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List Of Foods That Do Not Cause Insulin Release

Is It Time To Stop Blaming Insulin For “fat Storage”?

Is It Time To Stop Blaming Insulin For “fat Storage”?

Crack open any physiology textbook and chances are you’ll learn that after eating any normal meal, the release of insulin from the pancreas then signals the shutdown of the release of fatty acids from adipose (body fat) tissue and the increase of fatty acid uptake. Because of this well-known role of insulin, one of the more puzzling explanations offered by some – including a few respected scientists and medical professionals — for weight gain is that elevated insulin is to blame because of its involvement in “fat storage”. In addition, they argue that the reason why a diet lower in carbohydrates works for weight loss is because of reduced levels of the peptide hormone. It’s an easy conclusion to make. The logic goes that carbohydrates through their stimulation of insulin are fattening beyond their contribution of energy as kilocalories. It doesn’t matter how much you eat, so long as you avoid carbs to lose weight. Another growing belief floating mainly around fitness circles is that it’s best to forego foods containing carbs when heading to the gym. It’s for fear that the carbs’ action on insulin will squash fat burning stimulated by exercise. Then again, some low-carb proponents have also argued, physical activity as a means to expend energy for weight management is pointless altogether. Again, carbs are really all that matter because of their action on insulin. Where does all the extra energy from excess protein and fat go when overconsumed? And what about protein’s own effects in stimulating insulin or insulin’s role in promoting satiety? These questions are often overlooked or not easily answered by those that promote the “insulin is a fat storage hormone” proposition. Out to help repair insulin’s reputation is obesity researcher Stepha Continue reading >>

25 Simple Ways To Improve Insulin Sensitivity & Prevent Diabetes

25 Simple Ways To Improve Insulin Sensitivity & Prevent Diabetes

Insulin sensitivity is SO important for fat loss because when you are insulin resistant, the body is much more likely to store the food you eat as fat. Insulin resistance also produces inflammation in the body, causing a whole bunch of health problems that any sane person wouldn’t want to deal with. Here are 25 simple actions you can take that improve insulin sensitivity. #1: Do strength training and other anaerobic activities. Exercise is absolutely critical for improving insulin sensitivity because your muscles and cells are desperate for fuel during and after your workout. Training modes that build muscle, such as lifting weights or sprints, are most effective for improving insulin sensitivity because muscle consumes the majority of the energy transported in the blood (as much as 90 percent). For every 10 percent increase in muscle mass, you get an 11 percent reduction in insulin resistance. #2: Endurance exercise works too, but combined training is better. Endurance exercise has a very beneficial effect on insulin sensitivity, but only in trained muscle. So if you’re a runner, you’ll be fairly insulin sensitive in the leg musculature, but less so in the upper body. Therefore, it’s important to do some form of total body exercise and strength training is pretty much a no-brainer as your best option because combined aerobic and resistance programs improve insulin sensitivity more than aerobic training alone. #3: Optimize your carb intake. If you’re sedentary and overweight, optimizing carb intake may mean to eat a very low-carb (less than 50 grams a day kind of low) diet. For others it means to restrict carbs to 100 to 200 grams a day, or try carb cycling. For recreational trainees, it might mean to eat moderate to high-carb on training days and low-carb on Continue reading >>

Why Some Sugar-free Products Raise Blood Sugar

Why Some Sugar-free Products Raise Blood Sugar

In the latest “Really?” column, Anahad O’Connor explores why some foods labeled “sugar free” may still raise blood sugar. The culprits are sugar alcohols that are sometimes paired with artificial sweeteners. He writes: Sugar alcohols get their name from their structure, which looks like a cross between a molecule of alcohol and sugar but is technically neither. Companies have added them to more and more “sugar free” products, like cookies, chewing gum, hard candy and chocolate. For people trying to manage their blood sugar, this can make interpreting nutritional labels a little tricky. While sugar alcohols provide fewer calories than regular sugar — in general about 1.5 to 3 calories per gram, compared with 4 calories per gram of sugar — they can still slightly raise your blood sugar. To learn more, read the full column, “The Claim: Artificial Sweeteners Can Raise Blood Sugar,” then please join the discussion below. Continue reading >>

