulin Index (FII) measures the bodies insulin response to ingesting food versus simply looking at blood glucose levels (for example, foods containing high fructose levels do not cause Blood sugar spikes but can cause insulin spikes). Helps explain why some foods, previously considered good for diabetics or weight loss, may not fit the “bill”.
    Anyhow, worth a read.
    Following articles review some recent research, or provide more info. https://optimisingnutrition.com/2015/03/30/food_insulin_index/
    http://www.mendosa.com/blog/?p=3624

  2. Minka

    I just had a look at the list. In all honesty, I didn’t see that much difference between the ratings of those foods on the insulin index compared to a GI graph. Everything in the high insulin response category is just as I would expect, as I think of those foods in light of Glycemic Index. The only exception is the raisins, which I would have expected to be higher, or at least I know when I eat them they are ‘morish’ and spark cravings, which indicates to me that my body possibly does respond with an insulin spike and drop.

  3. bcjmmac

    In general, I agree that the GI is a good tool & simplest to use.
    Second link provides some interesting differences. Low fat dairy products tend to be double, or more, on the FII vs GI. Examples given are low fat strawberry yogurt (FII 84, GI 21): low fat cottage cheese (FII 52, GI 10), etc.
    What isn’t discussed in what I saw is whether or not those products incorporate any non-sugar sweeteners (agave, stevia, sucralose, etc). Often some sort of sweetener is added to low fat products to offset lack of fat/make them “palatable” . I presume non-sugar sweeteners since the GI is low.
    Some studies (according to Dr Fung & others) show that while non-sugar sweeteners may be low on GI, the body interprets them as sugar & secretes insulin (“sugar” receptors can’t tell the difference). The author in this case states it is dairy protein causing the effect, but only list low fat dairy products as having the wide differences!
    Something to consider, but think more research is likely needed.

  4. -> Continue reading
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Entry for Berkeley's Navigating the Gray Engineering Video Contest. Made Possible with the Information Provided by the Following Websites: http://www.globalresearch.ca http://www.nongmoproject.org http://www.actionbioscience.org http://www.scu.edu http://www.responsibletechnology.org http://www.gmfreecymru.org http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov http://www.elsevier.com http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org http://www.randi.org http://www.monsanto.com http://www.nspe.org Songs used under a creative commons license. A Very Special Thanks to Brittney Duquette and Jodie Howard

Understanding Our Bodies: Insulin

Almost everyone has heard of Insulin. You probably know that people with type 1 diabetes need to inject themselves with insulin to survive, and must constantly monitor the amount of sugar they eat. But what do you really know about insulin? What is its purpose in the body, and why do we need it? How does it relate to our diets? What happens when things go wrong with it? And why should anyone who doesn’t have diabetes give a hoot? Insulin is one of the most important hormones in the human body, and yet most people don’t really understand why our bodies make it or how what we eat affects the levels of insulin we produce. More so than any other hormone, our diet is key in regulating insulin levels, and thus a number of biological processes. As you’ll soon see, everyone should think about how what they eat impacts their body’s insulin release to be at their happiest and healthiest. Why We Need Insulin Every living thing requires energy to survive. In cells, energy is stored and shuttled around using a molecule called Adenosine Tri-Phosphate, or ATP. Whenever the cell then has an energy-requiring reaction, enzymes can use the energy stored in ATP’s phosphate bonds to fuel it. Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. bcjmmac

    I had never heard of this, until I did an internet search on a hunch, & therefore doubt many other people on this site have heard of it either. I did the search since I have read of the shortcomings of the glycemic index, glycemic load model – essentially they only look at glucose so the effects of artificial sweeteners, fructose, fats, etc, are not considered.
    To improve on the GI/GL model, the Food Insulin Index (FII) measures the bodies insulin response to ingesting food versus simply looking at blood glucose levels (for example, foods containing high fructose levels do not cause Blood sugar spikes but can cause insulin spikes). Helps explain why some foods, previously considered good for diabetics or weight loss, may not fit the “bill”.
    Anyhow, worth a read.
    Following articles review some recent research, or provide more info. https://optimisingnutrition.com/2015/03/30/food_insulin_index/
    http://www.mendosa.com/blog/?p=3624

  2. Minka

    I just had a look at the list. In all honesty, I didn’t see that much difference between the ratings of those foods on the insulin index compared to a GI graph. Everything in the high insulin response category is just as I would expect, as I think of those foods in light of Glycemic Index. The only exception is the raisins, which I would have expected to be higher, or at least I know when I eat them they are ‘morish’ and spark cravings, which indicates to me that my body possibly does respond with an insulin spike and drop.