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

A printable, colorful PDF version of this article can be found here. twitter summary: Adam identifies at least 22 things that affect blood glucose, including food, medication, activity, biological, & environmental factors. short summary: As patients, we tend to blame ourselves for out of range blood sugars – after all, the equation to “good diabetes management” is supposedly simple (eating, exercise, medication). But have you ever done everything right and still had a glucose that was too high or too low? In this article, I look into the wide variety of things that can actually affect blood glucose - at least 22! – including food, medication, activity, and both biological and environmental factors. The bottom line is that diabetes is very complicated, and for even the most educated and diligent patients, it’s nearly impossible to keep track of everything that affects blood glucose. So when you see an out-of-range glucose value, don’t judge yourself – use it as information to make better decisions. As a patient, I always fall into the trap of thinking I’m at fault for out of range blood sugars. By taking my medication, monitoring my blood glucose, watching what I eat, and exercising, I would like to have perfect in-range values all the time. But after 13 years of type 1 diabetes, I’ve learned it’s just not that simple. There are all kinds of factors that affect blood glucose, many of which are impossible to control, remember, or even account for. Based on personal experience, conversations with experts, and scientific research, here’s a non-exhaustive list of 22 factors that can affect blood glucose. They are separated into five areas – Food, Medication, Activity, Biological factors, and Environmental factors. I’ve provided arrows to show the ge Continue reading >>

Understanding Our Bodies: Insulin

Understanding Our Bodies: Insulin

Almost everyone has heard of Insulin. You probably know that people with type 1 diabetes need to inject themselves with insulin to survive, and must constantly monitor the amount of sugar they eat. But what do you really know about insulin? What is its purpose in the body, and why do we need it? How does it relate to our diets? What happens when things go wrong with it? And why should anyone who doesn’t have diabetes give a hoot? Insulin is one of the most important hormones in the human body, and yet most people don’t really understand why our bodies make it or how what we eat affects the levels of insulin we produce. More so than any other hormone, our diet is key in regulating insulin levels, and thus a number of biological processes. As you’ll soon see, everyone should think about how what they eat impacts their body’s insulin release to be at their happiest and healthiest. Why We Need Insulin Every living thing requires energy to survive. In cells, energy is stored and shuttled around using a molecule called Adenosine Tri-Phosphate, or ATP. Whenever the cell then has an energy-requiring reaction, enzymes can use the energy stored in ATP’s phosphate bonds to fuel it. Cells rely on ATP to survive, and to create ATP, they rely on glucose. All cells, from bacteria and fungi to us, take glucose and use it to generate ATP by a process called Oxidative Phosphorylation. First, glucose is converted to an intermediate molecule called pyruvate via a process called glycolosis. As long as there is oxygen around, this pyruvate is further converted to Acetyl CoA, which enters a cycle of reactions called the Citric Acid Cycle. This takes the carbon to carbon bonds and uses them to create high energy electrons, which are then passed down a chain of enzymes which use the e Continue reading >>

The Insulin Index Is Better For Managing Your Blood Sugar

The Insulin Index Is Better For Managing Your Blood Sugar

The Insulin Index is better for managing your blood sugar that the Glycemic Index. It is more recent than the Glycemic Index, which dates from the publication of “Glycemic index of foods” in 1981. The first publication of the Insulin Index came in 1997 with “The insulin index of foods.” The insulin index is broader than the Glycemic Index, which shows only the effect of carbohydrates on our blood sugar. The Insulin Index takes into account not just carbohydrate but also of all the dietary factors and their interactions that influence insulin demand. Most of the current research on the Glycemic Index and essentially all of it on the Insulin Index comes from Dr. Jennie Brand-Miller and her laboratories in Australia. Among her other titles, she is a professor of molecular biosciences and director of the Sydney University Glycemic Index Research Service. I’ve known her for more than 20 years, and we wrote my first book, What Makes My Blood Glucose Go Up…and Down? together. Dr. Brand-Miller and Me International Diabetes Federation Convention, Busan, Korea The original article that I published back in 2003 on the Insulin Index included only 38 foods that Dr. Brand-Miller and her colleagues studied then. Yet few of my older articles generated more interest than this limited study. The most interesting finding of that early study, published in a 1997 issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, was that foods rich in protein and baked foods rich in fat and refined carbohydrates elicited “insulin responses that were disproportionately higher than their glycemic responses.” Now 18 years later, the Insulin Index includes 120 foods in 1000 kJ servings. This study confirms that the Insulin Index of these foods eaten alone and in mixed meals better predicts th Continue reading >>

25 Foods That Make You Hungrier

25 Foods That Make You Hungrier

You know those days when your inbox feels like a confetti-filled piñata exploded in it and you can’t keep up? A not-so-fun explosion to deal with, eh? We’re with ya. And that’s exactly what happens to your blood sugar levels when you eat one of these nutrition landmines when you’re hungry. Eat one of these bad boys, and your blood sugar will spike like a skyrocket in flight. So, read on and then ditch these unwholesome foods that do more harm than good. And for some smarter choices, find out about these 20 Healthy Snacks That Fill You Up! It all goes back to when we were tiny babies. “Humans are programmed to have an opioid (opiate-like) response to a protein found in milk (casein) so that infants will continue their desire to consume adequate amounts of their mother's milk,” explains Julieanna Hever, MS, RD, CPT, a plant-based dietitian and author of The Vegiterranean Diet and The Complete Idiot's Guide to Plant-Based Nutrition. “Cheese, which is a concentrated form of milk, also induces this effect. These protein compounds, called casomorphins, combined with the high amount of fat and salt are what is responsible for the popular obsession with cheese. Thus, the more you have, the more you crave—as devised by nature.” Need more info? Learn more about the health benefits of giving up dairy. “Although juicing and juice cleanses are highly popular right now, the process used to make juice strips the most filling nutrient – fiber – from the sugary liquid,” explains Janel Funk, MS RD LDN. “This leaves you with a calorie-containing beverage that spikes your blood sugar, leading to a crash that leaves you hungrier. Studies have shown that our bodies aren't any more satiated with the calories in juice as opposed to those from food, so stick with wa Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes: 41 Foods That Improve Insulin Resistance

How To Reverse Diabetes: 41 Foods That Improve Insulin Resistance

This article was republished with permission from doctorshealthpress.com. A healthy diet is extremely important for anyone, but it’s especially important for diabetics. Many foods we consume are turned into glucose (sugar), which the body uses for energy during the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. When the pancreas fails to produce the hormone insulin, blood sugar cannot get into the body’s cells. (Fortunately, you can help to prevent and even reverse this condition with the diabetes-fighting foods listed below! Plus, you’ll find a helpful summary you can keep referring back to at the end of the article.) According to the annual National Diabetes Statistics Report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 9.3% of Americans suffer from type 1 or type 2 diabetes—that’s more than 29 million people! In fact, it is the seventh most common cause of death in the U.S. The disease can also snowball, and lead to many other serious health conditions, including blindness, nerve disorders, stroke, kidney disease, and heart disease. Natural Foods That Reverse Diabetes Luckily, diabetics can help reverse the condition with simple dietary changes. Food is definitely an important medicine for people with diabetes. What you eat can make all the difference between reversing the disease or making the condition even worse. What foods should diabetics avoid? They are likely some former favorites, such as bacon, French fries, and dairy products. A person with diabetes should stay away from processed foods, especially refined carbohydrates. For instance, pizza night should likely be cancelled. Other high-glycemic-index foods diabetics should avoid include many wheat flour products, white potatoes, white rice, candy, sodas, many cereal products, and especial Continue reading >>

Thirteen Foods That Won't Raise Blood Glucose

Thirteen Foods That Won't Raise Blood Glucose

By Christine Case-Lo and Ana Gotter Article last reviewed by Wed 8 March 2017. Visit our Nutrition / Diet category page for the latest news on this subject, or sign up to our newsletter to receive the latest updates on Nutrition / Diet. All references are available in the References tab. Continue reading >>