  3. bcjmmac

    In general, I agree that the GI is a good tool & simplest to use.
    Second link provides some interesting differences. Low fat dairy products tend to be double, or more, on the FII vs GI. Examples given are low fat strawberry yogurt (FII 84, GI 21): low fat cottage cheese (FII 52, GI 10), etc.
    What isn’t discussed in what I saw is whether or not those products incorporate any non-sugar sweeteners (agave, stevia, sucralose, etc). Often some sort of sweetener is added to low fat products to offset lack of fat/make them “palatable” . I presume non-sugar sweeteners since the GI is low.
    Some studies (according to Dr Fung & others) show that while non-sugar sweeteners may be low on GI, the body interprets them as sugar & secretes insulin (“sugar” receptors can’t tell the difference). The author in this case states it is dairy protein causing the effect, but only list low fat dairy products as having the wide differences!
    Something to consider, but think more research is likely needed.

  4. -> Continue reading
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Hello Everyone! I thought I'd make a video about the habits that have helped me stick to the diet and turn it into a lifestyle that is healthy and sustainable long term. #1: Eat the fattiest breakfast you can. Especially if you're leaving your place and might be exposed to not-so-healthy foods. #2: Always drink salty broth or water with sea salt or himalayan salt. #3: Get enough sleep and be well rested. #4: If you get a craving: stop, think and don't act on it right away. Pausing for 30 min to an hour will make the craving go away. #5: Slow down when you're eating. Savor every bite of the food you eat. Enjoy it. #6: Don't be obsessed with ketosis. Especially if you have chosen to make the ketogenic diet a lifestyle instead of a temporary diet. Be obsessed with quitting sugars and refined carbohydrates instead! Quitting alcohol is a good idea too :-) #7: Slow down. If you're doing this for weight-loss, don't rush in seeking results. Don't weigh yourself too much and don't monitor too much. The goal is health above skinny or lean. Much love to all! Instagram: http://instagram.com/terrauniversale Twitter: https://twitter.com/lailaterra My website: http://www.TerraUniversale.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TerraUnivesale Google+: https://plus.google.com/1183821719228...

5 Surprising Food Habits That Raise Your Blood Sugar

Taking care of your blood sugar is one of the most valuable things you can do for your mood, weight, and even your heart health. It’s essential for keeping your body’s chemicals (a.k.a. your hormones) in check and also helps stabilize your appetite. If you’re having a hard time finding some balance with your blood sugar, and constantly hungry no matter what, or jittery and shaky, then it’s time to turn to some tips for taking care of your blood sugar ASAP! Surprisingly, it’s not just the sugary white stuff that raises your blood sugar, and not even the fruit in your diet like some might say. It can also be caused by other factors that you’ll want to be aware of when going throughout your day. Your blood sugar really boils down to your insulin (the sugar hormone, as many call it), which also stores fat and secrets glucose into the cells. Your insulin isn’t your enemy when you care for it. It can help keep your energy stable, but the key is to slow it down for a steady walk, not send it on a rollercoaster ride. Here are some things you might not realize affect your blood sugar: 1. Too Much Caffeine Caffeine also raises insulin when consumed in excess. While a cup (or ev Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. bcjmmac

    I had never heard of this, until I did an internet search on a hunch, & therefore doubt many other people on this site have heard of it either. I did the search since I have read of the shortcomings of the glycemic index, glycemic load model – essentially they only look at glucose so the effects of artificial sweeteners, fructose, fats, etc, are not considered.
    To improve on the GI/GL model, the Food Insulin Index (FII) measures the bodies insulin response to ingesting food versus simply looking at blood glucose levels (for example, foods containing high fructose levels do not cause Blood sugar spikes but can cause insulin spikes). Helps explain why some foods, previously considered good for diabetics or weight loss, may not fit the “bill”.
    Anyhow, worth a read.
    Following articles review some recent research, or provide more info. https://optimisingnutrition.com/2015/03/30/food_insulin_index/
    http://www.mendosa.com/blog/?p=3624

  2. Minka

    I just had a look at the list. In all honesty, I didn’t see that much difference between the ratings of those foods on the insulin index compared to a GI graph. Everything in the high insulin response category is just as I would expect, as I think of those foods in light of Glycemic Index. The only exception is the raisins, which I would have expected to be higher, or at least I know when I eat them they are ‘morish’ and spark cravings, which indicates to me that my body possibly does respond with an insulin spike and drop.

  3. bcjmmac

    In general, I agree that the GI is a good tool & simplest to use.
    Second link provides some interesting differences. Low fat dairy products tend to be double, or more, on the FII vs GI. Examples given are low fat strawberry yogurt (FII 84, GI 21): low fat cottage cheese (FII 52, GI 10), etc.
    What isn’t discussed in what I saw is whether or not those products incorporate any non-sugar sweeteners (agave, stevia, sucralose, etc). Often some sort of sweetener is added to low fat products to offset lack of fat/make them “palatable” . I presume non-sugar sweeteners since the GI is low.
    Some studies (according to Dr Fung & others) show that while non-sugar sweeteners may be low on GI, the body interprets them as sugar & secretes insulin (“sugar” receptors can’t tell the difference). The author in this case states it is dairy protein causing the effect, but only list low fat dairy products as having the wide differences!
    Something to consider, but think more research is likely needed.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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