The Latest Food Insulin Index Data

The Latest Food Insulin Index Data

Understanding the factors that our requirement for insulin is critical to good managing and avoiding diabetes and maintaining good metabolic health. Living with someone who has Type 1 Diabetes for fifteen years I’ve gained an intimate understanding of how different foods will take your blood glucose levels on a wild ride. In this article, I will share my insights from the latest food insulin index data and how we can apply it to optimise our insulin and blood glucose response to the food we eat. Since she was ten, my wife Monica’s had to manually manage her blood sugars as they swing up with food and then drop again when she injects insulin. High blood glucose levels make her feel “yucky”. Plummeting blood glucose levels due to the mega doses of insulin don’t feel good either. Low blood glucose levels drive you to eat until you feel good again. This wild blood glucose roller coaster ride leaves you exhausted. If you have diabetes, you are likely familiar with this feeling. The dietary advice she received over the past three decades living with Type 1 has been sketchy at best. When she was first diagnosed, Monica tells the story of being made to eat so much high carb food that she hid it in the pot plants in her hospital room. When we decided we wanted to have kids, we found a great doctor who helped us to understand how to match insulin with carbs, but moderating the input of carbohydrate that necessitates insulin was never mentioned by physicians, endocrinologists or diabetes educators. Then in early 2014, I came across Jason Fung’s Aetiology of Obesity series on YouTube where he discussed the food insulin index research that had been carried out at the University of Sydney which seemed to provide more insight into our insulin response to food. I hoped that Continue reading >>

Fat Is The Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes

Fat Is The Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes

ron: I’m glad you asked this question, because it gets at a common issue that many people share. Due to science education in schools and the way media reports on scientific news, the general public is under the impression that each new study sort of wipes out any study that came before. Say that yesterday there was a study or article in favor of say butter, then you would see those headlines and think that the latest and greatest WORD from science is that butter is healthy. And then tomorrow, when another study comes out showing that butter is indeed unhealthy, there is another headline and people think that the latest “word” is that butter is now unhealthy. Another problem is that because people think the latest study is the latest word and since studies are not all going to agree, people think that the science keeps flip flopping and get frustrated with that. The media makes this worse by only reporting studies that they can make appear to be a “flip flop” as the media makes money off of eye catching headlines. . But that’s not how science actually works. When done in good faith, science is about hitting a subject from a whole bunch of different angles and attempting to replicate results multiple times. Understanding that life is messy and it’s extremely difficult (impossible?) to create perfect studies for subjects as complex as nutrition on long term health, we *expect* that not all the studies will agree with each other. However, over time, if we do our job, we can also expect that the *body of scientific evidence* will paint a fairly clear picture. I say all the time, “It’s not about any one study. It’s about the body of evidence.” . Did you know that there are over 100 studies showing that smoking is either neutral or health-promoting? But t Continue reading >>

Low-carb Theory Regarding Meat/insulin Is Flawed

Low-carb Theory Regarding Meat/insulin Is Flawed

Due to rising obesity and insulin resistance rates, low-carb and Paleo diets have become a popular approach to the growing population of overweight Americans. As stated by Dr. John McDougall, "Advocates of high-protein diets explain the reason people are fat is not because of the fat they eat, but because of hyperinsulinism and insulin resistance. Insulin encourages fat cells to store fat and prevents the release of fat from these cells. Therefore, high levels of insulin, known as hyperinsulinism, would be expected to promote obesity." One high-protein, low-carb website, emphasizes that carbohydrates are the "root of all evil" when it comes to weight loss and health. Consequently, the majority of calories from a low-carb diet come from meat, which contains protein and fat, but no carbs. Although carbs do make our insulin levels go up, Dr. Micheal Greger points out in the video above that scientists have known for over a half century that protein makes it go up as well. An "Insulin Index of Foods" was published in 1997 which listed 38 foods that produced higher insulin levels. This study and subsequent studies showed that any type of meat (beef, chicken, and pork) produced substantial insulin secretion. "In fact meat protein causes as much insulin release as pure sugar." Meat raised insulin levels higher than a large apple, a cup of oatmeal, a cup and a half of white flour pasta. Below we've highlighted a few points from the Insulin Index: "Some of the protein-rich foods (beef, cheese, eggs) had larger insulin responses per gram than did many of the foods consisting predominately of carbohydrate." "Carbohydrate is not the only stimulus for insulin secretion." Protein-rich foods can also stimulate insulin secretion without increasing blood glucose concentrations. "A low-f Continue reading >>

Nature's Best Sugar Blockers

Nature's Best Sugar Blockers

You may have heard that whole grain products are high in fiber. However, the starch in grains quickly turns to sugar and overwhelms any blood sugar-blocking effect the fiber might have. Of course, all fruits and vegetables contain sugar; that's what makes them carbohydrates. Nevertheless, most contain proportionately more soluble fiber than sugar, so they don't raise blood sugar as much as grain products and other refined carbohydrates do. Keeping blood sugar steady is an important tool for preventing insulin spikes, which can lock fat into your cells and prevent it from being used for energy. The substance in our diet that's most responsible for these blood sugar surges is starch. But the good news is you can blunt the blood sugar-raising effects by taking advantage of natural substances in foods—like fiber in fruits and veggies—that slow carbohydrate digestion and entry into the bloodstream. You can tell which fruits and vegetables have the best balance of fiber to sugar by looking at their glycemic loads (Not sure what that means? See Glycemic Impact 101.). All of the carbohydrates that have been associated with increased risk of obesity or diabetes have glycemic loads greater than 100. On the other hand, fruits and vegetables with glycemic loads less than 100 have been associated with reduced risk. Thus, you should avoid fruits or vegetables with glycemic loads higher than 100, even though they contain soluble fiber. Fruits and vegetables whose glycemic loads are between 50 and 100 are themselves acceptable to eat, but they release enough glucose to nullify their usefulness as sugar blockers. The best fruit and vegetable sugar blockers are those with glycemic loads less than 50. It takes about 10 grams of fiber to reduce the after-meal blood sugar surge from a s Continue reading >>

The Muscle-building Messenger: Your Complete Guide To Insulin

The Muscle-building Messenger: Your Complete Guide To Insulin

Years ago, insulin was only discussed in reference to diabetes. Insulin is the hormone that drives glucose out of the bloodstream and into cells, and diabetes is the loss of the ability to control blood glucose levels. Yet insulin is so much more than a hormone that controls glucose. For one, it's highly anabolic, which means it's critical for building muscle. Insulin also has a dark side, because it can increase fat storage. The challenge is to learn how to spike insulin to optimally recover from workouts and grow, while also blunting it to stay lean. Do you know all the facts about insulin and how to use it to your advantage? Don't be so sure. If not, my insulin guide will teach you how. Insulin And Muscle Insulin is actually a protein, and it is produced and released by the pancreas whenever you eat carbs, protein, or both. (That is, if the pancreas is working properly). Yet unlike the proteins that are the physical building blocks of muscle, this is a functional protein, much like growth hormone. Like all other proteins, insulin is a chain of amino acids strung together. But the way this protein chain is folded makes it act more like a signaling mechanism than a building block. From the pancreas, insulin enters the blood stream and travels to various tissues, including muscle tissue. The muscle fibers (or cells) are lined with insulin receptors, similar to a docking station. Once the insulin molecule docks onto the receptor, it signals the muscle cell to open up gates. This allows allow glucose, amino acids, and creatine to enter the muscles. This process is a major reason why insulin is so important for building muscle. Another reason is that when insulin docks onto the muscle cells, it instigates biochemical reactions in the muscle that increase protein synthesis, Continue reading >>

Six Insulin-sensitizing Foods For Weight Loss

Six Insulin-sensitizing Foods For Weight Loss

Insulin is the primary hormone that tells your body to store energy as fat or use it as fuel — so you want to ensure that your diet is designed to keep insulin levels (and in turn, your weight) in check. Food can be as powerful as a drug — it can make you weak and sick or it can make strong and healthy. I picked some of my favourite superfoods, spices and seeds that will not only protect against cancer, heart disease and diabetes, but also help your waistline by boosting your insulin-sensitivity. 1. Stay healthy with horseradish It may clear your sinuses and more. Horseradish contains a high percentage of glucosinolates (significantly more than broccoli), which act as a natural antibiotic and can also improve your resistance to cancer and environmental toxins. Horseradish is also said to aid digestion, reduce urinary tract infections and fight against certain pathogens in food, such as listeria, E. coli and staphylococcus aureus. Bottom line: If you prefer prepared horseradish to a homemade recipe, than look for one with no added sugars. 2. Ample dose of avocado Fats, when eaten in the proper balance with protein and carbohydrates, can help to slow the release of sugars into the bloodstream, which leads to less insulin release. The end result? You stay fuller longer, and your waist gets slimmer, faster. In one study 347 adults (half were females) who consumed an average of half an avocado a day had higher intakes of important nutrients — including dietary fibre, vitamin E, magnesium and potassium — than people who didn’t eat avocados. They also reaped the benefits of being lighter (7.5 pounds on average) with a smaller waist circumference (4cm on average). Bottom line: Keep in mind that fat does have twice the amount of calories as carbs or protein, so limit y Continue reading >>

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